Updated Manifest and DOMAIN.txt to refer to <your OS>_INSTALL.txt and
authorSamba Release Account <samba-bugs@samba.org>
Mon, 25 Aug 1997 03:21:13 +0000 (03:21 +0000)
committerSamba Release Account <samba-bugs@samba.org>
Mon, 25 Aug 1997 03:21:13 +0000 (03:21 +0000)
describe the nascent new documentation project. Renamed INSTALL.txt to
UNIX_INSTALL.txt.

Dan

Manifest
docs/INSTALL.txt [deleted file]
docs/textdocs/DOMAIN.txt

index 0948d13..7e8dc01 100644 (file)
--- a/Manifest
+++ b/Manifest
@@ -6,11 +6,29 @@ Directory     Notes:
 =========      ======
 docs           (Samba Documentation):
 --------------------------------------
-       Note in particular two files - INSTALL.txt and DIAGNOSIS.txt
-       You should also pay close attention to all the files with a
-       .txt extension.
 
-       Most problems can be solved by reference to the two files mentioned.
+       The Samba documentation for 1.9.17 has had some of its content
+       updated and a new structure has been put in place. However, since
+       this is all rather new the documentation format of previous
+       versions will remain in place. 
+
+       Note in particular two files - <your OS>_INSTALL.txt and DIAGNOSIS.txt
+       There is the potential for there to be many *INSTALL.txt files, one
+       for each OS that Samba supports. However we are moving all this into
+       the new structure. For now, most people will be using UNIX_INSTALL.txt.
+
+       You pay close attention to all the files with a
+       .txt extension. Most problems can be solved by reference to the 
+       two files mentioned.
+
+       The new documentation can be accessed starting from Samba-meta-FAQ.html,
+       in the docs/faq directory. This is incomplete, but to quote from the 
+       abstract, it:
+       
+       "contains overview information for the Samba suite of programs, 
+       a quick-start guide, and pointers to all other Samba documentation. 
+       Other FAQs exist for specific client and server issues, and HOWTO 
+       documents for more extended topics to do with Samba software."
 
 
 examples       (Example configuration files):
diff --git a/docs/INSTALL.txt b/docs/INSTALL.txt
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ee305dc..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,342 +0,0 @@
-Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
-Date:          Unknown
-Status:                Current
-
-Subject:       HOW TO INSTALL AND TEST SAMBA
-===============================================================================
-
-
-STEP 0. Read the man pages. They contain lots of useful info that will
-help to get you started. If you don't know how to read man pages then
-try something like:
-
-       nroff -man smbd.8 | more
-
-Unfortunately, having said this, the man pages are sadly out of date and
-really need more effort to maintain them. Other sources of information 
-are pointed to by the Samba web site, http://samba.canberra.edu.au/pub/samba.
-
-STEP 1. Building the binaries
-
-To do this, first edit the file source/Makefile. You will find that
-the Makefile has an entry for most unixes and you need to uncomment
-the one that matches your operating system.
-
-You should also edit the section at the top of the Makefile which
-determines where things will be installed. You need to get this right
-before compilation as Samba needs to find some things at runtime
-(smbrun in particular). There are also settings for where you want
-your log files etc. Make sure you get these right, and that the
-directories exist.
-
-Then type "make". This will create the binaries.
-
-Once it's successfully compiled you can use "make install" to install
-the binaries and manual pages. You can separately install the binaries
-and/or man pages using "make installbin" and "make installman".
-
-Note that if you are upgrading for a previous version of Samba you
-might like to know that the old versions of the binaries will be
-renamed with a ".old" extension. You can go back to the previous
-version with "make revert" if you find this version a disaster!
-
-STEP 2. The all important step
-
-At this stage you must fetch yourself a coffee or other drink you find
-stimulating. Getting the rest of the install right can sometimes be
-tricky, so you will probably need it.
-
-If you have installed samba before then you can skip this step.
-
-STEP 3. Create the smb configuration file. 
-
-There are sample configuration files in the examples subdirectory in
-the distribution. I suggest you read them carefully so you can see how
-the options go together in practice. See the man page for all the
-options.
-
-The simplest useful configuration file would be something like this:
-
-   workgroup = MYGROUP
-
-   [homes]
-      guest ok = no
-      read only = no
-
-which would allow connections by anyone with an account on the server,
-using either their login name or "homes" as the service name. (Note
-that I also set the workgroup that Samba is part of. See BROWSING.txt
-for defails)
-
-Note that "make install" will not install a smb.conf file. You need to
-create it yourself. You will also need to create the path you specify
-in the Makefile for the logs etc, such as /usr/local/samba.
-
-Make sure you put the smb.conf file in the same place you specified in
-the Makefile.
-
-STEP 4. Test your config file with testparm
-
-It's important that you test the validity of your smb.conf file using
-the testparm program. If testparm runs OK then it will list the loaded
-services. If not it will give an error message.
-
-Make sure it runs OK and that the services look resonable before
-proceeding. 
-
-STEP 5. Starting the smbd and nmbd. 
-
-You must choose to start smbd and nmbd either as daemons or from
-inetd. Don't try to do both!  Either you can put them in inetd.conf
-and have them started on demand by inetd, or you can start them as
-daemons either from the command line or in /etc/rc.local. See the man
-pages for details on the command line options.
-
-The main advantage of starting smbd and nmbd as a daemon is that they
-will respond slightly more quickly to an initial connection
-request. This is, however, unlilkely to be a problem.
-
-Step 5a. Starting from inetd.conf
-
-NOTE; The following will be different if you use NIS or NIS+ to
-distributed services maps.
-
-Look at your /etc/services. What is defined at port 139/tcp. If
-nothing is defined then add a line like this:
-
-netbios-ssn     139/tcp
-
-similarly for 137/udp you should have an entry like:
-
-netbios-ns     137/udp
-
-Next edit your /etc/inetd.conf and add two lines something like this:
-
-netbios-ssn stream tcp nowait root /usr/local/samba/bin/smbd smbd 
-netbios-ns dgram udp wait root /usr/local/samba/bin/nmbd nmbd 
-
-The exact syntax of /etc/inetd.conf varies between unixes. Look at the
-other entries in inetd.conf for a guide.
-
-NOTE: Some unixes already have entries like netbios_ns (note the
-underscore) in /etc/services. You must either edit /etc/services or
-/etc/inetd.conf to make them consistant.
-
-NOTE: On many systems you may need to use the "interfaces" option in
-smb.conf to specify the IP address and netmask of your interfaces. Run
-ifconfig as root if you don't know what the broadcast is for your
-net. nmbd tries to determine it at run time, but fails on some
-unixes. See the section on "testing nmbd" for a method of finding if
-you need to do this.
-
-!!!WARNING!!! Many unixes only accept around 5 parameters on the
-command line in inetd. This means you shouldn't use spaces between the
-options and arguments, or you should use a script, and start the
-script from inetd.
-
-Restart inetd, perhaps just send it a HUP. If you have installed an
-earlier version of nmbd then you may need to kill nmbd as well.
-
-Step 5b. Alternative: starting it as a daemon
-
-To start the server as a daemon you should create a script something
-like this one, perhaps calling it "startsmb"
-
-#!/bin/sh
-/usr/local/samba/bin/smbd -D 
-/usr/local/samba/bin/nmbd -D 
-
-then make it executable with "chmod +x startsmb"
-
-You can then run startsmb by hand or execute it from /etc/rc.local
-
-To kill it send a kill signal to the processes nmbd and smbd.
-
-NOTE: If you use the SVR4 style init system then you may like to look
-at the examples/svr4-startup script to make Samba fit into that system.
-
-
-STEP 6. Try listing the shares available on your server
-
-smbclient -L yourhostname 
-
-Your should get back a list of shares available on your server. If you
-don't then something is incorrectly setup. Note that this method can
-also be used to see what shares are available on other LanManager
-clients (such as WfWg).
-
-If you choose user level security then you may find that Samba requests
-a password before it will list the shares. See the smbclient docs for
-details. (you can force it to list the shares without a password by
-adding the option -U% to the command line. This will not work with
-non-Samba servers)
-
-STEP 7. try connecting with the unix client. eg:
-
-smbclient '\\yourhostname\aservice'
-
-Typically the "yourhostname" would be the name of the host where you
-installed smbd. The "aservice" is any service you have defined in the
-smb.conf file. Try your user name if you just have a [homes] section
-in smb.conf.
-
-For example if your unix host is bambi and your login name is fred you
-would type:
-
-smbclient '\\bambi\fred'
-
-NOTE: The number of slashes to use depends on the type of shell you
-use. You may need '\\\\bambi\\fred' with some shells.
-
-STEP 8. Try connecting from a dos/WfWg/Win95/NT/os-2 client. Try
-mounting disks. eg:
-
-net use d: \\servername\service
-
-Try printing. eg:
-
-net use lpt1: \\servername\spoolservice
-print filename
-
-Celebrate, or send me a bug report!
-
-WHAT IF IT DOESN'T WORK?
-========================
-
-If nothing works and you start to think "who wrote this pile of trash"
-then I suggest you do step 2 again (and again) till you calm down.
-
-Then you might read the file DIAGNOSIS.txt and the FAQ. If you are
-still stuck then try the mailing list or newsgroup (look in the README
-for details). Samba has been successfully installed at thousands of
-sites worldwide, so maybe someone else has hit your problem and has
-overcome it. You could also use the WWW site to scan back issues of
-the samba-digest.
-
-When you fix the problem PLEASE send me some updates to the
-documentation (or source code) so that the next person will find it
-easier. 
-
-DIAGNOSING PROBLEMS
-===================
-
-If you have instalation problems then go to DIAGNOSIS.txt to try to
-find the problem.
-
-SCOPE IDs
-=========
-
-By default Samba uses a blank scope ID. This means all your windows
-boxes must also have a blank scope ID. If you really want to use a
-non-blank scope ID then you will need to use the -i <scope> option to
-nmbd, smbd, and smbclient. All your PCs will need to have the same
-setting for this to work. I do not recommend scope IDs.
-
-
-CHOOSING THE PROTOCOL LEVEL
-===========================
-
-The SMB protocol has many dialects. Currently Samba supports 5, called
-CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2 and NT1.
-
-You can choose what maximum protocol to support in the smb.conf
-file. The default is NT1 and that is the best for the vast majority of
-sites.
-
-In older versions of Samba you may have found it necessary to use
-COREPLUS. The limitations that led to this have mostly been fixed. It
-is now less likely that you will want to use less than LANMAN1. The
-only remaining advantage of COREPLUS is that for some obscure reason
-WfWg preserves the case of passwords in this protocol, whereas under
-LANMAN1, LANMAN2 or NT1 it uppercases all passwords before sending them,
-forcing you to use the "password level=" option in some cases.
-
-The main advantage of LANMAN2 and NT1 is support for long filenames with some
-clients (eg: smbclient, Windows NT or Win95). 
-
-See the smb.conf manual page for more details.
-
-Note: To support print queue reporting you may find that you have to
-use TCP/IP as the default protocol under WfWg. For some reason if you
-leave Netbeui as the default it may break the print queue reporting on
-some systems. It is presumably a WfWg bug.
-
-
-PRINTING FROM UNIX TO A CLIENT PC
-=================================
-
-To use a printer that is available via a smb-based server from a unix
-host you will need to compile the smbclient program. You then need to
-install the script "smbprint". Read the instruction in smbprint for
-more details.
-
-There is also a SYSV style script that does much the same thing called
-smbprint.sysv. It contains instructions.
-
-
-LOCKING
-=======
-
-One area which sometimes causes trouble is locking.
-
-There are two types of locking which need to be performed by a SMB
-server. The first is "record locking" which allows a client to lock a
-range of bytes in a open file. The second is the "deny modes" that are
-specified when a file is open.
-
-Samba supports "record locking" using the fcntl() unix system
-call. This is often implemented using rpc calls to a rpc.lockd process
-running on the system that owns the filesystem. Unfortunately many
-rpc.lockd implementations are very buggy, particularly when made to
-talk to versions from other vendors. It is not uncommon for the
-rpc.lockd to crash.
-
-There is also a problem translating the 32 bit lock requests generated
-by PC clients to 31 bit requests supported by most
-unixes. Unfortunately many PC applications (typically OLE2
-applications) use byte ranges with the top bit set as semaphore
-sets. Samba attempts translation to support these types of
-applications, and the translation has proved to be quite successful.
-
-Strictly a SMB server should check for locks before every read and
-write call on a file. Unfortunately with the way fcntl() works this
-can be slow and may overstress the rpc.lockd. It is also almost always
-unnecessary as clients are supposed to independently make locking
-calls before reads and writes anyway if locking is important to
-them. By default Samba only makes locking calls when explicitly asked
-to by a client, but if you set "strict locking = yes" then it will
-make lock checking calls on every read and write. 
-
-You can also disable by range locking completely using "locking =
-no". This is useful for those shares that don't support locking or
-don't need it (such as cdroms). In this case Samba fakes the return
-codes of locking calls to tell clients that everything is OK.
-
-The second class of locking is the "deny modes". These are set by an
-application when it opens a file to determine what types of access
-should be allowed simultaneously with it's open. A client may ask for
-DENY_NONE, DENY_READ, DENY_WRITE or DENY_ALL. There are also special
-compatability modes called DENY_FCB and DENY_DOS.
-
-You can disable share modes using "share modes = no". This may be
-useful on a heavily loaded server as the share modes code is very
-slow. See also the FAST_SHARE_MODES option in the Makefile for a way
-to do full share modes very fast using shared memory (if your OS
-supports it).
-
-
-MAPPING USERNAMES
-=================
-
-If you have different usernames on the PCs and the unix server then
-take a look at the "username map" option. See the smb.conf man page
-for details.
-
-
-OTHER CHARACTER SETS
-====================
-
-If you have problems using filenames with accented characters in them
-(like the German, French or Scandinavian character sets) then I
-recommmend you look at the "valid chars" option in smb.conf and also
-take a look at the validchars package in the examples directory.
index 3e6b2f9..61970a1 100644 (file)
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ To use domain logons and profiles you need to do the following:
 
 
 1) Setup nmbd and smbd by configuring smb.conf so that Samba is
-   acting as the master browser. See INSTALL.txt and BROWSING.txt
+   acting as the master browser. See <your OS>_INSTALL.txt and BROWSING.txt
    for details.
 
 2) Setup a WINS server (see NetBIOS.txt) and configure all your clients