ctdb-tests: Remove unused tests from IP takeover test harness
[sharpe/samba-autobuild/.git] / README.Coding
1 Coding conventions in the Samba tree
2 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
3
4 .. contents::
5
6 ===========
7 Quick Start
8 ===========
9
10 Coding style guidelines are about reducing the number of unnecessary
11 reformatting patches and making things easier for developers to work
12 together.
13 You don't have to like them or even agree with them, but once put in place
14 we all have to abide by them (or vote to change them).  However, coding
15 style should never outweigh coding itself and so the guidelines
16 described here are hopefully easy enough to follow as they are very
17 common and supported by tools and editors.
18
19 The basic style for C code, also mentioned in prog_guide4.txt, is the Linux kernel
20 coding style (See Documentation/CodingStyle in the kernel source tree). This
21 closely matches what most Samba developers use already anyways, with a few
22 exceptions as mentioned below.
23
24 The coding style for Python code is documented in PEP8,
25 http://www.python.org/pep/pep8 (with spaces). 
26 If you have ever worked on another free software Python project, you are
27 probably already familiar with it.
28
29 But to save you the trouble of reading the Linux kernel style guide, here
30 are the highlights.
31
32 * Maximum Line Width is 80 Characters
33   The reason is not about people with low-res screens but rather sticking
34   to 80 columns prevents you from easily nesting more than one level of
35   if statements or other code blocks.  Use source3/script/count_80_col.pl
36   to check your changes.
37
38 * Use 8 Space Tabs to Indent
39   No whitespace fillers.
40
41 * No Trailing Whitespace
42   Use source3/script/strip_trail_ws.pl to clean up your files before
43   committing.
44
45 * Follow the K&R guidelines.  We won't go through all of them here. Do you
46   have a copy of "The C Programming Language" anyways right? You can also use
47   the format_indent.sh script found in source3/script/ if all else fails.
48
49
50
51 ============
52 Editor Hints
53 ============
54
55 Emacs
56 -----
57 Add the follow to your $HOME/.emacs file:
58
59   (add-hook 'c-mode-hook
60         (lambda ()
61                 (c-set-style "linux")
62                 (c-toggle-auto-state)))
63
64
65 Vi
66 --
67 (Thanks to SATOH Fumiyasu <fumiyas@osstech.jp> for these hints):
68
69 For the basic vi editor included with all variants of \*nix, add the
70 following to $HOME/.exrc:
71
72   set tabstop=8
73   set shiftwidth=8
74
75 For Vim, the following settings in $HOME/.vimrc will also deal with
76 displaying trailing whitespace:
77
78   if has("syntax") && (&t_Co > 2 || has("gui_running"))
79         syntax on
80         function! ActivateInvisibleCharIndicator()
81                 syntax match TrailingSpace "[ \t]\+$" display containedin=ALL
82                 highlight TrailingSpace ctermbg=Red
83         endf
84         autocmd BufNewFile,BufRead * call ActivateInvisibleCharIndicator()
85   endif
86   " Show tabs, trailing whitespace, and continued lines visually
87   set list listchars=tab:»·,trail:·,extends:…
88
89   " highlight overly long lines same as TODOs.
90   set textwidth=80
91   autocmd BufNewFile,BufRead *.c,*.h exec 'match Todo /\%>' . &textwidth . 'v.\+/'
92
93
94 =========================
95 FAQ & Statement Reference
96 =========================
97
98 Comments
99 --------
100
101 Comments should always use the standard C syntax.  C++
102 style comments are not currently allowed.
103
104 The lines before a comment should be empty. If the comment directly
105 belongs to the following code, there should be no empty line
106 after the comment, except if the comment contains a summary
107 of multiple following code blocks.
108
109 This is good:
110
111         ...
112         int i;
113
114         /*
115          * This is a multi line comment,
116          * which explains the logical steps we have to do:
117          *
118          * 1. We need to set i=5, because...
119          * 2. We need to call complex_fn1
120          */
121
122         /* This is a one line comment about i = 5. */
123         i = 5;
124
125         /*
126          * This is a multi line comment,
127          * explaining the call to complex_fn1()
128          */
129         ret = complex_fn1();
130         if (ret != 0) {
131         ...
132
133         /**
134          * @brief This is a doxygen comment.
135          *
136          * This is a more detailed explanation of
137          * this simple function.
138          *
139          * @param[in]   param1     The parameter value of the function.
140          *
141          * @param[out]  result1    The result value of the function.
142          *
143          * @return              0 on success and -1 on error.
144          */
145         int example(int param1, int *result1);
146
147 This is bad:
148
149         ...
150         int i;
151         /*
152          * This is a multi line comment,
153          * which explains the logical steps we have to do:
154          *
155          * 1. We need to set i=5, because...
156          * 2. We need to call complex_fn1
157          */
158         /* This is a one line comment about i = 5. */
159         i = 5;
160         /*
161          * This is a multi line comment,
162          * explaining the call to complex_fn1()
163          */
164         ret = complex_fn1();
165         if (ret != 0) {
166         ...
167
168         /*This is a one line comment.*/
169
170         /* This is a multi line comment,
171            with some more words...*/
172
173         /*
174          * This is a multi line comment,
175          * with some more words...*/
176
177 Indention & Whitespace & 80 columns
178 -----------------------------------
179
180 To avoid confusion, indentations have to be tabs with length 8 (not 8
181 ' ' characters).  When wrapping parameters for function calls,
182 align the parameter list with the first parameter on the previous line.
183 Use tabs to get as close as possible and then fill in the final 7
184 characters or less with whitespace.  For example,
185
186         var1 = foo(arg1, arg2,
187                    arg3);
188
189 The previous example is intended to illustrate alignment of function
190 parameters across lines and not as encourage for gratuitous line
191 splitting.  Never split a line before columns 70 - 79 unless you
192 have a really good reason.  Be smart about formatting.
193
194
195 If, switch, & Code blocks
196 -------------------------
197
198 Always follow an 'if' keyword with a space but don't include additional
199 spaces following or preceding the parentheses in the conditional.
200 This is good:
201
202         if (x == 1)
203
204 This is bad:
205
206         if ( x == 1 )
207
208 Yes we have a lot of code that uses the second form and we are trying
209 to clean it up without being overly intrusive.
210
211 Note that this is a rule about parentheses following keywords and not
212 functions.  Don't insert a space between the name and left parentheses when
213 invoking functions.
214
215 Braces for code blocks used by for, if, switch, while, do..while, etc.
216 should begin on the same line as the statement keyword and end on a line
217 of their own. You should always include braces, even if the block only
218 contains one statement.  NOTE: Functions are different and the beginning left
219 brace should be located in the first column on the next line.
220
221 If the beginning statement has to be broken across lines due to length,
222 the beginning brace should be on a line of its own.
223
224 The exception to the ending rule is when the closing brace is followed by
225 another language keyword such as else or the closing while in a do..while
226 loop.
227
228 Good examples:
229
230         if (x == 1) {
231                 printf("good\n");
232         }
233
234         for (x=1; x<10; x++) {
235                 print("%d\n", x);
236         }
237
238         for (really_really_really_really_long_var_name=0;
239              really_really_really_really_long_var_name<10;
240              really_really_really_really_long_var_name++)
241         {
242                 print("%d\n", really_really_really_really_long_var_name);
243         }
244
245         do {
246                 printf("also good\n");
247         } while (1);
248
249 Bad examples:
250
251         while (1)
252         {
253                 print("I'm in a loop!\n"); }
254
255         for (x=1;
256              x<10;
257              x++)
258         {
259                 print("no good\n");
260         }
261
262         if (i < 10)
263                 print("I should be in braces.\n");
264
265
266 Goto
267 ----
268
269 While many people have been academically taught that "goto"s are
270 fundamentally evil, they can greatly enhance readability and reduce memory
271 leaks when used as the single exit point from a function. But in no Samba
272 world what so ever is a goto outside of a function or block of code a good
273 idea.
274
275 Good Examples:
276
277         int function foo(int y)
278         {
279                 int *z = NULL;
280                 int ret = 0;
281
282                 if (y < 10) {
283                         z = malloc(sizeof(int) * y);
284                         if (z == NULL) {
285                                 ret = 1;
286                                 goto done;
287                         }
288                 }
289
290                 print("Allocated %d elements.\n", y);
291
292          done:
293                 if (z != NULL) {
294                         free(z);
295                 }
296
297                 return ret;
298         }
299
300
301 Primitive Data Types
302 --------------------
303
304 Samba has large amounts of historical code which makes use of data types
305 commonly supported by the C99 standard. However, at the time such types
306 as boolean and exact width integers did not exist and Samba developers
307 were forced to provide their own.  Now that these types are guaranteed to
308 be available either as part of the compiler C99 support or from
309 lib/replace/, new code should adhere to the following conventions:
310
311   * Booleans are of type "bool" (not BOOL)
312   * Boolean values are "true" and "false" (not True or False)
313   * Exact width integers are of type [u]int[8|16|32|64]_t
314
315 Most of the time a good name for a boolean variable is 'ok'. Here is an
316 example we often use:
317
318         bool ok;
319
320         ok = foo();
321         if (!ok) {
322                 /* do something */
323         }
324
325 It makes the code more readable and is easy to debug.
326
327 Typedefs
328 --------
329
330 Samba tries to avoid "typedef struct { .. } x_t;" so we do always try to use
331 "struct x { .. };". We know there are still such typedefs in the code,
332 but for new code, please don't do that anymore.
333
334 Initialize pointers
335 -------------------
336
337 All pointer variables MUST be initialized to NULL. History has
338 demonstrated that uninitialized pointer variables have lead to various
339 bugs and security issues.
340
341 Pointers MUST be initialized even if the assignment directly follows
342 the declaration, like pointer2 in the example below, because the
343 instructions sequence may change over time.
344
345 Good Example:
346
347         char *pointer1 = NULL;
348         char *pointer2 = NULL;
349
350         pointer2 = some_func2();
351
352         ...
353
354         pointer1 = some_func1();
355
356 Bad Example:
357
358         char *pointer1;
359         char *pointer2;
360
361         pointer2 = some_func2();
362
363         ...
364
365         pointer1 = some_func1();
366
367 Make use of helper variables
368 ----------------------------
369
370 Please try to avoid passing function calls as function parameters
371 in new code. This makes the code much easier to read and
372 it's also easier to use the "step" command within gdb.
373
374 Good Example:
375
376         char *name = NULL;
377         int ret;
378
379         name = get_some_name();
380         if (name == NULL) {
381                 ...
382         }
383
384         ret = some_function_my_name(name);
385         ...
386
387
388 Bad Example:
389
390         ret = some_function_my_name(get_some_name());
391         ...
392
393 Please try to avoid passing function return values to if- or
394 while-conditions. The reason for this is better handling of code under a
395 debugger.
396
397 Good example:
398
399         x = malloc(sizeof(short)*10);
400         if (x == NULL) {
401                 fprintf(stderr, "Unable to alloc memory!\n");
402         }
403
404 Bad example:
405
406         if ((x = malloc(sizeof(short)*10)) == NULL ) {
407                 fprintf(stderr, "Unable to alloc memory!\n");
408         }
409
410 There are exceptions to this rule. One example is walking a data structure in
411 an iterator style:
412
413         while ((opt = poptGetNextOpt(pc)) != -1) {
414                    ... do something with opt ...
415         }
416
417 But in general, please try to avoid this pattern.
418
419
420 Control-Flow changing macros
421 ----------------------------
422
423 Macros like NT_STATUS_NOT_OK_RETURN that change control flow
424 (return/goto/etc) from within the macro are considered bad, because
425 they look like function calls that never change control flow. Please
426 do not use them in new code.
427
428 The only exception is the test code that depends repeated use of calls
429 like CHECK_STATUS, CHECK_VAL and others.
430
431
432 DEBUG statements
433 ----------------
434
435 Use these following macros instead of DEBUG:
436
437 DBG_ERR log level 0             error conditions
438 DBG_WARNING     log level 1             warning conditions
439 DBG_NOTICE      log level 3             normal, but significant, condition
440 DBG_INFO        log level 5             informational message
441 DBG_DEBUG       log level 10            debug-level message
442
443 Example usage:
444
445 DBG_ERR("Memory allocation failed\n");
446 DBG_DEBUG("Received %d bytes\n", count);
447
448 The messages from these macros are automatically prefixed with the
449 function name.