Another set of updates.
authorJohn Terpstra <jht@samba.org>
Thu, 8 May 2003 07:40:57 +0000 (07:40 +0000)
committerJohn Terpstra <jht@samba.org>
Thu, 8 May 2003 07:40:57 +0000 (07:40 +0000)
(This used to be commit 5fc92d4596956ad7a2f099276fb529d0ba28d10b)

docs/docbook/projdoc/DOMAIN_MEMBER.xml
docs/docbook/projdoc/NetworkBrowsing.xml
docs/docbook/projdoc/ProfileMgmt.xml
docs/docbook/projdoc/Samba-BDC-HOWTO.xml
docs/docbook/projdoc/Samba-PDC-HOWTO.xml
docs/docbook/projdoc/UNIX_INSTALL.xml

index f12936a2152748e95c30e8822e5de5a565a9d84f..de4a8510c07ddc5e11af2f986d2fe7e7b59582e9 100644 (file)
 
 <title>Domain Membership</title>
 
-<sect1>
-<title>Domain Member Server</title>
-
 <para>
-This mode of server operation involves the samba machine being made a member
-of a domain security context. This means by definition that all user authentication
-will be done from a centrally defined authentication regime. The authentication
-regime may come from an NT3/4 style (old domain technology) server, or it may be
-provided from an Active Directory server (ADS) running on MS Windows 2000 or later.
+Domain Membership is a subject of vital concern, Samba must be able to participate
+as a member server in a Microsoft Domain security context, and Samba must be capable of
+providing Domain machine member trust accounts, otherwise it would not be capable of offering
+a viable option for many users.
 </para>
 
-<para><emphasis>
-Of course it should be clear that the authentication back end itself could be from any
-distributed directory architecture server that is supported by Samba. This can be
-LDAP (from OpenLDAP), or Sun's iPlanet, of NetWare Directory Server, etc.
-</emphasis></para>
-
 <para>
-Please refer to the section on Howto configure Samba as a Primary Domain Controller
-and for more information regarding how to create a domain machine account for a
-domain member server as well as for information regarding how to enable the samba
-domain member machine to join the domain and to be fully trusted by it.
+This chapter covers background information pertaining to domain membership, Samba
+configuration for it, and MS Windows client procedures for joining a domain.  Why is
+this necessary? Because both are areas in which there exists within the current MS
+Windows networking world and particularly in the Unix/Linux networking and administration
+world, a considerable level of mis-information, incorrect understanding, and a lack of
+knowledge. Hopefully this chapter will fill the voids.
 </para>
 
-</sect1>
-
 <sect1>
-<title>Joining an NT4 type Domain with Samba-3</title>
-<para><emphasis>Assumptions:</emphasis>
-<programlisting>
-       NetBIOS name: SERV1
-       Win2K/NT domain name: DOM
-       Domain's PDC NetBIOS name: DOMPDC
-       Domain's BDC NetBIOS names: DOMBDC1 and DOMBDC2
-</programlisting>
-</para>
-
-<para>First, you must edit your &smb.conf; file to tell Samba it should
-now use domain security.</para>
-
-<para>Change (or add) your <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#SECURITY">
-<parameter>security =</parameter></ulink> line in the [global] section 
-of your &smb.conf; to read:</para>
-
-<para><command>security = domain</command></para>
-
-<para>Next change the <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#WORKGROUP"><parameter>
-workgroup =</parameter></ulink> line in the [global] section to read: </para>
-
-<para><command>workgroup = DOM</command></para>
-
-<para>as this is the name of the domain we are joining. </para>
-
-<para>You must also have the parameter <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#ENCRYPTPASSWORDS">
-<parameter>encrypt passwords</parameter></ulink> set to <constant>yes
-</constant> in order for your users to authenticate to the NT PDC.</para>
-
-<para>Finally, add (or modify) a <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#PASSWORDSERVER">
-<parameter>password server =</parameter></ulink> line in the [global]
-section to read: </para>
-
-<para><command>password server = DOMPDC DOMBDC1 DOMBDC2</command></para>
-
-<para>These are the primary and backup domain controllers Samba 
-will attempt to contact in order to authenticate users. Samba will 
-try to contact each of these servers in order, so you may want to 
-rearrange this list in order to spread out the authentication load 
-among domain controllers.</para>
-
-<para>Alternatively, if you want smbd to automatically determine 
-the list of Domain controllers to use for authentication, you may 
-set this line to be :</para>
-
-<para><command>password server = *</command></para>
-
-<para>This method, allows Samba to use exactly the same
-mechanism that NT does. This 
-method either broadcasts or uses a WINS database in order to
-find domain controllers to authenticate against.</para>
-
-<para>In order to actually join the domain, you must run this
-command:</para>
-
-<para><prompt>root# </prompt><userinput>net join -S DOMPDC
--U<replaceable>Administrator%password</replaceable></userinput></para>
+<title>Features and Benefits</title>
 
 <para>
-If the <userinput>-S DOMPDC</userinput> argument is not given then
-the domain name will be obtained from smb.conf.
+MS Windows workstations and servers that want to participate in domain security need to
+be made Domain members. Participating in Domain security is often called 
+<emphasis>Single Sign On</emphasis> or SSO for short. This chapter describes the process
+that must be followed to make a workstation (or another server - be it an MS Windows NT4 / 200x
+server) or a Samba server a member of an MS Windows Domain security context.
 </para>
 
-<para>as we are joining the domain DOM and the PDC for that domain 
-(the only machine that has write access to the domain SAM database) 
-is DOMPDC. The <replaceable>Administrator%password</replaceable> is 
-the login name and password for an account which has the necessary 
-privilege to add machines to the domain.  If this is successful 
-you will see the message:</para>
-
-<para><computeroutput>Joined domain DOM.</computeroutput>
-or <computeroutput>Joined 'SERV1' to realm 'MYREALM'</computeroutput>
-</para>
-
-<para>in your terminal window. See the <ulink url="net.8.html">
-net(8)</ulink> man page for more details.</para>
-
-<para>This process joins the server to the domain
-without having to create the machine trust account on the PDC
-beforehand.</para>
-
-<para>This command goes through the machine account password 
-change protocol, then writes the new (random) machine account 
-password for this Samba server into a file in the same directory 
-in which an smbpasswd file would be stored - normally :</para>
-
-<para><filename>/usr/local/samba/private/secrets.tdb</filename></para>
-
-<para>This file is created and owned by root and is not 
-readable by any other user. It is the key to the domain-level 
-security for your system, and should be treated as carefully 
-as a shadow password file.</para>
-
-<para>Finally, restart your Samba daemons and get ready for 
-clients to begin using domain security!</para>
-
-<sect2>
-<title>Why is this better than security = server?</title>
-
-<para>Currently, domain security in Samba doesn't free you from 
-having to create local Unix users to represent the users attaching 
-to your server. This means that if domain user <constant>DOM\fred
-</constant> attaches to your domain security Samba server, there needs 
-to be a local Unix user fred to represent that user in the Unix 
-filesystem. This is very similar to the older Samba security mode 
-<ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#SECURITYEQUALSSERVER">security = server</ulink>, 
-where Samba would pass through the authentication request to a Windows 
-NT server in the same way as a Windows 95 or Windows 98 server would.
-</para>
-
-<para>Please refer to the <ulink url="winbind.html">Winbind 
-paper</ulink> for information on a system to automatically
-assign UNIX uids and gids to Windows NT Domain users and groups.
+<para>
+Samba-3 can join an MS Windows NT4 style domain as a native member server, an MS Windows
+Active Directory Domain as a native member server, or a Samba Domain Control network.
 </para>
 
-<para>The advantage to domain-level security is that the 
-authentication in domain-level security is passed down the authenticated 
-RPC channel in exactly the same way that an NT server would do it. This 
-means Samba servers now participate in domain trust relationships in 
-exactly the same way NT servers do (i.e., you can add Samba servers into 
-a resource domain and have the authentication passed on from a resource
-domain PDC to an account domain PDC).</para>
-
-<para>In addition, with <command>security = server</command> every Samba 
-daemon on a server has to keep a connection open to the 
-authenticating server for as long as that daemon lasts. This can drain 
-the connection resources on a Microsoft NT server and cause it to run 
-out of available connections. With <command>security = domain</command>, 
-however, the Samba daemons connect to the PDC/BDC only for as long 
-as is necessary to authenticate the user, and then drop the connection, 
-thus conserving PDC connection resources.</para>
-
-<para>And finally, acting in the same manner as an NT server 
-authenticating to a PDC means that as part of the authentication 
-reply, the Samba server gets the user identification information such 
-as the user SID, the list of NT groups the user belongs to, etc. </para>
-
-<note><para> Much of the text of this document 
-was first published in the Web magazine <ulink url="http://www.linuxworld.com">        
-LinuxWorld</ulink> as the article <ulink
-url="http://www.linuxworld.com/linuxworld/lw-1998-10/lw-10-samba.html">Doing 
-the NIS/NT Samba</ulink>.</para></note>
-</sect2>
 </sect1>
 
 <sect1>
-<title>Machine Trust Accounts and Domain Membership</title>
+<title>MS Windows Workstation/Server Machine Trust Accounts</title>
 
 <para>
 A machine trust account is an account that is used to authenticate a client machine
 (rather than a user) to the Domain Controller server.  In Windows terminology,
-this is known as a "Computer Account."</para>
+this is known as a "Computer Account."
+</para>
 
 <para>
 The password of a machine trust account acts as the shared secret for
@@ -201,7 +63,8 @@ because it does not possess a machine trust account, and thus has no
 shared secret with the domain controller.
 </para>
 
-<para>A Windows NT4 PDC stores each machine trust account in the Windows
+<para>
+A Windows NT4 PDC stores each machine trust account in the Windows
 Registry. The introduction of MS Windows 2000 saw the introduction of Active Directory,
 the new repository for machine trust accounts.
 </para>
@@ -211,13 +74,31 @@ A Samba PDC, however, stores each machine trust account in two parts,
 as follows:
 
 <itemizedlist>
-    <listitem><para>A Samba account, stored in the same location as user
-    LanMan and NT password hashes (currently <filename>smbpasswd</filename>).
-    The Samba account possesses and uses only the NT password hash.</para></listitem>
+       <listitem><para>
+       A Domain Security Account (stored in the <emphasis>passdb backend</emphasis>
+       that has been configured in the &smb.conf; file. The precise nature of the
+       account information that is stored depends on the type of backend database
+       that has been chosen.
+       </para>
+
+       <para>
+       The older format of this data is the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> database
+       which contains the unix login ID, the Unix user identifier (UID), and the
+       LanMan and NT encrypted passwords. There is also some other information in
+       this file that we do not need to concern ourselves with here.
+       </para>
 
-    <listitem><para>A corresponding Unix account, typically stored in
-    <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>. (Future releases will alleviate the need to
-    create <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> entries.) </para></listitem>
+       <para>
+       The two newer database types are called <emphasis>ldapsam, tdbsam</emphasis>.
+       Both store considerably more data than the older <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
+       file did. The extra information enables new user account controls to be used.
+       </para></listitem>
+
+       <listitem><para>
+       A corresponding Unix account, typically stored in <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>.
+       Work is in progress to allow a simplified mode of operation that does not require
+       Unix user accounts, but this may not be a feature of the early releases of Samba-3.
+       </para></listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
 </para>
 
@@ -226,39 +107,38 @@ There are two ways to create machine trust accounts:
 </para>
 
 <itemizedlist>
-       <listitem><para> Manual creation. Both the Samba and corresponding
-       Unix account are created by hand.</para></listitem>
+       <listitem><para>
+       Manual creation. Both the Samba and corresponding Unix account are created by hand.
+       </para></listitem>
        
-       <listitem><para> "On-the-fly" creation. The Samba machine trust
-       account is automatically created by Samba at the time the client
-       is joined to the domain. (For security, this is the
-       recommended method.) The corresponding Unix account may be
-       created automatically or manually. </para>
-       </listitem>
-
+       <listitem><para>
+       "On-the-fly" creation. The Samba machine trust account is automatically created by
+       Samba at the time the client is joined to the domain. (For security, this is the
+       recommended method.) The corresponding Unix account may be created automatically or manually. 
+       </para></listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
 
 <sect2>
 <title>Manual Creation of Machine Trust Accounts</title>
 
 <para>
-The first step in manually creating a machine trust account is to
-manually create the corresponding Unix account in
-<filename>/etc/passwd</filename>.  This can be done using
-<command>vipw</command> or other 'add user' command that is normally
-used to create new Unix accounts.  The following is an example for a
-Linux based Samba server:
+The first step in manually creating a machine trust account is to manually create the
+corresponding Unix account in <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>.  This can be done using
+<command>vipw</command> or other 'add user' command that is normally used to create new
+Unix accounts.  The following is an example for a Linux based Samba server:
 </para>
 
 <para>
-  <prompt>root# </prompt><command>/usr/sbin/useradd -g 100 -d /dev/null -c <replaceable>"machine 
-nickname"</replaceable> -s /bin/false <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$ </command>
+<prompt>root# </prompt><command>/usr/sbin/useradd -g 100 -d /dev/null -c <replaceable>"machine nickname"</replaceable> -s /bin/false <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$ </command>
 </para>
+
 <para>
 <prompt>root# </prompt><command>passwd -l <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$</command>
 </para>
 
-<para>On *BSD systems, this can be done using the 'chpass' utility:</para>
+<para>
+On *BSD systems, this can be done using the 'chpass' utility:
+</para>
 
 <para>
 <prompt>root# </prompt><command>chpass -a "<replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$:*:101:100::0:0:Workstation <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>:/dev/null:/sbin/nologin"</command>
@@ -271,9 +151,9 @@ home directory. For example a machine named 'doppy' would have an
 <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> entry like this:
 </para>
 
-<para><programlisting>
+<para>
 doppy$:x:505:501:<replaceable>machine_nickname</replaceable>:/dev/null:/bin/false
-</programlisting></para>
+</para>
 
 <para>
 Above, <replaceable>machine_nickname</replaceable> can be any
@@ -293,7 +173,9 @@ as shown here:
 </para>
 
 <para>
+<programlisting>
 <prompt>root# </prompt><userinput>smbpasswd -a -m <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable></userinput>
+</programlisting>
 </para>
 
 <para>
@@ -325,7 +207,8 @@ the corresponding Unix account.
 <para>
 The second (and recommended) way of creating machine trust accounts is
 simply to allow the Samba server to create them as needed when the client
-is joined to the domain. </para>
+is joined to the domain.
+</para>
 
 <para>Since each Samba machine trust account requires a corresponding
 Unix account, a method for automatically creating the
@@ -357,7 +240,7 @@ The procedure for joining a client to the domain varies with the version of Wind
 </para>
 
 <itemizedlist>
-<listitem><para><emphasis>Windows 2000</emphasis></para>
+       <listitem><para><emphasis>Windows 2000</emphasis></para>
 
        <para>
        When the user elects to join the client to a domain, Windows prompts for
@@ -373,35 +256,277 @@ The procedure for joining a client to the domain varies with the version of Wind
        encryption key for setting the password of the machine trust
        account. The machine trust account will be created on-the-fly, or
        updated if it already exists.
-       </para>
+       </para></listitem>
 
-</listitem>
+       <listitem><para><emphasis>Windows NT</emphasis></para>
 
-<listitem><para><emphasis>Windows NT</emphasis></para>
-
-    <para> If the machine trust account was created manually, on the
+       <para>
+       If the machine trust account was created manually, on the
        Identification Changes menu enter the domain name, but do not
        check the box "Create a Computer Account in the Domain."  In this case,
        the existing machine trust account is used to join the machine to
-       the domain.</para>
+       the domain.
+       </para>
 
-    <para> If the machine trust account is to be created
+       <para>
+       If the machine trust account is to be created
        on-the-fly, on the Identification Changes menu enter the domain
        name, and check the box "Create a Computer Account in the Domain."  In
        this case, joining the domain proceeds as above for Windows 2000
        (i.e., you must supply a Samba administrative account when
-       prompted).</para>
-</listitem>
+       prompted).
+       </para></listitem>
 
-<listitem><para><emphasis>Samba</emphasis></para>
+       <listitem><para><emphasis>Samba</emphasis></para>
        <para>Joining a samba client to a domain is documented in 
        the <link linkend="domain-member">Domain Member</link> chapter.
-</para></listitem>
+       </para></listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
 
 </sect2>
 </sect1>
 
+<sect1>
+<title>Domain Member Server</title>
+
+<para>
+This mode of server operation involves the samba machine being made a member
+of a domain security context. This means by definition that all user authentication
+will be done from a centrally defined authentication regime. The authentication
+regime may come from an NT3/4 style (old domain technology) server, or it may be
+provided from an Active Directory server (ADS) running on MS Windows 2000 or later.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>
+Of course it should be clear that the authentication back end itself could be from any
+distributed directory architecture server that is supported by Samba. This can be
+LDAP (from OpenLDAP), or Sun's iPlanet, of NetWare Directory Server, etc.
+</emphasis>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Please refer to the section on Howto configure Samba as a Primary Domain Controller
+and for more information regarding how to create a domain machine account for a
+domain member server as well as for information regarding how to enable the samba
+domain member machine to join the domain and to be fully trusted by it.
+</para>
+
+<sect2>
+<title>Joining an NT4 type Domain with Samba-3</title>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>Assumptions:</emphasis>
+<programlisting>
+       NetBIOS name: SERV1
+       Win2K/NT domain name: DOM
+       Domain's PDC NetBIOS name: DOMPDC
+       Domain's BDC NetBIOS names: DOMBDC1 and DOMBDC2
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+First, you must edit your &smb.conf; file to tell Samba it should
+now use domain security.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Change (or add) your <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#SECURITY">
+<parameter>security =</parameter></ulink> line in the [global] section 
+of your &smb.conf; to read:
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<programlisting>
+        <command>security = domain</command>
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Next change the <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#WORKGROUP"><parameter>
+workgroup =</parameter></ulink> line in the [global] section to read: 
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<programlisting>
+        <command>workgroup = DOM</command>
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+as this is the name of the domain we are joining.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+You must also have the parameter <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#ENCRYPTPASSWORDS">
+<parameter>encrypt passwords</parameter></ulink> set to <constant>yes
+</constant> in order for your users to authenticate to the NT PDC.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Finally, add (or modify) a <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#PASSWORDSERVER">
+<parameter>password server =</parameter></ulink> line in the [global]
+section to read: 
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<programlisting>
+        <command>password server = DOMPDC DOMBDC1 DOMBDC2</command>
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+These are the primary and backup domain controllers Samba 
+will attempt to contact in order to authenticate users. Samba will 
+try to contact each of these servers in order, so you may want to 
+rearrange this list in order to spread out the authentication load 
+among domain controllers.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Alternatively, if you want smbd to automatically determine 
+the list of Domain controllers to use for authentication, you may 
+set this line to be:
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<programlisting>
+        <command>password server = *</command>
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This method, allows Samba to use exactly the same mechanism that NT does. This 
+method either broadcasts or uses a WINS database in order to
+find domain controllers to authenticate against.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In order to actually join the domain, you must run this command:
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<programlisting>
+        <prompt>root# </prompt><userinput>net join -S DOMPDC -U<replaceable>Administrator%password</replaceable></userinput>
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If the <userinput>-S DOMPDC</userinput> argument is not given then
+the domain name will be obtained from smb.conf.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+As we are joining the domain DOM and the PDC for that domain 
+(the only machine that has write access to the domain SAM database) 
+is DOMPDC. The <replaceable>Administrator%password</replaceable> is 
+the login name and password for an account which has the necessary 
+privilege to add machines to the domain.  If this is successful 
+you will see the message:
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<computeroutput>Joined domain DOM.</computeroutput>
+or <computeroutput>Joined 'SERV1' to realm 'MYREALM'</computeroutput>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+in your terminal window. See the <ulink url="net.8.html">
+net(8)</ulink> man page for more details.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This process joins the server to the domain without having to create the machine
+trust account on the PDC beforehand.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This command goes through the machine account password 
+change protocol, then writes the new (random) machine account 
+password for this Samba server into a file in the same directory 
+in which an smbpasswd file would be stored - normally :
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<filename>/usr/local/samba/private/secrets.tdb</filename>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This file is created and owned by root and is not 
+readable by any other user. It is the key to the domain-level 
+security for your system, and should be treated as carefully 
+as a shadow password file.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Finally, restart your Samba daemons and get ready for 
+clients to begin using domain security!
+</para>
+
+</sect2>
+
+<sect2>
+<title>Why is this better than security = server?</title>
+
+<para>
+Currently, domain security in Samba doesn't free you from 
+having to create local Unix users to represent the users attaching 
+to your server. This means that if domain user <constant>DOM\fred
+</constant> attaches to your domain security Samba server, there needs 
+to be a local Unix user fred to represent that user in the Unix 
+filesystem. This is very similar to the older Samba security mode 
+<ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#SECURITYEQUALSSERVER">security = server</ulink>, 
+where Samba would pass through the authentication request to a Windows 
+NT server in the same way as a Windows 95 or Windows 98 server would.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Please refer to the <ulink url="winbind.html">Winbind 
+paper</ulink> for information on a system to automatically
+assign UNIX uids and gids to Windows NT Domain users and groups.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The advantage to domain-level security is that the 
+authentication in domain-level security is passed down the authenticated 
+RPC channel in exactly the same way that an NT server would do it. This 
+means Samba servers now participate in domain trust relationships in 
+exactly the same way NT servers do (i.e., you can add Samba servers into 
+a resource domain and have the authentication passed on from a resource
+domain PDC to an account domain PDC).
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In addition, with <command>security = server</command> every Samba 
+daemon on a server has to keep a connection open to the 
+authenticating server for as long as that daemon lasts. This can drain 
+the connection resources on a Microsoft NT server and cause it to run 
+out of available connections. With <command>security = domain</command>, 
+however, the Samba daemons connect to the PDC/BDC only for as long 
+as is necessary to authenticate the user, and then drop the connection, 
+thus conserving PDC connection resources.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+And finally, acting in the same manner as an NT server 
+authenticating to a PDC means that as part of the authentication 
+reply, the Samba server gets the user identification information such 
+as the user SID, the list of NT groups the user belongs to, etc. 
+</para>
+
+<note>
+<para>
+Much of the text of this document 
+was first published in the Web magazine <ulink url="http://www.linuxworld.com">        
+LinuxWorld</ulink> as the article <ulink
+url="http://www.linuxworld.com/linuxworld/lw-1998-10/lw-10-samba.html">Doing 
+the NIS/NT Samba</ulink>.
+</para>
+</note>
+
+</sect2>
+</sect1>
+
 <sect1>
 <title>Samba ADS Domain Membership</title>
 
@@ -413,7 +538,9 @@ Windows2000 KDC.
 <sect2>
 <title>Setup your <filename>smb.conf</filename></title>
 
-<para>You must use at least the following 3 options in smb.conf:</para>
+<para>
+You must use at least the following 3 options in smb.conf:
+</para>
 
 <para><programlisting>
        realm = your.kerberos.REALM
@@ -429,21 +556,25 @@ In case samba can't figure out your ads server using your realm name, use the
 </programlisting>
 </para>
 
-<note><para>You do *not* need a smbpasswd file, and older clients will
-  be authenticated as if <command>security = domain</command>,
-  although it won't do any harm
-  and allows you to have local users not in the domain.
-  I expect that the above required options will change soon when we get better
-  active directory integration.</para></note>
+<note><para>
+You do *not* need a smbpasswd file, and older clients will be authenticated as if
+<command>security = domain</command>, although it won't do any harm and allows you
+to have local users not in the domain. I expect that the above required options will
+change soon when we get better active directory integration.
+</para></note>
 
 </sect2>
   
 <sect2>
 <title>Setup your <filename>/etc/krb5.conf</filename></title>
 
-<para>Note: you will need the krb5 workstation, devel, and libs installed</para>
+<para>
+Note: you will need the krb5 workstation, devel, and libs installed
+</para>
 
-<para>The minimal configuration for <filename>krb5.conf</filename> is:</para>
+<para>
+The minimal configuration for <filename>krb5.conf</filename> is:
+</para>
 
 <para><programlisting>
        [realms]
@@ -452,17 +583,22 @@ In case samba can't figure out your ads server using your realm name, use the
            }
 </programlisting></para>
 
-<para>Test your config by doing a <userinput>kinit
+<para>
+Test your config by doing a <userinput>kinit
 <replaceable>USERNAME</replaceable>@<replaceable>REALM</replaceable></userinput> and
 making sure that your password is accepted by the Win2000 KDC.
 </para>
 
-<note><para>The realm must be uppercase or you will get "Cannot find KDC for requested
-realm while getting initial credentials" error </para></note>
+<note><para>
+The realm must be uppercase or you will get "Cannot find KDC for requested
+realm while getting initial credentials" error
+</para></note>
 
-<note><para>Time between the two servers must be synchronized.  You will get a
+<note><para>
+Time between the two servers must be synchronized.  You will get a
 "kinit(v5): Clock skew too great while getting initial credentials" if the time
-difference is more than five minutes. </para></note>
+difference is more than five minutes. 
+</para></note>
 
 <para>
 You also must ensure that you can do a reverse DNS lookup on the IP
@@ -554,11 +690,16 @@ specify the <parameter>-k</parameter> option to choose kerberos authentication.
 <sect2>
 <title>Notes</title>
 
-<para>You must change administrator password at least once after DC 
-install, to create the right encoding types</para>
+<para>
+You must change administrator password at least once after DC 
+install, to create the right encoding types
+</para>
+
+<para>
+w2k doesn't seem to create the _kerberos._udp and _ldap._tcp in
+their defaults DNS setup. Maybe fixed in service packs?
+</para>
 
-<para>w2k doesn't seem to create the _kerberos._udp and _ldap._tcp in
-   their defaults DNS setup. Maybe fixed in service packs?</para>
 </sect2>
 
 </sect1>
index 29768ea42ae809fa4ae887fd0d5eac8776d49ece..6327bde30aeb763daf98795d25f08aa4ef51acb3 100644 (file)
@@ -1283,6 +1283,32 @@ If either router R1 or R2 fails the following will occur:
 </orderedlist>
 </sect3>
 </sect2>
+</sect1>
+
+<sect1>
+<title>Common Errors</title>
+
+<para>
+Many questions are sked on the mailing lists regarding browsing. The majority of browsing
+problems originate out of incorrect configuration of NetBIOS name resolution. Some are of
+particular note.
+</para>
 
+<sect2>
+<title>How can one flush the Samba NetBIOS name cache without restarting samba?</title>
+
+<para>
+Sambas' nmbd process controls all browse list handling. Under normal circumstances it is
+safe to restart nmbd. This will effectively flush the samba NetBIOS name cache and cause it
+to be rebuilt. Note that this does NOT make certain that a rogue machine name will not re-appear
+in the browse list. When nmbd is taken out of service another machine on the network will
+become the browse master. This new list may still have the rogue entry in it. If you really
+want to clear a rogue machine from the list then every machine on the network will need to be
+shut down and restarted at after all machines are down. Failing a complete restart, the only
+other thing you can do is wait until the entry times out and is then flushed from the list.
+This may take a long time on some networks (months).
+</para>
+
+</sect2>
 </sect1>
 </chapter>
index 82897808b2cd86a747804886342b0b6662c8da3f..140dd44ba1b1cffc7a9d85b71600773fb36a3cf6 100644 (file)
@@ -1123,4 +1123,55 @@ In which case, the local cache copy will be deleted on logout.
 </sect2>
 </sect1>
 
+<sect1>
+<title>Common Errors</title>
+
+<para>
+THe following are some typical errors/problems/questions that have been asked.
+</para>
+
+<sect2>
+<title>How does one set up roaming profiles for just one (or a few) user/s or group/s?</title>
+
+<para>
+With samba-2.2.x the choice you have is to enable or disable roaming
+profiles support. It is a global only setting. The default is to have
+roaming profiles and the default path will locate them in the user's home
+directory.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If disabled globally then no-one will have roaming profile ability.
+If enabled and you want it to apply only to certain machines, then on
+those machines on which roaming profile support is NOT wanted it is then
+necessary to disable roaming profile handling in the registry of each such
+machine.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+With samba-3.0.0 (soon to be released) you can have a global profile
+setting in smb.conf _AND_ you can over-ride this by per-user settings
+using the Domain User Manager (as with MS Windows NT4/ Win 2Kx).
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In any case, you can configure only one profile per user. That profile can
+be either:
+</para>
+
+<itemizedlist>
+       <listitem><para>
+       A profile unique to that user
+       </para></listitem>
+       <listitem><para>
+       A mandatory profile (one the user can not change)
+       </para></listitem>
+       <listitem><para>
+       A group profile (really should be mandatory ie:unchangable)
+       </para></listitem>
+</itemizedlist>
+
+</sect2>
+</sect1>
+
 </chapter>
index 8b72c8e28f9d1b7c20457654a6a8643222f4c901..5d62902487110a8ecd8cf4f7dfb5e2b4015e5495 100644 (file)
@@ -17,9 +17,50 @@ with configuring a Samba Domain Controller as described in the
 <title>Features And Benefits</title>
 
 <para>
-Stuff goees here
+This is one of the most difficult chapters to summarise. It matters not what we say here
+for someone will still draw conclusions and / or approach the Samba-Team with expectations
+that are either not yet capable of being delivered, or that can be achieved for more
+effectively using a totally different approach. Since this HOWTO is already so large and
+extensive, we have taken the decision to provide sufficient (but not comprehensive)
+information regarding Backup Domain Control. In the event that you should have a persistent
+concern that is not addressed in this HOWTO document then please email 
+<ulink url="mailto:jht@samba.org">John H Terpstra</ulink> clearly setting out your requirements
+and / or question and we will do our best to provide a solution.
 </para>
 
+<para>
+Samba-3 is capable of acting as a Backup Domain Controller to another Samba Primary Domain
+Controller. A Samba-3 PDC can operate with an LDAP Account backend. The Samba-3 BDC can
+operate with a slave LDAP server for the  Account backend. This effectively gives samba a high
+degree of scalability. This is a very sweet (nice) solution for large organisations.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+While it is possible to run a Samba-3 BDC with non-LDAP backend, the administrator will
+need to figure out precisely what is the best way to replicate (copy / distribute) the
+user and machine Accounts backend. Again, Samba-3 provides a number of possibilities:
+</para>
+
+<itemizedlist>
+<title>Backup Domain Backend Account Distribution Options</title>
+       <listitem><para>
+       Passwd Backend is LDAP based, BDCs use a slave LDAP server
+       </para></listitem>
+               
+       <listitem><para>
+       Passdb Backend is tdbsam based, BDCs use cron based "net rcp vampire" to
+       suck down the Accounts database from the PDC
+       </para></listitem>
+               
+       <listitem><para>
+       Make use of rsync to replicate (pull down) copies of the essential account files
+       </para></listitem>
+               
+       <listitem><para>
+       Operate with an entirely local accounts database (not recommended)
+       </para></listitem>
+</itemizedlist>
+
 </sect1>
 
 <sect1>
@@ -202,29 +243,6 @@ mutually authenticate and the password change is done.
 </sect1>
 
 
-<sect1>
-<title>Can Samba be a Backup Domain Controller to an NT4 PDC?</title>
-
-<para>
-With version 2.2, no. The native NT4 SAM replication protocols have not yet been fully
-implemented. The Samba Team is working on understanding and implementing the protocols,
-but this work has not been finished for version 2.2.
-</para>
-
-<para>
-With version 3.0, the work on both the replication protocols and a suitable storage
-mechanism has progressed, and some form of NT4 BDC support is expected soon.
-</para>
-
-<para>
-Can I get the benefits of a BDC with Samba?  Yes. The main reason for implementing a
-BDC is availability. If the PDC is a Samba machine, a second Samba machine can be set up to
-service logon requests whenever the PDC is down.
-</para>
-
-</sect1>
-
-
 <sect1>
 <title>Backup Domain Controller Configuration</title>
 
@@ -273,11 +291,15 @@ Several things have to be done:
 
 </itemizedlist>
 
+<sect2>
+<title>Example Configuration</title>
+
 <para>
 Finally, the BDC has to be found by the workstations. This can be done by setting:
 </para>
 
 <para><programlisting>
+<title>Essential Parameters for BDC Operation</title>
        workgroup = SAMBA
        domain master = no
        domain logons = yes
@@ -285,13 +307,58 @@ Finally, the BDC has to be found by the workstations. This can be done by settin
 
 <para>
 in the [global]-section of the smb.conf of the BDC. This makes the BDC
-only register the name SAMBA#1c with the WINS server. This is no
-problem as the name SAMBA#1c is a NetBIOS group name that is meant to
+only register the name SAMBA&lt;#1c&gt; with the WINS server. This is no
+problem as the name SAMBA&lt;#1c&gt; is a NetBIOS group name that is meant to
 be registered by more than one machine. The parameter 'domain master =
-no' forces the BDC not to register SAMBA#1b which as a unique NetBIOS
+no' forces the BDC not to register SAMBA&lt;#1b&gt; which as a unique NetBIOS
 name is reserved for the Primary Domain Controller.
 </para>
 
+</sect2>
+</sect1>
+
+<sect1>
+<title>Common Errors</title>
+
+<para>
+As this is a rather new area for Samba there are not many examples thta we may refer to. Keep
+watching for updates to this section.
+</para>
+
+<sect2>
+<title>Machine Accounts keep expiring, what can I do?</title>
+
+<para>
+This problem will occur when occur when the account files are replicated from a central
+server but the local Domain Controllers are not forwarding machine account password updates
+back to the central server, or where there is an excessive delay in replication of the centrally
+changed machine account password to the local Domain Controller.
+</para>
+
+</sect2>
+
+<sect2>
+<title>Can Samba be a Backup Domain Controller to an NT4 PDC?</title>
+
+<para>
+With version 2.2, no. The native NT4 SAM replication protocols have not yet been fully
+implemented. The Samba Team is working on understanding and implementing the protocols,
+but this work has not been finished for version 2.2.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+With version 3.0, the work on both the replication protocols and a suitable storage
+mechanism has progressed, and some form of NT4 BDC support is expected soon.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Can I get the benefits of a BDC with Samba?  Yes. The main reason for implementing a
+BDC is availability. If the PDC is a Samba machine, a second Samba machine can be set up to
+service logon requests whenever the PDC is down.
+</para>
+
+</sect2>
+
 <sect2>
 <title>How do I replicate the smbpasswd file?</title>
 
@@ -309,7 +376,6 @@ Ssh itself can be set up to accept *only* rsync transfer without requiring the u
 to type a password.
 </para>
 
-
 </sect2>
 
 <sect2>
@@ -321,16 +387,7 @@ LDAP server, and will also follow referrals and rebind to the master if it ever
 needs to make a modification to the database. (Normally BDCs are read only, so
 this will not occur often).
 </para>
-</sect2>
-
-</sect1>
-
-<sect1>
-<title>Common Errors</title>
-
-<para>
-Stuff goes here
-</para>
 
+</sect2>
 </sect1>
 </chapter>
index fddd5aade665f20095ced82939b30bfbfe97a929..552a95c878bb0ffff290657ea2cb6e963eaa6404 100644 (file)
@@ -68,6 +68,24 @@ to not inflict pain on others. Do your learning on a test network.
 <sect1>
 <title>Features and Benefits</title>
 
+<para>
+<emphasis>What is the key benefit of Microsoft Domain security?</emphasis>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In a word, <emphasis>Single Sign On</emphasis>, or SSO for short. This to many is the holy
+grail of MS Windows NT and beyond networking. SSO allows users in a well designed network
+to log onto any workstation that is a member of the domain that their user account is in
+(or in a domain that has an appropriate trust relationship with the domain they are visiting)
+and they will be able to log onto the network and access resources (shares, files, and printers)
+as if they are sitting at their home (personal) workstation. This is a feature of the Domain
+security protocols.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The benefits of Domain security are fully available to those sites that deploy a Samba PDC.
+</para>
+
 <para>
 The following functionalities are new to the Samba-3 release:
 </para>
index 39fac749b9e72858d84c2d8f0f27829d1d2354d2..3dff9a55286756409e41cd28555d1a05e607e430 100644 (file)
@@ -13,7 +13,8 @@
 <sect1>
        <title>Obtaining and installing samba</title>
 
-       <para>Binary packages of samba are included in almost any Linux or 
+       <para>
+       Binary packages of samba are included in almost any Linux or
        Unix distribution. There are also some packages available at 
        <ulink url="http://samba.org/">the samba homepage</ulink>.
        </para>
 </sect1>
 
 <sect1>
-       <title>Configuring samba</title>
+       <title>Configuring samba (smb.conf)</title>
 
-       <para>Samba's configuration is stored in the smb.conf file, 
+       <para>
+       Samba's configuration is stored in the smb.conf file, 
        that usually resides in <filename>/etc/samba/smb.conf</filename> 
        or <filename>/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</filename>. You can either 
        edit this file yourself or do it using one of the many graphical 
        tools that are available, such as the web-based interface swat, that 
-       is included with samba.</para>
+       is included with samba.
+       </para>
        
 <sect2>
-       <title>Editing the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file</title>
+       <title>Example Configuration</title>
        
-       <para>There are sample configuration files in the examples 
-       subdirectory in the distribution. I suggest you read them 
-       carefully so you can see how the options go together in 
-       practice. See the man page for all the options.</para>
-
-       <para>The simplest useful configuration file would be 
-       something like this:</para>
-
-       <para><programlisting>
-[global]
-       workgroup = MYGROUP
-
-[homes]
-       guest ok = no
-       read only = no
-       </programlisting></para>
+       <para>
+       There are sample configuration files in the examples subdirectory in the
+       distribution. I suggest you read them carefully so you can see how the options
+       go together in practice. See the man page for all the options.
+       </para>
+
+       <para>
+       The simplest useful configuration file would be something like this:
+       </para>
+
+       <para>
+       <programlisting>
+       [global]
+               workgroup = MYGROUP
+
+       [homes]
+               guest ok = no
+               read only = no
+       </programlisting>
+       </para>
        
-       <para>which would allow connections by anyone with an 
-       account on the server, using either their login name or 
-       "<command>homes</command>" as the service name. (Note that I also set the 
-       workgroup that Samba is part of. See BROWSING.txt for details)</para>
+       <para>
+       This will allow connections by anyone with an account on the server, using either
+       their login name or "<command>homes</command>" as the service name.
+       (Note that the workgroup that Samba must also be set.)
+       </para>
        
-       <para>Make sure you put the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file in the same place 
+       <para>
+       Make sure you put the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file in the same place 
        you specified in the<filename>Makefile</filename> (the default is to 
-       look for it in <filename>/usr/local/samba/lib/</filename>).</para>
+       look for it in <filename>/usr/local/samba/lib/</filename>).
+       </para>
 
-       <para>For more information about security settings for the 
+       <para>
+       For more information about security settings for the 
        <command>[homes]</command> share please refer to the chapter 
-       <link linkend="securing-samba">Securing Samba</link>.</para>
+       <link linkend="securing-samba">Securing Samba</link>.
+       </para>
 
 <sect3>
-       <title>Test your config file with 
-       <command>testparm</command></title>
+       <title>Test your config file with <command>testparm</command></title>
 
-       <para>It's important that you test the validity of your
-       <filename>smb.conf</filename> file using the <application>testparm</application> program. 
-       If testparm runs OK then it will list the loaded services. If 
-       not it will give an error message.</para>
+       <para>
+       It's important that you test the validity of your <filename>smb.conf</filename>
+       file using the <application>testparm</application> program. If testparm runs OK
+       then it will list the loaded services. If not it will give an error message.
+       </para>
 
-       <para>Make sure it runs OK and that the services look 
-       reasonable before proceeding. </para>
+       <para>
+       Make sure it runs OK and that the services look reasonable before proceeding.
+       </para>
 
-       <para>Always run testparm again when you change 
-       <filename>smb.conf</filename>!</para>
+       <para>
+       Always run testparm again when you change <filename>smb.conf</filename>!
+       </para>
 
 </sect3>
 </sect2>
 
-       <sect2>
+<sect2>
        <title>SWAT</title>
 
        <para>
        on compiling, installing and configuring swat from source.
        </para>
 
-       <para>To launch SWAT just run your favorite web browser and 
-       point it at "http://localhost:901/". Replace <replaceable>localhost</replaceable> with the name of the computer you are running samba on if you 
-       are running samba on a different computer than your browser.</para>
+       <para>
+       To launch SWAT just run your favorite web browser and 
+       point it at "http://localhost:901/". Replace
+       <replaceable>localhost</replaceable>
+       with the name of the computer you are running samba on if you 
+       are running samba on a different computer than your browser.
+       </para>
 
-       <para>Note that you can attach to SWAT from any IP connected 
+       <para>
+       Note that you can attach to SWAT from any IP connected 
        machine but connecting from a remote machine leaves your 
        connection open to password sniffing as passwords will be sent 
-       in the clear over the wire. </para>
-       </sect2>
+       in the clear over the wire. 
+       </para>
+</sect2>
 </sect1>
 
 <sect1>
        Samba has been successfully installed at thousands of sites worldwide,
        so maybe someone else has hit your problem and has overcome it. </para>
 
-</sect1>       
+</sect1>
+
+<sect1>
+<title>Common Errors</title>
+
+<para>
+The following questions and issues get raised on the samba mailing list over and over again.
+</para>
+
+<sect2>
+<title>Why are so many smbd processes eating memory?</title>
+
+<para>
+Site that is running Samba on an AIX box. They are sharing out about 2 terabytes using samba.
+Samba was installed using smitty and the binaries. We seem to be experiencing a memory problem
+with this box.  When I do a svmon -Pu the monitoring program shows that smbd has several
+processes of smbd running:
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Is samba suppose to start this many different smbd processes?  Or does it run as one smbd process?  Also
+is it normal for it to be taking up this much memory?
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<programlisting>
+Inuse * 4096 = amount of memory being used by this process
+
+     Pid Command        Inuse      Pin     Pgsp  Virtual   64-bit    Mthrd
+   20950 smbd           33098     1906      181     5017        N        N
+   22262 smbd            9104     1906      5410
+   21060 smbd            9048     1906      181     5479        N        N
+   25972 smbd            8678     1906      181     5109        N        N
+   24524 smbd            8674     1906      181     5105        N        N
+   19262 smbd            8582     1906      181     5013        N        N
+   20722 smbd            8572     1906      181     5003        N        N
+   21454 smbd            8572     1906      181     5003        N        N
+   28946 smbd            8567     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   24076 smbd            8566     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   20138 smbd            8566     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   17608 smbd            8565     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   21820 smbd            8565     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   26940 smbd            8565     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   19884 smbd            8565     1906      181     4996        N        N
+    9912 smbd            8565     1906      181     4996        N        N
+   25800 smbd            8564     1906      181     4995        N        N
+   20452 smbd            8564     1906      181     4995        N        N
+   18592 smbd            8562     1906      181     4993        N        N
+   28216 smbd            8521     1906      181     4954        N        N
+   19110 smbd            8404     1906      181     4862        N        N
+
+   Total memory used:  841,592,832 bytes
+</programlisting>
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>ANSWER:</emphasis> Samba consists on three core programs:
+<emphasis>nmbd, smbd, winbindd</emphasis>. <command>nmbd</command> is the name server message daemon,
+<command>smbd</command> is the server message daemon, <command>winbind</command> is the daemon that
+handles communication with Domain Controllers.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If your system is NOT running as a WINS server, then there will be one (1) single instance of
+ <command>nmbd</command> running on your system. If it is running as a WINS server then there will be
+two (2) instances - one to handle the WINS requests.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<command>smbd</command> handles ALL connection requests and then spawns a new process for each client
+connection made. That is why you are seeing so many of them, one (1) per client connection.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<command>winbindd</command> will run as one or two daemons, depending on whether or not it is being
+run in "split mode" (in which case there will be two instances).
+</para>
+
+</sect2>
+</sect1>
+
 </chapter>