Updatting docs further. More to come.
[sfrench/samba-autobuild/.git] / docs / docbook / projdoc / UNIX_INSTALL.xml
1 <chapter id="install">
2 <chapterinfo>
3         &author.tridge;
4         &author.jelmer;
5         &author.jht;
6         <author><firstname>Karl</firstname><surname>Auer</surname></author>
7         <!-- Isn't some of this written by others as well? -->
8
9 </chapterinfo>
10
11 <title>How to Install and Test SAMBA</title>
12
13 <sect1>
14         <title>Obtaining and installing samba</title>
15
16         <para>Binary packages of samba are included in almost any Linux or 
17         Unix distribution. There are also some packages available at 
18         <ulink url="http://samba.org/">the samba homepage</ulink>.
19         </para>
20
21         <para>If you need to compile samba from source, check the 
22         <link linkend="compiling">appropriate appendix chapter</link>.</para>
23
24         <para>If you have already installed samba, or if your operating system
25         was pre-installed with samba, then you may not need to bother with this
26         chapter. On the other hand, you may want to read this chapter anyhow
27         for information about updating samba.</para>
28
29 </sect1>
30
31 <sect1>
32         <title>Configuring samba</title>
33
34         <para>Samba's configuration is stored in the smb.conf file, 
35         that usually resides in <filename>/etc/samba/smb.conf</filename> 
36         or <filename>/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</filename>. You can either 
37         edit this file yourself or do it using one of the many graphical 
38         tools that are available, such as the web-based interface swat, that 
39         is included with samba.</para>
40         
41 <sect2>
42         <title>Editing the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file</title>
43         
44         <para>There are sample configuration files in the examples 
45         subdirectory in the distribution. I suggest you read them 
46         carefully so you can see how the options go together in 
47         practice. See the man page for all the options.</para>
48
49         <para>The simplest useful configuration file would be 
50         something like this:</para>
51
52         <para><programlisting>
53 [global]
54         workgroup = MYGROUP
55
56 [homes]
57         guest ok = no
58         read only = no
59         </programlisting></para>
60         
61         <para>which would allow connections by anyone with an 
62         account on the server, using either their login name or 
63         "<command>homes</command>" as the service name. (Note that I also set the 
64         workgroup that Samba is part of. See BROWSING.txt for details)</para>
65         
66         <para>Make sure you put the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file in the same place 
67         you specified in the<filename>Makefile</filename> (the default is to 
68         look for it in <filename>/usr/local/samba/lib/</filename>).</para>
69
70         <para>For more information about security settings for the 
71         <command>[homes]</command> share please refer to the chapter 
72         <link linkend="securing-samba">Securing Samba</link>.</para>
73
74 <sect3>
75         <title>Test your config file with 
76         <command>testparm</command></title>
77
78         <para>It's important that you test the validity of your
79         <filename>smb.conf</filename> file using the <application>testparm</application> program. 
80         If testparm runs OK then it will list the loaded services. If 
81         not it will give an error message.</para>
82
83         <para>Make sure it runs OK and that the services look 
84         reasonable before proceeding. </para>
85
86         <para>Always run testparm again when you change 
87         <filename>smb.conf</filename>!</para>
88
89 </sect3>
90 </sect2>
91
92         <sect2>
93         <title>SWAT</title>
94
95         <para>
96         SWAT is a web-based interface that helps you configure samba. 
97         SWAT might not be available in the samba package on your platform, 
98         but in a separate package. Please read the swat manpage 
99         on compiling, installing and configuring swat from source.
100         </para>
101
102         <para>To launch SWAT just run your favorite web browser and 
103         point it at "http://localhost:901/". Replace <replaceable>localhost</replaceable> with the name of the computer you are running samba on if you 
104         are running samba on a different computer than your browser.</para>
105
106         <para>Note that you can attach to SWAT from any IP connected 
107         machine but connecting from a remote machine leaves your 
108         connection open to password sniffing as passwords will be sent 
109         in the clear over the wire. </para>
110         </sect2>
111 </sect1>
112
113 <sect1>
114         <title>Try listing the shares available on your 
115         server</title>
116
117         <para><prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>smbclient -L 
118         <replaceable>yourhostname</replaceable></userinput></para>
119
120         <para>You should get back a list of shares available on 
121         your server. If you don't then something is incorrectly setup. 
122         Note that this method can also be used to see what shares 
123         are available on other LanManager clients (such as WfWg).</para>
124
125         <para>If you choose user level security then you may find 
126         that Samba requests a password before it will list the shares. 
127         See the <command>smbclient</command> man page for details. (you 
128         can force it to list the shares without a password by
129         adding the option -U% to the command line. This will not work 
130         with non-Samba servers)</para>
131 </sect1>
132
133 <sect1>
134         <title>Try connecting with the unix client</title>
135         
136         <para><prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>smbclient <replaceable>
137         //yourhostname/aservice</replaceable></userinput></para>
138         
139         <para>Typically the <replaceable>yourhostname</replaceable> 
140         would be the name of the host where you installed &smbd;. 
141         The <replaceable>aservice</replaceable> is 
142         any service you have defined in the &smb.conf;
143         file. Try your user name if you just have a <command>[homes]</command>
144         section
145         in &smb.conf;.</para>
146
147         <para>For example if your unix host is <replaceable>bambi</replaceable>
148         and your login name is <replaceable>fred</replaceable> you would type:</para>
149
150         <para><prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>smbclient //<replaceable>bambi</replaceable>/<replaceable>fred</replaceable>
151         </userinput></para>
152 </sect1>
153
154 <sect1>
155         <title>Try connecting from a DOS, WfWg, Win9x, WinNT, 
156         Win2k, OS/2, etc... client</title>
157         
158         <para>Try mounting disks. eg:</para>
159
160         <para><prompt>C:\WINDOWS\> </prompt><userinput>net use d: \\servername\service
161         </userinput></para>
162
163         <para>Try printing. eg:</para>
164
165         <para><prompt>C:\WINDOWS\> </prompt><userinput>net use lpt1:
166         \\servername\spoolservice</userinput></para>
167
168         <para><prompt>C:\WINDOWS\> </prompt><userinput>print filename
169         </userinput></para>
170 </sect1>
171
172 <sect1>
173         <title>What If Things Don't Work?</title>
174         
175         <para>Then you might read the file chapter 
176         <link linkend="diagnosis">Diagnosis</link> and the 
177         FAQ. If you are still stuck then try to follow 
178         the <link linkend="problems">Analysing and Solving Problems chapter</link>
179         Samba has been successfully installed at thousands of sites worldwide,
180         so maybe someone else has hit your problem and has overcome it. </para>
181
182 </sect1>        
183 </chapter>