Correct "formated" typos.
[sfrench/samba-autobuild/.git] / docs-xml / using_samba / ch06.xml
1 <chapter label="6" id="SAMBA-CH-6">
2 <title>Users, Security, and Domains </title>
3
4
5
6
7 <para>This chapter discusses how to configure users with the Samba server. This topic may seem straightforward at first, but you'll soon discover that there are several ancillary problems that can crop up. One issue that Samba administrators have difficulty with is user authentication&mdash;password and security problems are by far the most common support questions on the Samba mailing lists. Learning why various authentication mechanisms work on certain architectures (and don't on others) can save you a tremendous amount of time testing and debugging Samba users in the future.</para>
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19 <sect1 role="" label="6.1" id="ch06-92902">
20 <title>Users and Groups</title>
21
22
23 <para>
24 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967489-0" class="startofrange"><primary>users</primary></indexterm>
25 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967489-1" class="startofrange"><primary>groups</primary></indexterm>Before we start, we need to warn you up front that if you are connecting to Samba with a Windows 98 or NT 4.0 Workstation SP3, you need to configure your server for encrypted passwords before you can make a connection; otherwise, the clients will refuse to connect to the Samba server. This is because each of those Windows clients sends encrypted passwords, and Samba needs to be configured to expect and decrypt them. We'll show you how to set up Samba for this task later in the chapter, assuming you haven't already tackled this problem in <link linkend="SAMBA-CH-2">Chapter 2</link>.</para>
26
27
28 <para>
29 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967590-0"><primary>users</primary><secondary>setting up</secondary></indexterm>
30 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967590-1"><primary>client users</primary><see>users</see></indexterm>Let's start with a single user. The easiest way to set up a client user is to create a Unix account (and <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967591-0"><primary>home directory, user's</primary></indexterm>home directory) for that individual on the server, and notify Samba of the user's existence. You can do the latter by creating a disk share that maps to the user's home directory in the Samba configuration file, and restricting access to that user with the <literal>valid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option. For example:</para>
31
32
33 <programlisting>[dave]
34                 path = /home/dave
35                 comment = Dave's home directory
36                 writeable = yes
37 <emphasis role="bold">                valid users = dave</emphasis></programlisting>
38
39
40 <para>The <literal>valid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option lists the users that will be allowed to access the share.  In this case, only the user <literal>dave</literal> is allowed to access the share. In the previous chapters, we specified that any user could access a disk share using the <literal>guest</literal> <literal>ok</literal> parameter. Because we don't wish to allow guest access, that option is absent here. We could grant both authenticated users and guest users access to a specific share if we wanted to. The difference between the two typically involves access rights for each of the files.</para>
41
42
43 <para>Remember that you can abbreviate the user's home directory by using the <literal>%H</literal> variable. In addition, you can use the Unix username variable <literal>%u</literal> and/or the client username variable <literal>%U</literal> in your options as well. For example:</para>
44
45
46 <programlisting>[dave]
47         comment = %U home directory
48         writeable = yes
49         valid users = dave
50         path = %H</programlisting>
51
52
53 <para>Both of these examples work as long as the Unix user that Samba uses to represent the client has read/write access to the directory referenced by the <literal>path</literal> option. In other words, a client must first pass Samba's security mechanisms (e.g., encrypted passwords, the <literal>valid users</literal> option, etc.) as well as the normal Unix file and directory permissions of its Unix-side user <emphasis>before</emphasis> it can gain read/write access to a share.</para>
54
55
56 <para>With a single user accessing a home directory, access permissions are taken care of when the operating system creates the user account. However, if you're creating a shared directory for group access, there are a few more steps you need to perform. Let's take a stab at a group share for the accounting department in the <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis> file:</para>
57
58
59 <programlisting>[accounting]
60         comment = Accounting Department Directory
61         writeable = yes
62         valid users = @account
63         path = /home/samba/accounting
64         create mode = 0660
65         directory mode = 0770</programlisting>
66
67
68 <para>The first thing that you might notice we did differently is to specify <literal>@account</literal> as the valid user instead of one or more individual usernames. This is shorthand for saying that the valid users are represented by the Unix group <literal>account</literal>. These users will need to be added to the group entry <literal>account</literal> in the system group file ( <filename>/etc/group</filename> or equivalent) to be recognized as part of the group. Once they are, Samba will recognize those users as valid users for the share.</para>
69
70
71 <para>In addition, you will need to create a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967592-0"><primary>shares</primary><secondary>access to</secondary><tertiary>creating for groups</tertiary></indexterm>shared directory that the members of the group can access, which is pointed to by the <literal>path</literal> configuration option. Here are the Unix commands that create the shared directory for the accounting department (assuming <emphasis>/home/samba</emphasis> already exists):</para>
72
73
74 <programlisting># <emphasis role="bold">mkdir /home/samba/accounting</emphasis># <emphasis role="bold">chgrp account /home/samba/accounting</emphasis># <emphasis role="bold">chmod 770 /home/samba/accounting</emphasis></programlisting>
75
76
77 <para>There are two other options in this <filename>smb.conf</filename> example, both of which we saw in the previous chapter. These options are <literal>create</literal> <literal>mode</literal> and <literal>directory</literal> <literal>mode</literal>. These options set the maximum file and directory permissions that a new file or directory can have. In this case, we have denied all world access to the contents of this share. (This is reinforced by the <emphasis>chmod</emphasis> command, shown earlier.).</para>
78
79
80 <sect2 role="" label="6.1.1" id="ch06-SECT-1.1">
81 <title>The [ homes] Share</title>
82
83
84 <para>Let's return to user shares for a moment. If we have several users to set up home directory shares for, we probably want to use the special <literal>[homes]</literal> share that we introduced in <link linkend="SAMBA-CH-5">Chapter 5</link>. With the <literal>[homes]</literal>
85 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967594-0"><primary sortas="homes share">[homes] share</primary></indexterm>
86 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967594-1"><primary>users</primary><secondary>shares for, setting up</secondary></indexterm> share, all we need to say is:</para>
87
88
89 <programlisting>[homes]
90         browsable = no
91         writable = yes</programlisting>
92
93
94 <para>The <literal>[homes]</literal> share is a special section of the Samba configuration file. If a user attempts to connect to an ordinary share that doesn't appear in the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file (such as specifying it with a UNC in Windows Explorer), Samba will search for a <literal>[homes]</literal> share. If one exists, the incoming share name is assumed to be a username and is queried as such in the password database ( <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> or equivalent) file of the Samba server. If it appears, Samba assumes the client is a Unix user trying to connect to his or her home directory.</para>
95
96
97 <para>As an illustration, let's assume that <literal>sofia</literal> is attempting to connect to a share called [<literal>sofia]</literal> on the Samba server. There is no share by that name in the configuration file, but a <literal>[homes]</literal> share exists and user <literal>sofia</literal> is present in the password database, so Samba takes the following steps:</para>
98
99
100 <orderedlist>
101 <listitem><para>Samba creates a new disk share called <literal>[sofia]</literal> with the <literal>path</literal> specified in the <literal>[homes]</literal> section. If there is no <literal>path</literal> option specified in <literal>[homes]</literal>, Samba initializes it to her home directory.</para></listitem>
102 <listitem><para>Samba initializes the new share's options from the defaults in <literal>[globals]</literal>, and any overriding options in <literal>[homes]</literal> with the exception of <literal>browseable</literal>.</para></listitem>
103 <listitem><para>Samba connects <literal>sofia</literal>'s client to that share.</para></listitem>
104 </orderedlist>
105
106 <para>The <literal>[homes]</literal> share is a fast, painless way to create shares for your user community without having to duplicate the information from the password database file in the <filename>smb.conf</filename> file. It does have some peculiarities, however, that we need to point out:</para>
107
108
109 <itemizedlist>
110 <listitem><para>The <literal>[homes]</literal> section can represent any account on the machine, which isn't always desirable. For example, it can potentially create a share for <emphasis>root</emphasis>, <emphasis>bin</emphasis>, <emphasis>sys</emphasis>, <emphasis>uucp</emphasis>, and the like. (You can set a global <literal>invalid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option to protect against this.)</para></listitem>
111 <listitem><para>The meaning of the <literal>browseable</literal> configuration option is different from other shares; it indicates only that a <literal>[homes]</literal> section won't show up in the local browse list, not that the <literal>[alice]</literal> share won't. When the <literal>[alice]</literal> section is created (after the initial connection), it will use the browsable value from the <literal>[globals]</literal> section for that share, not the value from <literal>[homes]</literal>.</para></listitem>
112 </itemizedlist>
113
114 <para>As we mentioned, there is no need for a path statement in <literal>[homes]</literal> if the users have Unix home directories in the server's <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> file. You should ensure that a valid home directory does exist, however, as Samba will not automatically create a home directory for a user, and will refuse a tree connect if the user's directory does not exist or is not accessible.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967568-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967489-0"/>
115 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967568-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967489-1"/></para>
116 </sect2>
117 </sect1>
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127 <sect1 role="" label="6.2" id="ch06-27678">
128 <title>Controlling Access to Shares</title>
129
130
131 <para>
132 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967497-0" class="startofrange"><primary>shares</primary><secondary>access to</secondary><tertiary>controlling</tertiary></indexterm>
133 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967497-1" class="startofrange"><primary>security</primary><secondary>restricting access to shares</secondary></indexterm>Often you will need to restrict the users who can access a specific share for security reasons. This is very easy to do with Samba since it contains a wealth of options for creating practically any security configuration. Let's introduce a few configurations that you might want to use in your own Samba setup.</para>
134
135
136 <warning role="ora">
137 <para>Again, if you are connecting with Windows 98 or NT 4.0 with Service Pack 3 (or above), those clients will send encrypted passwords to the Samba server. If Samba is not configured for this, it will continually refuse the connection. This chapter describes how to set up Samba for encrypted passwords. See <link linkend="ch06-61393">Section 6.4</link>.</para>
138
139 </warning>
140
141 <para>We've seen what happens when you specify valid users. However, you are also allowed to specify a list of invalid <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967599-0"><primary>users</primary><secondary>invalid, specifying</secondary></indexterm>users&mdash;users who should never be allowed access to Samba or its shares. This is done with the <literal>invalid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option. We hinted at one frequent use of this option earlier: a global default with the <literal>[homes]</literal> section to ensure that various system users and superusers cannot be forged for access. For example:</para>
142
143
144 <programlisting>[global]
145         invalid users = root bin daemon adm sync shutdown \
146                              halt mail news uucp operator gopher
147         auto services = dave peter bob
148
149 [homes]
150         browsable = no
151         writeable = yes</programlisting>
152
153
154 <para>The <literal>invalid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option, like <literal>valid</literal> <literal>users</literal>, can take group names as well as usernames. In the event that a user or group appears in both lists, the <literal>invalid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option takes precedence and the user or group will be denied access to the share.</para>
155
156
157 <para>At the other end of the spectrum, you can explicitly specify users who will be allowed <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967600-0"><primary>root user</primary><secondary>access</secondary></indexterm>
158 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967600-1"><primary>users</primary><secondary>allowing superuser (root) access to</secondary></indexterm>
159 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967600-2"><primary>superuser</primary><see>root user</see></indexterm>superuser (root) access to a share with the <literal>admin</literal> <literal>users</literal> option. An example follows:</para>
160
161
162 <programlisting>[sales]
163                 path = /home/sales
164                 comment = Fiction Corp Sales Data
165                 writeable = yes
166                 valid users = tom dick harry
167                 admin users = mike</programlisting>
168
169
170 <para>This option takes both group names and usernames. In addition, you can specify NIS netgroups by preceding them with an <literal>@</literal> as well; if the netgroup is not found, Samba will assume that you are referring to a standard Unix group.</para>
171
172
173 <para>Be careful if you assign an entire <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967601-0"><primary>groups</primary><secondary>administrative privileges for</secondary></indexterm>group administrative privileges to a share. The Samba team highly recommends you avoid using this option, as it essentially gives root access to the specified users or groups for that share.</para>
174
175
176 <para>If you wish to force <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967602-0"><primary>read-only/read-write access</primary></indexterm>
177 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967602-1"><primary>users</primary><secondary>read-only/read-write access</secondary></indexterm>read-only or read-write access to users who access a share, you can do so with the <literal>read</literal> <literal>list</literal> and <literal>write</literal> <literal>list</literal> options, respectively. These options can be used on a per-share basis to restrict a writable share or grant write access to specific users in a read-only share, respectively. For example:</para>
178
179
180 <programlisting>[sales]
181                 path = /home/sales
182                 comment = Fiction Corp Sales Data
183                 read only = yes
184                 write list = tom dick</programlisting>
185
186
187 <para>The <literal>write</literal> <literal>list</literal> option cannot override <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968868-0"><primary>Unix</primary><secondary>permissions, share write access and</secondary></indexterm>Unix permissions. If you've created the share without giving the write-list user write permission on the Unix system, he or she will be denied write access regardless of the setting of <literal>write</literal> <literal>list</literal>.</para>
188
189
190 <sect2 role="" label="6.2.1" id="ch06-SECT-2.1">
191 <title>Guest Access</title>
192
193
194 <para>
195 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967606-0" class="startofrange"><primary>guest access</primary></indexterm>As mentioned earlier, you can specify users who have guest access to a share. The options that control guest access are easy to work with. The first option, <literal>guest</literal> <literal>account</literal>, specifies the Unix account that guest users should be assigned when connecting to the Samba server. The default value for this is set during compilation, and is typically <literal>nobody</literal>. However, you may want to reset the guest user to <literal>ftp</literal> if you have trouble accessing various system services.</para>
196
197
198 <para>If you wish to restrict access in a share only to guests&mdash;in other words, all clients connect as the guest account when accessing the share&mdash;you can use the <literal>guest</literal> <literal>only</literal> option in conjunction with the <literal>guest ok</literal> option, as shown in the following example:</para>
199
200
201 <programlisting>[sales]
202                 path = /home/sales
203                 comment = Fiction Corp Sales Data
204                 writeable = yes
205                 guest ok = yes
206                 guest account = ftp
207                 guest only = yes</programlisting>
208
209
210 <para>Make sure you specify <literal>yes</literal> for both <literal>guest only</literal> and <literal>guest ok</literal> in this scenario; otherwise, Samba will not use the guest acount that you specify.</para>
211 </sect2>
212
213
214
215
216
217 <sect2 role="" label="6.2.2" id="ch06-SECT-2.2">
218 <title>Access Control Options</title>
219
220
221 <para>
222 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967608-0" class="startofrange"><primary>access-control options (shares)</primary></indexterm><link linkend="ch06-28077">Table 6.1</link> summarizes the options that you can use to control access to shares.</para>
223
224
225 <table label="6.1" id="ch06-28077">
226 <title>Share-level Access Options </title>
227
228 <tgroup cols="5">
229 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
230 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
231 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
232 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
233 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
234 <thead>
235 <row>
236
237 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
238
239 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
240
241 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
242
243 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
244
245 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
246
247 </row>
248
249 </thead>
250
251 <tbody>
252 <row>
253
254 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>admin users</literal></para></entry>
255
256 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (list of usernames)</para></entry>
257
258 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a list of users who can perform operations as root.</para></entry>
259
260 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
261
262 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
263
264 </row>
265
266 <row>
267
268 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>valid users</literal></para></entry>
269
270 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (list of usernames)</para></entry>
271
272 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a list of users that can connect to a share.</para></entry>
273
274 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
275
276 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
277
278 </row>
279
280 <row>
281
282 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>invalid users</literal></para></entry>
283
284 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (list of usernames)</para></entry>
285
286 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a list of users that will be denied access to a share.</para></entry>
287
288 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
289
290 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
291
292 </row>
293
294 <row>
295
296 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>read list</literal></para></entry>
297
298 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (list of usernames)</para></entry>
299
300 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a list of users that have read-only access to a writable share.</para></entry>
301
302 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
303
304 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
305
306 </row>
307
308 <row>
309
310 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>write list</literal></para></entry>
311
312 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (list of usernames)</para></entry>
313
314 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a list of users that have read-write access to a read-only share.</para></entry>
315
316 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
317
318 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
319
320 </row>
321
322 <row>
323
324 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>max connections</literal></para></entry>
325
326 <entry colname="col2"><para>numerical</para></entry>
327
328 <entry colname="col3"><para>Indicates the maximum number of connections for a share at a given time.</para></entry>
329
330 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>0</literal></para></entry>
331
332 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
333
334 </row>
335
336 <row>
337
338 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>guest only (only guest)</literal></para></entry>
339
340 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
341
342 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies that this share allows only guest access.</para></entry>
343
344 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
345
346 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
347
348 </row>
349
350 <row>
351
352 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>guest account</literal></para></entry>
353
354 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (name of account)</para></entry>
355
356 <entry colname="col3"><para>Names the Unix account that will be used for guest access.</para></entry>
357
358 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>nobody</literal></para></entry>
359
360 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
361
362 </row>
363
364 </tbody>
365 </tgroup>
366 </table>
367
368
369 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.2.1" id="ch06-SECT-2.2.1">
370 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969448-0"><primary>admin users option</primary></indexterm>
371 <title>
372 admin users</title>
373
374
375 <para>This option specifies a list of users that perform file operations as if they were <literal>root</literal>. This means that they can modify or destroy any other user's work, no matter what the permissions. Any files that they create will have root ownership and will use the default group of the admin user. The <literal>admin</literal> <literal>users</literal> option is used to allow PC users to act as administrators for particular shares. We urge you to avoid this option.</para>
376 </sect3>
377
378
379
380 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.2.2" id="ch06-SECT-2.2.2">
381 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969449-0"><primary>alid users option</primary></indexterm>
382 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969449-1"><primary>invalid users option</primary></indexterm>
383 <title>v
384 alid users and invalid users</title>
385
386
387 <para>These two options let you enumerate the users and groups who are granted or denied access to a particular share. You can enter a list of comma-delimited users, or indicate an NIS or Unix group name by prefixing the name with an at-sign (<literal>@</literal>).</para>
388
389
390 <para>The important rule to remember with these options is that any name or group in the <literal>invalid</literal> <literal>users</literal> list will <emphasis>always</emphasis> be denied access, even if it is included (in any form) in the <literal>valid</literal> <literal>users</literal> list. By default, neither option has a value associated with it. If both options have no value, any user is allowed to access the share.</para>
391 </sect3>
392
393
394
395 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.2.3" id="ch06-SECT-2.2.3">
396 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969450-0"><primary>read list option</primary></indexterm>
397 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969450-1"><primary>write list option</primary></indexterm>
398 <title>
399
400 read list and write list</title>
401
402
403 <para>Like the <literal>valid</literal> <literal>users</literal> <literal>and</literal> <literal>invalid</literal> <literal>users</literal> options, this pair of options specifies which users have read-only access to a writeable share and read-write access to a read-only share, respectively. The value of either options is a list of users. <literal>read</literal> <literal>list</literal> overrides any other Samba permissions granted&mdash;as well as Unix file permissions on the server system&mdash;to deny users write access. <literal>write</literal> <literal>list</literal> overrides other Samba permissions to grant write access, but cannot grant write access if the user lacks write permissions for the file on the Unix system. You can specify NIS or Unix group names by prefixing the name with an at sign (such as <literal>@users</literal>). Neither configuration option has a default value associated with it.</para>
404 </sect3>
405
406
407
408 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.2.4" id="ch06-SECT-2.2.4">
409 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969451-0"><primary>max connections option</primary></indexterm>
410 <title>
411 max connections</title>
412
413
414 <para>This option specifies the maximum number of client connections that a share can have at any given time. Any connections that are attempted after the maximum is reached will be rejected. The default value is <literal>0</literal>, which means that an unlimited number of connections are allowed. You can override it per share as follows:</para>
415
416
417 <programlisting>[accounting]
418         max connections = 30</programlisting>
419
420
421 <para>This option is useful in the event that you need to limit the number of users who are accessing a licensed program or piece of data concurrently.</para>
422 </sect3>
423
424
425
426 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.2.5" id="ch06-SECT-2.2.5">
427 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969452-0"><primary>guest only option</primary></indexterm>
428 <title>
429 guest only</title>
430
431
432 <para>This share-level option (sometimes called <literal>only</literal> <literal>guest</literal>) forces a connection to a share to be performed with the user specified by the <literal>guest</literal> <literal>account</literal> option. The share to which this is applied must explicitly specify <literal>guest</literal> <literal>ok</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>yes</literal> in order for this option to be recognized by Samba. The default value for this option is <literal>no</literal>.</para>
433 </sect3>
434
435
436
437 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.2.6" id="ch06-SECT-2.2.6">
438 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969453-0"><primary>guest account option</primary></indexterm>
439 <title>
440 guest account</title>
441
442
443 <para>This option specifies the name of account to be used for guest access to shares in Samba. The default for this option varies from system to system, but it is often set to <literal>nobody</literal>. Some default user accounts have trouble connecting as guest users. If that occurs on your system, the Samba team recommends using the ftp account as the guest<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967617-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967608-0"/> user.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967607-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967606-0"/></para>
444 </sect3>
445 </sect2>
446
447
448
449
450
451 <sect2 role="" label="6.2.3" id="ch06-SECT-2.3">
452 <title>Username Options</title>
453
454
455 <para>
456 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967622-0" class="startofrange"><primary>usernames</primary><secondary>options for</secondary></indexterm><link linkend="ch06-82964">Table 6.2</link> shows two additional options that Samba can use to correct for incompatibilities in usernames between Windows and Unix.</para>
457
458
459 <table label="6.2" id="ch06-82964">
460 <title>Username Options </title>
461
462 <tgroup cols="5">
463 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
464 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
465 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
466 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
467 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
468 <thead>
469 <row>
470
471 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
472
473 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
474
475 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
476
477 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
478
479 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
480
481 </row>
482
483 </thead>
484
485 <tbody>
486 <row>
487
488 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>username map</literal></para></entry>
489
490 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
491
492 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets the name of the username mapping file.</para></entry>
493
494 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
495
496 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
497
498 </row>
499
500 <row>
501
502 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>username level</literal></para></entry>
503
504 <entry colname="col2"><para>numerical</para></entry>
505
506 <entry colname="col3"><para>Indicates the number of capital letters to use when trying to match a username.</para></entry>
507
508 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>0</literal></para></entry>
509
510 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
511
512 </row>
513
514 </tbody>
515 </tgroup>
516 </table>
517
518
519 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.3.1" id="ch06-SECT-2.3.1">
520 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969456-0"><primary>username map option</primary></indexterm>
521 <title>
522 username map</title>
523
524
525 <para>
526 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967632-0"><primary>usernames</primary><secondary>SMB vs. Unix networks</secondary></indexterm>
527 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967632-1"><primary>SMB (Server Message Block)</primary><secondary>networks</secondary><tertiary>usernames and</tertiary></indexterm>
528 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967632-2"><primary>Unix</primary><secondary>networks, usernames and</secondary></indexterm>Client usernames on an SMB network can be relatively large (up to 255 characters), while usernames on a Unix network often cannot be larger than eight characters. This means that an individual user may have one username on a client and another (shorter) one on the Samba server. You can get past this issue by<firstterm> mapping</firstterm> a free-form client username to a Unix username of eight or fewer characters. It is placed in a standard text file, using a format that we'll describe shortly. You can then specify the pathname to Samba with the global <literal>username</literal> <literal>map</literal> option. Be sure to restrict access to this file; make the root user the file's owner and deny write access to others. Otherwise, an untrusted user who can access the file can easily map their client username to the root user of the Samba server.</para>
529
530
531 <para>You can specify this option as follows:</para>
532
533
534 <programlisting>[global]
535         username map = /etc/samba/usermap.txt</programlisting>
536
537
538 <para>Each of the entries in the username map file should be listed as follows: the Unix username, followed by an equal sign (<literal>=</literal>), followed by one or more whitespace-separated SMB client usernames. Note that unless instructed otherwise, (i.e., a guest connection), Samba will expect both the client and the server user to have the same password. You can also map NT groups to one or more specific Unix groups using the <literal>@</literal> sign. Here are some examples:</para>
539
540
541 <programlisting>jarwin = JosephArwin
542 manderso = MarkAnderson
543 users = @account</programlisting>
544
545
546 <para>Also, you can use the asterisk to specify a wildcard that matches any free-form client username as an entry in the username map file:</para>
547
548
549 <programlisting>nobody = *</programlisting>
550
551
552 <para>Comments in the file can be specified as lines beginning with (#) and (<literal>;</literal>).</para>
553
554
555 <para>Note that you can also use this file to redirect one Unix user to another user. Be careful if you do so because Samba and your client may not notify the user that the mapping has been made and Samba may be expecting a different password.</para>
556 </sect3>
557
558
559
560 <sect3 role="" label="6.2.3.2" id="ch06-SECT-2.3.2">
561 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969459-0"><primary>username level option</primary></indexterm>
562 <title>
563 username level</title>
564
565
566 <para>
567 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967633-0"><primary>usernames</primary><secondary>case sensitivity and</secondary></indexterm>
568 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967633-1"><primary>case sensitivity</primary><secondary>usernames and</secondary></indexterm>SMB clients (such as Windows) will often send usernames in SMB connection requests entirely in capital letters; in other words, client usernames are not necessarily case sensitive. On a Unix server, however, usernames <emphasis>are</emphasis> case sensitive: the user <literal>ANDY</literal> is different from the user <literal>andy</literal>. By default, Samba attacks this problem by doing the following:</para>
569
570
571 <orderedlist>
572 <listitem><para>Checking for a user account with the exact name sent by the client</para></listitem>
573 <listitem><para>Testing the username in all lowercase letters</para></listitem>
574 <listitem><para>Testing the username in lowercase letters with only the first letter capitalized</para></listitem>
575 </orderedlist>
576
577 <para>If you wish to have Samba attempt more combinations of uppercase and lowercase letters, you can use the <literal>username</literal> <literal>level</literal> global configuration option. This option takes an integer value that specifies how many letters in the username should be capitalized when attempting to connect to a share. You can specify this options as follows:</para>
578
579
580 <programlisting>[global]
581         username level = 3</programlisting>
582
583
584 <para>In this case, Samba will then attempt all permutations of usernames it can compute having three capital letters. The larger the number, the more computations Samba will have to perform to match the username and the longer the authentication wil<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967629-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967622-0"/>l take.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967624-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967497-0"/>
585 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967624-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967497-1"/></para>
586 </sect3>
587 </sect2>
588 </sect1>
589
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598 <sect1 role="" label="6.3" id="ch06-88596">
599 <title>Authentication Security</title>
600
601
602 <para>
603 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967505-0" class="startofrange"><primary>authentication</primary></indexterm>
604 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967505-1" class="startofrange"><primary>security</primary></indexterm>At this point, we should discuss how Samba authenticates users. Each user who attempts to connect to a share that does not allow guest access must provide a password to make a successful connection. What Samba does with that password&mdash;and consequently the strategy Samba will use to handle user authentication&mdash;is the arena of the <literal>security</literal> configuration option. There are currently four <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967637-0"><primary>security</primary><secondary>levels of</secondary></indexterm>security levels that Samba supports on its network: <firstterm>share</firstterm>, <firstterm>user</firstterm>, <firstterm>server</firstterm>, and <firstterm>domain</firstterm>.</para>
605
606
607 <variablelist>
608 <varlistentry><term>
609 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967638-0"><primary>share-level security</primary></indexterm>Share-level security</term>
610 <listitem><para>Each share in the workgroup has one or more passwords associated with it. Anyone who knows a valid password for the share can access it.</para></listitem>
611 </varlistentry>
612
613
614 <varlistentry><term>
615 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967639-0"><primary>user-level security</primary></indexterm>User-level security</term>
616 <listitem><para>Each share in the workgroup is configured to allow access from certain users. With each initial tree connection, the Samba server verifies users and their passwords to allow them access to the share.</para></listitem>
617 </varlistentry>
618
619
620 <varlistentry><term>Server-level security</term>
621 <listitem><para>This is the same as user-level security, except that the Samba server uses a separate SMB server to validate users and their passwords before granting access to the share.</para></listitem>
622 </varlistentry>
623
624
625 <varlistentry><term>
626 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967641-0"><primary>domain-level security</primary></indexterm>Domain-level security</term>
627 <listitem><para>Samba becomes a member of a Windows domain and uses the domain's <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967642-0"><primary>PDC (primary domain controller)</primary><secondary>domain-level security and</secondary></indexterm>primary domain controller (PDC) to perform authentication. Once authenticated, the user is given a special token that allows him or her access to any share with appropriate access rights. With this token, the PDC will not have to revalidate the user's password each time he or she attempts to access another share within the domain.</para></listitem>
628 </varlistentry>
629 </variablelist>
630
631
632 <para>Each of these security policies can be implemented with the global <literal>security</literal> option, as shown in <link linkend="ch06-73905">Table 6.3</link>.</para>
633
634
635 <table label="6.3" id="ch06-73905">
636 <title>Security Option </title>
637
638 <tgroup cols="5">
639 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
640 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
641 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
642 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
643 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
644 <thead>
645 <row>
646
647 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
648
649 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
650
651 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
652
653 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
654
655 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
656
657 </row>
658
659 </thead>
660
661 <tbody>
662 <row>
663
664 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>security</literal></para></entry>
665
666 <entry colname="col2"><para>
667 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968919-0"><primary>security</primary><secondary>options for</secondary></indexterm><literal>domain</literal>, <literal>server</literal>, <literal>share</literal>, or <literal>user</literal></para></entry>
668
669 <entry colname="col3"><para>Indicates the type of security that the Samba server will use.</para></entry>
670
671 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>user</literal> (Samba 2.0) or <literal>share</literal> (Samba 1.9)</para></entry>
672
673 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
674
675 </row>
676
677 </tbody>
678 </tgroup>
679 </table>
680
681
682 <sect2 role="" label="6.3.1" id="ch06-SECT-3.1">
683 <title>Share-level Security</title>
684
685
686 <para>
687 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967644-0" class="startofrange"><primary>share-level security</primary></indexterm>
688 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967644-1" class="startofrange"><primary>security</primary><secondary>share-level</secondary></indexterm>With share-level security, each share has one or more passwords associated with it. This differs from the other modes of security in that there are no restrictions as to whom can access a share, as long as that individual knows the correct password. Shares often have multiple passwords. For example, one password may grant read-only access, while another may grant read-write access, and so on. Security is maintained as long as unauthorized users do not discover the password for a share to which they shouldn't have access.</para>
689
690
691 <para>
692 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967666-0"><primary>OS/2, support for share-level security</primary></indexterm>
693 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967666-1"><primary>Windows 95/98</primary><secondary>share-level security, support for</secondary></indexterm>OS/2 and Window 95/98 both support share-level security on their resources. You can set up share-level security with Windows 95/98 by first enabling share-level security using the Access Control tab of the Network Control Panel dialog. Then select the Share-level Access Control radio button (which deselects the user-level access control radio button), as shown in <link linkend="ch06-33100">Figure 6.1</link>, and press the OK button.</para>
694
695
696 <figure label="6.1" id="ch06-33100">
697 <title>Selecting share-level security on a Windows machine</title>
698
699 <graphic width="502" depth="284" fileref="figs/sam.0601.gif"></graphic>
700 </figure>
701
702 <para>Next, right click on a resource&mdash;such as a hard drive or a CD-ROM&mdash;and select the Properties menu item. This will bring up the Resource Properties dialog box. Select the Sharing tab at the top of the dialog box and enable the resource as Shared As. From here, you can configure how the shared resource will appear to individual users, as well as assigning whether the resource will appear as read-only, read-write, or a mix, depending on the password that is supplied.</para>
703
704
705 <para>You might be thinking that this security model is not a good fit for Samba&mdash;and you would be right. In fact, if you set the <literal>security</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>share</literal> option in the Samba configuration file, Samba will still reuse the username/passwords combinations in the system password files to authenticate access. More precisely, Samba will take the following steps when a client requests a connection using <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967667-0"><primary>share-level security</primary><secondary>steps in taken by Samba</secondary></indexterm>share-level security:</para>
706
707
708 <orderedlist>
709 <listitem><para>When a connection is requested, Samba will accept the password and (if sent) the username of the client.</para></listitem>
710 <listitem><para>If the share is <literal>guest</literal> <literal>only </literal>, the user is immediately granted access to the share with the rights of the user specified by the <literal>guest</literal> <literal>account</literal> parameter; no password checking is performed.</para></listitem>
711 <listitem><para>For other shares, Samba appends the username to a list of users who are allowed access to the share. It then attempts to validate the password given in association with that username. If successful, Samba grants the user access to the share with the rights assigned to that user. The user will not need to authenticate again unless a <literal>revalidate</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>yes</literal> option has been set inside the share.</para></listitem>
712 <listitem><para>If the authentication is unsuccessful, Samba will attempt to validate the password against the list of users it has previously compiled throughout the attempted connections, as well as any specified under the share in the configuration file. If the password does not match any usernames (as specified in the system password file, typically <filename>/etc/passwd </filename>), the user is not granted access to the share under that username.</para></listitem>
713 <listitem><para>However, if the share has a <literal>guest</literal> <literal>ok</literal> or <literal>public</literal> option set, the user will default to access with the rights of the user specified by the <literal>guest</literal> <literal>account</literal> option.</para></listitem>
714 </orderedlist>
715
716 <para>You can indicate in the configuration file which users should be initially placed on the share-level security user list by using the <literal>username</literal> configuration option, as shown below:</para>
717
718
719 <programlisting>[global]
720         security = share
721 [accounting1]
722         path = /home/samba/accounting1
723         guest ok = no
724         writable = yes
725         username = davecb, pkelly, andyo</programlisting>
726
727
728 <para>Here, when a user attempts to connect to a share, Samba will verify the password that was sent against each of the users in its own list, in addition to the passwords of users <literal>davecb</literal>, <literal>pkelly</literal>, and <literal>andyo</literal>. If any of the passwords match, the connection will be verified and the user will be allowed. Otherwise, connection to the specific share will fail.</para>
729
730
731 <sect3 role="" label="6.3.1.1" id="ch06-SECT-3.1.1">
732 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967668-0"><primary>share-level security</primary><secondary>options for</secondary></indexterm>
733 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967668-1"><primary>security</primary><secondary>share-level</secondary><tertiary>options for</tertiary></indexterm>
734 <title>
735
736 Share Level Security Options</title>
737
738
739 <para><link linkend="ch06-80998">Table 6.4</link> shows the options typically associated with share-level security.</para>
740
741
742 <table label="6.4" id="ch06-80998">
743 <title>Share-Level Access Options </title>
744
745 <tgroup cols="5">
746 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
747 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
748 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
749 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
750 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
751 <thead>
752 <row>
753
754 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
755
756 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
757
758 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
759
760 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
761
762 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
763
764 </row>
765
766 </thead>
767
768 <tbody>
769 <row>
770
771 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>only user</literal></para></entry>
772
773 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
774
775 <entry colname="col3"><para>Indicates whether usernames specified by <literal>username</literal> will be the only ones allowed.</para></entry>
776
777 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
778
779 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
780
781 </row>
782
783 <row>
784
785 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>username </literal>(user or users)</para></entry>
786
787 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (list of usernames)</para></entry>
788
789 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a list of users against which a client's password will be tested.</para></entry>
790
791 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
792
793 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
794
795 </row>
796
797 </tbody>
798 </tgroup>
799 </table>
800 </sect3>
801
802
803
804 <sect3 role="" label="6.3.1.2" id="ch06-SECT-3.1.2">
805 <title>only user</title>
806
807
808 <para>This boolean option indicates whether Samba will allow connections to a share using share-level security based solely on the individuals specified in the <literal>username</literal> option, instead of those users compiled on Samba's internal list. The default value for this option is <literal>no</literal>. You can override it per share as follows:</para>
809
810
811 <programlisting>[global]
812     security = share
813 [data]
814     username = andy, peter, valerie
815     only user = yes</programlisting>
816 </sect3>
817
818
819
820 <sect3 role="" label="6.3.1.3" id="ch06-SECT-3.1.3">
821 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969462-0"><primary>username option</primary></indexterm>
822 <title>
823 username</title>
824
825
826 <para>This option presents a list of users against which Samba will test a connection password to allow access. It is typically used with clients that have share-level security to allow connections to a particular service based solely on a qualifying password&mdash;in this case, one that matches a password set up for a specific user:</para>
827
828
829 <programlisting>[global]
830     security = share
831 [data]
832      username = andy, peter, terry</programlisting>
833
834
835 <para>We recommend against using this option unless you are implementing a Samba server with share-level security.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967645-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967644-0"/>
836 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967645-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967644-1"/></para>
837 </sect3>
838 </sect2>
839
840
841
842
843
844 <sect2 role="" label="6.3.2" id="ch06-SECT-3.2">
845 <title>User-level Security</title>
846
847
848 <para>
849 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967646-0"><primary>user-level security</primary></indexterm>
850 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967646-1"><primary>security</primary><secondary>user-level</secondary></indexterm>The preferred mode of security with Samba is <firstterm>user-level security</firstterm>. With this method, each share is assigned specific users that can access it. When a user requests a connection to a share, Samba authenticates by validating the given username and password with the authorized users in the configuration file and the passwords in the password database of the Samba server. As mentioned earlier in the chapter, one way to isolate which users are allowed access to a specific <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967676-0"><primary>shares</primary><secondary>option for identifying users allowed access to</secondary></indexterm>share is by using the <literal>valid</literal> <literal>users</literal> option for each share:</para>
851
852
853 <programlisting>[global]
854         security = user
855 [accounting1]
856         writable = yes
857         valid users = bob, joe, sandy</programlisting>
858
859
860 <para>Each of the users listed will be allowed to connect to the share if the password provided matches the password stored in the system password database on the server. Once the initial authentication succeeds, the user will not need to re-enter a password again to access that share unless the <literal>revalidate</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>yes</literal> option has been set.</para>
861
862
863 <para>
864 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967677-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>user-level security and</secondary></indexterm>Passwords can be sent to the Samba server in either an encrypted or a non-encrypted format. If you have both types of systems on your network, you should ensure that the passwords represented by each user are stored both in a traditional account database and Samba's encrypted password database. This way, authorized users can gain access to their shares from any type of client.<footnote label="1" id="ch06-pgfId-968956">
865
866
867 <para>Having both encrypted and non-encrypted password clients on your network is another reason why Samba allows you to include (or not include) various options in the Samba configuration file based on the client operating system or machine name variables.</para>
868
869
870 </footnote> However, we recommend that you move your system to encrypted passwords and abandon non-encrypted passwords if security is an issue. <link linkend="ch06-61393">Section 6.4</link> in this chapter explains how to use encrypted as well as non-encrypted passwords.</para>
871 </sect2>
872
873
874
875
876
877 <sect2 role="" label="6.3.3" id="ch06-SECT-3.3">
878 <title>Server-level Security</title>
879
880
881 <para>
882 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967648-0"><primary>server-level security</primary></indexterm>
883 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967648-1"><primary>security</primary><secondary>server-level</secondary></indexterm>Server-level security is similar to user-level security. However, with server-level security, Samba delegates password authentication to another <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967679-0"><primary>SMB (Server Message Block)</primary><secondary>password server</secondary></indexterm>SMB password server, typically another Samba server or a Windows NT Server acting as a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967680-0"><primary>PDC (primary domain controller)</primary><secondary>sever-level security and</secondary></indexterm>PDC on the network. Note that Samba still maintains its list of shares and their configuration in its <filename>smb.conf</filename> file. When a client attempts to make a connection to a particular share, Samba validates that the user is indeed authorized to connect to the share. Samba will then attempt to validate the password by contacting the SMB password server through a known protocol and presenting the username and password to the SMB password server. If the password is accepted, a session will be established with the client. See <link linkend="ch06-89929">Figure 6.2</link> for an illustration of this setup.</para>
884
885
886 <figure label="6.2" id="ch06-89929">
887 <title>A typical system setup using server level security</title>
888
889 <graphic width="502" depth="177" fileref="figs/sam.0602.gif"></graphic>
890 </figure>
891
892 <para>You can configure Samba to use a separate password server under server-level security with the use of the <literal>password</literal> <literal>server</literal> global configuration option, as follows:</para>
893
894
895 <programlisting>[global]
896         security = server
897         password server = PHOENIX120 HYDRA134</programlisting>
898
899
900 <para>Note that you can specify more than one machine as the target of the <literal>password</literal> <literal>server </literal>; Samba will move down the list of servers in the event that its first choice is unreachable. The servers identified by the <literal>password</literal> <literal>server</literal> option are given as NetBIOS names, not their DNS names or equivalent IP addresses. Also, if any of the servers reject the given password, the connection will automatically fail&mdash;Samba will not attempt another server.</para>
901
902
903 <para>One caveat: when using this option, you will still need an account representing that user on the regular Samba server. This is because the Unix operating system needs a username to perform various I/O operations. The preferable method of handling this is to give the user an account on the Samba server but disable the account's password by replacing it in the system password file (e.g., <filename>/etc/passwd  </filename>) with an <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967681-0"><primary>asterisk (*), in system password file</primary></indexterm>
904 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967681-1"><primary>* (asterisk)</primary></indexterm>asterisk (*).</para>
905 </sect2>
906
907
908
909
910
911 <sect2 role="" label="6.3.4" id="ch06-SECT-3.4">
912 <title>Domain-level Security</title>
913
914
915 <para>
916 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967649-0" class="startofrange"><primary>domain-level security</primary></indexterm>
917 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967649-1" class="startofrange"><primary>security</primary><secondary>domain-level</secondary></indexterm>Domain-level security is similar to server-level security. However, with domainlevel security, the Samba server is acting as a member of a Windows domain. Recall from <link linkend="ch01-48078">Chapter 1</link> that each domain has a <firstterm>domain controller</firstterm>
918 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967685-0"><primary>domain controllers</primary></indexterm>, which is usually a Windows NT server offering password authentication. Including these controllers provides the workgroup with a definitive password server. The domain controllers keep track of users and passwords in their own <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967688-0"><primary>SAM (security account manager)</primary></indexterm>
919 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967688-1"><primary>security account manager (SAM)</primary></indexterm>security authentication module (SAM), and authenticates each user when he or she first logs on and wishes to access another machine's shares.</para>
920
921
922 <para>As mentioned earlier in this chapter, Samba has a similar ability to offer user-level security, but this option is Unix-centric and assumes that the authentication occurs via <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967689-0"><primary>Unix</primary><secondary>password files</secondary></indexterm>Unix password files. If the Unix machine is part of a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967690-0"><primary>NIS/NIS+ protocol</primary></indexterm>NIS or NIS+ domain, Samba will authenticate the users transparently against a shared password file, in typical Unix fashion. Samba then provides access to the NIS or NIS+ domain from Windows. There is, of course, no relationship between the NIS concept of a domain and the Windows concept of a domain.</para>
923
924
925 <para>
926 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967696-0"><primary>domains</primary><secondary>Windows</secondary><tertiary>authentication</tertiary></indexterm>
927 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967696-1"><primary>authentication</primary><secondary>NT domain</secondary></indexterm>With domain-level security, we now have the option of using the native NT mechanism. This has a number of advantages:</para>
928
929
930 <itemizedlist>
931 <listitem><para>It provides far better integration with NT: there are fewer "kludges" in the <filename>smb.conf</filename> options dealing with domains than with most Windows features. This allows more extensive use of NT management tools, such as the User Manager for Domains tool allowing PC support individuals to treat Samba servers as if they were large NT machines.</para></listitem>
932 <listitem><para>With the better integration comes protocol and code cleanups, allowing the Samba team to track the evolving NT implementation. NT Service Pack 4 corrects several problems in the protocol, and Samba's better integration makes it easier to track and adapt to these changes.</para></listitem>
933 <listitem><para>There is less overhead on the PDC because there is one less permanent network connection between it and the Samba server. Unlike the protocol used by the <literal>security</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>server</literal> option, the Samba server can make a Remote Procedure Call (RPC) call only when it needs authentication information. It can not keep a connection permanently up just for that.</para></listitem>
934 <listitem><para>Finally, the NT domain authentication scheme returns the full set of user attributes, not just success or failure. The attributes include a longer, more network-oriented version of the Unix uid, NT groups, and other information. This includes:</para>
935
936 <itemizedlist>
937 <listitem><para>Username</para></listitem>
938 <listitem><para>Full name</para></listitem>
939 <listitem><para>Description</para></listitem>
940 <listitem><para>Security identifier (a domain-wide extension of the Unix uid)</para></listitem>
941 <listitem><para>NT group memberships</para></listitem>
942 <listitem><para>Logon hours, and whether to force the user to log out immediately</para></listitem>
943 <listitem><para>Workstations the user is allowed to use</para></listitem>
944 <listitem><para>Account expiration date</para></listitem>
945 <listitem><para>Home directory</para></listitem>
946 <listitem><para>Login script</para></listitem>
947 <listitem><para>Profile</para></listitem>
948 <listitem><para>Account type</para></listitem>
949 </itemizedlist></listitem>
950 <listitem><para>The Samba developers used domain-level security in Samba version 2.0.4 to add and delete domain <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967702-0"><primary>users</primary><secondary>domain, semi-automatic deletion</secondary></indexterm>users on Samba servers semi-automatically. In addition, it adds room for other NT-like additions, such as supporting access control lists and changing permissions of files from the client.</para></listitem>
951 </itemizedlist>
952
953 <para>The advantage to this approach is less administration; there is only one authentication database to keep synchronized. The only local administration required on the Samba server will be creating directories for users to work in and <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> entries to keep their UIDs and groups in.</para>
954
955
956 <sect3 role="" label="6.3.4.1" id="ch06-SECT-3.4.1">
957 <title>Adding a Samba server to a Windows NT Domain</title>
958
959
960 <para>If you already have an NT <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967704-0"><primary>domains</primary><secondary>adding Samba server to Windows NT domain</secondary></indexterm>domain, you can easily add a Samba server to it. First, you will need to stop the Samba daemons. Then, add the Samba server to the NT domain on the PDC using the <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967706-0"><primary>Windows NT Server Manager for Domains tool</primary></indexterm>"Windows NT Server Manager for Domains" tool. When it asks for the computer type, choose "Windows NT Workstation or Server," and give it the NetBIOS name of the Samba server. This creates the machine account on the NT server.</para>
961
962
963 <para>Next, generate a Microsoft-format machine password using the <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
964 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967707-0"><primary>smbpasswd program</primary></indexterm> tool, which is explained in further detail in the next section. For example, if our domain is SIMPLE and the Windows NT PDC is <literal>beowulf</literal>, we could use the following command on the Samba server to accomplish this:</para>
965
966
967 <programlisting>smbpasswd -j SIMPLE -r beowulf</programlisting>
968
969
970 <para>Finally, add the following options to the <literal>[global]</literal> section of your <filename>smb.conf</filename> and restart the Samba daemons.</para>
971
972
973 <programlisting>[global]
974         security = domain
975         domain logins = yes
976         workgroup = SIMPLE
977         password server = beowulf</programlisting>
978
979
980 <para>Samba should now be configured for domain-level security. The <literal>domain</literal> <literal>logins</literal> option is explained in more detail later in this<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967657-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967649-0"/>
981 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967657-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967649-1"/> chapter.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967506-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967505-0"/>
982 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967506-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967505-1"/></para>
983 </sect3>
984 </sect2>
985 </sect1>
986
987
988
989
990
991
992
993
994
995 <sect1 role="" label="6.4" id="ch06-61393">
996 <title>Passwords</title>
997
998
999 <para>
1000 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967574-0" class="startofrange"><primary>passwords</primary></indexterm>Passwords are a thorny issue with Samba. So much so, in fact, that they are almost always the first major problem that users encounter when they install Samba, and generate by far the most questions sent to Samba support groups. In previous chapters, we've gotten around the need for passwords by placing the <literal>guest</literal> <literal>ok</literal> option in each of our configuration files, which allows connections without authenticating passwords. However, at this point, we need to delve deeper into Samba to discover what is happening on the network.</para>
1001
1002
1003 <para>
1004 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967709-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>encrypted</secondary><tertiary sortas="non-encrypted">vs. non-encrypted</tertiary></indexterm>
1005 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967709-1"><primary>encrypted passwords</primary></indexterm>Passwords sent from individual clients can be either encrypted or non-encrypted. Encrypted passwords are, of course, more secure. A <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967710-0"><primary>non-encrypted passwords</primary></indexterm>non-encrypted password can be easily read with a packet sniffing program, such as the modified <emphasis>tcpdump</emphasis>
1006 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967712-0"><primary>tcpdump utility</primary><secondary>passwords, reading</secondary></indexterm> program for Samba that we used in <link linkend="SAMBA-CH-3">Chapter 3</link>. Whether passwords are encrypted depends on the operating system that the client is using to connect to the Samba server. <link linkend="ch06-75183">Table 6.5</link> lists which Windows operating systems encrypt their passwords before sending them to the primary domain controller for authentication. If your client is not Windows, check the system documentation to see if SMB passwords are encrypted.</para>
1007
1008
1009 <table label="6.5" id="ch06-75183">
1010 <title>Windows Operating Systems with Encrypted Passwords </title>
1011
1012 <tgroup cols="2">
1013 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
1014 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
1015 <thead>
1016 <row>
1017
1018 <entry colname="col1"><para>Operating System</para></entry>
1019
1020 <entry colname="col2"><para>Encrypted or Non-encrypted</para></entry>
1021
1022 </row>
1023
1024 </thead>
1025
1026 <tbody>
1027 <row>
1028
1029 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal></literal>
1030 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967714-0"><primary>operating systems</primary><secondary>encrypted/non-encrypted passwords</secondary></indexterm>Windows 95</para></entry>
1031
1032 <entry colname="col2"><para>Non-encrypted</para></entry>
1033
1034 </row>
1035
1036 <row>
1037
1038 <entry colname="col1"><para>Windows 95 with SMB Update</para></entry>
1039
1040 <entry colname="col2"><para>Encrypted</para></entry>
1041
1042 </row>
1043
1044 <row>
1045
1046 <entry colname="col1"><para>Windows 98</para></entry>
1047
1048 <entry colname="col2"><para>Encrypted</para></entry>
1049
1050 </row>
1051
1052 <row>
1053
1054 <entry colname="col1"><para>Windows NT 3.<emphasis>x</emphasis></para></entry>
1055
1056 <entry colname="col2"><para>Non-encrypted</para></entry>
1057
1058 </row>
1059
1060 <row>
1061
1062 <entry colname="col1"><para>Windows NT 4.0 before SP 3</para></entry>
1063
1064 <entry colname="col2"><para>Non-encrypted</para></entry>
1065
1066 </row>
1067
1068 <row>
1069
1070 <entry colname="col1"><para>Windows NT 4.0 after SP 3</para></entry>
1071
1072 <entry colname="col2"><para>Encrypted</para></entry>
1073
1074 </row>
1075
1076 </tbody>
1077 </tgroup>
1078 </table>
1079
1080
1081 <para>There are actually two different encryption methods used: one for <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967715-0"><primary>Windows 95/98</primary><secondary>passwords, encrypted</secondary></indexterm>Windows 95 and 98 clients that reuses Microsoft's LAN Manager encryption style, and a separate one for <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967716-0"><primary>Windows NT</primary><secondary>passwords</secondary><tertiary>encrypted</tertiary></indexterm>Windows NT clients and servers. Windows 95 and 98 use an older encryption system inherited from the LAN Manager network software, while Windows NT clients and servers use a newer encryption system.</para>
1082
1083
1084 <para>If encrypted passwords are supported, Samba stores the encrypted passwords in a file called <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
1085 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967717-0"><primary>smbpasswd file</primary></indexterm>
1086 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967717-1"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>stored by Samba</secondary></indexterm>. By default, this file is located in the <filename>private</filename>
1087 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967719-0"><primary>private directory (Samba distribution)</primary></indexterm> directory of the Samba distribution (<filename>/usr/local/samba/private</filename>). At the same time, the client stores an encrypted version of a user's password on its own system. The plaintext password is never stored on either system. Each system encrypts the password automatically using a known algorithm when the password is set or changed.</para>
1088
1089
1090 <para>When a client requests a connection to an SMB server that supports encrypted passwords (such as Samba or Windows NT), the two computers undergo the following negotiations:</para>
1091
1092
1093 <orderedlist>
1094 <listitem><para>The client attempts to negotiate a protocol with the server.</para></listitem>
1095 <listitem><para>The server responds with a protocol and indicates that it supports encrypted passwords. At this time, it sends back a randomly-generated 8-byte challenge string.</para></listitem>
1096 <listitem><para>The client uses the challenge string as a key to encrypt its already encrypted password using an algorithm predefined by the negotiated protocol. It then sends the result to the server.</para></listitem>
1097 <listitem><para>The server does the same thing with the encrypted password stored in its database. If the results match, the passwords are equivalent and the user is authenticated.</para></listitem>
1098 </orderedlist>
1099
1100 <para>Note that even though the original passwords are not involved in the authentication process, you need to be very careful that the encrypted passwords located inside of the <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
1101 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967721-0"><primary>smbpasswd file</primary><secondary>caution with</secondary></indexterm> file are guarded from unauthorized users. If they are compromised, an unauthorized user can break into the system by replaying the steps of the previous algorithm. The <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967722-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>encrypted</secondary><tertiary sortas="plaintext">vs. plaintext</tertiary></indexterm>
1102 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967722-1"><primary>plaintext passwords</primary></indexterm>
1103 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967722-2"><primary sortas="encryptes passwords">encrypted passwords</primary><secondary sortas="plaintext passwords">vs. plaintext passwords</secondary></indexterm>encrypted passwords are just as sensitive as the plaintext passwords&mdash;this is known as <firstterm>plaintext-equivalent</firstterm> data in the cryptography world. Of course, you should also ensure that the clients safeguard their plaintext-equivalent passwords as well.</para>
1104
1105
1106 <para>You can configure Samba to accept encrypted passwords with the following global additions to <filename>smb.conf</filename>. Note that we explicitly name the location of the Samba password file:</para>
1107
1108
1109 <programlisting>[global]
1110         security = user
1111         encrypt passwords = yes
1112         smb passwd file = /usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd</programlisting>
1113
1114
1115 <para>Samba, however, will not accept any users until the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file has been initialized.</para>
1116
1117
1118 <sect2 role="" label="6.4.1" id="ch06-SECT-4.0.1">
1119 <title>Disabling encrypted passwords on the client</title>
1120
1121
1122 <para>
1123 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967724-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>encrypted</secondary><tertiary>disabling on Windows computers</tertiary></indexterm>While Unix authentication has been in use for decades, including the use of <emphasis>telnet</emphasis> and <emphasis>rlogin</emphasis> access across the Internet, it embodies well-known security risks. Plaintext passwords are sent over the Internet and can be retrieved from TCP packets by malicious snoopers. However, if you feel that your network is secure and you wish to use standard Unix <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> authentication for all clients, you can do so, but you must disable encrypted passwords on those Windows clients that default to using them.</para>
1124
1125
1126 <para>In order to do this, you must modify the Windows registry by installing two files on each system. Depending on the platform involved, the files are either <filename>NT4_PlainPassword.reg</filename> or <filename>Win95_PlainPassword.reg</filename>. You can perform this installation by copying the appropriate <filename>.reg</filename> files from the Samba distribution's <filename>/docs</filename> directory to a DOS floppy, and running it from the Run menu item on the client's Start Menu button. Incidentally, the Windows 95 <filename>.reg</filename> file works fine on Windows 98 as well.</para>
1127
1128
1129 <para>After you reboot the machine, the client will not encrypt its hashed passwords before sending them to the server. This means that the plaintext-equivalent passwords can been seen in the TCP packets that are broadcast across the network. Again, we encourage you not to do this unless you are absolutely sure that your network is secure.</para>
1130
1131
1132 <para>If passwords are not encrypted, you can indicate as much in your Samba configuration file:</para>
1133
1134
1135 <programlisting>[global]
1136         security = user
1137         encrypt passwords = no</programlisting>
1138 </sect2>
1139
1140
1141
1142
1143 <sect2 role="" label="6.4.2" id="ch06-17782">
1144 <title>The smbpasswd File</title>
1145
1146
1147 <para><filename></filename>
1148 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967731-0" class="startofrange"><primary>smbpasswd file</primary></indexterm>Samba stores its encrypted passwords in a file called <filename>smbpasswd</filename>, which by default resides in the <filename>/usr/local/samba/private</filename> directory. The <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
1149 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967742-0"><primary>smbpasswd file</primary><secondary>caution with</secondary></indexterm> file should be guarded as closely as the <filename>passwd</filename> file; it should be placed in a directory to which only the root user has read/write access. All other users should not be able to read from the directory at all. In addition, the file should have all access closed off to all users except for root.</para>
1150
1151
1152 <para>Before you can use encrypted passwords, you will need to create an entry for each Unix user in the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file. The structure of the file is somewhat similar to a Unix <filename>passwd</filename> file, but has different fields. <link linkend="ch06-54128">Figure 6.3</link> illustrates the layout of the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file; the entry shown is actually one line in the file.</para>
1153
1154
1155 <figure label="6.3" id="ch06-54128">
1156 <title>Structure of the smbpasswd file entry (actually one line)</title>
1157
1158 <graphic width="502" depth="177" fileref="figs/sam.0603.gif"></graphic>
1159 </figure>
1160
1161 <para>Here is a breakdown of the individual fields:</para>
1162
1163
1164 <variablelist>
1165 <varlistentry><term>Username</term>
1166 <listitem><para>This is the username of the account. It is taken directly from the system password file.</para></listitem>
1167 </varlistentry>
1168
1169
1170 <varlistentry><term>UID</term>
1171 <listitem><para>This is the user ID of the account. Like the username, it is taken directly from the system password file and must match the user it represents there.</para></listitem>
1172 </varlistentry>
1173
1174
1175 <varlistentry><term>LAN Manager Password Hash</term>
1176 <listitem><para>This is a 32-bit hexadecimal sequence that represents the password Windows 95 and 98 clients will use. It is derived by encrypting the string <literal>KGS!@#$%</literal> with a 56-bit DES algorithm using the user's password (forced to 14 bytes and converted to capital letters) twice repeated as the key. If there is currently no password for this user, the first 11 characters of the hash will consist of the sequence <literal>NO</literal> <literal>PASSWORD</literal> followed by <literal>X</literal> characters for the remainder. Anyone can access the share with no password. On the other hand, if the password has been disabled, it will consist of 32 <literal>X</literal> characters. Samba will not grant access to a user without a password unless the <literal>null</literal> <literal>passwords</literal> option has been set.</para></listitem>
1177 </varlistentry>
1178
1179
1180 <varlistentry><term>NT Password Hash</term>
1181 <listitem><para>This is a 32-bit hexadecimal sequence that represents the password Windows NT clients will use. It is derived by hashing the user's password (represented as a 16-bit little-endian Unicode sequence) with an MD4 hash. The password is not converted to uppercase letters first.</para></listitem>
1182 </varlistentry>
1183
1184
1185 <varlistentry><term>Account Flags</term>
1186 <listitem><para>This field consists of 11 characters between two braces ( [ ] ). Any of the following characters can appear in any order; the remaining characters should be spaces:</para>
1187
1188
1189 <variablelist>
1190 <varlistentry><term>U</term>
1191 <listitem><para>This account is a standard user account.</para></listitem>
1192 </varlistentry>
1193
1194
1195 <varlistentry><term>D</term>
1196 <listitem><para>This account is currently disabled and Samba should not allow any logins.</para></listitem>
1197 </varlistentry>
1198
1199
1200 <varlistentry><term>N</term>
1201 <listitem><para>This account has no password associated with it.</para></listitem>
1202 </varlistentry>
1203
1204
1205 <varlistentry><term>W</term>
1206 <listitem><para>This is a workstation trust account that can be used to configure Samba as a primary domain controller (PDC) when allowing Windows NT machines to join its domain.</para></listitem>
1207 </varlistentry>
1208 </variablelist></listitem>
1209 </varlistentry>
1210
1211
1212 <varlistentry><term>Last Change Time</term>
1213 <listitem><para>This code consists of the characters <literal>LCT-</literal> followed by a hexidecimal representation of the amount of seconds since the epoch (midnight on January 1, 1970) that the entry was last changed.</para></listitem>
1214 </varlistentry>
1215 </variablelist>
1216
1217
1218 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.2.1" id="ch06-SECT-4.1.1">
1219 <title>Adding entries to smbpasswd</title>
1220
1221
1222 <para><filename></filename>
1223 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967757-0"><primary>smbpasswd file</primary><secondary>adding entries to</secondary></indexterm>There are a few ways you can add a new entry to the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file:</para>
1224
1225
1226 <itemizedlist>
1227 <listitem><para>You can use the <firstterm>smbpasswd</firstterm> program with the <literal>-a</literal> option to automatically add any user that currently has a standard Unix system account on the server. This program resides in the <filename>/usr/local/samba/bin</filename> directory.</para></listitem>
1228 <listitem><para>You can use the <firstterm>addtosmbpass</firstterm>
1229 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967763-0"><primary>addtosmbpass executable</primary></indexterm> executable inside the <firstterm>/usr/local/samba/bin</firstterm> directory. This is actually a simple <emphasis>awk</emphasis>
1230 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967764-0"><primary>awk script</primary></indexterm> script that parses a system password file and extracts the username and UID of each entry you wish to add to the SMB password file. It then adds default fields for the remainder of the user's entry, which can be updated using the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> program later. In order to use this program, you will probably need to edit the first line of the file to correctly point to <emphasis>awk</emphasis> on your system.</para></listitem>
1231 <listitem><para>In the event that the neither of those options work for you, you can create a default entry by hand in the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file. The entry should be entirely on one line. Each field should be colon-separated and should look similar to the following:</para>
1232
1233
1234 <programlisting>dave:500:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:[U          ]:LCT-00000000:</programlisting>
1235
1236
1237 <para>This consists of the username and the UID as specified in the system password file, followed by two sets of exactly 32 <literal>X</literal> characters, followed by the account flags and last change time as it appears above. After you've added this entry, you must use the <firstterm>smbpasswd</firstterm> program to change the password for the user.</para></listitem>
1238 </itemizedlist>
1239 </sect3>
1240
1241
1242
1243 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.2.2" id="ch06-SECT-4.1.2">
1244 <title>Changing the encrypted password</title>
1245
1246
1247 <para>
1248 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967765-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>encrypted</secondary><tertiary>changing</tertiary></indexterm>If you need to change the encrypted password in the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file, you can also use the <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
1249 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967766-0"><primary>smbpasswd program</primary><secondary>changing encrypted passwords with</secondary></indexterm> program. Note that this program shares the same name as the encrypted password file itself, so be sure not to accidentally confuse the password file with the password-changing program.</para>
1250
1251
1252 <para>The <filename>smbpasswd</filename> program is almost identical to the <filename>passwd</filename> program that is used to change Unix account passwords. The program simply asks you to enter your old password (unless you're the root user), and duplicate entries of your new password. No password characters are shown on the screen.</para>
1253
1254
1255 <programlisting># <emphasis role="bold">smbpasswd dave</emphasis>
1256 Old SMB password:
1257 New SMB password:
1258 Retype new SMB password:
1259 Password changed for user dave</programlisting>
1260
1261
1262 <para>You can look at the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file after this command completes to verify that both the LAN Manager and the NT hashes of the passwords have been stored in their respective positions. Once users have encrypted password entries in the database, they should be able to connect to shares using encrypted passwords!<filename></filename>
1263 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967737-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967731-0"/></para>
1264 </sect3>
1265 </sect2>
1266
1267
1268
1269
1270
1271 <sect2 role="" label="6.4.3" id="ch06-97004">
1272 <title>Password Synchronization</title>
1273
1274
1275 <para>
1276 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967768-0" class="startofrange"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>synchronizing</secondary></indexterm>
1277 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967768-1" class="startofrange"><primary>synchronizing</primary><secondary>passwords</secondary></indexterm>Having a regular password and an encrypted version of the same password can be troublesome when you need to change both of them. Luckily, Samba affords you a limited ability to keep your passwords synchronized. Samba has a pair of configuration options that can be used to automatically update a user's regular Unix password when the encrypted password is changed on the system. The feature can be activated by specifying the <literal>unix</literal> <literal>password</literal> <literal>sync</literal> global configuration option:</para>
1278
1279
1280 <programlisting>[global]
1281         encrypt passwords = yes
1282         smb passwd file = /usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd
1283
1284         unix password sync = yes</programlisting>
1285
1286
1287 <para>With this option enabled, Samba will attempt to change the user's regular password (as <literal>root</literal>) when the encrypted version is changed with <filename>smbpasswd</filename>. However, there are two other options that have to be set correctly in order for this to work.</para>
1288
1289
1290 <para>The easier of the two is <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>program</literal>. This option simply specifies the Unix command used to change a user's standard system password. It is set to <literal>/bin/passw</literal>d <literal>%u</literal> by default. With some Unix systems, this is sufficient and you do not need to change anything. Others, such as Red Hat Linux, use <filename>/usr/bin/passwd</filename> instead. In addition, you may want to change this to another program or script at some point in the future. For example, let's assume that you want to use a script called <literal>changepass</literal> to change a user's password. Recall that you can use the variable <literal>%u</literal> to represent the current Unix username. So the example becomes:</para>
1291
1292
1293 <programlisting>[global]
1294         encrypt passwords = yes
1295         smb passwd file = /usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd
1296
1297         unix password sync = yes
1298         passwd program = changepass %u</programlisting>
1299
1300
1301 <para>Note that this program will be called as the <literal>root</literal> user when the <literal>unix</literal> <literal>password</literal> <literal>sync</literal> option is set to <literal>yes</literal>. This is because Samba does not necessarily have the plaintext old password of the user.</para>
1302
1303
1304 <para>The harder option to configure is <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal>. The <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal> option works like a Unix chat script. It specifies a series of strings to send as well as responses to expect from the program specified by the <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>program</literal> option. For example, this is what the default <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal> looks like. The delimiters are the spaces between each groupings of characters:</para>
1305
1306
1307 <programlisting>passwd chat = *old*password* %o\n *new*password* %n\n *new*password* %n\n *changed*</programlisting>
1308
1309
1310 <para>The first grouping represents a response expected from the password-changing program. Note that it can contain <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967780-0"><primary>wildcards (*) in password changing program</primary></indexterm>
1311 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967780-1"><primary>* wildcards</primary></indexterm>wildcards (*), which help to generalize the chat programs to be able to handle a variety of similar outputs. Here, <literal>*old*password*</literal> indicates that Samba is expecting any line from the password program containing the letters <literal>old</literal> followed by the letters <literal>password</literal>, without regard for what comes on either side or between them. Once instructed to, Samba will wait indefinitely for such a match. Is Samba does not receive the expected response, the password will fail.</para>
1312
1313
1314 <para>The second grouping indicates what Samba should send back once the data in the first grouping has been matched. In this case, you see <literal>%o\n</literal>. This response is actually two items: the variable <literal>%o</literal> represents the old password, while the <literal>\n</literal> is a newline character. So, in effect, this will "type" the old password into the standard input of the password changing program, and then "press" Enter.</para>
1315
1316
1317 <para>Following that is another response grouping, followed by data that will be sent back to the password changing program. (In fact, this response/send pattern continues indefinitely in any standard Unix <emphasis>chat</emphasis> script.) The script continues until the final pattern is matched.<footnote label="2" id="ch06-pgfId-969009">
1318
1319
1320 <para>This may not work under Red Hat Linux, as the password program typically responds "All authentication tokens updated successfully," instead of "Password changed." We provide a fix for this later in this section.</para>
1321
1322
1323 </footnote></para>
1324
1325
1326 <para>You can help match the response strings sent from the password program with the characters listed in <link linkend="ch06-77246">Table 6.6</link>. In addition, you can use the characters listed in <link linkend="ch06-38512">Table 6.7</link> to help formulate your response.</para>
1327
1328
1329 <table label="6.6" id="ch06-77246">
1330 <title>Password Chat Response Characters </title>
1331
1332 <tgroup cols="2">
1333 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
1334 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
1335 <thead>
1336 <row>
1337
1338 <entry colname="col1"><para>Character</para></entry>
1339
1340 <entry colname="col2"><para>Definition</para></entry>
1341
1342 </row>
1343
1344 </thead>
1345
1346 <tbody>
1347 <row>
1348
1349 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>*</literal></para></entry>
1350
1351 <entry colname="col2"><para>
1352 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967781-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>chat characters for</secondary></indexterm>
1353 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967781-1"><primary>chat characters for passwords</primary></indexterm>Zero or more occurrences of any character.</para></entry>
1354
1355 </row>
1356
1357 <row>
1358
1359 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>" "</literal></para></entry>
1360
1361 <entry colname="col2"><para>Allows you to include matching strings that contain spaces. Asterisks are still considered wildcards even inside of quotes, and you can represent a null response with empty quotes.</para></entry>
1362
1363 </row>
1364
1365 </tbody>
1366 </tgroup>
1367 </table>
1368
1369
1370 <table label="6.7" id="ch06-38512">
1371 <title>Password Chat Send Characters </title>
1372
1373 <tgroup cols="2">
1374 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
1375 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
1376 <thead>
1377 <row>
1378
1379 <entry colname="col1"><para>Character</para></entry>
1380
1381 <entry colname="col2"><para>Definition</para></entry>
1382
1383 </row>
1384
1385 </thead>
1386
1387 <tbody>
1388 <row>
1389
1390 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>%o</literal></para></entry>
1391
1392 <entry colname="col2"><para>The user's old password</para></entry>
1393
1394 </row>
1395
1396 <row>
1397
1398 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>%n</literal></para></entry>
1399
1400 <entry colname="col2"><para>The user's new password</para></entry>
1401
1402 </row>
1403
1404 <row>
1405
1406 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>\n</literal></para></entry>
1407
1408 <entry colname="col2"><para>The linefeed character</para></entry>
1409
1410 </row>
1411
1412 <row>
1413
1414 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>\r</literal></para></entry>
1415
1416 <entry colname="col2"><para>The carriage-return character</para></entry>
1417
1418 </row>
1419
1420 <row>
1421
1422 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>\t</literal></para></entry>
1423
1424 <entry colname="col2"><para>The tab character</para></entry>
1425
1426 </row>
1427
1428 <row>
1429
1430 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>\s</literal></para></entry>
1431
1432 <entry colname="col2"><para>A space</para></entry>
1433
1434 </row>
1435
1436 </tbody>
1437 </tgroup>
1438 </table>
1439
1440
1441 <para>For example, you may want to change your password chat to the following entry. This will handle scenarios in which you do not have to enter the old password. In addition, this will also handle the new <literal>all</literal> <literal>tokens</literal> <literal>updated</literal> <literal>successfully</literal> string that Red Hat Linux sends:</para>
1442
1443
1444 <programlisting>passwd chat = *new password* %n\n *new password* %n\n *success*</programlisting>
1445
1446
1447 <para>Again, the default chat should be sufficient for many Unix systems. If it isn't, you can use the <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal> <literal>debug</literal> global option to set up a new chat script for the password change program. The <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal> <literal>debug</literal> option logs everything during a password chat. This option is a simple boolean, as shown below:</para>
1448
1449
1450 <programlisting>[global]
1451     encrypted passwords = yes
1452     smb passwd file = /usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd
1453
1454     unix password sync = yes
1455     passwd chat debug = yes
1456     log level = 100</programlisting>
1457
1458
1459 <para>After you activate the password chat debug feature, all I/O received by Samba through the password chat will be sent to the Samba logs with a debug level of 100, which is why we entered a new log level option as well. As this can often generate multitudes of error logs, it may be more efficient to use your own script, by setting the <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>program</literal> option, in place of <filename>/bin/passwd</filename> to record what happens during the exchange. Also, make sure to protect your log files with strict file permissions and to delete them as soon as you've grabbed the information you need, because they contain the passwords in plaintext.</para>
1460
1461
1462 <para>The operating system on which Samba is running may have strict requirements for valid passwords in order to make them more impervious to dictionary attacks and the like. Users should be made aware of these restrictions when changing their passwords.</para>
1463
1464
1465 <para>Earlier we said that password synchronization is limited. This is because there is no reverse synchronization of the encrypted <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file when a standard Unix password is updated by a user. There are various strategies to get around this, including NIS and freely available implementations of the <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967787-0"><primary>PAM (pluggable authentication modules)</primary></indexterm>
1466 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967787-1"><primary>pluggable authentication modules (PAM)</primary></indexterm>pluggable authentication modules (PAM) standard, but none of them really solve all the problems yet. In the future, when Windows 2000 emerges, we will see more compliance with the <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967788-0"><primary>LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol)</primary><secondary>replacement for password snychronization</secondary></indexterm>Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), which promises to make password synchronization a thing of the past.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967772-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967768-0"/>
1467 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967772-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967768-1"/></para>
1468 </sect2>
1469
1470
1471
1472
1473
1474 <sect2 role="" label="6.4.4" id="ch06-SECT-4.3">
1475 <title>Password Configuration Options</title>
1476
1477
1478 <para>The options in <link linkend="ch06-68460">Table 6.8</link> will help you work with passwords in Samba.</para>
1479
1480
1481 <table label="6.8" id="ch06-68460">
1482 <title>Password Configuration Options </title>
1483
1484 <tgroup cols="5">
1485 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
1486 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
1487 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
1488 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
1489 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
1490 <thead>
1491 <row>
1492
1493 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
1494
1495 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
1496
1497 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
1498
1499 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
1500
1501 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
1502
1503 </row>
1504
1505 </thead>
1506
1507 <tbody>
1508 <row>
1509
1510 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>encrypt passwords</literal></para></entry>
1511
1512 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
1513
1514 <entry colname="col3"><para>
1515 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969358-0" class="startofrange"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>options for</secondary></indexterm>Turns on encrypted passwords.</para></entry>
1516
1517 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
1518
1519 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1520
1521 </row>
1522
1523 <row>
1524
1525 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>unix password sync </literal></para></entry>
1526
1527 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
1528
1529 <entry colname="col3"><para>If <literal>yes</literal>, Samba updates the standard Unix password database when a user changes his or her encrypted password.</para></entry>
1530
1531 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
1532
1533 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1534
1535 </row>
1536
1537 <row>
1538
1539 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>passwd chat</literal></para></entry>
1540
1541 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (chat commands)</para></entry>
1542
1543 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets a sequence of commands that will be sent to the password program.</para></entry>
1544
1545 <entry colname="col4"><para>See earlier section on this option</para></entry>
1546
1547 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1548
1549 </row>
1550
1551 <row>
1552
1553 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>passwd chat debug</literal></para></entry>
1554
1555 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
1556
1557 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sends debug logs of the password-change process to the log files with a level of 100.</para></entry>
1558
1559 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
1560
1561 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1562
1563 </row>
1564
1565 <row>
1566
1567 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>passwd program</literal></para></entry>
1568
1569 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (Unix command)</para></entry>
1570
1571 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets the program to be used to change passwords.</para></entry>
1572
1573 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>/bin/passwd %u</literal></para></entry>
1574
1575 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1576
1577 </row>
1578
1579 <row>
1580
1581 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>null passwords</literal></para></entry>
1582
1583 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
1584
1585 <entry colname="col3"><para>If <literal>yes</literal>, Samba allows access for users with null passwords.</para></entry>
1586
1587 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
1588
1589 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1590
1591 </row>
1592
1593 <row>
1594
1595 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>smb passwd file</literal></para></entry>
1596
1597 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
1598
1599 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies the name of the encrypted password file.</para></entry>
1600
1601 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>/usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd</literal></para></entry>
1602
1603 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1604
1605 </row>
1606
1607 <row>
1608
1609 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>hosts equiv</literal></para></entry>
1610
1611 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
1612
1613 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies the name of a file that contains hosts and users that can connect without using a password.</para></entry>
1614
1615 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
1616
1617 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1618
1619 </row>
1620
1621 <row>
1622
1623 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>use rhosts</literal></para></entry>
1624
1625 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
1626
1627 <entry colname="col3"><para>.<emphasis>rhosts</emphasis> file that allows users to connect without using a password.</para></entry>
1628
1629 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
1630
1631 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
1632
1633 </row>
1634
1635 </tbody>
1636 </tgroup>
1637 </table>
1638
1639
1640 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.1" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.1">
1641 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969469-0"><primary>unix password sync option</primary></indexterm>
1642 <title>
1643 unix password sync</title>
1644
1645
1646 <para>The <literal>unix</literal> <literal>password</literal> <literal>sync</literal> global option allows Samba to update the standard Unix password file when a user changes his or her encrypted password. The encrypted password is stored on a Samba server in the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file, which is located in <filename>/usr/local/samba/private</filename> by default. You can activate this feature as follows:</para>
1647
1648
1649 <programlisting>[global]
1650         unix password sync = yes</programlisting>
1651
1652
1653 <para>If this option is enabled, Samba changes the encrypted password and, in addition, attempts to change the standard Unix password by passing the username and new password to the program specified by the <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>program</literal> option (described earlier). Note that Samba does not necessarily have access to the plaintext password for this user, so the password changing program must be invoked as <literal>root</literal>.<footnote label="3" id="ch06-pgfId-959675">
1654
1655
1656 <para>This is because the Unix <emphasis>passwd</emphasis> program, which is the usual target for this operation, allows <literal>root</literal> to change a user's password without the security restriction that requests the old password of that user.</para>
1657
1658
1659 </footnote> If the Unix password change does not succeed, for whatever reason, the SMB password will not be changed either.</para>
1660 </sect3>
1661
1662
1663
1664 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.2" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.2">
1665 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969472-0"><primary>encrypt passwords option</primary></indexterm>
1666 <title>
1667 encrypt passwords</title>
1668
1669
1670 <para>
1671 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967797-0"><primary>encrypted passwords</primary><secondary>option for</secondary></indexterm>The <literal>encrypt</literal> <literal>passwords</literal> global option switches Samba from using plaintext passwords to encrypted passwords for authentication. Encrypted passwords will be expected from clients if the option is set to <literal>yes</literal>:</para>
1672
1673
1674 <programlisting>encrypt passwords = yes</programlisting>
1675
1676
1677 <para>By default, Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 3 or above and Windows 98 transmit encrypted passwords over the network. If you are enabling encrypted passwords, you must have a valid <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file in place and populated with usernames that will authenticate with encrypted passwords. (See <link linkend="ch06-17782">Section 6.4.2</link> earlier in this chapter.) In addition, Samba must know the location of the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file; if it is not in the default location (typically <filename>/usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd</filename>), you can explicitly name it using the <literal>smb</literal> <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>file</literal> option.</para>
1678
1679
1680 <para>If you wish, you can use the <literal>update</literal> <literal>encrypted</literal> to force Samba to update the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file with encrypted passwords each time a client connects to a non-encrypted password.</para>
1681
1682
1683 <para>A common strategy to ensure that hosts who need encrypted password authentication indeed receive it is with the <literal>include</literal> option. With this, you can create individual configuration files that will be read in based on OS-type (<literal>%a</literal>) or client name (<literal>%m</literal>). These host-specific or OS-specific configuration files can contain an <literal>encrypted</literal> <literal>passwords</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>yes</literal> option that will activate only when those clients are connecting to the server.</para>
1684 </sect3>
1685
1686
1687
1688 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.3" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.3">
1689 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969475-0"><primary>passwd program option</primary></indexterm>
1690 <title>
1691 passwd program</title>
1692
1693
1694 <para>The <literal>passwd</literal>
1695 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967798-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>passwd program</secondary></indexterm> <literal>program</literal> is used to specify a program on the Unix Samba server that Samba can use to update the standard system password file when the encrypted password file is updated. This option defaults to the standard <emphasis>passwd</emphasis> program, usually located in the <filename>/bin</filename> directory. The <literal>%u</literal> variable is typically used here as the requesting user when the command is executed. The actual handling of input and output to this program during execution is handled through the <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal> option. <link linkend="ch06-97004">Section 6.4.3</link>, earlier in this chapter, covers this option in detail.</para>
1696 </sect3>
1697
1698
1699
1700 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.4" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.4">
1701 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969476-0"><primary>passwd chat option</primary></indexterm>
1702 <title>
1703 passwd chat</title>
1704
1705
1706 <para>This option specifies a series of send/response strings similar to a Unix chat script, which are used to interface with the password-changing program on the Samba server. <link linkend="ch06-97004">Section 6.4.3</link>, earlier in this chapter, covers this option in detail.</para>
1707 </sect3>
1708
1709
1710
1711 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.5" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.5">
1712 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969477-0"><primary>passwd chat debug option</primary></indexterm>
1713 <title>
1714 passwd chat debug</title>
1715
1716
1717 <para>If set to <literal>yes</literal>, the <literal>passwd</literal> <literal>chat</literal> <literal>debug</literal> global option logs everything sent or received by Samba during a password chat. All the I/O received by Samba through the password chat is sent to the Samba logs with a debug level of 100; you will need to specify <literal>log</literal> <literal>level</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>100</literal> in order for the information to be recorded. <link linkend="ch06-97004">Section 6.4.3</link> earlier in this chapter, describes this option in more detail. Be aware that if you do set this option, the plaintext passwords will be visible in the debugging logs, which could be a security hazard if they are not properly secured.</para>
1718 </sect3>
1719
1720
1721
1722 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.6" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.6">
1723 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969478-0"><primary>password level option</primary></indexterm>
1724 <title>
1725 password level</title>
1726
1727
1728 <para>With SMB, non-encrypted (or plaintext) passwords are sent with capital letters, just like the usernames mentioned previously. Many Unix users, however, choose passwords with both uppercase and lowercase letters. Samba, by default, only attempts to match the password entirely in lowercase letters, and not capitalizing the first letter.</para>
1729
1730
1731 <para>Like <literal>username</literal> <literal>level</literal>, there is a <literal>password</literal> <literal>level</literal> option that can be used to attempt various permutations of the password with capital letters. This option takes an integer value that specifies how many letters in the password should be capitalized when attempting to connect to a share. You can specify this options as follows:</para>
1732
1733
1734 <programlisting>[global]
1735         password level = 3</programlisting>
1736
1737
1738 <para>In this case, Samba will then attempt all permutations of the password it can compute having three capital letters. The larger the number, the more computations Samba will have to perform to match the password, and the longer a connection to a specific share may take.</para>
1739 </sect3>
1740
1741
1742
1743 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.7" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.7">
1744 <title>null passwords</title>
1745
1746
1747 <para>This global option tells Samba whether or not to allow access from users that have <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967801-0"><primary>null passwords</primary></indexterm>
1748 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967801-1"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>null</secondary></indexterm>null passwords (encrypted or non-encrypted) set in their accounts. The default value is <literal>no</literal>. You can override it as follows:</para>
1749
1750
1751 <programlisting>null passwords = yes</programlisting>
1752
1753
1754 <para>We highly recommend against doing so unless you are familiar with the security risks this option can present to your system, including inadvertent access to system users (such as <filename>bin</filename>) in the system password file who have null passwords set.</para>
1755 </sect3>
1756
1757
1758
1759 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.8" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.8">
1760 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969483-0"><primary>smb passwd file option</primary></indexterm>
1761 <title>
1762 smb passwd file</title>
1763
1764
1765 <para>
1766 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968245-0"><primary>smbpasswd file</primary><secondary>option for location of</secondary></indexterm>This global option identifies the location of the encrypted password database. By default, it is set to <filename>/usr/local/samba/private/smbpasswd</filename>. You can override it as follows:</para>
1767
1768
1769 <programlisting>[global]
1770         smb passwd file = /etc/smbpasswd</programlisting>
1771
1772
1773 <para>This location, for example, is common on many Red Hat distributions.</para>
1774 </sect3>
1775
1776
1777
1778 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.9" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.9">
1779 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969486-0"><primary>hosts equiv option</primary></indexterm>
1780 <title>
1781 hosts equiv</title>
1782
1783
1784 <para>This global option specifies the name of a standard Unix <filename>hosts.equiv</filename> file that will allow hosts or users to access shares without specifying a password. You can specify the location of such a file as follows:</para>
1785
1786
1787 <programlisting>[global]
1788         hosts equiv = /etc/hosts.equiv</programlisting>
1789
1790
1791 <para>The default value for this option does not specify any <filename>hosts.equiv</filename> file. Because using such a file is essentially a huge security risk, we highly recommend that you do not use this option unless you are confident in the security of your network.</para>
1792 </sect3>
1793
1794
1795
1796 <sect3 role="" label="6.4.4.10" id="ch06-SECT-4.3.10">
1797 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969487-0"><primary>use rhosts option</primary></indexterm>
1798 <title>
1799 use rhosts</title>
1800
1801
1802 <para>This global option specifies the name of a standard Unix user's <filename>.rhosts</filename> file that will allow foreign hosts to access <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967803-0"><primary>shares</primary><secondary>access to</secondary><tertiary sortas="foreign hosts, option for">by foreign hosts, option for</tertiary></indexterm>shares without specifying a password. You can specify the location of such a file as follows:</para>
1803
1804
1805 <programlisting>[global]
1806         use rhosts = /home/dave/.rhosts</programlisting>
1807
1808
1809 <para>The default value for this option does not specify any <filename>.rhosts</filename> file. Like the <literal>hosts</literal> <literal>equiv</literal> option above, using such a file is a security risk. We highly recommend that you do use this option unless you are confident in the security of<indexterm id="ch06-idx-968233-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-969358-0"/> your network.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-968235-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967574-0"/></para>
1810 </sect3>
1811 </sect2>
1812 </sect1>
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822 <sect1 role="" label="6.5" id="ch06-23084">
1823 <title>Windows Domains</title>
1824
1825
1826 <para>
1827 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967533-0" class="startofrange"><primary>domains</primary><secondary>Windows</secondary></indexterm>
1828 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967533-1" class="startofrange"><primary>Windows 95/98</primary><secondary>domains</secondary></indexterm>
1829 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967533-2" class="startofrange"><primary>Windows NT</primary><secondary>domains</secondary></indexterm>Now that you are comfortable with users and passwords on a Samba server, we can show you how to set up Samba to become a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967819-0"><primary>PDC (primary domain controller)</primary><secondary>Samba, setting up as</secondary></indexterm>primary domain controller for Windows 95/98 and NT machines. Why use domains? The answer probably isn't obvious until you look behind the scenes, especially with Windows 95/98.</para>
1830
1831
1832 <para>Recall that with traditional workgroups, Windows 95/98 simply accepts each username and password that you enter when logging on to the system. There are no unauthorized users with Windows 95/98; if a new user logs on, the operating system simply asks for a new password and authenticates the user against that password from then on. The only time that Windows 95/98 attempts to use the password you entered is when connecting to another share.</para>
1833
1834
1835 <para>
1836 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967805-0"><primary>domain logons</primary></indexterm>Domain logons, on the other hand, are similar to Unix systems. In order to log on to the domain, a valid username and password must be presented at startup, which is then authenticated against the primary domain controller's password database. If the password is invalid, the user is immediately notified and they cannot log on to the domain.</para>
1837
1838
1839 <para>There's more good news: once you have successfully logged on to the domain, you can access any of the shares in the domain to which you have rights without having to reauthenticate yourself. More precisely, the primary domain controller returns a token to the client machine that allows it to access any share without consulting the PDC again. Although you probably won't notice the shift, this can be beneficial in cutting down network traffic. (You can disable this behavior if you wish by using the <literal>revalidate</literal> option.)</para>
1840
1841
1842 <sect2 role="" label="6.5.1" id="ch06-36822">
1843 <title>Configuring Samba for Windows Domain Logons</title>
1844
1845
1846 <para>If you wish to allow Samba to act as a domain controller, use the following sections to configure Samba and your clients to allow domain access.</para>
1847
1848
1849 <tip role="ora">
1850 <para>If you would like more information on how to set up domains, see the <filename>DOMAINS.TXT</filename> file that comes with the Samba distribution.</para>
1851
1852 </tip>
1853
1854 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.1.1" id="ch06-SECT-5.1.1">
1855 <title>Windows 95/98 clients</title>
1856
1857
1858 <para>
1859 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967815-0"><primary>Windows 95/98</primary><secondary>domain logons, configuring</secondary></indexterm>Setting up Samba as a PDC for Windows 95/98 clients is somewhat anticlimactic. All you really need to do on the server side is ensure that:</para>
1860
1861
1862 <itemizedlist>
1863 <listitem><para>Samba is the only primary domain controller for the current workgroup.</para></listitem>
1864 <listitem><para>There is a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967817-0"><primary>WINS (Windows Internet Name Service)</primary><secondary>server</secondary><tertiary>configuring  Windows domain logons and</tertiary></indexterm>WINS server available on the network, either a Samba machine or a Windows NT server. (See <link linkend="SAMBA-CH-7">Chapter 7</link>, for more information on WINS.)</para></listitem>
1865 <listitem><para>Samba is using user-level security (i.e., it doesn't hand off password authentication to anyone else). You do not want to use domain-level security if Samba itself is acting as the PDC.</para></listitem>
1866 </itemizedlist>
1867
1868 <para>At that point, you can insert the following options into your Samba configuration file:</para>
1869
1870
1871 <programlisting>[global]
1872         workgroup = SIMPLE
1873         domain logons = yes
1874
1875 # Be sure to set user-level security!
1876
1877         security = user
1878
1879 # Be sure to become the primary domain controller!
1880
1881         os level = 34
1882         local master = yes
1883         preferred master = yes
1884         domain master = yes</programlisting>
1885
1886
1887 <para>The <literal>domain</literal> <literal>logons</literal> option enables Samba to perform domain authentication on behalf of other clients that request it. The name of the domain will be the same as the workgroup listed in the Samba configuration file, in this case: SIMPLE.</para>
1888
1889
1890 <para>After that, you need to create a non-writable, non-public, non-browesable disk share called <literal>[netlogon]</literal> (it does not matter where this share points to as long as each Windows client can connect to it):</para>
1891
1892
1893 <programlisting>[netlogon]
1894         comment = The domain logon service
1895         path = /export/samba/logon
1896         public = no
1897         writeable = no
1898         browsable = no</programlisting>
1899 </sect3>
1900
1901
1902
1903 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.1.2" id="ch06-SECT-5.1.2">
1904 <title>Windows NT clients</title>
1905
1906
1907 <para>
1908 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967816-0"><primary>Windows NT</primary><secondary>configuring domain logons</secondary></indexterm>If you have Window NT clients on your system, there are a few more steps that need to be taken in order for Samba to act as their primary domain controller.</para>
1909
1910
1911 <warning role="ora">
1912 <para>You will need to use at least <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967821-0"><primary>Samba</primary><secondary>version 2.1</secondary><tertiary>PDC functionality and</tertiary></indexterm>
1913 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967821-1"><primary>PDC (primary domain controller)</primary><secondary>Samba 2.1 and</secondary></indexterm>
1914 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967821-2"><primary>Windows NT</primary><secondary>user authentication and</secondary></indexterm>Samba 2.1 to ensure that PDC functionality for Windows NT clients is present. Prior to Samba 2.1, only limited user authentication for NT clients was present. At the time this book went to press, Samba 2.0.5 was the latest version, but Samba  2.1 was available through CVS download. Instructions on downloading alpha versions of Samba are given in <link linkend="SAMBA-AP-E">Appendix E</link>.</para>
1915
1916 </warning>
1917
1918 <para>As before, you need to ensure that Samba is a primary domain controller for the current workgroup and is using user-level security. However, you must also ensure that Samba is using encrypted passwords. In other words, alter the <literal>[global]</literal> options the previous example to include the <literal>encrypted</literal> <literal>passwords</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>yes</literal> option, as shown here:</para>
1919
1920
1921 <programlisting>[global]
1922         workgroup = SIMPLE
1923         encrypted passwords = yes
1924         domain logons = yes
1925
1926         security = user</programlisting>
1927 </sect3>
1928
1929
1930
1931 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.1.3" id="ch06-SECT-5.1.3">
1932 <title>Creating trust accounts for NT clients</title>
1933
1934
1935 <para>This step is exclusively for Windows NT clients. All NT clients that connect to a primary domain controller make use of <firstterm>trust accounts</firstterm>
1936 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967823-0"><primary>trust accounts, creating</primary></indexterm>. These accounts allow a machine to log in to the <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967824-0"><primary>PDC (primary domain controller)</primary><secondary>trust accounts and</secondary></indexterm>PDC itself (not one of its shares), which means that the PDC can trust any further connections from users on that client. For all intents and purposes, a trust account is identical to a user account. In fact, we will be using standard Unix user accounts to emulate trust accounts for the Samba server.</para>
1937
1938
1939 <para>The login name of a machine's trust account is the name of the machine with a dollar sign appended to it. For example, if our Windows NT machine is named <literal>chimaera</literal>, the login account would be <literal>chimaera$</literal>. The initial password of the account is simply the name of the machine in lowercase letters. In order to forge the trust account on the Samba server, you need to create a Unix account with the appropriate machine name, as well as an encrypted password entry in the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> database.</para>
1940
1941
1942 <para>Let's tackle the first part. Here, we only need to modify the <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> file to support the trust account; there is no need to create a home directory or assign a shell to the "user" because the only part we are interested in is whether a login is permitted. Therefore, we can create a "dummy" account with the following entry:</para>
1943
1944
1945 <programlisting>chimaera$:*:1000:900:Trust Account:/dev/null:/dev/null</programlisting>
1946
1947
1948 <para>Note that we have also disabled the password field by placing a <literal>*</literal> in it. This is because Samba will use the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file to contain the password instead, and we don't want anyone to telnet into the machine using that account. In fact, the only value other than the account name that is used here is the UID of the account for the encrypted password database (1000). This number must map to a unique resource ID on the NT server and cannot conflict with any other resource IDs. Hence, no NT user or group should map to this number or a networking error will occur.</para>
1949
1950
1951 <para>Next, add the encrypted password using the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> command, as follows:</para>
1952
1953
1954 <programlisting># <userinput>smbpasswd -a -m chimaera</userinput>
1955 Added user chimaera$
1956 Password changed for user chimaera$</programlisting>
1957
1958
1959 <para>The <literal>-m</literal> option specifies that a machine trust account is being generated. The <filename>smbpasswd</filename> program will automatically set the initial encrypted password as the NetBIOS name of the machine in lowercase letters; you don't need to enter it. When specifying this option on the command line, do not put a dollar sign after the machine name&mdash;it will be appended automatically. Once the encrypted password has been added, Samba is ready to handle domain logins from a NT client.</para>
1960 </sect3>
1961 </sect2>
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967 <sect2 role="" label="6.5.2" id="ch06-SECT-5.2">
1968 <title>Configuring Windows Clients for Domain Logons</title>
1969
1970
1971 <para>Once you have Samba configured for domain logons, you need to set up your Windows clients to log on to the domain at startup.</para>
1972
1973
1974 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.2.1" id="ch06-SECT-5.2.1">
1975 <title>Windows 95/98</title>
1976
1977
1978 <para>
1979 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969407-0"><primary>domain logons</primary><secondary>configuring Windows 95/98 for</secondary></indexterm>
1980 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969407-1"><primary>domains</primary><secondary>logons</secondary><see>domain logons</see></indexterm>With Windows 95/98, this can be done by raising the Network configuration dialog in the Windows Control Panel and selecting the Properties for "Client for Microsoft Networks." At this point, you should see a dialog box similar to <link linkend="ch06-48609">Figure 6.4</link>. Select the "Logon to Windows Domain" checkbox at the top of the dialog box, and enter the workgroup that is listed in the Samba configuration file as the Windows NT domain. Then click on OK and reboot the machine when asked.</para>
1981
1982
1983 <figure label="6.4" id="ch06-48609">
1984 <title>Configuring a Windows 95/98 client for domain logons</title>
1985
1986 <graphic width="502" depth="359" fileref="figs/sam.0604.gif"></graphic>
1987 </figure>
1988
1989 <warning role="ora">
1990 <para>If Windows complains that you are already logged into the domain,  you probably have an active connection to a share in the workgroup (such as a mapped network drive). Simply disconnect the resource temporarily by right-clicking on its icon and choosing the Disconnect pop-up menu item.</para>
1991
1992 </warning>
1993
1994 <para>When Windows reboots, you should see the standard <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967825-0"><primary>login dialog box, domain logons</primary><secondary>Windows 95/98</secondary></indexterm>login dialog with an addition: a field for a domain. The domain name should already be filled in, so simply enter your password and click on the OK button. At this point, Windows should consult the primary domain controller (Samba) to see if the password is correct. (You can check the log files if you want to see this in action.) If it worked, congratulations! You have properly configured Samba to act as a domain controller for Windows 95/98 machines and your client is successfully connected.</para>
1995 </sect3>
1996
1997
1998
1999 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.2.2" id="ch06-SECT-5.2.2">
2000 <title>Windows NT 4.0</title>
2001
2002
2003 <para>
2004 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967826-0"><primary>domain logons</primary><secondary>configuring Windows NT 4.0 for</secondary></indexterm>To configure Windows NT for domain logons, open the Network configuration dialog in the Windows NT Control Panel. The first tab that you see should list the identification of the machine.</para>
2005
2006
2007 <para>Press the Change button and you should see the dialog box shown in <link linkend="ch06-89804">Figure 6.5</link>. In this dialog box, you can choose to have the Windows NT client become a member of the domain by selecting the radio button marked Domain in the "Member of " box. Then, type in the domain that you wish the client to login to; it should be the same as the workgroup that you specified in the Samba configuration file. Do not check the box marked "Create a Computer Account in the Domain"&mdash;Samba does not currently support this functionality.</para>
2008
2009
2010 <figure label="6.5" id="ch06-89804">
2011 <title>Configuring a Windows NT client for domain logons</title>
2012
2013 <graphic width="502" depth="359" fileref="figs/sam.0605.gif"></graphic>
2014 </figure>
2015
2016 <warning role="ora">
2017 <para>Like Windows 95/98, if NT complains that you are already logged in, you probably have an active connection to a share in the workgroup (such as a mapped network drive). Disconnect the resource temporarily by right-clicking on its icon and choosing the Disconnect pop-up menu item.</para>
2018
2019 </warning>
2020
2021 <para>After you press the OK button, Windows should present you with a small <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967838-0"><primary>login dialog box, domain logons</primary><secondary>Windows NT</secondary></indexterm>dialog box welcoming you to the domain. At this point, you will need to reset the Windows NT machine. Once it comes up again, the machine will automatically present you with a log on screen similar to the one for Windows 95/98 clients. You can now log in using any account that you have already on the Samba server that is configured to accept logins.</para>
2022
2023
2024 <warning role="ora">
2025 <para>Be sure to select the correct domain in the <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967844-0"><primary>domains</primary><secondary>Windows</secondary><tertiary>caution when selecting</tertiary></indexterm>
2026 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967844-1"><primary>Windows NT</primary><secondary>domains</secondary><tertiary>caution when selecting</tertiary></indexterm>Windows NT logon dialog box. Once selected, it may take a moment for Windows NT to build the list of available domains.</para>
2027
2028 </warning>
2029
2030 <para>After you enter the password, Windows NT should consult the primary domain controller (Samba) to see if the password is correct. Again, you can check the log files if you want to see this in action. If it worked, you have successfully configured Samba to act as a domain controller for Windows NT machines.</para>
2031 </sect3>
2032 </sect2>
2033
2034
2035
2036
2037
2038 <sect2 role="" label="6.5.3" id="ch06-SECT-5.3">
2039 <title>Domain Options</title>
2040
2041
2042 <para><link linkend="ch06-53106">Table 6.9</link> shows the options that are commonly used in association with domain logons.</para>
2043
2044
2045 <table label="6.9" id="ch06-53106">
2046 <title>Windows 95/98 Domain Logon Options </title>
2047
2048 <tgroup cols="5">
2049 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
2050 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
2051 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
2052 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
2053 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
2054 <thead>
2055 <row>
2056
2057 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
2058
2059 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
2060
2061 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
2062
2063 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
2064
2065 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
2066
2067 </row>
2068
2069 </thead>
2070
2071 <tbody>
2072 <row>
2073
2074 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>domain logons</literal></para></entry>
2075
2076 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
2077
2078 <entry colname="col3"><para>Indicates whether Windows domain logons are to be used.</para></entry>
2079
2080 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
2081
2082 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2083
2084 </row>
2085
2086 <row>
2087
2088 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>domain group map</literal></para></entry>
2089
2090 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
2091
2092 <entry colname="col3"><para>Name of the file used to map Unix to Windows NT domain groups.</para></entry>
2093
2094 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2095
2096 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2097
2098 </row>
2099
2100 <row>
2101
2102 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>domain user map</literal></para></entry>
2103
2104 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
2105
2106 <entry colname="col3"><para>Name of the file used to map Unix to Windows NT domain users.</para></entry>
2107
2108 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2109
2110 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2111
2112 </row>
2113
2114 <row>
2115
2116 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>local group map</literal></para></entry>
2117
2118 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (fully-qualified pathname)</para></entry>
2119
2120 <entry colname="col3"><para>Name of the file used to map Unix to Windows NT local groups.</para></entry>
2121
2122 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2123
2124 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2125
2126 </row>
2127
2128 <row>
2129
2130 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>revalidate</literal></para></entry>
2131
2132 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
2133
2134 <entry colname="col3"><para>If <literal>yes</literal>, Samba forces users to authenticate themselves with each connection to a share.</para></entry>
2135
2136 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
2137
2138 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
2139
2140 </row>
2141
2142 </tbody>
2143 </tgroup>
2144 </table>
2145
2146
2147 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.3.1" id="ch06-SECT-5.3.1">
2148 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969495-0"><primary>domain logons option</primary></indexterm>
2149 <title>
2150 domain logons</title>
2151
2152
2153 <para>This option configures Samba to accept domain logons as a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968113-0"><primary>PDC (primary domain controller)</primary><secondary>domain option for</secondary></indexterm>primary domain controller. When a client successfully logs on to the domain, Samba will return a special token to the client that allows the client to access domain shares without consulting the PDC again for authentication. Note that the Samba machine must be in user-level security (<literal>security</literal> <literal>=</literal> <literal>user</literal>) and must be the PDC in order for this option to function. In addition, Windows machines will expect a <literal>[netlogon]</literal> share to exist on the Samba server (see <link linkend="ch06-36822">Section 6.5.1</link> earlier in this chapter).</para>
2154 </sect3>
2155
2156
2157
2158 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.3.2" id="ch06-SECT-5.3.2">
2159 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969498-0"><primary>domain group map option</primary></indexterm>
2160 <title>
2161 domain group map</title>
2162
2163
2164 <para>This option specifies the location of a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968114-0"><primary>mapping</primary><secondary>files, options for location of</secondary></indexterm>mapping file designed to translate Windows NT domain group names to Unix group names. The file should reside on the Samba server. For example:</para>
2165
2166
2167 <programlisting>/usr/local/samba/private/groups.mapping</programlisting>
2168
2169
2170 <para>The file has a simple format:</para>
2171
2172
2173 <programlisting><replaceable>UnixGroup = NTGroup</replaceable></programlisting>
2174
2175
2176 <para>An example is:</para>
2177
2178
2179 <programlisting>admin = Administrative</programlisting>
2180
2181
2182 <para>The specified Unix group should be a valid group in the <filename>/etc/group</filename> file. The NT group should be the name to which you want the Unix group to map on an NT client. This option will work only with Windows NT clients.</para>
2183 </sect3>
2184
2185
2186
2187 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.3.3" id="ch06-SECT-5.3.3">
2188 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969499-0"><primary>domain user map option</primary></indexterm>
2189 <title>
2190 domain user map</title>
2191
2192
2193 <para>This option specifies the location of a mapping file designed to translate Unix usernames to Windows NT domain usernames. The file should reside on the Samba server. For example:</para>
2194
2195
2196 <programlisting>/usr/local/samba/private/domainuser.mapping</programlisting>
2197
2198
2199 <para>The file has a simple format:</para>
2200
2201
2202 <programlisting><replaceable>UnixUsername</replaceable> = [\\<replaceable>Domain</replaceable>\\]<replaceable>NTUserName</replaceable></programlisting>
2203
2204
2205 <para>An example entry is:</para>
2206
2207
2208 <programlisting>joe = Joseph Miller</programlisting>
2209
2210
2211 <para>The Unix name specified should be a valid username in the <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> file. The NT name should be the username to which you want to Unix username to map on an NT client. This option will work with Windows NT clients only.</para>
2212
2213
2214 <tip role="ora">
2215 <para>If you would like more information on how Windows NT uses domain usernames and local groups, we recommend Eric Pearce's <citetitle>Windows NT in a Nutshell</citetitle>, published by O'Reilly.</para>
2216
2217 </tip>
2218 </sect3>
2219
2220
2221
2222 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.3.4" id="ch06-SECT-5.3.4">
2223 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969502-0"><primary>local group map option</primary></indexterm>
2224 <title>
2225 local group map</title>
2226
2227
2228 <para>This option specifies the location of a mapping file designed to translate Windows NT local group names to Unix group names. Local group names include those such as Administrator and Users. The file should reside on the Samba server. For example:</para>
2229
2230
2231 <programlisting>/usr/local/samba/private/localgroup.mapping</programlisting>
2232
2233
2234 <para>The file has a simple format:</para>
2235
2236
2237 <programlisting><replaceable>UnixGroup</replaceable> = [BUILTIN\]<replaceable>NTGroup</replaceable></programlisting>
2238
2239
2240 <para>An example entry is:</para>
2241
2242
2243 <programlisting>root = BUILTIN\Administrators</programlisting>
2244
2245
2246 <para>This option will work with Windows NT clients only. For more information, see Eric Pearce's <citetitle>Windows NT in a Nutshell</citetitle> (O'Reilly).</para>
2247 </sect3>
2248
2249
2250
2251 <sect3 role="" label="6.5.3.5" id="ch06-SECT-5.3.5">
2252 <title>revalidate</title>
2253
2254
2255 <para>This share-level option tells Samba to force users to authenticate with <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968116-0"><primary>passwords</primary><secondary>options for</secondary><tertiary>share-level</tertiary></indexterm>
2256 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968116-1"><primary>authentication</primary><secondary>share-level option for</secondary></indexterm>
2257 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968116-2"><primary>users</primary><secondary>share-level option for authentication of</secondary></indexterm>
2258 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968116-3"><primary>revalidation of users</primary></indexterm>passwords each time they connect to a different share on a machine, no matter what level of security is in place on the Samba server. The default value is <literal>no</literal>, which allows users to be trusted once they successfully authenticate themselves. You can override it as:</para>
2259
2260
2261 <programlisting>revalidate = yes</programlisting>
2262
2263
2264 <para>You can use this option to increase security on your system. However, you should weigh it against the inconvenience of having users revalidate themselves to every share.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-968204-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967533-0"/>
2265 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968204-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967533-1"/>
2266 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968204-2" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967533-2"/></para>
2267 </sect3>
2268 </sect2>
2269 </sect1>
2270
2271
2272
2273
2274
2275
2276
2277
2278
2279 <sect1 role="" label="6.6" id="ch06-38153">
2280 <title>Logon Scripts</title>
2281
2282
2283 <para>
2284 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967542-0" class="startofrange"><primary>logon scripts</primary></indexterm>
2285 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967542-1" class="startofrange"><primary>scripts</primary><secondary>logon</secondary></indexterm>
2286 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967542-2" class="startofrange"><primary>domain logons</primary><secondary>scripts for</secondary></indexterm>Samba supports the execution of Windows logon scripts, which are scripts (<indexterm id="ch06-idx-968119-0"><primary sortas="BAT scripts">.BAT scripts</primary></indexterm>
2287 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968119-1"><primary sortas="CMD scripts"> .CMD scripts</primary></indexterm>.BAT or .CMD) that are executed on the client when a user logs on to a Windows domain. Note that these scripts are stored on the Unix side, but are transported across the network to the client side and executed once a user logs on. These scripts are invaluable for dynamically setting up network configurations for users when they log on. The downside is that because they run on Windows, they must use the <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968120-0"><primary>network configuration commands</primary></indexterm>
2288 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968120-1"><primary>resources for further information</primary><secondary>Windows network configuration commands</secondary></indexterm>Windows network configuration commands.</para>
2289
2290
2291 <tip role="ora">
2292 <para>If you would like more information on NET commands, we recommend the following O'Reilly handbooks: <emphasis>Windows NT in a Nutshell</emphasis>, <emphasis>Windows 95 in a Nutshell</emphasis>, and <emphasis>Windows 98 in a Nutshell.</emphasis></para>
2293
2294 </tip>
2295
2296 <para>You can instruct Samba to use a logon script with the <literal>logon</literal> <literal>script</literal> option, as follows:</para>
2297
2298
2299 <programlisting>[global]
2300         domain logons = yes
2301         security = user
2302         workgroup = SIMPLE
2303
2304         os level = 34
2305         local master = yes
2306         preferred master = yes
2307         domain master = yes
2308         logon script = %U.bat
2309
2310 [netlogon]
2311         comment = The domain logon service
2312         path = /export/samba/logon
2313         public = no
2314         writeable = no
2315         browsable = no</programlisting>
2316
2317
2318 <para>Note that this example uses the <literal>%U</literal> variable, which will individualize the script based on the user that is logging in. It is common to customize logon scripts based on the user or machine name that is logging onto the domain. These scripts can then be used to configure individual settings for users or clients.</para>
2319
2320
2321 <para>Each logon script should be stored at the base of the <literal>[netlogon]</literal> share. For example, if the base of the <literal>[netlogon]</literal> share is <filename>/export/samba/logon</filename> and the logon script is <filename>jeff.bat</filename>, the file should be located at <filename>/export/samba/logon/jeff.bat</filename>. When a user logs on to a domain that contains a startup script, he or she will see a small dialog that informs them that the script is executing, as well as any output the script generates in an MS-DOS-like box.</para>
2322
2323
2324 <para>One warning: because these scripts are loaded by Windows and executed on the Windows side, they must consist of DOS formatted <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968122-0"><primary>carriage-returns for scripts</primary></indexterm>
2325 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968122-1"><primary>DOS-formatted carriage returns</primary></indexterm>
2326 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968122-2"><primary>Unix</primary><secondary> carriage returns</secondary></indexterm>carriage-return/linefeed characters instead of Unix carriage returns. It's best to use a DOS- or Windows-based editor to create them.</para>
2327
2328
2329 <para>Here is an example of a logon script that sets the current time to match that of the Samba server and maps two network drives, <literal>h</literal> and <literal>i</literal>, to individual shares on the server:</para>
2330
2331
2332 <programlisting>#  Reset the current time to that shown by the server.
2333 #  We must have the "time server = yes" option in the
2334 #  smb.conf for this to work.
2335
2336 echo Setting Current Time...
2337 net time \\hydra /set /yes
2338
2339 #  Here we map network drives to shares on the Samba
2340 #  server
2341 echo Mapping Network Drives to Samba Server Hydra...
2342 net use h: \\hydra\data
2343 net use i: \\hydra\network</programlisting>
2344
2345
2346 <sect2 role="" label="6.6.1" id="ch06-SECT-6.0.1">
2347 <title>Roaming profiles</title>
2348
2349
2350 <para><firstterm></firstterm>
2351 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968132-0" class="startofrange"><primary>profiles</primary><secondary>roaming</secondary></indexterm>
2352 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968132-1" class="startofrange"><primary>roaming profiles</primary></indexterm>In Windows 95 and NT, each user can have his or her own <firstterm>profile</firstterm>
2353 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968123-0"><primary>profiles</primary></indexterm>. A profile bundles information such as: the appearance of a user's desktop, the applications that appear on the start menus, the background, and other miscellaneous items. If the profile is stored on a local disk, it's called a <firstterm>local profile</firstterm>
2354 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968124-0"><primary>profiles</primary><secondary>local</secondary></indexterm>
2355 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968124-1"><primary>local profiles</primary></indexterm>, since it describes what a user's environment is like on one machine. If the profile is stored on a server, on the other hand, the user can download the same profile to any client machine that is connected to the server. The latter is called a <firstterm>roaming profile</firstterm> because the user can roam around from machine to machine and still use the same profile. This makes it particularly convenient when someone might be logging in from his or her desk one day and from a portable in the field the next. <link linkend="ch06-71393">Figure 6.6</link> illustrates local and roaming profiles.</para>
2356
2357
2358 <figure label="6.6" id="ch06-71393">
2359 <title>Local profiles versus roaming profiles</title>
2360
2361 <graphic width="502" depth="303" fileref="figs/sam.0606.gif"></graphic>
2362 </figure>
2363
2364 <para>Samba will provide roaming profiles if it is configured for domain logons and you provide a tree of directories pointed to by the <literal>logon</literal> <literal>path</literal> option. This option is typically used with one of the user variables, as shown in this example:</para>
2365
2366
2367 <programlisting>[global]
2368         domain logons = yes
2369         security = user
2370         workgroup = SIMPLE
2371         os level = 34
2372         local master = yes
2373         preferred master = yes
2374         domain master = yes
2375
2376         logon path =  \\hydra\profile\%U</programlisting>
2377
2378
2379 <para>We need to create a new share to support the profiles, which is a basic disk share accessible only by the Samba process' user (<literal>root</literal>). This share must be writeable, but should not be browseable. In addition, we must create a directory for each user who wishes to log on (based on how we specified our <literal>logon</literal> <literal>path</literal> in the example above), which is accessible only by that user. For an added measure of security, we use the <literal>directory</literal> <literal>mode</literal> and <literal>create</literal> <literal>mode</literal> options to keep anyone who connects to it from viewing or altering the files created in those directories:</para>
2380
2381
2382 <programlisting>[profile]
2383   comment = User profiles
2384   path = /export/samba/profile
2385   create mode = 0600
2386   directory mode = 0700
2387   writable = yes
2388   browsable = no</programlisting>
2389
2390
2391 <para>Once a user initially logs on, the Windows client will create a <filename>user.dat</filename> or <filename>ntuser.dat</filename> file&mdash;depending on which operating system the client is running. The client then uploads the contents of the desktop, the Start Menu, the Network Neighborhood, and the programs folders in individual folders in the directory. When the user subsequently logs on, those contents will be downloaded from the server and activated for the client machine with which the user is logging on. When he or she logs off, those contents will be uploaded back on the server until the next time the user connects. If you look at the directory listing of a profile folder, you'll see the following:</para>
2392
2393
2394 <programlisting># ls -al
2395
2396 total 321
2397 drwxrwxr-x   9 root  simple    Jul 21 20:44 .
2398 drwxrwxr-x   4 root  simple    Jul 22 14:32 ..
2399 drwxrwx---   3 fred  develope  Jul 12 07:15 Application Data
2400 drwxrwx---   3 fred  develope  Jul 12 07:15 Start Menu
2401 drwxrwx---   2 fred  develope  Jul 12 07:15 cookies
2402 drwxrwx---   2 fred  develope  Jul 12 07:15 desktop
2403 drwxrwx---   7 fred  develope  Jul 12 07:15 history
2404 drwxrwx---   2 fred  develope  Jul 12 07:15 nethood
2405 drwxrwx---   2 fred  develope  Jul 19 21:05 recent
2406 -rw-------   1 fred  develope  Jul 21 21:59 user.dat</programlisting>
2407
2408
2409 <para>The <filename>user.dat</filename> files are binary configuration files, created automatically by Windows. They can be edited with the Profile Editor on a Windows client, but they can be somewhat tricky to get correct. Samba supports them correctly for all clients up to NT 5.0 beta, but they're still relatively new<firstterm></firstterm>
2410 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968138-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-968132-0"/>
2411 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968138-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-968132-1"/>.</para>
2412
2413
2414 <tip role="ora">
2415 <para>Hints and HOWTOs for handling logon scripts are available in the Samba documentation tree, in both <filename>docs/textdocs/DOMAIN.txt</filename> and <filename>docs/textdocs/PROFILES.txt</filename>.<firstterm></firstterm>
2416 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968148-0"><primary>profiles</primary><secondary>roaming</secondary></indexterm>
2417 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968148-1"><primary>roaming profiles</primary></indexterm></para>
2418
2419 </tip>
2420 </sect2>
2421
2422
2423
2424
2425
2426 <sect2 role="" label="6.6.2" id="ch06-SECT-6.0.2">
2427 <title>Mandatory profiles</title>
2428
2429
2430 <para>
2431 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968144-0"><primary>profiles</primary><secondary>mandatory</secondary></indexterm>
2432 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968144-1"><primary>mandatory profiles</primary></indexterm>Users can also have <firstterm>mandatory profiles</firstterm>, which are roaming profiles that they cannot change. For example, with a mandatory profile, if a user adds a command to the Start Menu on Tuesday, it will be gone when he or she logs in again on Wednesday. The mandatory profile is simply a <filename>user.dat</filename> file that has been renamed to <filename>user.man</filename> and made read-only on the Unix server. It normally contains settings that the administrator wishes to ensure the user always executes. For example, if an administrator wants to create a <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968145-0"><primary>fixed user configuration</primary></indexterm>fixed user configuration, he or she can do the following:</para>
2433
2434
2435 <orderedlist>
2436 <listitem><para>Create the read-write directory on the Samba server.</para></listitem>
2437 <listitem><para>Set the <literal>logon</literal> <literal>path</literal> option in the <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis> file to point to this directory.</para></listitem>
2438 <listitem><para>Logon as the user from Windows 95/98 to have the client populate the directory.</para></listitem>
2439 <listitem><para>Rename the resulting <filename>user.dat</filename> to <filename>user.man</filename>.</para></listitem>
2440 <listitem><para>Make the directory and its contents read only.</para></listitem>
2441 </orderedlist>
2442
2443 <para>Mandatory profiles are fairly unusual. Roaming profiles, on the other hand, are one of the more desirable features of Windows that Samba can support.</para>
2444 </sect2>
2445
2446
2447
2448
2449 <sect2 role="" label="6.6.3" id="ch06-SECT-6.1">
2450 <title>Logon Script Options</title>
2451
2452
2453 <para>
2454 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968152-0" class="startofrange"><primary>logon scripts</primary><secondary>options for</secondary></indexterm><link linkend="ch06-46661">Table 6.10</link> summarizes the options commonly used in association with Windows domain logon scripts.</para>
2455
2456
2457 <table label="6.10" id="ch06-46661">
2458 <title>Logon Script Options </title>
2459
2460 <tgroup cols="5">
2461 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
2462 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
2463 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
2464 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
2465 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
2466 <thead>
2467 <row>
2468
2469 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
2470
2471 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
2472
2473 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
2474
2475 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
2476
2477 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
2478
2479 </row>
2480
2481 </thead>
2482
2483 <tbody>
2484 <row>
2485
2486 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>logon script</literal></para></entry>
2487
2488 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (DOS path)</para></entry>
2489
2490 <entry colname="col3"><para>Name of DOS/NT batch file</para></entry>
2491
2492 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2493
2494 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2495
2496 </row>
2497
2498 <row>
2499
2500 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>logon path</literal></para></entry>
2501
2502 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (UNC server and share name)</para></entry>
2503
2504 <entry colname="col3"><para>Location of roaming profile for user</para></entry>
2505
2506 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>\\%N\%U\profile</literal></para></entry>
2507
2508 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2509
2510 </row>
2511
2512 <row>
2513
2514 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>logon drive</literal></para></entry>
2515
2516 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (drive letter)</para></entry>
2517
2518 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies the logon drive for a home directory (NT only)</para></entry>
2519
2520 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>Z</literal>:</para></entry>
2521
2522 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2523
2524 </row>
2525
2526 <row>
2527
2528 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>logon home</literal></para></entry>
2529
2530 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (UNC server and share name)</para></entry>
2531
2532 <entry colname="col3"><para>Specifies a location for home directories for clients logging on to the domain</para></entry>
2533
2534 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>\\%N\%U</literal></para></entry>
2535
2536 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2537
2538 </row>
2539
2540 </tbody>
2541 </tgroup>
2542 </table>
2543
2544
2545 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.3.1" id="ch06-SECT-6.1.1">
2546 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969510-0"><primary>logon script option</primary></indexterm>
2547 <title>
2548 logon script</title>
2549
2550
2551 <para>This option specifies a Windows .BAT or .CMD file with lines ending in carriage-return/line feed that will be executed on the client after a user has logged on to the domain. Each logon script should be stored at the base of a share entitled <literal>[netlogin]</literal> (see <link linkend="ch06-36822">Section 6.5.1</link> for details.) This option frequently uses the <literal>%U</literal> or <literal>%m</literal> variables (user or NetBIOS name) to point to an individual script. For example:</para>
2552
2553
2554 <programlisting>logon script = %U.bat</programlisting>
2555
2556
2557 <para>will execute a script based on the username located at the base of the <literal>[netlogin]</literal> share. If the user who is connecting is <literal>fred</literal> and the path of the <literal>[netlogin]</literal> share maps to the directory <filename>/export/samba/netlogin</filename>, the script should be <filename>/export/samba/netlogin/fred.bat</filename>. Because these scripts are downloaded to the client and executed on the Windows side, they must consist of DOS formatted carriage-return/linefeed characters instead of Unix carriage returns.</para>
2558 </sect3>
2559
2560
2561
2562 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.3.2" id="ch06-SECT-6.1.2">
2563 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969513-0"><primary>logon path option</primary></indexterm>
2564 <title>
2565 logon path</title>
2566
2567
2568 <para>This option provides a location for <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968161-0"><primary>roaming profiles</primary><secondary>option for location of</secondary></indexterm>
2569 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968161-1"><primary>profiles</primary><secondary>roaming</secondary><tertiary>option for location of</tertiary></indexterm>roaming profiles. When the user logs on, a roaming profile will be downloaded from the server to the client and activated for the user who is logging on. When the user logs off, those contents will be uploaded back on the server until the next time the user connects.</para>
2570
2571
2572 <para>It is often more secure to create a separate share exclusively for storing user profiles:</para>
2573
2574
2575 <programlisting>logon path =  \\hydra\profile\%U</programlisting>
2576
2577
2578 <para>For more informaiton on this option, see <link linkend="ch06-38153">Section 6.6</link> earlier in this chapter.</para>
2579 </sect3>
2580
2581
2582
2583 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.3.3" id="ch06-SECT-6.1.3">
2584 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969514-0"><primary>logon drive option</primary></indexterm>
2585 <title>
2586 logon drive</title>
2587
2588
2589 <para>This option specifies the drive letter on an NT client to which the home directory specified with the <literal>logon</literal> <literal>home</literal> option will be mapped. Note that this option will work with Windows NT clients only. For example:</para>
2590
2591
2592 <programlisting>logon home = I:</programlisting>
2593
2594
2595 <para>You should always use drive letters that will not conflict with fixed drives on the client machine. The default is Z:, which is a good choice because it is as far away from A:, C:, and D: as possible.</para>
2596 </sect3>
2597
2598
2599
2600 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.3.4" id="ch06-SECT-6.1.4">
2601 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969517-0"><primary>logon home option</primary></indexterm>
2602 <title>
2603 logon home </title>
2604
2605
2606 <para>This option specifies the location of a user's <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968162-0"><primary>home directory, user's</primary><secondary>logon script option for location of</secondary></indexterm>
2607 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968162-1"><primary>users</primary><secondary>home directory</secondary><tertiary>logon script option for location of</tertiary></indexterm>home directory for use by the DOS NET commands. For example, to specify a home directory as a share on a Samba server, use the following:</para>
2608
2609
2610 <programlisting>logon home = \\hydra\%U</programlisting>
2611
2612
2613 <para>Note that this works nicely with the <literal>[homes]</literal> service, although you can specify any directory you wish. Home directories can be mapped with a logon script using the following command:</para>
2614
2615
2616 <programlisting>NET USE I: /HOME</programlisting>
2617
2618
2619 <para>In addition, you can use the User Environment Profile under User Properties in the Windows NT User Manager to verify that the home directory has automatically been set.<indexterm id="ch06-idx-968155-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-968152-0"/></para>
2620 </sect3>
2621 </sect2>
2622
2623
2624
2625
2626
2627 <sect2 role="" label="6.6.4" id="ch06-SECT-6.2">
2628 <title>Other Connection Scripts</title>
2629
2630
2631 <para>
2632 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968164-0"><primary>scripts</primary><secondary>connection</secondary></indexterm>
2633 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968164-1"><primary>connections</primary><secondary>scripts for</secondary></indexterm>After a user successfully makes a connection to any Samba share, you may want the Samba server to execute a program on its side to prepare the share for use. Samba allows scripts to be executed before and after someone connects to a share. You do not need to be using Windows domains to take advantage of the options. <link linkend="ch06-67528">Table 6.11</link> introduces some of the configuration options provided for setting up users.</para>
2634
2635
2636 <table label="6.11" id="ch06-67528">
2637 <title>Connection Script Options </title>
2638
2639 <tgroup cols="5">
2640 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
2641 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
2642 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
2643 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
2644 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
2645 <thead>
2646 <row>
2647
2648 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
2649
2650 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
2651
2652 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
2653
2654 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
2655
2656 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
2657
2658 </row>
2659
2660 </thead>
2661
2662 <tbody>
2663 <row>
2664
2665 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>root preexec</literal></para></entry>
2666
2667 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (Unix command)</para></entry>
2668
2669 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets a command to run as <literal>root</literal>, before connecting to the share.</para></entry>
2670
2671 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2672
2673 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
2674
2675 </row>
2676
2677 <row>
2678
2679 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>preexec (exec)</literal></para></entry>
2680
2681 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (Unix command)</para></entry>
2682
2683 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets a Unix command to run as the user before connecting to the share.</para></entry>
2684
2685 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2686
2687 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
2688
2689 </row>
2690
2691 <row>
2692
2693 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>postexec</literal></para></entry>
2694
2695 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (Unix command)</para></entry>
2696
2697 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets a Unix command to run as the user after disconnecting from the share.</para></entry>
2698
2699 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2700
2701 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
2702
2703 </row>
2704
2705 <row>
2706
2707 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>root postexec</literal></para></entry>
2708
2709 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (Unix command)</para></entry>
2710
2711 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets a Unix command to run as <literal>root</literal> after disconnecting from the share.</para></entry>
2712
2713 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2714
2715 <entry colname="col5"><para>Share</para></entry>
2716
2717 </row>
2718
2719 </tbody>
2720 </tgroup>
2721 </table>
2722
2723
2724 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.4.1" id="ch06-SECT-6.2.1">
2725 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969520-0"><primary>root preexec option</primary></indexterm>
2726 <title>
2727 root preexec</title>
2728
2729
2730 <para>The first form of the logon command is called <literal>root</literal> <literal>preexec</literal>. This option specifies a Unix command as its value that will be run <emphasis>as the root user</emphasis> before any connection to a share is completed. You should use this option specifically for performing actions that require <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968166-0"><primary>root user</primary></indexterm>
2731 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968166-1"><primary>privileges, option for</primary></indexterm>root privilege. For example, <literal>root</literal> <literal>preexec</literal> can be used to mount CD-ROMs for a share that makes them available to the clients, or to create necessary directories. If no <literal>root</literal> <literal>preexec</literal> option is specified, there is no default action. Here is an example of how you can use the command to mount a CD-ROM:</para>
2732
2733
2734 <programlisting>[homes]
2735         browseable = no
2736         writeable = yes
2737         root preexec = /etc/mount /dev/cdrom2</programlisting>
2738
2739
2740 <para>Remember that these commands will be run as the root user. Therefore, in order to ensure security, users should never be able to modify the target of the <literal>root</literal> <literal>preexec</literal> command.</para>
2741 </sect3>
2742
2743
2744
2745 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.4.2" id="ch06-SECT-6.2.2">
2746 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969523-0"><primary>preexec option</primary></indexterm>
2747 <title>
2748 preexec</title>
2749
2750
2751 <para>The next option run before logon is the <literal>preexec</literal> option, sometimes just called <literal>exec</literal>. This is an ordinary unprivileged command run by Samba as the user specified by the variable <literal>%u</literal>. For example, a common use of this option is to perform <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968167-0"><primary>log files/logging</primary><secondary>options for</secondary></indexterm>logging, such as the following:</para>
2752
2753
2754 <programlisting>[homes]
2755 <userinput>preexec = echo "%u connected to %S from %m (%I)\" &gt;&gt;/tmp/.log</userinput></programlisting>
2756
2757
2758 <para>Be warned that any information the command sends to standard output will not be seen by the user, but is instead thrown away. If you intend to use a <literal>preexec</literal> script, you should ensure that it will run correctly before having Samba invoke it.</para>
2759 </sect3>
2760
2761
2762
2763 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.4.3" id="ch06-SECT-6.2.3">
2764 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969524-0"><primary>postexec option</primary></indexterm>
2765 <title>
2766 postexec</title>
2767
2768
2769 <para>Once the user disconnects from the share, the command specified with <literal>postexec</literal> is run as the user on the Samba server to do any necessary cleanup. This option is essentially the same as the <literal>preexec</literal> option. Again, remember that the command is run as the user represented by <literal>%u</literal> and any information sent to standard output will be ignored.</para>
2770 </sect3>
2771
2772
2773
2774 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.4.4" id="ch06-SECT-6.2.4">
2775 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969525-0"><primary>root postexec option</primary></indexterm>
2776 <title>
2777 root postexec</title>
2778
2779
2780 <para>Following the <literal>postexec</literal> option, the <literal>root</literal> <literal>postexec</literal> command is run, if one has been specified. Again, this option specifies a Unix command as its value that will be run <emphasis>as the</emphasis> <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968179-0"><primary>root user</primary></indexterm>
2781 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968179-1"><primary>privileges, option for</primary></indexterm><emphasis>root user</emphasis> before disconnecting from a share. You should use this option specifically for performing actions that require root privilege.</para>
2782 </sect3>
2783 </sect2>
2784
2785
2786
2787
2788
2789 <sect2 role="" label="6.6.5" id="ch06-SECT-6.3">
2790 <title>Working with NIS and NFS</title>
2791
2792
2793 <para>Finally, Samba has the ability to work with <indexterm id="ch06-idx-968184-0"><primary>NIS/NIS+ protocol</primary><secondary>how Samba works with</secondary></indexterm>NIS and NIS+. If there is more than one file server, and each runs Samba, it may be desirable to have the SMB client connect to the server whose disks actually house the user's home directory. It isn't normally a good idea to ship files across the network once via NFS to a Samba server, only to be sent across the network once again to the client via SMB. (For one thing, it's slow&mdash;about 30 percent of normal Samba speed). Therefore, there are a pair of options to tell Samba that NIS knows the name of the right server and indicate in which NIS map the information lives.</para>
2794
2795
2796 <para><link linkend="ch06-27466">Table 6.12</link> introduces some of the other configuration options specifically for setting up users.</para>
2797
2798
2799 <table label="6.12" id="ch06-27466">
2800 <title>NIS Options </title>
2801
2802 <tgroup cols="5">
2803 <colspec colnum="1" colname="col1"/>
2804 <colspec colnum="2" colname="col2"/>
2805 <colspec colnum="3" colname="col3"/>
2806 <colspec colnum="4" colname="col4"/>
2807 <colspec colnum="5" colname="col5"/>
2808 <thead>
2809 <row>
2810
2811 <entry colname="col1"><para>Option</para></entry>
2812
2813 <entry colname="col2"><para>Parameters</para></entry>
2814
2815 <entry colname="col3"><para>Function</para></entry>
2816
2817 <entry colname="col4"><para>Default</para></entry>
2818
2819 <entry colname="col5"><para>Scope</para></entry>
2820
2821 </row>
2822
2823 </thead>
2824
2825 <tbody>
2826 <row>
2827
2828 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>nis homedir</literal></para></entry>
2829
2830 <entry colname="col2"><para>boolean</para></entry>
2831
2832 <entry colname="col3"><para>If <literal>yes</literal>, use NIS instead of <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> to look up the path of a user's home directory</para></entry>
2833
2834 <entry colname="col4"><para><literal>no</literal></para></entry>
2835
2836 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2837
2838 </row>
2839
2840 <row>
2841
2842 <entry colname="col1"><para><literal>homedir map</literal></para></entry>
2843
2844 <entry colname="col2"><para>string (NIS map name)</para></entry>
2845
2846 <entry colname="col3"><para>Sets the NIS map to use to look up a user's home directory</para></entry>
2847
2848 <entry colname="col4"><para>None</para></entry>
2849
2850 <entry colname="col5"><para>Global</para></entry>
2851
2852 </row>
2853
2854 </tbody>
2855 </tgroup>
2856 </table>
2857
2858
2859 <sect3 role="" label="6.6.5.1" id="ch06-SECT-6.3.1">
2860 <title>nis homedir and homedir map</title>
2861
2862
2863 <para>The <literal>nis</literal>
2864 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969528-0"><primary>nis homedir option</primary></indexterm>
2865 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-969528-1"><primary>homedir map option</primary></indexterm> <literal>homedir</literal> and <literal>homedir</literal> <literal>map</literal> options are for Samba servers on network sites where Unix home directories are provided using NFS, the automounter, and NIS (Yellow Pages).</para>
2866
2867
2868 <para>The <literal>nis</literal> <literal>homedir</literal> option indicates that the home directory server for the user needs to be looked up in NIS. The <literal>homedir</literal> <literal>map</literal> option tells Samba what NIS map to look in for the server that has the user's home directory. The server needs to be a Samba server, so the client can do an SMB connect to it, and the other Samba servers need to have NIS installed so they can do the lookup.</para>
2869
2870
2871 <para>For example, if user <literal>joe</literal> asks for a share called <literal>[joe]</literal>, and the <literal>nis</literal> <literal>homedir</literal> option is set to <literal>yes</literal>, Samba will look in the file specified by <literal>homedir</literal> <literal>map</literal> for a home directory for <literal>joe</literal>. If it finds one, Samba will return the associated machine name to the client. The client will then try to connect to <emphasis>that</emphasis> machine and get the share from there. Enabling NIS lookups looks<indexterm id="ch06-idx-967545-0" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967542-0"/>
2872 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967545-1" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967542-1"/>
2873 <indexterm id="ch06-idx-967545-2" class="endofrange" startref="ch06-idx-967542-2"/> like the following:</para>
2874
2875
2876 <programlisting>[globals]
2877         nis homedir = yes
2878         homedir map = amd.map</programlisting>
2879 </sect3>
2880 </sect2>
2881 </sect1>
2882 </chapter>