docs: Update doc to use absolute path for 'dedicated keytab file'
[sfrench/samba-autobuild/.git] / docs-xml / manpages / smb.conf.5.xml
1 <refentry id="smb.conf.5" xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2003/XInclude"
2                          xmlns:samba="http://www.samba.org/samba/DTD/samba-doc">
3         
4 <refmeta>
5         <refentrytitle>smb.conf</refentrytitle>
6         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum>
7         <refmiscinfo class="source">Samba</refmiscinfo>
8         <refmiscinfo class="manual">File Formats and Conventions</refmiscinfo>
9         <refmiscinfo class="version">4.6</refmiscinfo>
10 </refmeta>
11
12
13 <refnamediv>
14         <refname>smb.conf</refname>
15         <refpurpose>The configuration file for the Samba suite</refpurpose>
16 </refnamediv>
17
18 <refsect1>
19         <title>SYNOPSIS</title>
20
21         <para>
22         The <filename moreinfo="none">smb.conf</filename> file is a configuration  file for the Samba suite. <filename
23         moreinfo="none">smb.conf</filename> contains  runtime configuration information for the Samba programs. The
24         complete description of the file format and possible parameters held within are here for reference purposes.
25         </para>
26 </refsect1>
27
28 <refsect1 id="FILEFORMATSECT">
29         <title>FILE FORMAT</title>
30
31         <para>
32         The file consists of sections and parameters. A section begins with the name of the section in square brackets
33         and continues until the next section begins. Sections contain parameters of the form:
34 <programlisting>
35 <replaceable>name</replaceable> = <replaceable>value </replaceable>
36 </programlisting>
37         </para>
38
39         <para>
40         The file is line-based - that is, each newline-terminated line represents either a comment, a section name or
41         a parameter.
42         </para>
43
44         <para>Section and parameter names are not case sensitive.</para>
45
46         <para>
47         Only the first equals sign in a parameter is significant.  Whitespace before or after the first equals sign is
48         discarded.  Leading, trailing and internal whitespace in section and parameter names is irrelevant. Leading
49         and trailing whitespace in a parameter value is discarded. Internal whitespace within a parameter value is
50         retained verbatim.
51         </para>
52
53         <para>
54         Any line beginning with a semicolon (<quote>;</quote>) or a hash (<quote>#</quote>) 
55         character is ignored, as are lines containing only whitespace.
56         </para>
57
58         <para>
59         Any line ending in a <quote><literal>\</literal></quote> is continued on the next line in the customary UNIX fashion.
60         </para>
61
62         <para>
63         The values following the equals sign in parameters are all either a string (no quotes needed) or a boolean,
64         which may be given as yes/no, 1/0 or true/false. Case is not significant in boolean values, but is preserved
65         in string values. Some items such as create masks are numeric.
66         </para>
67
68 </refsect1>
69
70 <refsect1>
71         <title>SECTION DESCRIPTIONS</title>
72
73         <para>
74         Each section in the configuration file (except for the [global] section) describes a shared resource (known as
75         a <quote>share</quote>). The section name is the name of the shared resource and the parameters within the
76         section define the shares attributes.
77         </para>
78
79         <para>
80         There are three special sections, [global], [homes] and [printers], which are described under
81          <emphasis>special sections</emphasis>. The following notes apply to ordinary section descriptions.
82         </para>
83
84         <para>
85         A share consists of a directory to which access is being given plus a description of the access rights
86         which are granted to the user of the service. Some housekeeping options are also specifiable.
87         </para>
88         
89         <para>
90         Sections are either file share services (used by the client as an extension of their native file systems)
91         or printable services (used by the client to access print services on the host running the server).
92         </para>
93         
94         <para>
95         Sections may be designated <emphasis>guest</emphasis> services, in which case no password is required to
96         access them. A specified UNIX <emphasis>guest account</emphasis> is used to define access privileges in this
97         case.
98         </para>
99
100         <para>
101         Sections other than guest services will require a password to access them. The client provides the
102         username. As older clients only provide passwords and not usernames, you may specify a list of usernames to
103         check against the password using the <literal>user =</literal> option in the share definition. For modern clients
104         such as Windows 95/98/ME/NT/2000, this should not be necessary.
105         </para> 
106
107         <para>
108         The access rights granted by the server are masked by the access rights granted to the specified or guest
109         UNIX user by the host system. The server does not grant more access than the host system grants.
110         </para>
111         
112         <para>
113         The following sample section defines a file space share.  The user has write access to the path <filename
114         moreinfo="none">/home/bar</filename>.  The share is accessed via the share name <literal>foo</literal>:
115 <programlisting>
116         <smbconfsection name="[foo]"/>
117         <smbconfoption name="path">/home/bar</smbconfoption>
118         <smbconfoption name="read only">no</smbconfoption>
119 </programlisting>
120         </para>
121
122         <para>
123         The following sample section defines a printable share.  The share is read-only, but printable. That is,
124         the only write access permitted is via calls to open, write to and close a spool file. The <emphasis>guest
125         ok</emphasis> parameter means access will be permitted as the default guest user (specified elsewhere):
126 <programlisting>
127         <smbconfsection name="[aprinter]"/>
128         <smbconfoption name="path">/usr/spool/public</smbconfoption>
129         <smbconfoption name="read only">yes</smbconfoption>
130         <smbconfoption name="printable">yes</smbconfoption>
131         <smbconfoption name="guest ok">yes</smbconfoption>
132 </programlisting>
133         </para>
134
135 </refsect1>
136
137 <refsect1>
138         <title>SPECIAL SECTIONS</title>
139         
140         <refsect2>
141                 <title>The [global] section</title>
142                 
143                 <para>
144                 Parameters in this section apply to the server as a whole, or are defaults for sections that do not
145                 specifically define certain items. See the notes under PARAMETERS for more information.
146                 </para>
147         </refsect2>
148         
149         <refsect2 id="HOMESECT">
150                 <title>The [homes] section</title>
151                 
152                 <para>
153                 If a section called [homes] is included in the configuration file, services connecting clients
154                 to their home directories can be created on the fly by the server.
155                 </para>
156
157                 <para>
158                 When the connection request is made, the existing sections are scanned. If a match is found, it is
159                 used. If no match is found, the requested section name is treated as a username and looked up in the local
160                 password file. If the name exists and the correct password has been given, a share is created by cloning the
161                 [homes] section.
162                 </para>
163                 
164                 <para>
165                 Some modifications are then made to the newly created share:
166                 </para>
167                 
168                 <itemizedlist>
169                         <listitem><para>
170                         The share name is changed from homes to the located username.
171                         </para></listitem>
172
173                         <listitem><para>
174                         If no path was given, the path is set to the user's home directory.
175                         </para></listitem>
176                 </itemizedlist>
177
178                 <para>
179                 If you decide to use a <emphasis>path =</emphasis> line in your [homes] section, it may be useful 
180                 to use the %S macro. For example:
181 <programlisting>
182 <userinput moreinfo="none">path = /data/pchome/%S</userinput>
183 </programlisting>
184                 is useful if you have different home directories for your PCs than for UNIX access.
185                 </para>
186
187                 <para>
188                 This is a fast and simple way to give a large number of clients access to their home directories with a minimum 
189                 of fuss.
190                 </para>
191
192                 <para>
193                 A similar process occurs if the requested section name is <quote>homes</quote>, except that the share
194                 name is not changed to that of the requesting user. This method of using the [homes] section works well if
195                 different users share a client PC.
196                 </para>
197                 
198                 <para>
199                 The [homes] section can specify all the parameters a normal service section can specify, though some make more sense 
200                 than others. The following is a typical and suitable [homes] section:
201 <programlisting>
202 <smbconfsection name="[homes]"/>
203 <smbconfoption name="read only">no</smbconfoption>
204 </programlisting>
205                 </para>
206         
207                 <para>
208                 An important point is that if guest access is specified in the [homes] section, all home directories will be 
209                 visible to all clients <emphasis>without a password</emphasis>.  In the very unlikely event that this is actually
210                 desirable, it is wise to also specify <emphasis>read only access</emphasis>.
211                 </para>
212
213                 <para>
214                 The <emphasis>browseable</emphasis> flag for auto home directories will be inherited from the global browseable 
215                 flag, not the [homes] browseable flag. This is useful as it means setting <emphasis>browseable = no</emphasis> in
216                 the [homes] section will hide the [homes] share but make any auto home directories visible.
217                 </para>
218         </refsect2>
219
220         <refsect2 id="PRINTERSSECT">
221                 <title>The [printers] section</title>
222                 
223                 <para>
224                 This section works like [homes], but for printers.
225                 </para>
226
227                 <para>
228                 If a [printers] section occurs in the configuration file, users are able to connect to any printer 
229                 specified in the local host's printcap file.
230                 </para>
231
232                 <para>
233                 When a connection request is made, the existing sections are scanned. If a match is found, it is used.
234                 If no match is found, but a [homes] section exists, it is used as described above. Otherwise, the requested
235                 section name is treated as a printer name and the appropriate printcap file is scanned to see if the requested
236                 section name is a valid printer share name. If a match is found, a new printer share is created by cloning the
237                 [printers] section.
238                 </para>
239
240                 <para>
241                 A few modifications are then made to the newly created share:
242                 </para>
243
244                 <itemizedlist>
245                         <listitem><para>The share name is set to the located printer name</para></listitem>
246
247                         <listitem><para>If no printer name was given, the printer name is set to the located printer name</para></listitem>
248
249                         <listitem><para>If the share does not permit guest access and no username was given, the username is set
250                                 to the located printer name.</para></listitem>
251                 </itemizedlist>
252
253                 <para>
254                 The [printers] service MUST be printable - if you specify otherwise, the server will refuse 
255                 to load the configuration file.
256                 </para>
257                 
258                 <para>
259                 Typically the path specified is that of a world-writeable spool directory with the sticky bit set on 
260                 it. A typical [printers] entry looks like this:
261 <programlisting>
262 <smbconfsection name="[printers]"/>
263 <smbconfoption name="path">/usr/spool/public</smbconfoption>
264 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">yes</smbconfoption>
265 <smbconfoption name="printable">yes</smbconfoption>
266 </programlisting>
267                 </para>
268
269                 <para>
270                 All aliases given for a printer in the printcap file are legitimate printer names as far as the server is concerned. 
271                 If your printing subsystem doesn't work like that, you will have to set up a pseudo-printcap. This is a file
272                 consisting of one or more lines like this:
273 <programlisting>
274 alias|alias|alias|alias...    
275 </programlisting>
276                 </para>
277
278                 <para>
279                 Each alias should be an acceptable printer name for your printing subsystem. In the [global] section,
280                 specify the new file as your printcap.  The server will only recognize names found in your pseudo-printcap,
281                 which of course can contain whatever aliases you like. The same technique could be used simply to limit access
282                 to a subset of your local printers.
283                 </para>
284
285                 <para>
286                 An alias, by the way, is defined as any component of the first entry of a printcap record. Records are separated by newlines,
287                 components (if there are more than one) are separated by vertical bar symbols (<literal>|</literal>).
288                 </para>
289                 
290                 <note><para>
291                 On SYSV systems which use lpstat to determine what printers are defined on the system you may be able to use
292                 <literal>printcap name = lpstat</literal> to automatically obtain a list of printers. See the
293                 <literal>printcap name</literal> option for more details.
294                 </para></note>
295         </refsect2>
296 </refsect1>
297
298 <refsect1>
299         <title>USERSHARES</title>
300
301         <para>Starting with Samba version 3.0.23 the capability for non-root users to add, modify, and delete
302         their own share definitions has been added. This capability is called <emphasis>usershares</emphasis> and
303         is controlled by a set of parameters in the [global] section of the smb.conf.
304         The relevant parameters are :
305         </para>
306
307         <variablelist>
308                 <varlistentry>
309                 <term>usershare allow guests</term>
310                 <listitem><para>Controls if usershares can permit guest access.</para></listitem>
311                 </varlistentry>
312
313                 <varlistentry>
314                 <term>usershare max shares</term>
315                 <listitem><para>Maximum number of user defined shares allowed.</para></listitem>
316                 </varlistentry>
317
318                 <varlistentry>
319                 <term>usershare owner only</term>
320                 <listitem><para>If set only directories owned by the sharing user can be shared.</para></listitem>
321                 </varlistentry>
322
323                 <varlistentry>
324                 <term>usershare path</term>
325                 <listitem><para>Points to the directory containing the user defined share definitions.
326                 The filesystem permissions on this directory control who can create user defined shares.</para></listitem>
327                 </varlistentry>
328
329                 <varlistentry>
330                 <term>usershare prefix allow list</term>
331                 <listitem><para>Comma-separated list of absolute pathnames restricting what directories
332                 can be shared. Only directories below the pathnames in this list are permitted.</para></listitem>
333                 </varlistentry>
334
335                 <varlistentry>
336                 <term>usershare prefix deny list</term>
337                 <listitem><para>Comma-separated list of absolute pathnames restricting what directories
338                 can be shared. Directories below the pathnames in this list are prohibited.</para></listitem>
339                 </varlistentry>
340
341                 <varlistentry>
342                 <term>usershare template share</term>
343                 <listitem><para>Names a pre-existing share used as a template for creating new usershares.
344                 All other share parameters not specified in the user defined share definition
345                 are copied from this named share.</para></listitem>
346                 </varlistentry>
347         </variablelist>
348
349         <para>To allow members of the UNIX group <literal>foo</literal> to create user defined
350         shares, create the directory to contain the share definitions as follows:
351         </para>
352         <para>Become root:</para>
353 <programlisting>
354 mkdir /usr/local/samba/lib/usershares
355 chgrp foo /usr/local/samba/lib/usershares
356 chmod 1770 /usr/local/samba/lib/usershares
357 </programlisting>
358 <para>Then add the parameters 
359
360 <programlisting>
361         <smbconfoption name="usershare path">/usr/local/samba/lib/usershares</smbconfoption>
362         <smbconfoption name="usershare max shares">10</smbconfoption> # (or the desired number of shares)
363 </programlisting> 
364
365         to the global
366         section of your <filename>smb.conf</filename>. Members of the group foo may then manipulate the user defined shares
367         using the following commands.</para>
368
369         <variablelist>
370                 <varlistentry>
371                 <term>net usershare add sharename path [comment] [acl] [guest_ok=[y|n]]</term>
372                 <listitem><para>To create or modify (overwrite) a user defined share.</para></listitem>
373                 </varlistentry>
374
375                 <varlistentry>
376                 <term>net usershare delete sharename</term>
377                 <listitem><para>To delete a user defined share.</para></listitem>
378                 </varlistentry>
379
380                 <varlistentry>
381                 <term>net usershare list wildcard-sharename</term>
382                 <listitem><para>To list user defined shares.</para></listitem>
383                 </varlistentry>
384
385                 <varlistentry>
386                 <term>net usershare info wildcard-sharename</term>
387                 <listitem><para>To print information about user defined shares.</para></listitem>
388                 </varlistentry>
389         </variablelist>
390 </refsect1>
391         
392 <refsect1>
393         <title>PARAMETERS</title>
394
395         <para>Parameters define the specific attributes of sections.</para>
396
397         <para>
398         Some parameters are specific to the [global] section (e.g., <emphasis>security</emphasis>).  Some parameters
399         are usable in all sections (e.g., <emphasis>create mask</emphasis>). All others are permissible only in normal
400         sections. For the purposes of the following descriptions the [homes] and [printers] sections will be
401         considered normal.  The letter <emphasis>G</emphasis> in parentheses indicates that a parameter is specific to
402         the [global] section. The letter <emphasis>S</emphasis> indicates that a parameter can be specified in a
403         service specific section. All <emphasis>S</emphasis> parameters can also be specified in the [global] section
404         - in which case they will define the default behavior for all services.
405         </para>
406
407         <para>
408         Parameters are arranged here in alphabetical order - this may not create best bedfellows, but at least you can
409         find them! Where there are synonyms, the preferred synonym is described, others refer to the preferred
410         synonym.
411         </para>
412 </refsect1>
413
414 <refsect1>
415         <title>VARIABLE SUBSTITUTIONS</title>
416
417         <para>
418         Many of the strings that are settable in the config file can take substitutions. For example the option
419         <quote>path = /tmp/%u</quote> is interpreted as <quote>path = /tmp/john</quote> if the user connected with the
420         username john.
421         </para>
422
423         <para>
424         These substitutions are mostly noted in the descriptions below, but there are some general substitutions
425         which apply whenever they might be relevant. These are:
426         </para>
427
428         <variablelist>
429                 <varlistentry>
430                 <term>%U</term>
431                 <listitem><para>session username (the username that the client wanted, not
432                         necessarily the same as the one they got).</para></listitem>
433                 </varlistentry>
434                 
435                 <varlistentry>
436                 <term>%G</term>
437                 <listitem><para>primary group name of %U.</para></listitem>
438                 </varlistentry>
439
440                 <varlistentry>
441                 <term>%h</term>
442                 <listitem><para>the Internet hostname that Samba is running on.</para></listitem>
443                 </varlistentry>
444
445                 <varlistentry>
446                 <term>%m</term>
447                 <listitem><para>the NetBIOS name of the client machine (very useful).</para>
448
449                         <para>This parameter is not available when Samba listens on port 445, as clients no longer
450                         send this information. If you use this macro in an include statement on a domain that has
451                         a Samba domain controller be sure to set in the [global] section <parameter>smb ports =
452                         139</parameter>. This will cause Samba to not listen on port 445 and will permit include
453                         functionality to function as it did with Samba 2.x.
454                         </para></listitem>
455
456                 </varlistentry>
457                 
458                 <varlistentry>
459                 <term>%L</term>
460                 <listitem><para>the NetBIOS name of the server. This allows you to change your config based on what
461                         the client calls you. Your server can have a <quote>dual personality</quote>.
462                 </para></listitem>
463                 </varlistentry>
464                 
465                 <varlistentry>
466                 <term>%M</term>
467                 <listitem><para>the Internet name of the client machine.
468                 </para></listitem>
469                 </varlistentry>
470                 
471                 <varlistentry>
472                 <term>%R</term>
473                 <listitem><para>the selected protocol level after protocol negotiation. It can be one of
474                         CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2, NT1,
475                         SMB2_02, SMB2_10, SMB2_22, SMB2_24,
476                         SMB3_00, SMB3_02, SMB3_10, SMB3_11
477                         or SMB2_FF.</para></listitem>
478                 </varlistentry>
479
480                 <varlistentry>
481                 <term>%d</term>
482                 <listitem><para>the process id of the current server
483                         process.</para></listitem>
484                 </varlistentry>
485                 
486                 <varlistentry>
487                 <term>%a</term>
488                 <listitem><para>
489                     The architecture of the remote
490                     machine.  It currently recognizes Samba (<constant>Samba</constant>), 
491                     the Linux CIFS file system (<constant>CIFSFS</constant>), OS/2, (<constant>OS2</constant>),
492                     Mac OS X (<constant>OSX</constant>), Windows for Workgroups (<constant>WfWg</constant>), Windows 9x/ME 
493                     (<constant>Win95</constant>), Windows NT (<constant>WinNT</constant>),
494                     Windows 2000 (<constant>Win2K</constant>),
495                     Windows XP (<constant>WinXP</constant>),
496                     Windows XP 64-bit(<constant>WinXP64</constant>),
497                     Windows 2003 including
498                     2003R2 (<constant>Win2K3</constant>), and Windows
499                     Vista (<constant>Vista</constant>).  Anything else will be known as 
500                     <constant>UNKNOWN</constant>.</para> 
501                 </listitem>
502                 </varlistentry>
503                 
504                 <varlistentry>
505                 <term>%I</term>
506                 <listitem><para>the IP address of the client machine.</para>
507                 <para>Before 4.0.0 it could contain IPv4 mapped IPv6 addresses,
508                         now it only contains IPv4 or IPv6 addresses.</para>
509                 </listitem>
510                 </varlistentry>
511
512                 <varlistentry>
513                 <term>%i</term>
514                 <listitem><para>the local IP address to which a client connected.</para>
515                 <para>Before 4.0.0 it could contain IPv4 mapped IPv6 addresses,
516                         now it only contains IPv4 or IPv6 addresses.</para>
517                 </listitem>
518                 </varlistentry>
519
520                 <varlistentry>
521                 <term>%T</term>
522                 <listitem><para>the current date and time.</para></listitem>
523                 </varlistentry>
524
525                 <varlistentry>
526                 <term>%D</term>
527                 <listitem><para>name of the domain or workgroup of the current user.</para></listitem>
528                 </varlistentry>
529                 
530                 <varlistentry>
531                 <term>%w</term>
532                 <listitem><para>the winbind separator.</para></listitem>
533                 </varlistentry>
534                 
535                 <varlistentry>
536                 <term>%$(<replaceable>envvar</replaceable>)</term>
537                 <listitem><para>the value of the environment variable
538                 <replaceable>envar</replaceable>.</para></listitem>
539                 </varlistentry>
540         </variablelist>
541
542         <para>
543         The following substitutes apply only to some configuration options (only those that are
544         used when a connection has been established):
545         </para>
546
547         <variablelist>
548                 <varlistentry>
549                 <term>%S</term>
550                 <listitem><para>the name of the current service, if any.</para>
551                 </listitem>
552                 </varlistentry>
553         
554                 <varlistentry>
555                 <term>%P</term>
556                 <listitem><para>the root directory of the current service, if any.</para></listitem>
557                 </varlistentry>
558         
559                 <varlistentry>
560                 <term>%u</term>
561                 <listitem><para>username of the current service, if any.</para>
562                 </listitem>
563                 </varlistentry>
564         
565                 <varlistentry>
566                 <term>%g</term>
567                 <listitem><para>primary group name of %u.</para></listitem>
568                 </varlistentry>
569         
570                 <varlistentry>
571                 <term>%H</term>
572                 <listitem><para>the home directory of the user given by %u.</para></listitem>
573                 </varlistentry>
574
575                 <varlistentry>
576                 <term>%N</term>
577                 <listitem><para>
578                         the name of your NIS home directory server.  This is obtained from your NIS auto.map entry. 
579                         If you have not compiled Samba with the <emphasis>--with-automount</emphasis> option, this
580                         value will be the same as %L.</para></listitem>
581                 </varlistentry>
582         
583                 <varlistentry>
584                 <term>%p</term>
585                 <listitem><para>
586                         the path of the service's home directory, obtained from your NIS auto.map entry. The NIS
587                         auto.map entry is split up as <literal>%N:%p</literal>.</para></listitem>
588                 </varlistentry>
589         </variablelist>
590         
591         <para>
592         There are some quite creative things that can be done with these substitutions and other
593         <filename moreinfo="none">smb.conf</filename> options.
594         </para>
595 </refsect1>
596
597 <refsect1 id="NAMEMANGLINGSECT">
598         <title>NAME MANGLING</title>
599         
600         <para>
601         Samba supports <literal>name mangling</literal> so that DOS and Windows clients can use files that don't
602         conform to the 8.3 format. It can also be set to adjust the case of 8.3 format filenames.
603         </para>
604
605         <para>
606         There are several options that control the way mangling is performed, and they are grouped here rather
607         than listed separately. For the defaults look at the output of the testparm program.
608         </para>
609
610         <para>
611         These options can be set separately for each service.
612         </para>
613
614         <para>
615         The options are:
616         </para>
617         
618         <variablelist>
619         
620         <varlistentry>
621                 <term>case sensitive = yes/no/auto</term>
622                 <listitem><para>
623                 controls whether filenames are case sensitive. If they aren't, Samba must do a filename search and match on
624                 passed names. The default setting of auto allows clients that support case sensitive filenames (Linux CIFSVFS
625                 and smbclient 3.0.5 and above currently) to tell the Samba server on a per-packet basis that they wish to
626                 access the file system in a case-sensitive manner (to support UNIX case sensitive semantics). No Windows or
627                 DOS system supports case-sensitive filename so setting this option to auto is that same as setting it to no
628                 for them. Default <emphasis>auto</emphasis>.
629                 </para></listitem>
630                 </varlistentry> 
631
632                 <varlistentry>
633                 <term>default case = upper/lower</term>
634                 <listitem><para>
635                 controls what the default case is for new filenames (ie. files that don't currently exist in the filesystem).
636                 Default <emphasis>lower</emphasis>.  IMPORTANT NOTE: As part of the optimizations for directories containing
637                 large numbers of files, the following special case applies. If the options
638                 <smbconfoption  name="case sensitive">yes</smbconfoption>, <smbconfoption name="preserve case">No</smbconfoption>, and
639                 <smbconfoption name="short preserve case">No</smbconfoption> are set, then the case of <emphasis>all</emphasis>
640                 incoming client filenames, not just new filenames, will be modified. See additional notes below.
641                 </para></listitem>
642                 </varlistentry> 
643         
644                 <varlistentry>
645                 <term>preserve case = yes/no</term>
646                 <listitem><para>
647                 controls whether new files (ie. files that don't currently exist in the filesystem) are created with the case
648                 that the client passes, or if they are forced to be the <literal>default</literal> case. Default
649                 <emphasis>yes</emphasis>.
650                 </para></listitem>
651                 </varlistentry> 
652
653                 <varlistentry>
654                 <term>short preserve case = yes/no</term>
655                 <listitem><para>
656                 controls if new files (ie. files that don't currently exist in the filesystem) which conform to 8.3 syntax,
657                 that is all in upper case and of suitable length, are created upper case, or if they are forced to be the
658                 <literal>default</literal> case. This option can be used with <literal>preserve case = yes</literal> to permit
659                 long filenames to retain their case, while short names are lowercased. Default <emphasis>yes</emphasis>.
660                 </para></listitem>
661                 </varlistentry> 
662         </variablelist>
663         
664         <para>
665         By default, Samba 3.0 has the same semantics as a Windows NT server, in that it is case insensitive
666         but case preserving. As a special case for directories with large numbers of files, if the case
667         options are set as follows, "case sensitive = yes", "case preserve = no", "short preserve case = no"
668         then the "default case" option will be applied and will modify all filenames sent from the client
669         when accessing this share.
670         </para>
671         
672 </refsect1>
673
674 <refsect1>
675         <title>REGISTRY-BASED CONFIGURATION</title>
676
677         <para>
678                 Starting with Samba version 3.2.0, the capability to
679                 store Samba configuration in the registry is available.
680                 The configuration is stored in the registry key
681                  <emphasis><literal>HKLM\Software\Samba\smbconf</literal></emphasis>.
682                 There are two levels of registry configuration:
683         </para>
684
685         <orderedlist continuation="restarts" inheritnum="ignore" numeration="arabic">
686                 <listitem><para>Share definitions stored in registry are used.
687                 This is triggered by setting the global 
688                 parameter <parameter>registry shares</parameter>
689                 to <quote>yes</quote> in <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis>.
690                 </para>
691
692                 <para>The registry shares are loaded not at startup but
693                 on demand at runtime by <emphasis>smbd</emphasis>.
694                 Shares defined in <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis> take
695                 priority over shares of the same name defined in
696                 registry.</para></listitem>
697
698                 <listitem>
699                 <para>Global <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis>
700                 options stored in registry are used. This can be activated
701                 in two different ways:</para>
702
703                 <para>Firstly, a registry only configuration is triggered
704                 by setting
705                 <smbconfoption name="config backend">registry</smbconfoption>
706                 in the [global] section of <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis>.
707                 This resets everything that has been read from config files
708                 to this point and reads the content of the global configuration
709                 section from the registry.
710                 This is the recommended method of using registry based
711                 configuration.</para>
712
713                 <para>Secondly, a mixed configuration can be activated
714                 by a special new meaning of the parameter
715                 <smbconfoption name="include">registry</smbconfoption>
716                 in the [global] section of <emphasis>smb.conf</emphasis>.
717                 This reads the global options from registry with the same
718                 priorities as for an include of a text file.
719                 This may be especially useful in cases where an initial
720                 configuration is needed to access the registry.</para>
721
722                 <para>Activation of global registry options automatically
723                 activates registry shares. So in the registry only case,
724                 shares are loaded on demand only.</para>
725                 </listitem>
726         </orderedlist>
727
728         <para>
729                 Note: To make registry-based configurations foolproof
730                 at least to a certain extent, the use
731                 of <parameter>lock directory</parameter> and
732                  <parameter>config backend</parameter>
733                 inside the registry configuration has been disabled:
734                 Especially by changing the
735                  <parameter>lock directory</parameter> inside the registry
736                 configuration, one would create a broken setup where the daemons
737                 do not see the configuration they loaded once it is active.
738         </para>
739
740         <para>
741                 The registry configuration can be accessed with
742                 tools like <emphasis>regedit</emphasis> or <emphasis>net (rpc)
743                 registry</emphasis> in the key
744                  <emphasis><literal>HKLM\Software\Samba\smbconf</literal></emphasis>.
745
746                 More conveniently, the <emphasis>conf</emphasis> subcommand of the
747                  <citerefentry><refentrytitle>net</refentrytitle>
748                 <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry> utility
749                 offers a dedicated interface to read and write the
750                 registry based configuration locally, i.e. directly
751                 accessing the database file, circumventing the
752                 server.
753         </para>
754
755 </refsect1>
756
757 <refsect1 ID="IDMAPCONSIDERATIONS">
758         <title>IDENTITY MAPPING CONSIDERATIONS</title>
759
760         <para>
761         In the SMB protocol, users, groups, and machines are represented by their security identifiers (SIDs).
762         On POSIX system Samba processes need to run under corresponding POSIX user identities and
763         with supplemental POSIX groups to allow access to the files owned by those users and groups.
764         The process of mapping SIDs to POSIX users and groups is called <emphasis>IDENTITY MAPPING</emphasis>
765         or, in short, <emphasis>ID MAPPING</emphasis>.
766         </para>
767
768         <para>
769         Samba supports multiple ways to map SIDs to POSIX users and groups. The configuration is driven by
770         the <smbconfoption name="idmap config DOMAIN : OPTION"/> option which allows one to specify identity
771         mapping (idmap) options for each domain separately.
772         </para>
773
774         <para>
775         Identity mapping modules implement different strategies for mapping of SIDs to POSIX user and group
776         identities. They are applicable to different use cases and scenarios. It is advised to read the documentation
777         of the individual identity mapping modules before choosing a specific scenario to use. Each identity
778         management module is documented in a separate manual page. The standard idmap backends are
779         tdb (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_tdb</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
780         tdb2 (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_tdb2</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
781         ldap (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_ldap</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
782         rid (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_rid</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
783         hash (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_hash</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
784         autorid (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_autorid</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
785         ad (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_ad</refentrytitle> <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>),
786         nss (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_nss</refentrytitle> <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>), and
787         rfc2307 (<citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_rfc2307</refentrytitle> <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>).
788         </para>
789
790         <para>
791         Overall, ID mapping configuration should be decided carefully. Changes to the already deployed ID mapping
792         configuration may create the risk of losing access to the data or disclosing the data to the wrong parties.
793         </para>
794
795         <para>
796         This example shows how to configure two domains with <citerefentry><refentrytitle>idmap_rid</refentrytitle>
797         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum> </citerefentry>, the principal domain and a trusted domain,
798         leaving the default id mapping scheme at tdb.
799         </para>
800
801         <programlisting>
802         [global]
803         security = domain
804         workgroup = MAIN
805
806         idmap config * : backend        = tdb
807         idmap config * : range          = 1000000-1999999
808
809         idmap config MAIN : backend     = rid
810         idmap config MAIN : range       = 5000000-5999999
811
812         idmap config TRUSTED : backend  = rid
813         idmap config TRUSTED : range    = 6000000-6999999
814         </programlisting>
815 </refsect1>
816
817 <refsect1>
818         <title>EXPLANATION OF EACH PARAMETER</title>
819         
820         <samba:parameterlist>
821                 <!-- The URI below is resolved to local generated version of parameters.all.xml //-->
822                 <!-- WAF build places it in bin/default/docs-xml/smbdotconf/parameters.all.xml //-->
823                 <!-- and we redirect there via use of XML_CATALOG_FILES, see docs-xml/build/catalog.xml.in //-->
824                 <xi:include href="http://www.samba.org/samba/smbdotconf/parameters.all.xml" parse="xml"/>
825         </samba:parameterlist>
826
827 </refsect1>
828
829 <refsect1>
830         <title>WARNINGS</title>
831         
832         <para>
833         Although the configuration file permits service names to contain spaces, your client software may not.
834         Spaces will be ignored in comparisons anyway, so it shouldn't be a problem - but be aware of the possibility.
835         </para>
836
837         <para>
838         On a similar note, many clients - especially DOS clients - limit service names to eight characters.
839         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smbd</refentrytitle> <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry> has no such
840         limitation, but attempts to connect from such clients will fail if they truncate the service names.  For this
841         reason you should probably keep your service names down to eight characters in length.
842         </para>
843
844         <para>
845         Use of the <literal>[homes]</literal> and <literal>[printers]</literal> special sections make life 
846         for an administrator easy, but the various combinations of default attributes can be tricky. Take extreme
847         care when designing these sections. In particular, ensure that the permissions on spool directories are
848         correct.
849         </para>
850
851 </refsect1>
852
853 <refsect1>
854         <title>VERSION</title>
855
856         <para>This man page is correct for version 4 of the Samba suite.</para>
857 </refsect1>
858
859 <refsect1>
860         <title>SEE ALSO</title>
861         <para>
862         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>samba</refentrytitle>
863         <manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smbpasswd</refentrytitle>
864         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smbd</refentrytitle>
865         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>nmbd</refentrytitle>
866         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>winbindd</refentrytitle>
867         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>samba</refentrytitle>
868         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>samba-tool</refentrytitle>
869         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smbclient</refentrytitle>
870         <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>nmblookup</refentrytitle>
871         <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>, <citerefentry><refentrytitle>testparm</refentrytitle>
872         <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para>
873 </refsect1>
874
875 <refsect1>
876         <title>AUTHOR</title>
877         
878         <para>
879         The original Samba software and related utilities were created by Andrew Tridgell. Samba is now developed
880         by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the Linux kernel is developed.
881         </para>
882         
883         <para>
884         The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. The man page sources were converted to YODL format (another 
885         excellent piece of Open Source software, available at <ulink noescape="1" url="ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/">
886         ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/</ulink>) and updated for the Samba 2.0 release by Jeremy Allison.  The conversion
887         to DocBook for Samba 2.2 was done by Gerald Carter. The conversion to DocBook XML 4.2 for Samba 3.0 was done by
888         Alexander Bokovoy.
889         </para>
890 </refsect1>
891
892 </refentry>