sfrench/cifs-2.6.git
12 months agodocs/core-api/mm: fix user memory accessors formatting
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:39 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
docs/core-api/mm: fix user memory accessors formatting

The descriptions of userspace memory access functions had minor issues
with formatting that made kernel-doc unable to properly detect the
function/macro names and the return value sections:

./arch/x86/include/asm/uaccess.h:80: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/include/asm/uaccess.h:139: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/include/asm/uaccess.h:231: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/include/asm/uaccess.h:505: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/include/asm/uaccess.h:530: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/lib/usercopy_32.c:58: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/lib/usercopy_32.c:69: warning: No description found for return
value of 'clear_user'
./arch/x86/lib/usercopy_32.c:78: info: Scanning doc for
./arch/x86/lib/usercopy_32.c:90: warning: No description found for return
value of '__clear_user'

Fix the formatting.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1549549644-4903-3-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agodocs/mm: vmalloc: re-indent kernel-doc comemnts
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:36 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
docs/mm: vmalloc: re-indent kernel-doc comemnts

Some kernel-doc comments in mm/vmalloc.c have leading tab in
indentation.  This leads to excessive indentation in the generated HTML
and to the inconsistency of its layout ([1] vs [2]).

Besides, multi-line Note: sections are not handled properly with extra
indentation.

[1] https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/v4.20/core-api/mm-api.html?#c.vm_map_ram
[2] https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/v4.20/core-api/mm-api.html?#c.vfree

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1549549644-4903-2-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/page_poison: update comment after code moved
Michael S. Tsirkin [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:33 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm/page_poison: update comment after code moved

mm/debug-pagealloc.c is no more, so of course header now needs to be
updated.  This seems like something checkpatch should be able to catch -
worth looking into?

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190207191113.14039-1-mst@redhat.com
Fixes: 8823b1dbc05f ("mm/page_poison.c: enable PAGE_POISONING as a separate option")
Signed-off-by: Michael S. Tsirkin <mst@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agonuma: make "nr_online_nodes" unsigned int
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:29 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
numa: make "nr_online_nodes" unsigned int

Number of online NUMA nodes can't be negative as well.  This doesn't
save space as the variable is used only in 32-bit context, but do it
anyway for consistency.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190201223151.GB15820@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agonuma: make "nr_node_ids" unsigned int
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:26 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
numa: make "nr_node_ids" unsigned int

Number of NUMA nodes can't be negative.

This saves a few bytes on x86_64:

add/remove: 0/0 grow/shrink: 4/21 up/down: 27/-265 (-238)
Function                                     old     new   delta
hv_synic_alloc.cold                           88     110     +22
prealloc_shrinker                            260     262      +2
bootstrap                                    249     251      +2
sched_init_numa                             1566    1567      +1
show_slab_objects                            778     777      -1
s_show                                      1201    1200      -1
kmem_cache_init                              346     345      -1
__alloc_workqueue_key                       1146    1145      -1
mem_cgroup_css_alloc                        1614    1612      -2
__do_sys_swapon                             4702    4699      -3
__list_lru_init                              655     651      -4
nic_probe                                   2379    2374      -5
store_user_store                             118     111      -7
red_zone_store                               106      99      -7
poison_store                                 106      99      -7
wq_numa_init                                 348     338     -10
__kmem_cache_empty                            75      65     -10
task_numa_free                               186     173     -13
merge_across_nodes_store                     351     336     -15
irq_create_affinity_masks                   1261    1246     -15
do_numa_crng_init                            343     321     -22
task_numa_fault                             4760    4737     -23
swapfile_init                                179     156     -23
hv_synic_alloc                               536     492     -44
apply_wqattrs_prepare                        746     695     -51

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190201223029.GA15820@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm,oom: don't kill global init via memory.oom.group
Tetsuo Handa [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:22 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm,oom: don't kill global init via memory.oom.group

Since setting global init process to some memory cgroup is technically
possible, oom_kill_memcg_member() must check it.

  Tasks in /test1 are going to be killed due to memory.oom.group set
  Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 1 (systemd) total-vm:43400kB, anon-rss:1228kB, file-rss:3992kB, shmem-rss:0kB
  oom_reaper: reaped process 1 (systemd), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
  Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init! exitcode=0x0000008b

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
static char buffer[10485760];
static int pipe_fd[2] = { EOF, EOF };
unsigned int i;
int fd;
char buf[64] = { };
if (pipe(pipe_fd))
return 1;
if (chdir("/sys/fs/cgroup/"))
return 1;
fd = open("cgroup.subtree_control", O_WRONLY);
write(fd, "+memory", 7);
close(fd);
mkdir("test1", 0755);
fd = open("test1/memory.oom.group", O_WRONLY);
write(fd, "1", 1);
close(fd);
fd = open("test1/cgroup.procs", O_WRONLY);
write(fd, "1", 1);
snprintf(buf, sizeof(buf) - 1, "%d", getpid());
write(fd, buf, strlen(buf));
close(fd);
snprintf(buf, sizeof(buf) - 1, "%lu", sizeof(buffer) * 5);
fd = open("test1/memory.max", O_WRONLY);
write(fd, buf, strlen(buf));
close(fd);
for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
if (fork() == 0) {
char c;
close(pipe_fd[1]);
read(pipe_fd[0], &c, 1);
memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
sleep(3);
_exit(0);
}
close(pipe_fd[0]);
close(pipe_fd[1]);
sleep(3);
return 0;
}

[   37.052923][ T9185] a.out invoked oom-killer: gfp_mask=0xcc0(GFP_KERNEL), order=0, oom_score_adj=0
[   37.056169][ T9185] CPU: 4 PID: 9185 Comm: a.out Kdump: loaded Not tainted 5.0.0-rc4-next-20190131 #280
[   37.059205][ T9185] Hardware name: VMware, Inc. VMware Virtual Platform/440BX Desktop Reference Platform, BIOS 6.00 04/13/2018
[   37.062954][ T9185] Call Trace:
[   37.063976][ T9185]  dump_stack+0x67/0x95
[   37.065263][ T9185]  dump_header+0x51/0x570
[   37.066619][ T9185]  ? trace_hardirqs_on+0x3f/0x110
[   37.068171][ T9185]  ? _raw_spin_unlock_irqrestore+0x3d/0x70
[   37.069967][ T9185]  oom_kill_process+0x18d/0x210
[   37.071515][ T9185]  out_of_memory+0x11b/0x380
[   37.072936][ T9185]  mem_cgroup_out_of_memory+0xb6/0xd0
[   37.074601][ T9185]  try_charge+0x790/0x820
[   37.076021][ T9185]  mem_cgroup_try_charge+0x42/0x1d0
[   37.077629][ T9185]  mem_cgroup_try_charge_delay+0x11/0x30
[   37.079370][ T9185]  do_anonymous_page+0x105/0x5e0
[   37.080939][ T9185]  __handle_mm_fault+0x9cb/0x1070
[   37.082485][ T9185]  handle_mm_fault+0x1b2/0x3a0
[   37.083819][ T9185]  ? handle_mm_fault+0x47/0x3a0
[   37.085181][ T9185]  __do_page_fault+0x255/0x4c0
[   37.086529][ T9185]  do_page_fault+0x28/0x260
[   37.087788][ T9185]  ? page_fault+0x8/0x30
[   37.088978][ T9185]  page_fault+0x1e/0x30
[   37.090142][ T9185] RIP: 0033:0x7f8b183aefe0
[   37.091433][ T9185] Code: 20 f3 44 0f 7f 44 17 d0 f3 44 0f 7f 47 30 f3 44 0f 7f 44 17 c0 48 01 fa 48 83 e2 c0 48 39 d1 74 a3 66 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 <66> 44 0f 7f 01 66 44 0f 7f 41 10 66 44 0f 7f 41 20 66 44 0f 7f 41
[   37.096917][ T9185] RSP: 002b:00007fffc5d329e8 EFLAGS: 00010206
[   37.098615][ T9185] RAX: 00000000006010e0 RBX: 0000000000000008 RCX: 0000000000c30000
[   37.100905][ T9185] RDX: 00000000010010c0 RSI: 0000000000000000 RDI: 00000000006010e0
[   37.103349][ T9185] RBP: 0000000000000000 R08: 00007f8b188f4740 R09: 0000000000000000
[   37.105797][ T9185] R10: 00007fffc5d32420 R11: 00007f8b183aef40 R12: 0000000000000005
[   37.108228][ T9185] R13: 0000000000000000 R14: ffffffffffffffff R15: 0000000000000000
[   37.110840][ T9185] memory: usage 51200kB, limit 51200kB, failcnt 125
[   37.113045][ T9185] memory+swap: usage 0kB, limit 9007199254740988kB, failcnt 0
[   37.115808][ T9185] kmem: usage 0kB, limit 9007199254740988kB, failcnt 0
[   37.117660][ T9185] Memory cgroup stats for /test1: cache:0KB rss:49484KB rss_huge:30720KB shmem:0KB mapped_file:0KB dirty:0KB writeback:0KB inactive_anon:0KB active_anon:49700KB inactive_file:0KB active_file:0KB unevictable:0KB
[   37.123371][ T9185] oom-kill:constraint=CONSTRAINT_NONE,nodemask=(null),cpuset=/,mems_allowed=0,oom_memcg=/test1,task_memcg=/test1,task=a.out,pid=9188,uid=0
[   37.128158][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9188 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:10324kB, file-rss:504kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.132710][ T9185] Tasks in /test1 are going to be killed due to memory.oom.group set
[   37.132833][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9188 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.135498][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 1 (systemd) total-vm:43400kB, anon-rss:1228kB, file-rss:3992kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.143434][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9182 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:76kB, file-rss:588kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.144328][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 1 (systemd), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.147585][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9183 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:6228kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.157222][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9184 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:6228kB, file-rss:508kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.157259][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9185 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:6228kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.157291][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9186 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:4180kB, file-rss:508kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.157306][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9183 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.157328][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9187 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:4180kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.157452][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9189 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:6228kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.158733][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9190 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:552kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.160083][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9186 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.160187][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9189 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.206941][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9185 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.212300][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9191 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:4180kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.212317][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9190 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.218860][ T9185] Memory cgroup out of memory: Killed process 9192 (a.out) total-vm:14456kB, anon-rss:1080kB, file-rss:512kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.227667][   T54] oom_reaper: reaped process 9192 (a.out), now anon-rss:0kB, file-rss:0kB, shmem-rss:0kB
[   37.292323][ T9193] abrt-hook-ccpp (9193) used greatest stack depth: 10480 bytes left
[   37.351843][    T1] Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init! exitcode=0x0000008b
[   37.354833][    T1] CPU: 7 PID: 1 Comm: systemd Kdump: loaded Not tainted 5.0.0-rc4-next-20190131 #280
[   37.357876][    T1] Hardware name: VMware, Inc. VMware Virtual Platform/440BX Desktop Reference Platform, BIOS 6.00 04/13/2018
[   37.361685][    T1] Call Trace:
[   37.363239][    T1]  dump_stack+0x67/0x95
[   37.365010][    T1]  panic+0xfc/0x2b0
[   37.366853][    T1]  do_exit+0xd55/0xd60
[   37.368595][    T1]  do_group_exit+0x47/0xc0
[   37.370415][    T1]  get_signal+0x32a/0x920
[   37.372449][    T1]  ? _raw_spin_unlock_irqrestore+0x3d/0x70
[   37.374596][    T1]  do_signal+0x32/0x6e0
[   37.376430][    T1]  ? exit_to_usermode_loop+0x26/0x9b
[   37.378418][    T1]  ? prepare_exit_to_usermode+0xa8/0xd0
[   37.380571][    T1]  exit_to_usermode_loop+0x3e/0x9b
[   37.382588][    T1]  prepare_exit_to_usermode+0xa8/0xd0
[   37.384594][    T1]  ? page_fault+0x8/0x30
[   37.386453][    T1]  retint_user+0x8/0x18
[   37.388160][    T1] RIP: 0033:0x7f42c06974a8
[   37.389922][    T1] Code: Bad RIP value.
[   37.391788][    T1] RSP: 002b:00007ffc3effd388 EFLAGS: 00010213
[   37.394075][    T1] RAX: 000000000000000e RBX: 00007ffc3effd390 RCX: 0000000000000000
[   37.396963][    T1] RDX: 000000000000002a RSI: 00007ffc3effd390 RDI: 0000000000000004
[   37.399550][    T1] RBP: 00007ffc3effd680 R08: 0000000000000000 R09: 0000000000000000
[   37.402334][    T1] R10: 00000000ffffffff R11: 0000000000000246 R12: 0000000000000001
[   37.404890][    T1] R13: ffffffffffffffff R14: 0000000000000884 R15: 000056460b1ac3b0

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/201902010336.x113a4EO027170@www262.sakura.ne.jp
Fixes: 3d8b38eb81cac813 ("mm, oom: introduce memory.oom.group")
Signed-off-by: Tetsuo Handa <penguin-kernel@I-love.SAKURA.ne.jp>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, swap: bounds check swap_info array accesses to avoid NULL derefs
Daniel Jordan [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:19 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm, swap: bounds check swap_info array accesses to avoid NULL derefs

Dan Carpenter reports a potential NULL dereference in
get_swap_page_of_type:

  Smatch complains that the NULL checks on "si" aren't consistent.  This
  seems like a real bug because we have not ensured that the type is
  valid and so "si" can be NULL.

Add the missing check for NULL, taking care to use a read barrier to
ensure CPU1 observes CPU0's updates in the correct order:

     CPU0                           CPU1
     alloc_swap_info()              if (type >= nr_swapfiles)
       swap_info[type] = p              /* handle invalid entry */
       smp_wmb()                    smp_rmb()
       ++nr_swapfiles               p = swap_info[type]

Without smp_rmb, CPU1 might observe CPU0's write to nr_swapfiles before
CPU0's write to swap_info[type] and read NULL from swap_info[type].

Ying Huang noticed other places in swapfile.c don't order these reads
properly.  Introduce swap_type_to_swap_info to encourage correct usage.

Use READ_ONCE and WRITE_ONCE to follow the Linux Kernel Memory Model
(see tools/memory-model/Documentation/explanation.txt).

This ordering need not be enforced in places where swap_lock is held
(e.g.  si_swapinfo) because swap_lock serializes updates to nr_swapfiles
and the swap_info array.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190131024410.29859-1-daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com
Fixes: ec8acf20afb8 ("swap: add per-partition lock for swapfile")
Signed-off-by: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Reported-by: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Suggested-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrea Parri <andrea.parri@amarulasolutions.com>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Alan Stern <stern@rowland.harvard.edu>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com>
Cc: Paul McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmscan.c: do not allocate duplicate stack variables in shrink_page_list()
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:15 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm/vmscan.c: do not allocate duplicate stack variables in shrink_page_list()

On path shrink_inactive_list() ---> shrink_page_list() we allocate stack
variables for the statistics twice.  This is completely useless, and
this just consumes stack much more, then we really need.

The patch kills duplicate stack variables from shrink_page_list(), and
this reduce stack usage and object file size significantly:

Stack usage:
  Before: vmscan.c:1122:22:shrink_page_list 648 static
  After:  vmscan.c:1122:22:shrink_page_list 616 static

Size of vmscan.o:
           text    data     bss     dec     hex filename
  Before: 56866    4720     128   61714    f112 mm/vmscan.o
  After:  56770    4720     128   61618    f0b2 mm/vmscan.o

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/154894900030.5211.12104993874109647641.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: ksm: do not block on page lock when searching stable tree
Yang Shi [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:12 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm: ksm: do not block on page lock when searching stable tree

ksmd needs to search the stable tree to look for the suitable KSM page,
but the KSM page might be locked for a while due to i.e.  KSM page rmap
walk.  Basically it is not a big deal since commit 2c653d0ee2ae ("ksm:
introduce ksm_max_page_sharing per page deduplication limit"), since
max_page_sharing limits the number of shared KSM pages.

But it still sounds not worth waiting for the lock, the page can be
skip, then try to merge it in the next scan to avoid potential stall if
its content is still intact.

Introduce trylock mode to get_ksm_page() to not block on page lock, like
what try_to_merge_one_page() does.  And, define three possible
operations (nolock, lock and trylock) as enum type to avoid stacking up
bools and make the code more readable.

Return -EBUSY if trylock fails, since NULL means not find suitable KSM
page, which is a valid case.

With the default max_page_sharing setting (256), there is almost no
observed change comparing lock vs trylock.

However, with ksm02 of LTP, the reduced ksmd full scan time can be
observed, which has set max_page_sharing to 786432.  With lock version,
ksmd may tak 10s - 11s to run two full scans, with trylock version ksmd
may take 8s - 11s to run two full scans.  And, the number of
pages_sharing and pages_to_scan keep same.  Basically, this change has
no harm.

[hughd@google.com: fix BUG_ON()]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/alpine.LSU.2.11.1902182122280.6914@eggly.anvils
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1548793753-62377-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Suggested-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: memcontrol: expose THP events on a per-memcg basis
Chris Down [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:09 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm: memcontrol: expose THP events on a per-memcg basis

Currently THP allocation events data is fairly opaque, since you can
only get it system-wide.  This patch makes it easier to reason about
transparent hugepage behaviour on a per-memcg basis.

For anonymous THP-backed pages, we already have MEMCG_RSS_HUGE in v1,
which is used for v1's rss_huge [sic].  This is reused here as it's
fairly involved to untangle NR_ANON_THPS right now to make it per-memcg,
since right now some of this is delegated to rmap before we have any
memcg actually assigned to the page.  It's a good idea to rework that,
but let's leave untangling THP allocation for a future patch.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix build]
[chris@chrisdown.name: fix memcontrol build when THP is disabled]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190131160802.GA5777@chrisdown.name
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190129205852.GA7310@chrisdown.name
Signed-off-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: vmscan: do not iterate all mem cgroups for global direct reclaim
Yang Shi [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:05 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm: vmscan: do not iterate all mem cgroups for global direct reclaim

In current implementation, both kswapd and direct reclaim has to iterate
all mem cgroups.  It is not a problem before offline mem cgroups could
be iterated.  But, currently with iterating offline mem cgroups, it
could be very time consuming.  In our workloads, we saw over 400K mem
cgroups accumulated in some cases, only a few hundred are online memcgs.
Although kswapd could help out to reduce the number of memcgs, direct
reclaim still get hit with iterating a number of offline memcgs in some
cases.  We experienced the responsiveness problems due to this
occassionally.

A simple test with pref shows it may take around 220ms to iterate 8K
memcgs in direct reclaim:
             dd 13873 [011]   578.542919: vmscan:mm_vmscan_direct_reclaim_begin
             dd 13873 [011]   578.758689: vmscan:mm_vmscan_direct_reclaim_end
So for 400K, it may take around 11 seconds to iterate all memcgs.

Here just break the iteration once it reclaims enough pages as what
memcg direct reclaim does.  This may hurt the fairness among memcgs.
But the cached iterator cookie could help to achieve the fairness more
or less.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1548799877-10949-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: swap: use mem_cgroup_is_root() instead of deferencing css->parent
Yang Shi [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:48:02 +0000 (15:48 -0800)]
mm: swap: use mem_cgroup_is_root() instead of deferencing css->parent

mem_cgroup_is_root() is the preferred API to check if memcg is root or
not.  Use it instead of deferencing css->parent.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1547232913-118148-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Tim Chen <tim.c.chen@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoselftests/memfd: add tests for F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE seal
Joel Fernandes (Google) [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:58 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
selftests/memfd: add tests for F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE seal

Add tests to verify sealing memfds with the F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE works as
expected.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190112203816.85534-3-joel@joelfernandes.org
Signed-off-by: Joel Fernandes (Google) <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Reviewed-by: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: J. Bruce Fields <bfields@fieldses.org>
Cc: Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>
Cc: John Stultz <john.stultz@linaro.org>
Cc: Marc-Andr Lureau <marcandre.lureau@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/memfd: add an F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE seal to memfd
Joel Fernandes (Google) [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:54 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
mm/memfd: add an F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE seal to memfd

Android uses ashmem for sharing memory regions.  We are looking forward
to migrating all usecases of ashmem to memfd so that we can possibly
remove the ashmem driver in the future from staging while also
benefiting from using memfd and contributing to it.  Note staging
drivers are also not ABI and generally can be removed at anytime.

One of the main usecases Android has is the ability to create a region
and mmap it as writeable, then add protection against making any
"future" writes while keeping the existing already mmap'ed
writeable-region active.  This allows us to implement a usecase where
receivers of the shared memory buffer can get a read-only view, while
the sender continues to write to the buffer.  See CursorWindow
documentation in Android for more details:

  https://developer.android.com/reference/android/database/CursorWindow

This usecase cannot be implemented with the existing F_SEAL_WRITE seal.
To support the usecase, this patch adds a new F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE seal
which prevents any future mmap and write syscalls from succeeding while
keeping the existing mmap active.

A better way to do F_SEAL_FUTURE_WRITE seal was discussed [1] last week
where we don't need to modify core VFS structures to get the same
behavior of the seal.  This solves several side-effects pointed by Andy.
self-tests are provided in later patch to verify the expected semantics.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20181111173650.GA256781@google.com/

Thanks a lot to Andy for suggestions to improve code.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190112203816.85534-2-joel@joelfernandes.org
Signed-off-by: Joel Fernandes (Google) <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Acked-by: John Stultz <john.stultz@linaro.org>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: J. Bruce Fields <bfields@fieldses.org>
Cc: Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>
Cc: Marc-Andr Lureau <marcandre.lureau@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agopowerpc/mm/iommu: allow large IOMMU page size only for hugetlb backing
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:51 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
powerpc/mm/iommu: allow large IOMMU page size only for hugetlb backing

THP pages can get split during different code paths.  An incremented
reference count does imply we will not split the compound page.  But the
pmd entry can be converted to level 4 pte entries.  Keep the code
simpler by allowing large IOMMU page size only if the guest ram is
backed by hugetlb pages.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114095438.32470-6-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Alexey Kardashevskiy <aik@ozlabs.ru>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: David Gibson <david@gibson.dropbear.id.au>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agopowerpc/mm/iommu: allow migration of cma allocated pages during mm_iommu_do_alloc
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:47 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
powerpc/mm/iommu: allow migration of cma allocated pages during mm_iommu_do_alloc

The current code doesn't do page migration if the page allocated is a
compound page.  With HugeTLB migration support, we can end up allocating
hugetlb pages from CMA region.  Also, THP pages can be allocated from
CMA region.  This patch updates the code to handle compound pages
correctly.  The patch also switches to a single get_user_pages with the
right count, instead of doing one get_user_pages per page.  That avoids
reading page table multiple times.  This is done by using
get_user_pages_longterm, because that also takes care of DAX backed
pages.

DAX pages lifetime is dictated by file system rules and as such, we need
to make sure that we free these pages on operations like truncate and
punch hole.  If we have long term pin on these pages, which are mostly
return to userspace with elevated page count, the entity holding the
long term pin may not be aware of the fact that file got truncated and
the file system blocks possibly got reused.  That can result in
corruption.

The patch also converts the hpas member of mm_iommu_table_group_mem_t to
a union.  We use the same storage location to store pointers to struct
page.  We cannot update all the code path use struct page *, because we
access hpas in real mode and we can't do that struct page * to pfn
conversion in real mode.

[aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com: address review feedback, update changelog]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190227144736.5872-4-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114095438.32470-5-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Alexey Kardashevskiy <aik@ozlabs.ru>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: David Gibson <david@gibson.dropbear.id.au>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: update get_user_pages_longterm to migrate pages allocated from CMA region
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:44 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
mm: update get_user_pages_longterm to migrate pages allocated from CMA region

This patch updates get_user_pages_longterm to migrate pages allocated
out of CMA region.  This makes sure that we don't keep non-movable pages
(due to page reference count) in the CMA area.

This will be used by ppc64 in a later patch to avoid pinning pages in
the CMA region.  ppc64 uses CMA region for allocation of the hardware
page table (hash page table) and not able to migrate pages out of CMA
region results in page table allocation failures.

One case where we hit this easy is when a guest using a VFIO passthrough
device.  VFIO locks all the guest's memory and if the guest memory is
backed by CMA region, it becomes unmovable resulting in fragmenting the
CMA and possibly preventing other guests from allocation a large enough
hash page table.

NOTE: We allocate the new page without using __GFP_THISNODE

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114095438.32470-3-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Alexey Kardashevskiy <aik@ozlabs.ru>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: David Gibson <david@gibson.dropbear.id.au>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/cma: add PF flag to force non cma alloc
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:40 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
mm/cma: add PF flag to force non cma alloc

Patch series "mm/kvm/vfio/ppc64: Migrate compound pages out of CMA
region", v8.

ppc64 uses the CMA area for the allocation of guest page table (hash
page table).  We won't be able to start guest if we fail to allocate
hash page table.  We have observed hash table allocation failure because
we failed to migrate pages out of CMA region because they were pinned.
This happen when we are using VFIO.  VFIO on ppc64 pins the entire guest
RAM.  If the guest RAM pages get allocated out of CMA region, we won't
be able to migrate those pages.  The pages are also pinned for the
lifetime of the guest.

Currently we support migration of non-compound pages.  With THP and with
the addition of hugetlb migration we can end up allocating compound
pages from CMA region.  This patch series add support for migrating
compound pages.

This patch (of 4):

Add PF_MEMALLOC_NOCMA which make sure any allocation in that context is
marked non-movable and hence cannot be satisfied by CMA region.

This is useful with get_user_pages_longterm where we want to take a page
pin by migrating pages from CMA region.  Marking the section
PF_MEMALLOC_NOCMA ensures that we avoid unnecessary page migration
later.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114095438.32470-2-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Suggested-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Alexey Kardashevskiy <aik@ozlabs.ru>
Cc: David Gibson <david@gibson.dropbear.id.au>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: better document PG_reserved
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:36 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
mm: better document PG_reserved

The usage of PG_reserved and how PG_reserved pages are to be treated is
buried deep down in different parts of the kernel.  Let's shine some
light onto these details by documenting current users and expected
behavior.

Especially, clarify on the "Some of them might not even exist" case.
These are physical memory gaps that will never be dumped as they are not
marked as IORESOURCE_SYSRAM.  PG_reserved does in general not hinder
anybody from dumping or swapping.  In some cases, these pages will not
be stored in the hibernation image.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-10-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Anthony Yznaga <anthony.yznaga@oracle.com>
Cc: Miles Chen <miles.chen@mediatek.com>
Cc: <yi.z.zhang@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoia64: perfmon: don't mark buffer pages as PG_reserved
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:32 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
ia64: perfmon: don't mark buffer pages as PG_reserved

In the old days, remap_pfn_range() required pages to be marked as
PG_reserved, so they would e.g.  never get swapped out.  This was
required for special mappings.  Nowadays, this is fully handled via the
VMA (VM_IO | VM_PFNMAP | VM_DONTEXPAND | VM_DONTDUMP inside
remap_pfn_range() to be precise).  PG_reserved is no longer required but
only a relic from the past.

So only architecture specific MM handling might require it (e.g.  to
detect them as MMIO pages).  As there are no architecture specific
checks for PageReserved() apart from MCA handling in ia64code, this can
go.  Use simple vzalloc()/vfree() instead.

Note that before calling vzalloc(), size has already been aligned to
PAGE_SIZE, no need to align again.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-9-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoarm64: kdump: no need to mark crashkernel pages manually PG_reserved
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:28 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
arm64: kdump: no need to mark crashkernel pages manually PG_reserved

The crashkernel is reserved via memblock_reserve().  memblock_free_all()
will call free_low_memory_core_early(), which will go over all reserved
memblocks, marking the pages as PG_reserved.

So manually marking pages as PG_reserved is not necessary, they are
already in the desired state (otherwise they would have been handed over
to the buddy as free pages and bad things would happen).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-8-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Matthias Brugger <mbrugger@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Bhupesh Sharma <bhsharma@redhat.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: James Morse <james.morse@arm.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Kleikamp <dave.kleikamp@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Florian Fainelli <f.fainelli@gmail.com>
Cc: Stefan Agner <stefan@agner.ch>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Hackmann <ghackmann@android.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Kristina Martsenko <kristina.martsenko@arm.com>
Cc: CHANDAN VN <chandan.vn@samsung.com>
Cc: AKASHI Takahiro <takahiro.akashi@linaro.org>
Cc: Logan Gunthorpe <logang@deltatee.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoarm64: kexec: no need to ClearPageReserved()
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:25 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
arm64: kexec: no need to ClearPageReserved()

This will be done by free_reserved_page().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-7-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: James Morse <james.morse@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Bhupesh Sharma <bhsharma@redhat.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: James Morse <james.morse@arm.com>
Cc: Marc Zyngier <marc.zyngier@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Kleikamp <dave.kleikamp@oracle.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agom68k/mm: use __ClearPageReserved()
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:21 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
m68k/mm: use __ClearPageReserved()

The PG_reserved flag is cleared from memory that is part of the kernel
image (and therefore marked as PG_reserved).  Avoid using PG_reserved
directly.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-6-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoriscv/vdso: don't clear PG_reserved
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:18 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
riscv/vdso: don't clear PG_reserved

The VDSO is part of the kernel image and therefore the struct pages are
marked as reserved during boot.

As we install a special mapping, the actual struct pages will never be
exposed to MM via the page tables.  We can therefore leave the pages
marked as reserved.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-5-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@sifive.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@sifive.com>
Cc: Albert Ou <aou@eecs.berkeley.edu>
Cc: Tobias Klauser <tklauser@distanz.ch>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agopowerpc/vdso: don't clear PG_reserved
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:14 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
powerpc/vdso: don't clear PG_reserved

The VDSO is part of the kernel image and therefore the struct pages are
marked as reserved during boot.

As we install a special mapping, the actual struct pages will never be
exposed to MM via the page tables.  We can therefore leave the pages
marked as reserved.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-4-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> [powerpc]
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@c-s.fr>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agos390/vdso: don't clear PG_reserved
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:10 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
s390/vdso: don't clear PG_reserved

The VDSO is part of the kernel image and therefore the struct pages are
marked as reserved during boot.

As we install a special mapping, the actual struct pages will never be
exposed to MM via the page tables.  We can therefore leave the pages
marked as reserved.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-3-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Suggested-by: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoagp: efficeon: no need to set PG_reserved on GATT tables
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:07 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
agp: efficeon: no need to set PG_reserved on GATT tables

Patch series "mm: PG_reserved cleanups and documentation", v2.

I was recently going over all users of PG_reserved.  Short story: it is
difficult and sometimes not really clear if setting/checking for
PG_reserved is only a relict from the past.  Easy to break things.  I
guess I now have a pretty good idea wh things are like that nowadays and
how they evolved.

I had way more cleanups in this series inititally, but some
architectures take PG_reserved as a way to apply a different caching
strategy (for MMIO pages).  So I decided to only include the most
obvious changes (that are less likely to break something).  So the big
chunk of manual SetPageReserved users are MMIO/DMA related things on
device buffers.

Most notably, for device memory we will hopefully soon stop setting
PG_reserved.  Then the documentation has to be updated.

This patch (of 9):

The l1 GATT page table is kept in a special on-chip page with 64
entries.  We allocate the l2 page table pages via get_zeroed_page() and
enter them into the table.  These l2 pages are modified accordingly when
inserting/removing memory via efficeon_insert_memory and
efficeon_remove_memory.

Apart from that, these pages are not exposed or ioremap'ed.  We can stop
setting them reserved (propably copied from generic code).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114125903.24845-2-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Airlie <airlied@linux.ie>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: rid swapoff of quadratic complexity
Vineeth Remanan Pillai [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:47:03 +0000 (15:47 -0800)]
mm: rid swapoff of quadratic complexity

This patch was initially posted by Kelley Nielsen.  Reposting the patch
with all review comments addressed and with minor modifications and
optimizations.  Also, folding in the fixes offered by Hugh Dickins and
Huang Ying.  Tests were rerun and commit message updated with new
results.

try_to_unuse() is of quadratic complexity, with a lot of wasted effort.
It unuses swap entries one by one, potentially iterating over all the
page tables for all the processes in the system for each one.

This new proposed implementation of try_to_unuse simplifies its
complexity to linear.  It iterates over the system's mms once, unusing
all the affected entries as it walks each set of page tables.  It also
makes similar changes to shmem_unuse.

Improvement

swapoff was called on a swap partition containing about 6G of data, in a
VM(8cpu, 16G RAM), and calls to unuse_pte_range() were counted.

Present implementation....about 1200M calls(8min, avg 80% cpu util).
Prototype.................about  9.0K calls(3min, avg 5% cpu util).

Details

In shmem_unuse(), iterate over the shmem_swaplist and, for each
shmem_inode_info that contains a swap entry, pass it to
shmem_unuse_inode(), along with the swap type.  In shmem_unuse_inode(),
iterate over its associated xarray, and store the index and value of
each swap entry in an array for passing to shmem_swapin_page() outside
of the RCU critical section.

In try_to_unuse(), instead of iterating over the entries in the type and
unusing them one by one, perhaps walking all the page tables for all the
processes for each one, iterate over the mmlist, making one pass.  Pass
each mm to unuse_mm() to begin its page table walk, and during the walk,
unuse all the ptes that have backing store in the swap type received by
try_to_unuse().  After the walk, check the type for orphaned swap
entries with find_next_to_unuse(), and remove them from the swap cache.
If find_next_to_unuse() starts over at the beginning of the type, repeat
the check of the shmem_swaplist and the walk a maximum of three times.

Change unuse_mm() and the intervening walk functions down to
unuse_pte_range() to take the type as a parameter, and to iterate over
their entire range, calling the next function down on every iteration.
In unuse_pte_range(), make a swap entry from each pte in the range using
the passed in type.  If it has backing store in the type, call
swapin_readahead() to retrieve the page and pass it to unuse_pte().

Pass the count of pages_to_unuse down the page table walks in
try_to_unuse(), and return from the walk when the desired number of
pages has been swapped back in.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114153129.4852-2-vpillai@digitalocean.com
Signed-off-by: Vineeth Remanan Pillai <vpillai@digitalocean.com>
Signed-off-by: Kelley Nielsen <kelleynnn@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: refactor swap-in logic out of shmem_getpage_gfp
Vineeth Remanan Pillai [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:58 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm: refactor swap-in logic out of shmem_getpage_gfp

swapin logic can be reused independently without rest of the logic in
shmem_getpage_gfp.  So lets refactor it out as an independent function.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190114153129.4852-1-vpillai@digitalocean.com
Signed-off-by: Vineeth Remanan Pillai <vpillai@digitalocean.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kelley Nielsen <kelleynnn@gmail.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmscan.c: remove 7th argument of isolate_lru_pages()
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:55 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm/vmscan.c: remove 7th argument of isolate_lru_pages()

We may simply check for sc->may_unmap in isolate_lru_pages() instead of
doing that in both of its callers.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/154748280735.29962.15867846875217618569.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, mempolicy: fix uninit memory access
Vlastimil Babka [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:50 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm, mempolicy: fix uninit memory access

Syzbot with KMSAN reports (excerpt):

==================================================================
BUG: KMSAN: uninit-value in mpol_rebind_policy mm/mempolicy.c:353 [inline]
BUG: KMSAN: uninit-value in mpol_rebind_mm+0x249/0x370 mm/mempolicy.c:384
CPU: 1 PID: 17420 Comm: syz-executor4 Not tainted 4.20.0-rc7+ #15
Hardware name: Google Google Compute Engine/Google Compute Engine, BIOS
Google 01/01/2011
Call Trace:
  __dump_stack lib/dump_stack.c:77 [inline]
  dump_stack+0x173/0x1d0 lib/dump_stack.c:113
  kmsan_report+0x12e/0x2a0 mm/kmsan/kmsan.c:613
  __msan_warning+0x82/0xf0 mm/kmsan/kmsan_instr.c:295
  mpol_rebind_policy mm/mempolicy.c:353 [inline]
  mpol_rebind_mm+0x249/0x370 mm/mempolicy.c:384
  update_tasks_nodemask+0x608/0xca0 kernel/cgroup/cpuset.c:1120
  update_nodemasks_hier kernel/cgroup/cpuset.c:1185 [inline]
  update_nodemask kernel/cgroup/cpuset.c:1253 [inline]
  cpuset_write_resmask+0x2a98/0x34b0 kernel/cgroup/cpuset.c:1728

...

Uninit was created at:
  kmsan_save_stack_with_flags mm/kmsan/kmsan.c:204 [inline]
  kmsan_internal_poison_shadow+0x92/0x150 mm/kmsan/kmsan.c:158
  kmsan_kmalloc+0xa6/0x130 mm/kmsan/kmsan_hooks.c:176
  kmem_cache_alloc+0x572/0xb90 mm/slub.c:2777
  mpol_new mm/mempolicy.c:276 [inline]
  do_mbind mm/mempolicy.c:1180 [inline]
  kernel_mbind+0x8a7/0x31a0 mm/mempolicy.c:1347
  __do_sys_mbind mm/mempolicy.c:1354 [inline]

As it's difficult to report where exactly the uninit value resides in
the mempolicy object, we have to guess a bit.  mm/mempolicy.c:353
contains this part of mpol_rebind_policy():

        if (!mpol_store_user_nodemask(pol) &&
            nodes_equal(pol->w.cpuset_mems_allowed, *newmask))

"mpol_store_user_nodemask(pol)" is testing pol->flags, which I couldn't
ever see being uninitialized after leaving mpol_new().  So I'll guess
it's actually about accessing pol->w.cpuset_mems_allowed on line 354,
but still part of statement starting on line 353.

For w.cpuset_mems_allowed to be not initialized, and the nodes_equal()
reachable for a mempolicy where mpol_set_nodemask() is called in
do_mbind(), it seems the only possibility is a MPOL_PREFERRED policy
with empty set of nodes, i.e.  MPOL_LOCAL equivalent, with MPOL_F_LOCAL
flag.  Let's exclude such policies from the nodes_equal() check.  Note
the uninit access should be benign anyway, as rebinding this kind of
policy is always a no-op.  Therefore no actual need for stable
inclusion.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/a71997c3-e8ae-a787-d5ce-3db05768b27c@suse.cz
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/73da3e9c-cc84-509e-17d9-0c434bb9967d@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reported-by: syzbot+b19c2dc2c990ea657a71@syzkaller.appspotmail.com
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Yisheng Xie <xieyisheng1@huawei.com>
Cc: zhong jiang <zhongjiang@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomemcg: killed threads should not invoke memcg OOM killer
Tetsuo Handa [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:47 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
memcg: killed threads should not invoke memcg OOM killer

If a memory cgroup contains a single process with many threads
(including different process group sharing the mm) then it is possible
to trigger a race when the oom killer complains that there are no oom
elible tasks and complain into the log which is both annoying and
confusing because there is no actual problem.  The race looks as
follows:

P1 oom_reaper P2
try_charge try_charge
  mem_cgroup_out_of_memory
    mutex_lock(oom_lock)
      out_of_memory
        oom_kill_process(P1,P2)
         wake_oom_reaper
    mutex_unlock(oom_lock)
     oom_reap_task
  mutex_lock(oom_lock)
    select_bad_process # no victim

The problem is more visible with many threads.

Fix this by checking for fatal_signal_pending from
mem_cgroup_out_of_memory when the oom_lock is already held.

The oom bypass is safe because we do the same early in the try_charge
path already.  The situation migh have changed in the mean time.  It
should be safe to check for fatal_signal_pending and tsk_is_oom_victim
but for a better code readability abstract the current charge bypass
condition into should_force_charge and reuse it from that path.  "

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/01370f70-e1f6-ebe4-b95e-0df21a0bc15e@i-love.sakura.ne.jp
Signed-off-by: Tetsuo Handa <penguin-kernel@I-love.SAKURA.ne.jp>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/page_alloc.c: check return value of memblock_alloc_node_nopanic()
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:43 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm/page_alloc.c: check return value of memblock_alloc_node_nopanic()

There are two early memory allocations that use
memblock_alloc_node_nopanic() and do not check its return value.

While this happens very early during boot and chances that the
allocation will fail are diminishing, it is still worth to have proper
checks for the allocation errors.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1547734941-944-1-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoarch/powerpc/mm/hugetlb: NestMMU workaround for hugetlb mprotect RW upgrade
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:40 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
arch/powerpc/mm/hugetlb: NestMMU workaround for hugetlb mprotect RW upgrade

NestMMU requires us to mark the pte invalid and flush the tlb when we do
a RW upgrade of pte.  We fixed a variant of this in the fault path in
bd5050e38aec ("powerpc/mm/radix: Change pte relax sequence to handle
nest MMU hang").

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190116085035.29729-6-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/hugetlb: add prot_modify_start/commit sequence for hugetlb update
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:37 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm/hugetlb: add prot_modify_start/commit sequence for hugetlb update

Architectures like ppc64 require to do a conditional tlb flush based on
the old and new value of pte.  Follow the regular pte change protection
sequence for hugetlb too.  This allows the architectures to override the
update sequence.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190116085035.29729-5-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoarch/powerpc/mm: Nest MMU workaround for mprotect RW upgrade
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:33 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
arch/powerpc/mm: Nest MMU workaround for mprotect RW upgrade

NestMMU requires us to mark the pte invalid and flush the tlb when we do
a RW upgrade of pte.  We fixed a variant of this in the fault path in
bd5050e38aec ("powerpc/mm/radix: Change pte relax sequence to handle
nest MMU hang").

Do the same for mprotect upgrades.

Hugetlb is handled in the next patch.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190116085035.29729-4-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: update ptep_modify_prot_commit to take old pte value as arg
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:29 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm: update ptep_modify_prot_commit to take old pte value as arg

Architectures like ppc64 require to do a conditional tlb flush based on
the old and new value of pte.  Enable that by passing old pte value as
the arg.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190116085035.29729-3-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: update ptep_modify_prot_start/commit to take vm_area_struct as arg
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:26 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm: update ptep_modify_prot_start/commit to take vm_area_struct as arg

Patch series "NestMMU pte upgrade workaround for mprotect", v5.

We can upgrade pte access (R -> RW transition) via mprotect.  We need to
make sure we follow the recommended pte update sequence as outlined in
commit bd5050e38aec ("powerpc/mm/radix: Change pte relax sequence to
handle nest MMU hang") for such updates.  This patch series does that.

This patch (of 5):

Some architectures may want to call flush_tlb_range from these helpers.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190116085035.29729-2-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: fix some typos in mm directory
Wei Yang [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:22 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm: fix some typos in mm directory

No functional change.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118235123.27843-1-richard.weiyang@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/page_owner: move config option to mm/Kconfig.debug
Changbin Du [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:19 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm/page_owner: move config option to mm/Kconfig.debug

Move the PAGE_OWNER option from submenu "Compile-time checks and
compiler options" to dedicated submenu "Memory Debugging".

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190120024254.6270-1-changbin.du@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Changbin Du <changbin.du@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Masahiro Yamada <yamada.masahiro@socionext.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/mmap.c: remove some redundancy in arch_get_unmapped_area_topdown()
Yang Fan [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:16 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm/mmap.c: remove some redundancy in arch_get_unmapped_area_topdown()

The variable 'addr' is redundant in arch_get_unmapped_area_topdown(),
just use parameter 'addr0' directly.  Then remove the const qualifier of
the parameter, and change its name to 'addr'.

And in according with other functions, remove the const qualifier of all
other no-pointer parameters in function arch_get_unmapped_area_topdown().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190127041112.25599-1-nullptr.cpp@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Fan <nullptr.cpp@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, oom: remove 'prefer children over parent' heuristic
Shakeel Butt [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:12 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm, oom: remove 'prefer children over parent' heuristic

Since the start of the git history of Linux, the kernel after selecting
the worst process to be oom-killed, prefer to kill its child (if the
child does not share mm with the parent).  Later it was changed to
prefer to kill a child who is worst.  If the parent is still the worst
then the parent will be killed.

This heuristic assumes that the children did less work than their parent
and by killing one of them, the work lost will be less.  However this is
very workload dependent.  If there is a workload which can benefit from
this heuristic, can use oom_score_adj to prefer children to be killed
before the parent.

The select_bad_process() has already selected the worst process in the
system/memcg.  There is no need to recheck the badness of its children
and hoping to find a worse candidate.  That's a lot of unneeded racy
work.  Also the heuristic is dangerous because it make fork bomb like
workloads to recover much later because we constantly pick and kill
processes which are not memory hogs.  So, let's remove this whole
heuristic.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190121215850.221745-2-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Tetsuo Handa <penguin-kernel@i-love.sakura.ne.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: no need to check return value of debugfs_create functions
Greg Kroah-Hartman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:09 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm: no need to check return value of debugfs_create functions

When calling debugfs functions, there is no need to ever check the
return value.  The function can work or not, but the code logic should
never do something different based on this.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190122152151.16139-14-gregkh@linuxfoundation.org
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/memory.c: prevent mapping typed pages to userspace
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:06 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm/memory.c: prevent mapping typed pages to userspace

Pages which use page_type must never be mapped to userspace as it would
destroy their page type.  Add an explicit check for this instead of
assuming that kernel drivers always get this right.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190129053830.3749-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: prevent mapping slab pages to userspace
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:46:02 +0000 (15:46 -0800)]
mm: prevent mapping slab pages to userspace

It's never appropriate to map a page allocated by SLAB into userspace.
A buggy device driver might try this, or an attacker might be able to
find a way to make it happen.

Christoph said:

: Let's just fail the code.  Currently this may work with SLUB.  But SLAB
: and SLOB overlay fields with mapcount.  So you would have a corrupted page
: struct if you mapped a slab page to user space.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190125173827.2658-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Acked-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmalloc.c: fix kernel BUG at mm/vmalloc.c:512!
Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:59 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm/vmalloc.c: fix kernel BUG at mm/vmalloc.c:512!

One of the vmalloc stress test case triggers the kernel BUG():

  <snip>
  [60.562151] ------------[ cut here ]------------
  [60.562154] kernel BUG at mm/vmalloc.c:512!
  [60.562206] invalid opcode: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP PTI
  [60.562247] CPU: 0 PID: 430 Comm: vmalloc_test/0 Not tainted 4.20.0+ #161
  [60.562293] Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996), BIOS 1.10.2-1 04/01/2014
  [60.562351] RIP: 0010:alloc_vmap_area+0x36f/0x390
  <snip>

it can happen due to big align request resulting in overflowing of
calculated address, i.e.  it becomes 0 after ALIGN()'s fixup.

Fix it by checking if calculated address is within vstart/vend range.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190124115648.9433-2-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Cc: Joel Fernandes <joelaf@google.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Garnier <thgarnie@google.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, memcg: extract memcg maxable seq_file logic to seq_show_memcg_tunable
Chris Down [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:55 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, memcg: extract memcg maxable seq_file logic to seq_show_memcg_tunable

memcg has a significant number of files exposed to kernfs where their
value is either exposed directly or is "max" in the case of
PAGE_COUNTER_MAX.

This patch makes this generic by providing a single function to do this
work.  In combination with the previous patch adding
mem_cgroup_from_seq, this makes all of the seq_show feeder functions
significantly more simple.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190124194100.GA31425@chrisdown.name
Signed-off-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, memcg: create mem_cgroup_from_seq
Chris Down [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:52 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, memcg: create mem_cgroup_from_seq

This is the start of a series of patches similar to my earlier
DEFINE_MEMCG_MAX_OR_VAL work, but with less Macro Magic(tm).

There are a bunch of places we go from seq_file to mem_cgroup, which
currently requires manually getting the css, then getting the mem_cgroup
from the css.  It's in enough places now that having mem_cgroup_from_seq
makes sense (and also makes the next patch a bit nicer).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190124194050.GA31341@chrisdown.name
Signed-off-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agokernel: cgroup: add poll file operation
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:48 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
kernel: cgroup: add poll file operation

Cgroup has a standardized poll/notification mechanism for waking all
pollers on all fds when a filesystem node changes.  To allow polling for
custom events, add a .poll callback that can override the default.

This is in preparation for pollable cgroup pressure files which have
per-fd trigger configurations.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190124211518.244221-3-surenb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Dennis Zhou <dennis@kernel.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Li Zefan <lizefan@huawei.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agofs: kernfs: add poll file operation
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:45 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
fs: kernfs: add poll file operation

Patch series "psi: pressure stall monitors", v3.

Android is adopting psi to detect and remedy memory pressure that
results in stuttering and decreased responsiveness on mobile devices.

Psi gives us the stall information, but because we're dealing with
latencies in the millisecond range, periodically reading the pressure
files to detect stalls in a timely fashion is not feasible.  Psi also
doesn't aggregate its averages at a high enough frequency right now.

This patch series extends the psi interface such that users can
configure sensitive latency thresholds and use poll() and friends to be
notified when these are breached.

As high-frequency aggregation is costly, it implements an aggregation
method that is optimized for fast, short-interval averaging, and makes
the aggregation frequency adaptive, such that high-frequency updates
only happen while monitored stall events are actively occurring.

With these patches applied, Android can monitor for, and ward off,
mounting memory shortages before they cause problems for the user.  For
example, using memory stall monitors in userspace low memory killer
daemon (lmkd) we can detect mounting pressure and kill less important
processes before device becomes visibly sluggish.

In our memory stress testing psi memory monitors produce roughly 10x
less false positives compared to vmpressure signals.  Having ability to
specify multiple triggers for the same psi metric allows other parts of
Android framework to monitor memory state of the device and act
accordingly.

The new interface is straightforward.  The user opens one of the
pressure files for writing and writes a trigger description into the
file descriptor that defines the stall state - some or full, and the
maximum stall time over a given window of time.  E.g.:

        /* Signal when stall time exceeds 100ms of a 1s window */
        char trigger[] = "full 100000 1000000";
        fd = open("/proc/pressure/memory");
        write(fd, trigger, sizeof(trigger));
        while (poll() >= 0) {
                ...
        }
        close(fd);

When the monitored stall state is entered, psi adapts its aggregation
frequency according to what the configured time window requires in order
to emit event signals in a timely fashion.  Once the stalling subsides,
aggregation reverts back to normal.

The trigger is associated with the open file descriptor.  To stop
monitoring, the user only needs to close the file descriptor and the
trigger is discarded.

Patches 1-4 prepare the psi code for polling support.  Patch 5
implements the adaptive polling logic, the pressure growth detection
optimized for short intervals, and hooks up write() and poll() on the
pressure files.

The patches were developed in collaboration with Johannes Weiner.

This patch (of 5):

Kernfs has a standardized poll/notification mechanism for waking all
pollers on all fds when a filesystem node changes.  To allow polling for
custom events, add a .poll callback that can override the default.

This is in preparation for pollable cgroup pressure files which have
per-fd trigger configurations.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190124211518.244221-2-surenb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Dennis Zhou <dennis@kernel.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Li Zefan <lizefan@huawei.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: capture a page under direct compaction
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:41 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: capture a page under direct compaction

Compaction is inherently race-prone as a suitable page freed during
compaction can be allocated by any parallel task.  This patch uses a
capture_control structure to isolate a page immediately when it is freed
by a direct compactor in the slow path of the page allocator.  The
intent is to avoid redundant scanning.

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                               selective-v3r17          capture-v3r19
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      2582.11 (   0.00%)     2563.68 (   0.71%)
Amean     fault-both-5      4500.26 (   0.00%)     4233.52 (   5.93%)
Amean     fault-both-7      5819.53 (   0.00%)     6333.65 (  -8.83%)
Amean     fault-both-12     9321.18 (   0.00%)     9759.38 (  -4.70%)
Amean     fault-both-18     9782.76 (   0.00%)    10338.76 (  -5.68%)
Amean     fault-both-24    15272.81 (   0.00%)    13379.55 *  12.40%*
Amean     fault-both-30    15121.34 (   0.00%)    16158.25 (  -6.86%)
Amean     fault-both-32    18466.67 (   0.00%)    18971.21 (  -2.73%)

Latency is only moderately affected but the devil is in the details.  A
closer examination indicates that base page fault latency is reduced but
latency of huge pages is increased as it takes creater care to succeed.
Part of the "problem" is that allocation success rates are close to 100%
even when under pressure and compaction gets harder

                                5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                          selective-v3r17          capture-v3r19
Percentage huge-3        96.70 (   0.00%)       98.23 (   1.58%)
Percentage huge-5        96.99 (   0.00%)       95.30 (  -1.75%)
Percentage huge-7        94.19 (   0.00%)       97.24 (   3.24%)
Percentage huge-12       94.95 (   0.00%)       97.35 (   2.53%)
Percentage huge-18       96.74 (   0.00%)       97.30 (   0.58%)
Percentage huge-24       97.07 (   0.00%)       97.55 (   0.50%)
Percentage huge-30       95.69 (   0.00%)       98.50 (   2.95%)
Percentage huge-32       96.70 (   0.00%)       99.27 (   2.65%)

And scan rates are reduced as expected by 6% for the migration scanner
and 29% for the free scanner indicating that there is less redundant
work.

Compaction migrate scanned    20815362    19573286
Compaction free scanned       16352612    11510663

[mgorman@techsingularity.net: remove redundant check]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190201143853.GH9565@techsingularity.net
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-23-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: be selective about what pageblocks to clear skip hints
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:38 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: be selective about what pageblocks to clear skip hints

Pageblock hints are cleared when compaction restarts or kswapd makes
enough progress that it can sleep but it's over-eager in that the bit is
cleared for migration sources with no LRU pages and migration targets
with no free pages.  As pageblock skip hint flushes are relatively rare
and out-of-band with respect to kswapd, this patch makes a few more
expensive checks to see if it's appropriate to even clear the bit.
Every pageblock that is not cleared will avoid 512 pages being scanned
unnecessarily on x86-64.

The impact is variable with different workloads showing small
differences in latency, success rates and scan rates.  This is expected
as clearing the hints is not that common but doing a small amount of
work out-of-band to avoid a large amount of work in-band later is
generally a good thing.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-22-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
[cai@lca.pw: no stuck in __reset_isolation_pfn()]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190206034732.75687-1-cai@lca.pw
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: sample pageblocks for free pages
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:34 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: sample pageblocks for free pages

Once fast searching finishes, there is a possibility that the linear
scanner is scanning full blocks found by the fast scanner earlier.  This
patch uses an adaptive stride to sample pageblocks for free pages.  The
more consecutive full pageblocks encountered, the larger the stride
until a pageblock with free pages is found.  The scanners might meet
slightly sooner but it is an acceptable risk given that the search of
the free lists may still encounter the pages and adjust the cached PFN
of the free scanner accordingly.

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                              roundrobin-v3r17       samplefree-v3r17
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      2752.37 (   0.00%)     2729.95 (   0.81%)
Amean     fault-both-5      4341.69 (   0.00%)     4397.80 (  -1.29%)
Amean     fault-both-7      6308.75 (   0.00%)     6097.61 (   3.35%)
Amean     fault-both-12    10241.81 (   0.00%)     9407.15 (   8.15%)
Amean     fault-both-18    13736.09 (   0.00%)    10857.63 *  20.96%*
Amean     fault-both-24    16853.95 (   0.00%)    13323.24 *  20.95%*
Amean     fault-both-30    15862.61 (   0.00%)    17345.44 (  -9.35%)
Amean     fault-both-32    18450.85 (   0.00%)    16892.00 (   8.45%)

The latency is mildly improved offseting some overhead from earlier
patches that are prerequisites for the rest of the series.  However, a
major impact is on the free scan rate with an 82% reduction.

                                5.0.0-rc1      5.0.0-rc1
                         roundrobin-v3r17 samplefree-v3r17
Compaction migrate scanned    21607271            20116887
Compaction free scanned       95336406            16668703

It's also the first time in the series where the number of pages scanned
by the migration scanner is greater than the free scanner due to the
increased search efficiency.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-21-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: round-robin the order while searching the free lists for a target
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:31 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: round-robin the order while searching the free lists for a target

As compaction proceeds and creates high-order blocks, the free list
search gets less efficient as the larger blocks are used as compaction
targets.  Eventually, the larger blocks will be behind the migration
scanner for partially migrated pageblocks and the search fails.  This
patch round-robins what orders are searched so that larger blocks can be
ignored and find smaller blocks that can be used as migration targets.

The overall impact was small on 1-socket but it avoids corner cases
where the migration/free scanners meet prematurely or situations where
many of the pageblocks encountered by the free scanner are almost full
instead of being properly packed.  Previous testing had indicated that
without this patch there were occasional large spikes in the free
scanner without this patch.

[dan.carpenter@oracle.com: fix static checker warning]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-20-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: reduce premature advancement of the migration target scanner
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:28 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: reduce premature advancement of the migration target scanner

The fast isolation of free pages allows the cached PFN of the free
scanner to advance faster than necessary depending on the contents of
the free list.  The key is that fast_isolate_freepages() can update
zone->compact_cached_free_pfn via isolate_freepages_block().  When the
fast search fails, the linear scan can start from a point that has
skipped valid migration targets, particularly pageblocks with just
low-order free pages.  This can cause the migration source/target
scanners to meet prematurely causing a reset.

This patch starts by avoiding an update of the pageblock skip
information and cached PFN from isolate_freepages_block() and puts the
responsibility of updating that information in the callers.  The fast
scanner will update the cached PFN if and only if it finds a block that
is higher than the existing cached PFN and sets the skip if the
pageblock is full or nearly full.  The linear scanner will update
skipped information and the cached PFN only when a block is completely
scanned.  The total impact is that the free scanner advances more slowly
as it is primarily driven by the linear scanner instead of the fast
search.

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                               noresched-v3r17         slowfree-v3r17
Amean     fault-both-3      2965.68 (   0.00%)     3036.75 (  -2.40%)
Amean     fault-both-5      3995.90 (   0.00%)     4522.24 * -13.17%*
Amean     fault-both-7      5842.12 (   0.00%)     6365.35 (  -8.96%)
Amean     fault-both-12     9550.87 (   0.00%)    10340.93 (  -8.27%)
Amean     fault-both-18    13304.72 (   0.00%)    14732.46 ( -10.73%)
Amean     fault-both-24    14618.59 (   0.00%)    16288.96 ( -11.43%)
Amean     fault-both-30    16650.96 (   0.00%)    16346.21 (   1.83%)
Amean     fault-both-32    17145.15 (   0.00%)    19317.49 ( -12.67%)

The impact to latency is higher than the last version but it appears to
be due to a slight increase in the free scan rates which is a potential
side-effect of the patch.  However, this is necessary for later patches
that are more careful about how pageblocks are treated as earlier
iterations of those patches hit corner cases where the restarts were
punishing and very visible.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-19-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: do not consider a need to reschedule as contention
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:24 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: do not consider a need to reschedule as contention

Scanning on large machines can take a considerable length of time and
eventually need to be rescheduled.  This is treated as an abort event
but that's not appropriate as the attempt is likely to be retried after
making numerous checks and taking another cycle through the page
allocator.  This patch will check the need to reschedule if necessary
but continue the scanning.

The main benefit is reduced scanning when compaction is taking a long
time or the machine is over-saturated.  It also avoids an unnecessary
exit of compaction that ends up being retried by the page allocator in
the outer loop.

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                              synccached-v3r16        noresched-v3r17
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      2958.27 (   0.00%)     2965.68 (  -0.25%)
Amean     fault-both-5      4091.90 (   0.00%)     3995.90 (   2.35%)
Amean     fault-both-7      5803.05 (   0.00%)     5842.12 (  -0.67%)
Amean     fault-both-12     9481.06 (   0.00%)     9550.87 (  -0.74%)
Amean     fault-both-18    14141.51 (   0.00%)    13304.72 (   5.92%)
Amean     fault-both-24    16438.00 (   0.00%)    14618.59 (  11.07%)
Amean     fault-both-30    17531.72 (   0.00%)    16650.96 (   5.02%)
Amean     fault-both-32    17101.96 (   0.00%)    17145.15 (  -0.25%)

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-18-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: rework compact_should_abort as compact_check_resched
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:21 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: rework compact_should_abort as compact_check_resched

With incremental changes, compact_should_abort no longer makes any
documented sense.  Rename to compact_check_resched and update the
associated comments.  There is no benefit other than reducing redundant
code and making the intent slightly clearer.  It could potentially be
merged with earlier patches but it just makes the review slightly
harder.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-17-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: keep cached migration PFNs synced for unusable pageblocks
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:18 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: keep cached migration PFNs synced for unusable pageblocks

Migrate has separate cached PFNs for ASYNC and SYNC* migration on the
basis that some migrations will fail in ASYNC mode.  However, if the
cached PFNs match at the start of scanning and pageblocks are skipped
due to having no isolation candidates, then the sync state does not
matter.  This patch keeps matching cached PFNs in sync until a pageblock
with isolation candidates is found.

The actual benefit is marginal given that the sync scanner following the
async scanner will often skip a number of pageblocks but it's useless
work.  Any benefit depends heavily on whether the scanners restarted
recently.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-16-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: check early for huge pages encountered by the migration scanner
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:14 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: check early for huge pages encountered by the migration scanner

When scanning for sources or targets, PageCompound is checked for huge
pages as they can be skipped quickly but it happens relatively late
after a lot of setup and checking.  This patch short-cuts the check to
make it earlier.  It might still change when the lock is acquired but
this has less overhead overall.  The free scanner advances but the
migration scanner does not.  Typically the free scanner encounters more
movable blocks that change state over the lifetime of the system and
also tends to scan more aggressively as it's actively filling its
portion of the physical address space with data.  This could change in
the future but for the moment, this worked better in practice and
incurred fewer scan restarts.

The impact on latency and allocation success rates is marginal but the
free scan rates are reduced by 15% and system CPU usage is reduced by
3.3%.  The 2-socket results are not materially different.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-15-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: finish pageblock scanning on contention
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:11 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: finish pageblock scanning on contention

Async migration aborts on spinlock contention but contention can be high
when there are multiple compaction attempts and kswapd is active.  The
consequence is that the migration scanners move forward uselessly while
still contending on locks for longer while leaving suitable migration
sources behind.

This patch will acquire the lock but track when contention occurs.  When
it does, the current pageblock will finish as compaction may succeed for
that block and then abort.  This will have a variable impact on latency
as in some cases useless scanning is avoided (reduces latency) but a
lock will be contended (increase latency) or a single contended
pageblock is scanned that would otherwise have been skipped (increase
latency).

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                                norescan-v3r16    finishcontend-v3r16
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      3002.07 (   0.00%)     3153.17 (  -5.03%)
Amean     fault-both-5      4684.47 (   0.00%)     4280.52 (   8.62%)
Amean     fault-both-7      6815.54 (   0.00%)     5811.50 *  14.73%*
Amean     fault-both-12    10864.02 (   0.00%)     9276.85 (  14.61%)
Amean     fault-both-18    12247.52 (   0.00%)    11032.67 (   9.92%)
Amean     fault-both-24    15683.99 (   0.00%)    14285.70 (   8.92%)
Amean     fault-both-30    18620.02 (   0.00%)    16293.76 *  12.49%*
Amean     fault-both-32    19250.28 (   0.00%)    16721.02 *  13.14%*

                                5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                           norescan-v3r16    finishcontend-v3r16
Percentage huge-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 (   0.00%)
Percentage huge-3        95.00 (   0.00%)       96.82 (   1.92%)
Percentage huge-5        94.22 (   0.00%)       95.40 (   1.26%)
Percentage huge-7        92.35 (   0.00%)       95.92 (   3.86%)
Percentage huge-12       91.90 (   0.00%)       96.73 (   5.25%)
Percentage huge-18       89.58 (   0.00%)       96.77 (   8.03%)
Percentage huge-24       90.03 (   0.00%)       96.05 (   6.69%)
Percentage huge-30       89.14 (   0.00%)       96.81 (   8.60%)
Percentage huge-32       90.58 (   0.00%)       97.41 (   7.54%)

There is a variable impact that is mostly good on latency while allocation
success rates are slightly higher.  System CPU usage is reduced by about
10% but scan rate impact is mixed

Compaction migrate scanned    27997659.00    20148867
Compaction free scanned      120782791.00   118324914

Migration scan rates are reduced 28% which is expected as a pageblock is
used by the async scanner instead of skipped.  The impact on the free
scanner is known to be variable.  Overall the primary justification for
this patch is that completing scanning of a pageblock is very important
for later patches.

[yuehaibing@huawei.com: fix unused variable warning]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-14-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: avoid rescanning the same pageblock multiple times
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:07 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: avoid rescanning the same pageblock multiple times

Pageblocks are marked for skip when no pages are isolated after a scan.
However, it's possible to hit corner cases where the migration scanner
gets stuck near the boundary between the source and target scanner.  Due
to pages being migrated in blocks of COMPACT_CLUSTER_MAX, pages that are
migrated can be reallocated before the pageblock is complete.  The
pageblock is not necessarily skipped so it can be rescanned multiple
times.  Similarly, a pageblock with some dirty/writeback pages may fail
to migrate and be rescanned until writeback completes which is wasteful.

This patch tracks if a pageblock is being rescanned.  If so, then the
entire pageblock will be migrated as one operation.  This narrows the
race window during which pages can be reallocated during migration.
Secondly, if there are pages that cannot be isolated then the pageblock
will still be fully scanned and marked for skipping.  On the second
rescan, the pageblock skip is set and the migration scanner makes
progress.

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                                findfree-v3r16         norescan-v3r16
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      3200.68 (   0.00%)     3002.07 (   6.21%)
Amean     fault-both-5      4847.75 (   0.00%)     4684.47 (   3.37%)
Amean     fault-both-7      6658.92 (   0.00%)     6815.54 (  -2.35%)
Amean     fault-both-12    11077.62 (   0.00%)    10864.02 (   1.93%)
Amean     fault-both-18    12403.97 (   0.00%)    12247.52 (   1.26%)
Amean     fault-both-24    15607.10 (   0.00%)    15683.99 (  -0.49%)
Amean     fault-both-30    18752.27 (   0.00%)    18620.02 (   0.71%)
Amean     fault-both-32    21207.54 (   0.00%)    19250.28 *   9.23%*

                                5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                           findfree-v3r16         norescan-v3r16
Percentage huge-3        96.86 (   0.00%)       95.00 (  -1.91%)
Percentage huge-5        93.72 (   0.00%)       94.22 (   0.53%)
Percentage huge-7        94.31 (   0.00%)       92.35 (  -2.08%)
Percentage huge-12       92.66 (   0.00%)       91.90 (  -0.82%)
Percentage huge-18       91.51 (   0.00%)       89.58 (  -2.11%)
Percentage huge-24       90.50 (   0.00%)       90.03 (  -0.52%)
Percentage huge-30       91.57 (   0.00%)       89.14 (  -2.65%)
Percentage huge-32       91.00 (   0.00%)       90.58 (  -0.46%)

Negligible difference but this was likely a case when the specific
corner case was not hit.  A previous run of the same patch based on an
earlier iteration of the series showed large differences where migration
rates could be halved when the corner case was hit.

The specific corner case where migration scan rates go through the roof
was due to a dirty/writeback pageblock located at the boundary of the
migration/free scanner did not happen in this case.  When it does
happen, the scan rates multipled by massive margins.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-13-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: use free lists to quickly locate a migration target
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:45:01 +0000 (15:45 -0800)]
mm, compaction: use free lists to quickly locate a migration target

Similar to the migration scanner, this patch uses the free lists to
quickly locate a migration target.  The search is different in that
lower orders will be searched for a suitable high PFN if necessary but
the search is still bound.  This is justified on the grounds that the
free scanner typically scans linearly much more than the migration
scanner.

If a free page is found, it is isolated and compaction continues if
enough pages were isolated.  For SYNC* scanning, the full pageblock is
scanned for any remaining free pages so that is can be marked for
skipping in the near future.

1-socket thpfioscale
                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                                 isolmig-v3r15         findfree-v3r16
Amean     fault-both-3      3024.41 (   0.00%)     3200.68 (  -5.83%)
Amean     fault-both-5      4749.30 (   0.00%)     4847.75 (  -2.07%)
Amean     fault-both-7      6454.95 (   0.00%)     6658.92 (  -3.16%)
Amean     fault-both-12    10324.83 (   0.00%)    11077.62 (  -7.29%)
Amean     fault-both-18    12896.82 (   0.00%)    12403.97 (   3.82%)
Amean     fault-both-24    13470.60 (   0.00%)    15607.10 * -15.86%*
Amean     fault-both-30    17143.99 (   0.00%)    18752.27 (  -9.38%)
Amean     fault-both-32    17743.91 (   0.00%)    21207.54 * -19.52%*

The impact on latency is variable but the search is optimistic and
sensitive to the exact system state.  Success rates are similar but the
major impact is to the rate of scanning

                                5.0.0-rc1      5.0.0-rc1
                            isolmig-v3r15 findfree-v3r16
Compaction migrate scanned    25646769          29507205
Compaction free scanned      201558184         100359571

The free scan rates are reduced by 50%.  The 2-socket reductions for the
free scanner are more dramatic which is a likely reflection that the
machine has more memory.

[dan.carpenter@oracle.com: fix static checker warning]
[vbabka@suse.cz: correct number of pages scanned for lower orders]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-12-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: keep migration source private to a single compaction instance
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:58 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: keep migration source private to a single compaction instance

Due to either a fast search of the free list or a linear scan, it is
possible for multiple compaction instances to pick the same pageblock
for migration.  This is lucky for one scanner and increased scanning for
all the others.  It also allows a race between requests on which first
allocates the resulting free block.

This patch tests and updates the pageblock skip for the migration
scanner carefully.  When isolating a block, it will check and skip if
the block is already in use.  Once the zone lock is acquired, it will be
rechecked so that only one scanner can set the pageblock skip for
exclusive use.  Any scanner contending will continue with a linear scan.
The skip bit is still set if no pages can be isolated in a range.  While
this may result in redundant scanning, it avoids unnecessarily acquiring
the zone lock when there are no suitable migration sources.

1-socket thpscale
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      3390.40 (   0.00%)     3024.41 (  10.80%)
Amean     fault-both-5      5082.28 (   0.00%)     4749.30 (   6.55%)
Amean     fault-both-7      7012.51 (   0.00%)     6454.95 (   7.95%)
Amean     fault-both-12    11346.63 (   0.00%)    10324.83 (   9.01%)
Amean     fault-both-18    15324.19 (   0.00%)    12896.82 *  15.84%*
Amean     fault-both-24    16088.50 (   0.00%)    13470.60 *  16.27%*
Amean     fault-both-30    18723.42 (   0.00%)    17143.99 (   8.44%)
Amean     fault-both-32    18612.01 (   0.00%)    17743.91 (   4.66%)

                                5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                            findmig-v3r15          isolmig-v3r15
Percentage huge-3        89.83 (   0.00%)       92.96 (   3.48%)
Percentage huge-5        91.96 (   0.00%)       93.26 (   1.41%)
Percentage huge-7        92.85 (   0.00%)       93.63 (   0.84%)
Percentage huge-12       92.74 (   0.00%)       92.80 (   0.07%)
Percentage huge-18       91.71 (   0.00%)       91.62 (  -0.10%)
Percentage huge-24       92.13 (   0.00%)       91.50 (  -0.69%)
Percentage huge-30       93.79 (   0.00%)       92.73 (  -1.13%)
Percentage huge-32       91.27 (   0.00%)       91.94 (   0.74%)

This shows a reasonable reduction in latency as multiple compaction
scanners do not operate on the same blocks with a similar allocation
success rate.

Compaction migrate scanned    41093126    25646769

Migration scan rates are reduced by 38%.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-11-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: use free lists to quickly locate a migration source
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:54 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: use free lists to quickly locate a migration source

The migration scanner is a linear scan of a zone with a potentiall large
search space.  Furthermore, many pageblocks are unusable such as those
filled with reserved pages or partially filled with pages that cannot
migrate.  These still get scanned in the common case of allocating a THP
and the cost accumulates.

The patch uses a partial search of the free lists to locate a migration
source candidate that is marked as MOVABLE when allocating a THP.  It
prefers picking a block with a larger number of free pages already on
the basis that there are fewer pages to migrate to free the entire
block.  The lowest PFN found during searches is tracked as the basis of
the start for the linear search after the first search of the free list
fails.  After the search, the free list is shuffled so that the next
search will not encounter the same page.  If the search fails then the
subsequent searches will be shorter and the linear scanner is used.

If this search fails, or if the request is for a small or
unmovable/reclaimable allocation then the linear scanner is still used.
It is somewhat pointless to use the list search in those cases.  Small
free pages must be used for the search and there is no guarantee that
movable pages are located within that block that are contiguous.

                                     5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                                 noboost-v3r10          findmig-v3r15
Amean     fault-both-3      3771.41 (   0.00%)     3390.40 (  10.10%)
Amean     fault-both-5      5409.05 (   0.00%)     5082.28 (   6.04%)
Amean     fault-both-7      7040.74 (   0.00%)     7012.51 (   0.40%)
Amean     fault-both-12    11887.35 (   0.00%)    11346.63 (   4.55%)
Amean     fault-both-18    16718.19 (   0.00%)    15324.19 (   8.34%)
Amean     fault-both-24    21157.19 (   0.00%)    16088.50 *  23.96%*
Amean     fault-both-30    21175.92 (   0.00%)    18723.42 *  11.58%*
Amean     fault-both-32    21339.03 (   0.00%)    18612.01 *  12.78%*

                                5.0.0-rc1              5.0.0-rc1
                            noboost-v3r10          findmig-v3r15
Percentage huge-3        86.50 (   0.00%)       89.83 (   3.85%)
Percentage huge-5        92.52 (   0.00%)       91.96 (  -0.61%)
Percentage huge-7        92.44 (   0.00%)       92.85 (   0.44%)
Percentage huge-12       92.98 (   0.00%)       92.74 (  -0.25%)
Percentage huge-18       91.70 (   0.00%)       91.71 (   0.02%)
Percentage huge-24       91.59 (   0.00%)       92.13 (   0.60%)
Percentage huge-30       90.14 (   0.00%)       93.79 (   4.04%)
Percentage huge-32       90.03 (   0.00%)       91.27 (   1.37%)

This shows an improvement in allocation latencies with similar
allocation success rates.  While not presented, there was a 31%
reduction in migration scanning and a 8% reduction on system CPU usage.
A 2-socket machine showed similar benefits.

[mgorman@techsingularity.net: several fixes]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190204120111.GL9565@techsingularity.net
[vbabka@suse.cz: migrate block that was found-fast, some optimisations]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-10-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <Vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: ignore the fragmentation avoidance boost for isolation and compaction
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:50 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: ignore the fragmentation avoidance boost for isolation and compaction

When pageblocks get fragmented, watermarks are artifically boosted to
reclaim pages to avoid further fragmentation events.  However,
compaction is often either fragmentation-neutral or moving movable pages
away from unmovable/reclaimable pages.  As the true watermarks are
preserved, allow compaction to ignore the boost factor.

The expected impact is very slight as the main benefit is that
compaction is slightly more likely to succeed when the system has been
fragmented very recently.  On both 1-socket and 2-socket machines for
THP-intensive allocation during fragmentation the success rate was
increased by less than 1% which is marginal.  However, detailed tracing
indicated that failure of migration due to a premature ENOMEM triggered
by watermark checks were eliminated.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-9-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: always finish scanning of a full pageblock
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:46 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: always finish scanning of a full pageblock

When compaction is finishing, it uses a flag to ensure the pageblock is
complete but it makes sense to always complete migration of a pageblock.
Minimally, skip information is based on a pageblock and partially
scanned pageblocks may incur more scanning in the future.  The pageblock
skip handling also becomes more strict later in the series and the hint
is more useful if a complete pageblock was always scanned.

The potentially impacts latency as more scanning is done but it's not a
consistent win or loss as the scanning is not always a high percentage
of the pageblock and sometimes it is offset by future reductions in
scanning.  Hence, the results are not presented this time due to a
misleading mix of gains/losses without any clear pattern.  However, full
scanning of the pageblock is important for later patches.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-8-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, migrate: immediately fail migration of a page with no migration handler
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:43 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, migrate: immediately fail migration of a page with no migration handler

Pages with no migration handler use a fallback handler which sometimes
works and sometimes persistently retries.  A historical example was
blockdev pages but there are others such as odd refcounting when
page->private is used.  These are retried multiple times which is
wasteful during compaction so this patch will fail migration faster
unless the caller specifies MIGRATE_SYNC.

This is not expected to help THP allocation success rates but it did
reduce latencies very slightly in some cases.

1-socket thpfioscale
                                        4.20.0                 4.20.0
                              noreserved-v2r15         failfast-v2r15
Amean     fault-both-1         0.00 (   0.00%)        0.00 *   0.00%*
Amean     fault-both-3      3839.67 (   0.00%)     3833.72 (   0.15%)
Amean     fault-both-5      5177.47 (   0.00%)     4967.15 (   4.06%)
Amean     fault-both-7      7245.03 (   0.00%)     7139.19 (   1.46%)
Amean     fault-both-12    11534.89 (   0.00%)    11326.30 (   1.81%)
Amean     fault-both-18    16241.10 (   0.00%)    16270.70 (  -0.18%)
Amean     fault-both-24    19075.91 (   0.00%)    19839.65 (  -4.00%)
Amean     fault-both-30    22712.11 (   0.00%)    21707.05 (   4.43%)
Amean     fault-both-32    21692.92 (   0.00%)    21968.16 (  -1.27%)

The 2-socket results are not materially different.  Scan rates are
similar as expected.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-7-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: rename map_pages to split_map_pages
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:39 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: rename map_pages to split_map_pages

It's non-obvious that high-order free pages are split into order-0 pages
from the function name.  Fix it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-6-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: remove unnecessary zone parameter in some instances
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:36 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: remove unnecessary zone parameter in some instances

A zone parameter is passed into a number of top-level compaction
functions despite the fact that it's already in compact_control.  This
is harmless but it did need an audit to check if zone actually ever
changes meaningfully.  This patches removes the parameter in a number of
top-level functions.  The change could be much deeper but this was
enough to briefly clarify the flow.

No functional change.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-5-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: remove last_migrated_pfn from compact_control
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:32 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: remove last_migrated_pfn from compact_control

The last_migrated_pfn field is a bit dubious as to whether it really
helps but either way, the information from it can be inferred without
increasing the size of compact_control so remove the field.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-4-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: rearrange compact_control
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:28 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: rearrange compact_control

compact_control spans two cache lines with write-intensive lines on
both.  Rearrange so the most write-intensive fields are in the same
cache line.  This has a negligible impact on the overall performance of
compaction and is more a tidying exercise than anything.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-3-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, compaction: shrink compact_control
Mel Gorman [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:25 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm, compaction: shrink compact_control

Patch series "Increase success rates and reduce latency of compaction", v3.

This series reduces scan rates and success rates of compaction,
primarily by using the free lists to shorten scans, better controlling
of skip information and whether multiple scanners can target the same
block and capturing pageblocks before being stolen by parallel requests.
The series is based on mmotm from January 9th, 2019 with the previous
compaction series reverted.

I'm mostly using thpscale to measure the impact of the series.  The
benchmark creates a large file, maps it, faults it, punches holes in the
mapping so that the virtual address space is fragmented and then tries
to allocate THP.  It re-executes for different numbers of threads.  From
a fragmentation perspective, the workload is relatively benign but it
does stress compaction.

The overall impact on latencies for a 1-socket machine is

      baseline       patches
Amean     fault-both-3      3832.09 (   0.00%)     2748.56 *  28.28%*
Amean     fault-both-5      4933.06 (   0.00%)     4255.52 (  13.73%)
Amean     fault-both-7      7017.75 (   0.00%)     6586.93 (   6.14%)
Amean     fault-both-12    11610.51 (   0.00%)     9162.34 *  21.09%*
Amean     fault-both-18    17055.85 (   0.00%)    11530.06 *  32.40%*
Amean     fault-both-24    19306.27 (   0.00%)    17956.13 (   6.99%)
Amean     fault-both-30    22516.49 (   0.00%)    15686.47 *  30.33%*
Amean     fault-both-32    23442.93 (   0.00%)    16564.83 *  29.34%*

The allocation success rates are much improved

   baseline  patches
Percentage huge-3        85.99 (   0.00%)       97.96 (  13.92%)
Percentage huge-5        88.27 (   0.00%)       96.87 (   9.74%)
Percentage huge-7        85.87 (   0.00%)       94.53 (  10.09%)
Percentage huge-12       82.38 (   0.00%)       98.44 (  19.49%)
Percentage huge-18       83.29 (   0.00%)       99.14 (  19.04%)
Percentage huge-24       81.41 (   0.00%)       97.35 (  19.57%)
Percentage huge-30       80.98 (   0.00%)       98.05 (  21.08%)
Percentage huge-32       80.53 (   0.00%)       97.06 (  20.53%)

That's a nearly perfect allocation success rate.

The biggest impact is on the scan rates

Compaction migrate scanned    55893379    19341254
Compaction free scanned      474739990    11903963

The number of pages scanned for migration was reduced by 65% and the
free scanner was reduced by 97.5%.  So much less work in exchange for
lower latency and better success rates.

The series was also evaluated using a workload that heavily fragments
memory but the benefits there are also significant, albeit not
presented.

It was commented that we should be rethinking scanning entirely and to a
large extent I agree.  However, to achieve that you need a lot of this
series in place first so it's best to make the linear scanners as best
as possible before ripping them out.

This patch (of 22):

The isolate and migrate scanners should never isolate more than a
pageblock of pages so unsigned int is sufficient saving 8 bytes on a
64-bit build.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190118175136.31341-2-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/filemap: pass inclusive 'end_byte' parameter to filemap_range_has_page
zhengbin [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:21 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm/filemap: pass inclusive 'end_byte' parameter to filemap_range_has_page

The 'end_byte' parameter of filemap_range_has_page is required to be
inclusive, so follow the rule.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1548678679-18122-1-git-send-email-zhengbin13@huawei.com
Fixes: 6be96d3ad34a ("fs: return if direct I/O will trigger writeback")
Signed-off-by: zhengbin <zhengbin13@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <darrick.wong@oracle.com>
Cc: Amir Goldstein <amir73il@gmail.com>
Cc: Dave Chinner <david@fromorbit.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Hou Tao <houtao1@huawei.com>
Cc: zhangyi (F) <yi.zhang@huawei.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: shuffle GFP_* flags
Alexey Dobriyan [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:18 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm: shuffle GFP_* flags

GFP_KERNEL is one of the most used constant but on archs like arm with
fixed length instruction some constants are more equal than the others.
Constants with tightly packed bits can be injected directly into
instruction stream:

   0:   e3a00d33        mov     r0, #3264       ; 0xcc0

Others require multiple instructions or even loading out of instruction
stream:

   0:   e3a000c0        mov     r0, #192        ; 0xc0
   4:   e3400060        movt    r0, #96 ; 0x60

Shuffle GFP_* flags so that GFP_KERNEL/GFP_ATOMIC + __GFP_ZERO bits are
close to each other.

Savings on arm configs are ~0.1%.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190109201838.GA9140@avx2
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: swap: add comment for swap_vma_readahead
Yang Shi [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:15 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm: swap: add comment for swap_vma_readahead

swap_vma_readahead()'s comment is missing, just add it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1546543673-108536-2-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Tim Chen <tim.c.chen@intel.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: swap: check if swap backing device is congested or not
Yang Shi [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:11 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm: swap: check if swap backing device is congested or not

Swap readahead would read in a few pages regardless if the underlying
device is busy or not.  It may incur long waiting time if the device is
congested, and it may also exacerbate the congestion.

Use inode_read_congested() to check if the underlying device is busy or
not like what file page readahead does.  Get inode from
swap_info_struct.

Although we can add inode information in swap_address_space
(address_space->host), it may lead some unexpected side effect, i.e.  it
may break mapping_cap_account_dirty().  Using inode from
swap_info_struct seems simple and good enough.

Just does the check in vma_cluster_readahead() since
swap_vma_readahead() is just used for non-rotational device which much
less likely has congestion than traditional HDD.

Although swap slots may be consecutive on swap partition, it still may
be fragmented on swap file.  This check would help to reduce excessive
stall for such case.

The test with page_fault1 of will-it-scale (sometimes tracing may just
show runtest.py that is the wrapper script of page_fault1), which
basically launches NR_CPU threads to generate 128MB anonymous pages for
each thread, on my virtual machine with congested HDD shows long tail
latency is reduced significantly.

Without the patch
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.311706: funcgraph_entry:      #57377.796 us |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.369103: funcgraph_entry:        5.642us   |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.369119: funcgraph_entry:      #1289.592 us |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.370411: funcgraph_entry:        4.957us   |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.370419: funcgraph_entry:        1.940us   |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.378847: funcgraph_entry:      #1411.385 us |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.380262: funcgraph_entry:        3.916us   |  do_swap_page();
 page_fault1_thr-1490  [023]   129.380275: funcgraph_entry:      #4287.751 us |  do_swap_page();

With the patch
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.925911: funcgraph_entry:      #9870.146 us |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935785: funcgraph_entry:        9.802us   |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935799: funcgraph_entry:        3.551us   |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935806: funcgraph_entry:        2.142us   |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935853: funcgraph_entry:        6.938us   |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935864: funcgraph_entry:        3.765us   |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935871: funcgraph_entry:        3.600us   |  do_swap_page();
      runtest.py-1417  [020]   301.935878: funcgraph_entry:        7.202us   |  do_swap_page();

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: code cleanup]
[yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com: add comment]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/bbc7bda7-62d0-df1a-23ef-d369e865bdca@linux.alibaba.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1546543673-108536-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Tim Chen <tim.c.chen@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/filemap.c: remove redundant test from find_get_pages_contig
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:08 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm/filemap.c: remove redundant test from find_get_pages_contig

After we establish a reference on the page, we check the pointer
continues to be in the correct position in i_pages.  Checking
page->index afterwards is unnecessary; if it were to change, then the
pointer to it from the page cache would also move.  The check used to be
done before grabbing a reference on the page which was racy (see commit
9cbb4cb21b19f ("mm: find_get_pages_contig fixlet")), but nobody noticed
that moving the check after grabbing the reference was redundant.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190107200224.13260-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/memcontrol.c: use struct_size() in kmalloc()
Gustavo A. R. Silva [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:05 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm/memcontrol.c: use struct_size() in kmalloc()

One of the more common cases of allocation size calculations is finding
the size of a structure that has a zero-sized array at the end, along
with memory for some number of elements for that array.  For example:

  struct foo {
      int stuff;
      void *entry[];
  };

  instance = kmalloc(sizeof(struct foo) + sizeof(void *) * count, GFP_KERNEL);

Instead of leaving these open-coded and prone to type mistakes, we can
now use the new struct_size() helper:

  instance = kmalloc(struct_size(instance, entry, count), GFP_KERNEL);

This code was detected with the help of Coccinelle.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190104183726.GA6374@embeddedor
Signed-off-by: Gustavo A. R. Silva <gustavo@embeddedor.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: remove extra drain pages on pcp list
Wei Yang [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:44:01 +0000 (15:44 -0800)]
mm: remove extra drain pages on pcp list

In the current implementation, there are two places to isolate a range
of page: __offline_pages() and alloc_contig_range().  During this
procedure, it will drain pages on pcp list.

Below is a brief call flow:

  __offline_pages()/alloc_contig_range()
      start_isolate_page_range()
          set_migratetype_isolate()
              drain_all_pages()
      drain_all_pages()                 <--- A

This snippet shows the current logic is isolate and drain pcp list for
each pageblock and drain pcp list again for the whole range.

start_isolate_page_range is responsible for isolating the given pfn
range.  One part of that job is to make sure that also pages that are on
the allocator pcp lists are properly isolated.  Otherwise they could be
reused and the range wouldn't be completely isolated until the memory is
freed back.  While there is no strict guarantee here because pages might
get allocated at any time before drain_all_pages is called there doesn't
seem to be any strong demand for such a guarantee.

In any case, draining is already done at the isolation level and there
is no need to do it again later by start_isolate_page_range callers
(memory hotplug and CMA allocator currently).  Therefore remove
pointless draining in existing callers to make the code more clear and
functionally correct.

[mhocko@suse.com: provide a clearer changelog for the last two paragraphs]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190105233141.2329-1-richard.weiyang@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoarm64/mm: enable HugeTLB migration for contiguous bit HugeTLB pages
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:58 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
arm64/mm: enable HugeTLB migration for contiguous bit HugeTLB pages

Let arm64 subscribe to the previously added framework in which
architecture can inform whether a given huge page size is supported for
migration.  This just overrides the default function
arch_hugetlb_migration_supported() and enables migration for all
possible HugeTLB page sizes on arm64.

With this, HugeTLB migration support on arm64 now covers all possible
HugeTLB options.

          CONT PTE    PMD    CONT PMD    PUD
          --------    ---    --------    ---
  4K:        64K      2M        32M      1G
  16K:        2M     32M         1G
  64K:        2M    512M        16G

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545121450-1663-6-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Steve Capper <steve.capper@arm.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoarm64/mm: enable HugeTLB migration
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:55 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
arm64/mm: enable HugeTLB migration

Let arm64 subscribe to generic HugeTLB page migration framework.  Right
now this only works on the following PMD and PUD level HugeTLB page
sizes with various kernel base page size combinations.

         CONT PTE    PMD    CONT PMD    PUD
         --------    ---    --------    ---
  4K:         NA     2M         NA      1G
  16K:        NA    32M         NA
  64K:        NA   512M         NA

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545121450-1663-5-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Steve Capper <steve.capper@arm.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/hugetlb: enable arch specific huge page size support for migration
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:51 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/hugetlb: enable arch specific huge page size support for migration

Architectures like arm64 have HugeTLB page sizes which are different
than generic sizes at PMD, PUD, PGD level and implemented via contiguous
bits.  At present these special size HugeTLB pages cannot be identified
through macros like (PMD|PUD|PGDIR)_SHIFT and hence chosen not be
migrated.

Enabling migration support for these special HugeTLB page sizes along
with the generic ones (PMD|PUD|PGD) would require identifying all of
them on a given platform.  A platform specific hook can precisely
enumerate all huge page sizes supported for migration.  Instead of
comparing against standard huge page orders let
hugetlb_migration_support() function call a platform hook
arch_hugetlb_migration_support().  Default definition for the platform
hook maintains existing semantics which checks standard huge page order.
But an architecture can choose to override the default and provide
support for a comprehensive set of huge page sizes.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545121450-1663-4-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Steve Capper <steve.capper@arm.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/hugetlb: enable PUD level huge page migration
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:48 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/hugetlb: enable PUD level huge page migration

Architectures like arm64 have PUD level HugeTLB pages for certain configs
(1GB huge page is PUD based on ARM64_4K_PAGES base page size) that can
be enabled for migration.  It can be achieved through checking for
PUD_SHIFT order based HugeTLB pages during migration.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545121450-1663-3-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Steve Capper <steve.capper@arm.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/hugetlb: distinguish between migratability and movability
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:44 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/hugetlb: distinguish between migratability and movability

Patch series "arm64/mm: Enable HugeTLB migration", v4.

This patch series enables HugeTLB migration support for all supported
huge page sizes at all levels including contiguous bit implementation.
Following HugeTLB migration support matrix has been enabled with this
patch series.  All permutations have been tested except for the 16GB.

           CONT PTE    PMD    CONT PMD    PUD
           --------    ---    --------    ---
  4K:         64K     2M         32M     1G
  16K:         2M    32M          1G
  64K:         2M   512M         16G

First the series adds migration support for PUD based huge pages.  It
then adds a platform specific hook to query an architecture if a given
huge page size is supported for migration while also providing a default
fallback option preserving the existing semantics which just checks for
(PMD|PUD|PGDIR)_SHIFT macros.  The last two patches enables HugeTLB
migration on arm64 and subscribe to this new platform specific hook by
defining an override.

The second patch differentiates between movability and migratability
aspects of huge pages and implements hugepage_movable_supported() which
can then be used during allocation to decide whether to place the huge
page in movable zone or not.

This patch (of 5):

During huge page allocation it's migratability is checked to determine
if it should be placed under movable zones with GFP_HIGHUSER_MOVABLE.
But the movability aspect of the huge page could depend on other factors
than just migratability.  Movability in itself is a distinct property
which should not be tied with migratability alone.

This differentiates these two and implements an enhanced movability check
which also considers huge page size to determine if it is feasible to be
placed under a movable zone.  At present it just checks for gigantic pages
but going forward it can incorporate other enhanced checks.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545121450-1663-2-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Steve Capper <steve.capper@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: remove sysctl_extfrag_handler()
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:41 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm: remove sysctl_extfrag_handler()

sysctl_extfrag_handler() neglects to propagate the return value from
proc_dointvec_minmax() to its caller.  It's a wrapper that doesn't need
to exist, so just use proc_dointvec_minmax() directly.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190104032557.3056-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Reported-by: Aditya Pakki <pakki001@umn.edu>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoselftests/vm: add script helper for CONFIG_TEST_VMALLOC_MODULE
Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:37 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
selftests/vm: add script helper for CONFIG_TEST_VMALLOC_MODULE

Add the test script for the kernel test driver to analyse vmalloc
allocator for benchmarking and stressing purposes.  It is just a kernel
module loader.  You can specify and pass different parameters in order
to investigate allocations behaviour.  See "usage" output for more
details.

Also add basic vmalloc smoke test to the "run_vmtests" suite.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103142108.20744-4-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agovmalloc: add test driver to analyse vmalloc allocator
Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:34 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
vmalloc: add test driver to analyse vmalloc allocator

This adds a new kernel module for analysis of vmalloc allocator.  It is
only enabled as a module.  There are two main reasons this module should
be used for: performance evaluation and stressing of vmalloc subsystem.

It consists of several test cases.  As of now there are 8.  The module
has five parameters we can specify to change its the behaviour.

1) run_test_mask - set of tests to be run

id: 1,   name: fix_size_alloc_test
id: 2,   name: full_fit_alloc_test
id: 4,   name: long_busy_list_alloc_test
id: 8,   name: random_size_alloc_test
id: 16,  name: fix_align_alloc_test
id: 32,  name: random_size_align_alloc_test
id: 64,  name: align_shift_alloc_test
id: 128, name: pcpu_alloc_test

By default all tests are in run test mask.  If you want to select some
specific tests it is possible to pass the mask.  For example for first,
second and fourth tests we go 11 value.

2) test_repeat_count - how many times each test should be repeated
By default it is one time per test. It is possible to pass any number.
As high the value is the test duration gets increased.

3) test_loop_count - internal test loop counter. By default it is set
to 1000000.

4) single_cpu_test - use one CPU to run the tests
By default this parameter is set to false. It means that all online
CPUs execute tests. By setting it to 1, the tests are executed by
first online CPU only.

5) sequential_test_order - run tests in sequential order
By default this parameter is set to false. It means that before running
tests the order is shuffled. It is possible to make it sequential, just
set it to 1.

Performance analysis:
In order to evaluate performance of vmalloc allocations, usually it
makes sense to use only one CPU that runs tests, use sequential order,
number of repeat tests can be different as well as set of test mask.

For example if we want to run all tests, to use one CPU and repeat each
test 3 times. Insert the module passing following parameters:

single_cpu_test=1 sequential_test_order=1 test_repeat_count=3

with following output:

<snip>
Summary: fix_size_alloc_test passed: 3 failed: 0 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 901177 usec
Summary: full_fit_alloc_test passed: 3 failed: 0 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 1039341 usec
Summary: long_busy_list_alloc_test passed: 3 failed: 0 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 11775763 usec
Summary: random_size_alloc_test passed 3: failed: 0 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 6081992 usec
Summary: fix_align_alloc_test passed: 3 failed: 0 repeat: 3, loops: 1000000 avg: 2003712 usec
Summary: random_size_align_alloc_test passed: 3 failed: 0 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 2895689 usec
Summary: align_shift_alloc_test passed: 0 failed: 3 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 573 usec
Summary: pcpu_alloc_test passed: 3 failed: 0 repeat: 3 loops: 1000000 avg: 95802 usec
All test took CPU0=192945605995 cycles
<snip>

The align_shift_alloc_test is expected to be failed.

Stressing:
In order to stress the vmalloc subsystem we run all available test cases
on all available CPUs simultaneously. In order to prevent constant behaviour
pattern, the test cases array is shuffled by default to randomize the order
of test execution.

For example if we want to run all tests(default), use all online CPUs(default)
with shuffled order(default) and to repeat each test 30 times. The command
would be like:

modprobe vmalloc_test test_repeat_count=30

Expected results are the system is alive, there are no any BUG_ONs or Kernel
Panics the tests are completed, no memory leaks.

[urezki@gmail.com: fix 32-bit builds]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190106214839.ffvjvmrn52uqog7k@pc636
[urezki@gmail.com: make CONFIG_TEST_VMALLOC depend on CONFIG_MMU]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190219085441.s6bg2gpy4esny5vw@pc636
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103142108.20744-3-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agovmalloc: export __vmalloc_node_range for CONFIG_TEST_VMALLOC_MODULE
Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:30 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
vmalloc: export __vmalloc_node_range for CONFIG_TEST_VMALLOC_MODULE

Export __vmaloc_node_range() function if CONFIG_TEST_VMALLOC_MODULE is
enabled.  Some test cases in vmalloc test suite module require and make
use of that function.  Please note, that it is not supposed to be used
for other purposes.

We need it only for performance analysis, stressing and stability check
of vmalloc allocator.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103142108.20744-2-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmalloc: pass VM_USERMAP flags directly to __vmalloc_node_range()
Roman Penyaev [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:27 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/vmalloc: pass VM_USERMAP flags directly to __vmalloc_node_range()

vmalloc_user*() calls differ from normal vmalloc() only in that they set
VM_USERMAP flags for the area.  During the whole history of vmalloc.c
changes now it is possible simply to pass VM_USERMAP flags directly to
__vmalloc_node_range() call instead of finding the area (which obviously
takes time) after the allocation.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103145954.16942-4-rpenyaev@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Roman Penyaev <rpenyaev@suse.de>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: "Luis R. Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmalloc: do not call kmemleak_free() on not yet accounted memory
Roman Penyaev [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:24 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/vmalloc: do not call kmemleak_free() on not yet accounted memory

__vmalloc_area_node() calls vfree() on error path, which in turn calls
kmemleak_free(), but area is not yet accounted by kmemleak_vmalloc().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103145954.16942-3-rpenyaev@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Roman Penyaev <rpenyaev@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: "Luis R. Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmalloc: fix size check for remap_vmalloc_range_partial()
Roman Penyaev [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:20 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/vmalloc: fix size check for remap_vmalloc_range_partial()

When VM_NO_GUARD is not set area->size includes adjacent guard page,
thus for correct size checking get_vm_area_size() should be used, but
not area->size.

This fixes possible kernel oops when userspace tries to mmap an area on
1 page bigger than was allocated by vmalloc_user() call: the size check
inside remap_vmalloc_range_partial() accounts non-existing guard page
also, so check successfully passes but vmalloc_to_page() returns NULL
(guard page does not physically exist).

The following code pattern example should trigger an oops:

  static int oops_mmap(struct file *file, struct vm_area_struct *vma)
  {
        void *mem;

        mem = vmalloc_user(4096);
        BUG_ON(!mem);
        /* Do not care about mem leak */

        return remap_vmalloc_range(vma, mem, 0);
  }

And userspace simply mmaps size + PAGE_SIZE:

  mmap(NULL, 8192, PROT_WRITE|PROT_READ, MAP_PRIVATE, fd, 0);

Possible candidates for oops which do not have any explicit size
checks:

   *** drivers/media/usb/stkwebcam/stk-webcam.c:
   v4l_stk_mmap[789]   ret = remap_vmalloc_range(vma, sbuf->buffer, 0);

Or the following one:

   *** drivers/video/fbdev/core/fbmem.c
   static int
   fb_mmap(struct file *file, struct vm_area_struct * vma)
        ...
        res = fb->fb_mmap(info, vma);

Where fb_mmap callback calls remap_vmalloc_range() directly without any
explicit checks:

   *** drivers/video/fbdev/vfb.c
   static int vfb_mmap(struct fb_info *info,
             struct vm_area_struct *vma)
   {
       return remap_vmalloc_range(vma, (void *)info->fix.smem_start, vma->vm_pgoff);
   }

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103145954.16942-2-rpenyaev@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Roman Penyaev <rpenyaev@suse.de>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: "Luis R. Rodriguez" <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmalloc.c: make vmalloc_32_user() align base kernel virtual address to SHMLBA
Roman Penyaev [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:17 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm/vmalloc.c: make vmalloc_32_user() align base kernel virtual address to SHMLBA

This patch repeats the original one from David S Miller:

  2dca6999eed5 ("mm, perf_event: Make vmalloc_user() align base kernel virtual address to SHMLBA")

but for missed vmalloc_32_user() case, which also requires correct
alignment of virtual address on kernel side to avoid D-caches aliases.
A bit of copy-paste from original patch to recover in memory of what is
all about:

  When a vmalloc'd area is mmap'd into userspace, some kind of
  co-ordination is necessary for this to work on platforms with cpu
  D-caches which can have aliases.

  Otherwise kernel side writes won't be seen properly in userspace and
  vice versa.

  If the kernel side mapping and the user side one have the same
  alignment, modulo SHMLBA, this can work as long as VM_SHARED is shared
  of VMA and for all current users this is true. VM_SHARED will force
  SHMLBA alignment of the user side mmap on platforms with D-cache
  aliasing matters.

  David S. Miller

> What are the user-visible runtime effects of this change?

In simple words: proper alignment avoids possible difference in data,
seen by different virtual mapings: userspace and kernel in our case.
I.e. userspace reads cache line A, kernel writes to cache line B.  Both
cache lines correspond to the same physical memory (thus aliases).

So this should fix data corruption for archs with vivt and vipt caches,
e.g. armv6.  Personally I've never worked with this archs, I just
spotted the strange difference in code: for one case we do alignment,
for another - not.  I have a strong feeling that David simply missed
vmalloc_32_user() case.

>
> Is a -stable backport needed?

No, I do not think so.  The only one user of vmalloc_32_user() is
virtual frame buffer device drivers/video/fbdev/vfb.c, which has in the
description "The main use of this frame buffer device is testing and
debugging the frame buffer subsystem.  Do NOT enable it for normal
systems!".

And it seems to me that this vfb.c does not need 32bit addressable pages
(vmalloc_32_user() case), because it is virtual device and should not
care about things like dma32 zones, etc.  Probably is better to clean
the code and switch vfb.c from vmalloc_32_user() to vmalloc_user() case
and wipe out vmalloc_32_user() from vmalloc.c completely.  But I'm not
very much sure that this is worth to do, that's so minor, so we can
leave it as is.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190108110944.23591-1-rpenyaev@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Roman Penyaev <rpenyaev@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomemcg: localize memcg_kmem_enabled() check
Shakeel Butt [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:13 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
memcg: localize memcg_kmem_enabled() check

Move the memcg_kmem_enabled() checks into memcg kmem charge/uncharge
functions, so, the users don't have to explicitly check that condition.

This is purely code cleanup patch without any functional change.  Only
the order of checks in memcg_charge_slab() can potentially be changed
but the functionally it will be same.  This should not matter as
memcg_charge_slab() is not in the hot path.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190103161203.162375-1-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm, slub: make the comment of put_cpu_partial() complete
Wei Yang [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:10 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm, slub: make the comment of put_cpu_partial() complete

There are two cases when put_cpu_partial() is invoked.

    * __slab_free
    * get_partial_node

This patch just makes it cover these two cases.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181025094437.18951-3-richard.weiyang@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: reuse only-pte-mapped KSM page in do_wp_page()
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:06 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
mm: reuse only-pte-mapped KSM page in do_wp_page()

Add an optimization for KSM pages almost in the same way that we have
for ordinary anonymous pages.  If there is a write fault in a page,
which is mapped to an only pte, and it is not related to swap cache; the
page may be reused without copying its content.

[ Note that we do not consider PageSwapCache() pages at least for now,
  since we don't want to complicate __get_ksm_page(), which has nice
  optimization based on this (for the migration case). Currenly it is
  spinning on PageSwapCache() pages, waiting for when they have
  unfreezed counters (i.e., for the migration finish). But we don't want
  to make it also spinning on swap cache pages, which we try to reuse,
  since there is not a very high probability to reuse them. So, for now
  we do not consider PageSwapCache() pages at all. ]

So in reuse_ksm_page() we check for 1) PageSwapCache() and 2)
page_stable_node(), to skip a page, which KSM is currently trying to
link to stable tree.  Then we do page_ref_freeze() to prohibit KSM to
merge one more page into the page, we are reusing.  After that, nobody
can refer to the reusing page: KSM skips !PageSwapCache() pages with
zero refcount; and the protection against of all other participants is
the same as for reused ordinary anon pages pte lock, page lock and
mmap_sem.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: replace BUG_ON()s with WARN_ON()s]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/154471491016.31352.1168978849911555609.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Claudio Imbrenda <imbrenda@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agotools/: replace open encodings for NUMA_NO_NODE
Stephen Rothwell [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:43:01 +0000 (15:43 -0800)]
tools/: replace open encodings for NUMA_NO_NODE

This replaces all open encodings in tools with NUMA_NO_NODE.  Also
linux/numa.h is now needed for the perf build.

[sfr@canb.auug.org.au: fix for replace open encodings for NUMA_NO_NODE]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190108131141.730e9c4f@canb.auug.org.au
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545127933-10711-3-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Doug Ledford <dledford@redhat.com> [drivers/infiniband]
Cc: Hans Verkuil <hverkuil@xs4all.nl>
Cc: Jeff Kirsher <jeffrey.t.kirsher@intel.com> [ixgbe]
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> [mtip32xx]
Cc: Joseph Qi <jiangqi903@gmail.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> [powerpc]
Cc: Vinod Koul <vkoul@kernel.org> [dmaengine.c]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm: replace all open encodings for NUMA_NO_NODE
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:42:58 +0000 (15:42 -0800)]
mm: replace all open encodings for NUMA_NO_NODE

Patch series "Replace all open encodings for NUMA_NO_NODE", v3.

All these places for replacement were found by running the following
grep patterns on the entire kernel code.  Please let me know if this
might have missed some instances.  This might also have replaced some
false positives.  I will appreciate suggestions, inputs and review.

1. git grep "nid == -1"
2. git grep "node == -1"
3. git grep "nid = -1"
4. git grep "node = -1"

This patch (of 2):

At present there are multiple places where invalid node number is
encoded as -1.  Even though implicitly understood it is always better to
have macros in there.  Replace these open encodings for an invalid node
number with the global macro NUMA_NO_NODE.  This helps remove NUMA
related assumptions like 'invalid node' from various places redirecting
them to a common definition.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1545127933-10711-2-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Jeff Kirsher <jeffrey.t.kirsher@intel.com> [ixgbe]
Acked-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> [mtip32xx]
Acked-by: Vinod Koul <vkoul@kernel.org> [dmaengine.c]
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> [powerpc]
Acked-by: Doug Ledford <dledford@redhat.com> [drivers/infiniband]
Cc: Joseph Qi <jiangqi903@gmail.com>
Cc: Hans Verkuil <hverkuil@xs4all.nl>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agomm/vmalloc.c: don't dereference possible NULL pointer in __vunmap()
Liviu Dudau [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:42:54 +0000 (15:42 -0800)]
mm/vmalloc.c: don't dereference possible NULL pointer in __vunmap()

find_vmap_area() can return a NULL pointer and we're going to
dereference it without checking it first.  Use the existing
find_vm_area() function which does exactly what we want and checks for
the NULL pointer.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181228171009.22269-1-liviu@dudau.co.uk
Fixes: f3c01d2f3ade ("mm: vmalloc: avoid racy handling of debugobjects in vunmap")
Signed-off-by: Liviu Dudau <liviu@dudau.co.uk>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Chintan Pandya <cpandya@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoPM/Hibernate: exclude all PageOffline() pages
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:42:50 +0000 (15:42 -0800)]
PM/Hibernate: exclude all PageOffline() pages

The content of pages that are marked PG_offline is not of interest (e.g.
inflated by a balloon driver), let's skip these pages.

In saveable_highmem_page(), move the PageReserved() check to a new check
along with the PageOffline() check to separate it from the swsusp
checks.

[david@redhat.com: v2]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181122100627.5189-9-david@redhat.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181119101616.8901-9-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Pavel Machek <pavel@ucw.cz>
Acked-by: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: Pavel Machek <pavel@ucw.cz>
Cc: Len Brown <len.brown@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Boris Ostrovsky <boris.ostrovsky@oracle.com>
Cc: Christian Hansen <chansen3@cisco.com>
Cc: Dave Young <dyoung@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Haiyang Zhang <haiyangz@microsoft.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Juergen Gross <jgross@suse.com>
Cc: Julien Freche <jfreche@vmware.com>
Cc: Kairui Song <kasong@redhat.com>
Cc: Kazuhito Hagio <k-hagio@ab.jp.nec.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com>
Cc: "K. Y. Srinivasan" <kys@microsoft.com>
Cc: Lianbo Jiang <lijiang@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Miles Chen <miles.chen@mediatek.com>
Cc: Nadav Amit <namit@vmware.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com>
Cc: Pankaj gupta <pagupta@redhat.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Stefano Stabellini <sstabellini@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Hemminger <sthemmin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Xavier Deguillard <xdeguillard@vmware.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 months agoPM/Hibernate: use pfn_to_online_page()
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 5 Mar 2019 23:42:45 +0000 (15:42 -0800)]
PM/Hibernate: use pfn_to_online_page()

Let's use pfn_to_online_page() instead of pfn_to_page() when checking
for saveable pages to not save/restore offline memory sections.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181119101616.8901-8-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Pavel Machek <pavel@ucw.cz>
Acked-by: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: Len Brown <len.brown@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Boris Ostrovsky <boris.ostrovsky@oracle.com>
Cc: Christian Hansen <chansen3@cisco.com>
Cc: Dave Young <dyoung@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Haiyang Zhang <haiyangz@microsoft.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Juergen Gross <jgross@suse.com>
Cc: Julien Freche <jfreche@vmware.com>
Cc: Kairui Song <kasong@redhat.com>
Cc: Kazuhito Hagio <k-hagio@ab.jp.nec.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com>
Cc: "K. Y. Srinivasan" <kys@microsoft.com>
Cc: Lianbo Jiang <lijiang@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Miles Chen <miles.chen@mediatek.com>
Cc: Nadav Amit <namit@vmware.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com>
Cc: Pankaj gupta <pagupta@redhat.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Stefano Stabellini <sstabellini@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Hemminger <sthemmin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Xavier Deguillard <xdeguillard@vmware.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>