sfrench/cifs-2.6.git
17 months agoMerge tag 'linux-watchdog-4.20-rc1' of git://www.linux-watchdog.org/linux-watchdog
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 17:25:22 +0000 (10:25 -0700)]
Merge tag 'linux-watchdog-4.20-rc1' of git://linux-watchdog.org/linux-watchdog

Pull watchdog updates from Wim Van Sebroeck:

 - Add Armada 37xx CPU watchdog

 - w83627hf_wdt: Add Support for NCT6796D, NCT6797D, NCT6798D

 - hpwdt: several improvements

 - renesas_wdt: SPDX identifiers, stop when unregistering, support for
   R7S9210

 - rza_wdt: SPDX identifiers, support longer timeouts

 - core: fix null pointer dereference when releasing cdev

 - iTCO_wdt: Drop option vendorsupport=2

 - sama5d4: fix timeout-sec usage

 - lantiq_wdt: convert to watchdog framework

 - several small fixes

* tag 'linux-watchdog-4.20-rc1' of git://www.linux-watchdog.org/linux-watchdog: (30 commits)
  watchdog: ts4800: release syscon device node in ts4800_wdt_probe()
  watchdog: armada_37xx_wdt: use do_div for u64 division
  documentation: watchdog: add documentation for armada-37xx-wdt
  dt-bindings: watchdog: Document armada-37xx-wdt binding
  watchdog: Add support for Armada 37xx CPU watchdog
  dt-bindings: watchdog: add mpc8xxx-wdt support
  watchdog: mpc8xxx: provide boot status
  MAINTAINERS: Fix file pattern for MEN Z069 watchdog driver
  dt-bindings: watchdog: renesas-wdt: Add support for R7S9210
  watchdog: rza_wdt: Support longer timeouts
  watchdog: hpwdt: Disable PreTimeout when Timeout is smaller
  watchdog: w83627hf_wdt: Support NCT6796D, NCT6797D, NCT6798D
  watchdog: mpc8xxx: use dev_xxxx() instead of pr_xxxx()
  watchdog: lantiq: add get_timeleft callback
  watchdog: lantiq: Convert to watchdog_device
  watchdog: lantiq: update register names to better match spec
  watchdog: sama5d4: fix timeout-sec usage
  watchdog: fix a small number of "watchog" typos in comments
  watchdog: rza_wdt: convert to SPDX identifiers
  watchdog: iTCO_wdt: Remove unused hooks
  ...

17 months agoMerge branch 'for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/dtor/input
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 17:20:39 +0000 (10:20 -0700)]
Merge branch 'for-linus' of git://git./linux/kernel/git/dtor/input

Pull input updates from Dmitry Torokhov:
 "Just random driver fixups, nothing exiting"

* 'for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/dtor/input:
  Input: synaptics - avoid using uninitialized variable when probing
  Input: xen-kbdfront - mark expected switch fall-through
  Input: atmel_mxt_ts - mark expected switch fall-through
  Input: cyapa - mark expected switch fall-throughs
  Input: wm97xx-ts - fix exit path
  Input: of_touchscreen - add support for touchscreen-min-x|y
  Input: Fix DIR-685 touchkeys MAINTAINERS entry
  Input: elants_i2c - use DMA safe i2c when possible
  Input: silead - try firmware reload after unsuccessful resume
  Input: st1232 - set INPUT_PROP_DIRECT property
  Input: xilinx_ps2 - convert to using %pOFn instead of device_node.name
  Input: atmel_mxt_ts - fix multiple <linux/property.h> includes
  Input: sun4i-lradc - convert to using %pOFn instead of device_node.name
  Input: pwm-vibrator - correct pwms in DT binding example

17 months agoMerge tag 'rtc-4.20' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/abelloni/linux
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 16:24:24 +0000 (09:24 -0700)]
Merge tag 'rtc-4.20' of git://git./linux/kernel/git/abelloni/linux

Pull RTC updates from Alexandre Belloni:
 "This cycle, there were mostly non urgent fixes in drivers. I also
  finally unexported the non managed registration.

  Subsystem:

   - non devm managed registration is now removed from the driver API

   - all the unnecessary rtc_valid_tm() calls have been removed

  Drivers:

   - abx80X: watchdog support

   - cmos: fix non ACPI support

   - sc27xx: fix alarm support

   - Remove a possible sysfs race condition for ab8500, ds1307, ds1685,
     isl1208

   - Fix a possible race condition where an irq handler may be called
     before the rtc_device struct is allocated for mt6397, pl030,
     menelaus, armada38x"

* tag 'rtc-4.20' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/abelloni/linux: (54 commits)
  rtc: sc27xx: Always read normal alarm when registering RTC device
  rtc: sc27xx: Add check to see if need to enable the alarm interrupt
  rtc: sc27xx: Remove interrupts disable and clear in probe()
  rtc: sc27xx: Clear SPG value update interrupt status
  rtc: sc27xx: Set wakeup capability before registering rtc device
  rtc: s35390a: Change buf's type to u8 in s35390a_init
  rtc: ds1307: fix ds1339 wakealarm support
  rtc: ds1685: simplify getting .driver_data
  rtc: m41t80: mark expected switch fall-through
  rtc: tegra: Propagate errors from platform_get_irq()
  rtc: cmos: Remove the `use_acpi_alarm' module parameter for !ACPI
  rtc: cmos: Fix non-ACPI undefined reference to `hpet_rtc_interrupt'
  rtc: mv: let the core handle invalid alarms
  rtc: vr41xx: switch to rtc_time64_to_tm/rtc_tm_to_time64
  rtc: ab8500: remove useless check
  rtc: ab8500: let the core handle range
  rtc: ab8500: use rtc_add_group
  rtc: rs5c348: report error when time is invalid
  rtc: rs5c348: remove forward declaration
  rtc: rs5c348: remove useless label
  ...

17 months agoMerge tag 'led-fix-for-4.20-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git...
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 16:20:42 +0000 (09:20 -0700)]
Merge tag 'led-fix-for-4.20-rc1' of git://git./linux/kernel/git/j.anaszewski/linux-leds

Pull LED fix from Jacek Anaszewski.

* tag 'led-fix-for-4.20-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/j.anaszewski/linux-leds:
  leds: gpio: set led_dat->gpiod pointer for OF defined GPIO leds

17 months agoi2c-hid: properly terminate i2c_hid_dmi_desc_override_table[] array
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 16:10:48 +0000 (09:10 -0700)]
i2c-hid: properly terminate i2c_hid_dmi_desc_override_table[] array

Commit 9ee3e06610fd ("HID: i2c-hid: override HID descriptors for certain
devices") added a new dmi_system_id quirk table to override certain HID
report descriptors for some systems that lack them.

But the table wasn't properly terminated, causing the dmi matching to
walk off into la-la-land, and starting to treat random data as dmi
descriptor pointers, causing boot-time oopses if you were at all
unlucky.

Terminate the array.

We really should have some way to just statically check that arrays that
should be terminated by an empty entry actually are so.  But the HID
people really should have caught this themselves, rather than have me
deal with an oops during the merge window.  Tssk, tssk.

Cc: Julian Sax <jsbc@gmx.de>
Cc: Benjamin Tissoires <benjamin.tissoires@redhat.com>
Cc: Jiri Kosina <jkosina@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agoMerge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 02:33:41 +0000 (19:33 -0700)]
Merge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)

Merge updates from Andrew Morton:

 - a few misc things

 - ocfs2 updates

 - most of MM

* emailed patches from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>: (132 commits)
  hugetlbfs: dirty pages as they are added to pagecache
  mm: export add_swap_extent()
  mm: split SWP_FILE into SWP_ACTIVATED and SWP_FS
  tools/testing/selftests/vm/map_fixed_noreplace.c: add test for MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE
  mm: thp: relocate flush_cache_range() in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()
  mm: thp: fix mmu_notifier in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()
  mm: thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page race condition
  mm/kasan/quarantine.c: make quarantine_lock a raw_spinlock_t
  mm/gup: cache dev_pagemap while pinning pages
  Revert "x86/e820: put !E820_TYPE_RAM regions into memblock.reserved"
  mm: return zero_resv_unavail optimization
  mm: zero remaining unavailable struct pages
  tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: add MAP_HUGETLB option
  tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: add MAP_SHARED option
  tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: allow user specified file
  tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: fix 'write' flag usage
  mm/gup_benchmark.c: add additional pinning methods
  mm/gup_benchmark.c: time put_page()
  mm: don't raise MEMCG_OOM event due to failed high-order allocation
  mm/page-writeback.c: fix range_cyclic writeback vs writepages deadlock
  ...

17 months agoMerge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 02:25:07 +0000 (19:25 -0700)]
Merge git://git./linux/kernel/git/davem/net

Pull networking fixes from David Miller:
 "What better way to start off a weekend than with some networking bug
  fixes:

  1) net namespace leak in dump filtering code of ipv4 and ipv6, fixed
     by David Ahern and Bjørn Mork.

  2) Handle bad checksums from hardware when using CHECKSUM_COMPLETE
     properly in UDP, from Sean Tranchetti.

  3) Remove TCA_OPTIONS from policy validation, it turns out we don't
     consistently use nested attributes for this across all packet
     schedulers. From David Ahern.

  4) Fix SKB corruption in cadence driver, from Tristram Ha.

  5) Fix broken WoL handling in r8169 driver, from Heiner Kallweit.

  6) Fix OOPS in pneigh_dump_table(), from Eric Dumazet"

* git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net: (28 commits)
  net/neigh: fix NULL deref in pneigh_dump_table()
  net: allow traceroute with a specified interface in a vrf
  bridge: do not add port to router list when receives query with source 0.0.0.0
  net/smc: fix smc_buf_unuse to use the lgr pointer
  ipv6/ndisc: Preserve IPv6 control buffer if protocol error handlers are called
  net/{ipv4,ipv6}: Do not put target net if input nsid is invalid
  lan743x: Remove SPI dependency from Microchip group.
  drivers: net: remove <net/busy_poll.h> inclusion when not needed
  net: phy: genphy_10g_driver: Avoid NULL pointer dereference
  r8169: fix broken Wake-on-LAN from S5 (poweroff)
  octeontx2-af: Use GFP_ATOMIC under spin lock
  net: ethernet: cadence: fix socket buffer corruption problem
  net/ipv6: Allow onlink routes to have a device mismatch if it is the default route
  net: sched: Remove TCA_OPTIONS from policy
  ice: Poll for link status change
  ice: Allocate VF interrupts and set queue map
  ice: Introduce ice_dev_onetime_setup
  net: hns3: Fix for warning uninitialized symbol hw_err_lst3
  octeontx2-af: Copy the right amount of memory
  net: udp: fix handling of CHECKSUM_COMPLETE packets
  ...

17 months agoMerge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/sparc
Linus Torvalds [Sat, 27 Oct 2018 00:15:49 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
Merge git://git./linux/kernel/git/davem/sparc

Pull sparc fixes from David Miller:
 "Some more sparc fixups, mostly aimed at getting the allmodconfig build
  up and clean again"

* git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/sparc:
  sparc64: Rework xchg() definition to avoid warnings.
  sparc64: Export __node_distance.
  sparc64: Make corrupted user stacks more debuggable.

17 months agohugetlbfs: dirty pages as they are added to pagecache
Mike Kravetz [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:58 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
hugetlbfs: dirty pages as they are added to pagecache

Some test systems were experiencing negative huge page reserve counts and
incorrect file block counts.  This was traced to /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
removing clean pages from hugetlbfs file pagecaches.  When non-hugetlbfs
explicit code removes the pages, the appropriate accounting is not
performed.

This can be recreated as follows:
 fallocate -l 2M /dev/hugepages/foo
 echo 1 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
 fallocate -l 2M /dev/hugepages/foo
 grep -i huge /proc/meminfo
   AnonHugePages:         0 kB
   ShmemHugePages:        0 kB
   HugePages_Total:    2048
   HugePages_Free:     2047
   HugePages_Rsvd:    18446744073709551615
   HugePages_Surp:        0
   Hugepagesize:       2048 kB
   Hugetlb:         4194304 kB
 ls -lsh /dev/hugepages/foo
   4.0M -rw-r--r--. 1 root root 2.0M Oct 17 20:05 /dev/hugepages/foo

To address this issue, dirty pages as they are added to pagecache.  This
can easily be reproduced with fallocate as shown above.  Read faulted
pages will eventually end up being marked dirty.  But there is a window
where they are clean and could be impacted by code such as drop_caches.
So, just dirty them all as they are added to the pagecache.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/b5be45b8-5afe-56cd-9482-28384699a049@oracle.com
Fixes: 6bda666a03f0 ("hugepages: fold find_or_alloc_pages into huge_no_page()")
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Mihcla Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: export add_swap_extent()
Omar Sandoval [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:55 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: export add_swap_extent()

Btrfs currently does not support swap files because swap's use of bmap
does not work with copy-on-write and multiple devices.  See 35054394c4b3
("Btrfs: stop providing a bmap operation to avoid swapfile corruptions").

However, the swap code has a mechanism for the filesystem to manually add
swap extents using add_swap_extent() from the ->swap_activate() aop.
iomap has done this since 67482129cdab ("iomap: add a swapfile activation
function").  Btrfs will do the same in a later patch, so export
add_swap_extent().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/bb1208575e02829aae51b538709476964f97b1ea.1536704650.git.osandov@fb.com
Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.cz>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Nikolay Borisov <nborisov@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: split SWP_FILE into SWP_ACTIVATED and SWP_FS
Omar Sandoval [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:51 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: split SWP_FILE into SWP_ACTIVATED and SWP_FS

The SWP_FILE flag serves two purposes: to make swap_{read,write}page() go
through the filesystem, and to make swapoff() call ->swap_deactivate().
For Btrfs, we want the latter but not the former, so split this flag into
two.  This makes us always call ->swap_deactivate() if ->swap_activate()
succeeded, not just if it didn't add any swap extents itself.

This also resolves the issue of the very misleading name of SWP_FILE,
which is only used for swap files over NFS.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/6d63d8668c4287a4f6d203d65696e96f80abdfc7.1536704650.git.osandov@fb.com
Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com>
Reviewed-by: Nikolay Borisov <nborisov@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agotools/testing/selftests/vm/map_fixed_noreplace.c: add test for MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE
Michael Ellerman [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:48 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
tools/testing/selftests/vm/map_fixed_noreplace.c: add test for MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE

Add a test for MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE, based on some code originally by Jann
Horn.  This would have caught the overlap bug reported by Daniel Micay.

I originally suggested to Michal that we create MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE, but
instead of writing a selftest I spent my time bike-shedding whether it
should be called MAP_FIXED_SAFE/NOCLOBBER/WEAK/NEW ..  mea culpa.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181013133929.28653-1-mpe@ellerman.id.au
Signed-off-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Florian Weimer <fweimer@redhat.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Joel Stanley <joel@jms.id.au>
Cc: Jason Evans <jasone@google.com>
Cc: David Goldblatt <davidtgoldblatt@gmail.com>
Cc: Daniel Micay <danielmicay@gmail.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: thp: relocate flush_cache_range() in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()
Andrea Arcangeli [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:43 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: thp: relocate flush_cache_range() in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()

There should be no cache left by the time we overwrite the old transhuge
pmd with the new one.  It's already too late to flush through the virtual
address because we already copied the page data to the new physical
address.

So flush the cache before the data copy.

Also delete the "end" variable to shutoff a "unused variable" warning on
x86 where flush_cache_range() is a noop.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181015202311.7209-1-aarcange@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Aaron Tomlin <atomlin@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: thp: fix mmu_notifier in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()
Andrea Arcangeli [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:40 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: thp: fix mmu_notifier in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()

change_huge_pmd() after arming the numa/protnone pmd doesn't flush the TLB
right away.  do_huge_pmd_numa_page() flushes the TLB before calling
migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page().  By the time do_huge_pmd_numa_page()
runs some CPU could still access the page through the TLB.

change_huge_pmd() before arming the numa/protnone transhuge pmd calls
mmu_notifier_invalidate_range_start().  So there's no need of
mmu_notifier_invalidate_range_start()/mmu_notifier_invalidate_range_only_end()
sequence in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page() too, because by the time
migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page() runs, the pmd mapping has already been
invalidated in the secondary MMUs.  It has to or if a secondary MMU can
still write to the page, the migrate_page_copy() would lose data.

However an explicit mmu_notifier_invalidate_range() is needed before
migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page() starts copying the data of the
transhuge page or the below can happen for MMU notifier users sharing the
primary MMU pagetables and only implementing ->invalidate_range:

CPU0 CPU1 GPU sharing linux pagetables using
                                only ->invalidate_range
----------- ------------ ---------
GPU secondary MMU writes to the page
mapped by the transhuge pmd
change_pmd_range()
mmu..._range_start()
->invalidate_range_start() noop
change_huge_pmd()
set_pmd_at(numa/protnone)
pmd_unlock()
do_huge_pmd_numa_page()
CPU TLB flush globally (1)
CPU cannot write to page
migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()
GPU writes to the page...
migrate_page_copy()
...GPU stops writing to the page
CPU TLB flush (2)
mmu..._range_end() (3)
->invalidate_range_stop() noop
->invalidate_range()
GPU secondary MMU is invalidated
and cannot write to the page anymore
(too late)

Just like we need a CPU TLB flush (1) because the TLB flush (2) arrives
too late, we also need a mmu_notifier_invalidate_range() before calling
migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page(), because the ->invalidate_range() in
(3) also arrives too late.

This requirement is the result of the lazy optimization in
change_huge_pmd() that releases the pmd_lock without first flushing the
TLB and without first calling mmu_notifier_invalidate_range().

Even converting the removed mmu_notifier_invalidate_range_only_end() into
a mmu_notifier_invalidate_range_end() would not have been enough to fix
this, because it run after migrate_page_copy().

After the hugepage data copy is done migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page()
can proceed and call set_pmd_at without having to flush the TLB nor any
secondary MMUs because the secondary MMU invalidate, just like the CPU TLB
flush, has to happen before the migrate_page_copy() is called or it would
be a bug in the first place (and it was for drivers using
->invalidate_range()).

KVM is unaffected because it doesn't implement ->invalidate_range().

The standard PAGE_SIZEd migrate_misplaced_page is less accelerated and
uses the generic migrate_pages which transitions the pte from
numa/protnone to a migration entry in try_to_unmap_one() and flushes TLBs
and all mmu notifiers there before copying the page.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181013002430.698-3-aarcange@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Aaron Tomlin <atomlin@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page race condition
Andrea Arcangeli [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:36 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page race condition

Patch series "migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page race conditions".

Aaron found a new instance of the THP MADV_DONTNEED race against
pmdp_clear_flush* variants, that was apparently left unfixed.

While looking into the race found by Aaron, I may have found two more
issues in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page.

These race conditions would not cause kernel instability, but they'd
corrupt userland data or leave data non zero after MADV_DONTNEED.

I did only minor testing, and I don't expect to be able to reproduce this
(especially the lack of ->invalidate_range before migrate_page_copy,
requires the latest iommu hardware or infiniband to reproduce).  The last
patch is noop for x86 and it needs further review from maintainers of
archs that implement flush_cache_range() (not in CC yet).

To avoid confusion, it's not the first patch that introduces the bug fixed
in the second patch, even before removing the
pmdp_huge_clear_flush_notify, that _notify suffix was called after
migrate_page_copy already run.

This patch (of 3):

This is a corollary of ced108037c2aa ("thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs.  numa
balancing race"), 58ceeb6bec8 ("thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs.  MADV_FREE
race") and 5b7abeae3af8c ("thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs clear soft dirty
race).

When the above three fixes where posted Dave asked
https://lkml.kernel.org/r/929b3844-aec2-0111-fef7-8002f9d4e2b9@intel.com
but apparently this was missed.

The pmdp_clear_flush* in migrate_misplaced_transhuge_page() was introduced
in a54a407fbf7 ("mm: Close races between THP migration and PMD numa
clearing").

The important part of such commit is only the part where the page lock is
not released until the first do_huge_pmd_numa_page() finished disarming
the pagenuma/protnone.

The addition of pmdp_clear_flush() wasn't beneficial to such commit and
there's no commentary about such an addition either.

I guess the pmdp_clear_flush() in such commit was added just in case for
safety, but it ended up introducing the MADV_DONTNEED race condition found
by Aaron.

At that point in time nobody thought of such kind of MADV_DONTNEED race
conditions yet (they were fixed later) so the code may have looked more
robust by adding the pmdp_clear_flush().

This specific race condition won't destabilize the kernel, but it can
confuse userland because after MADV_DONTNEED the memory won't be zeroed
out.

This also optimizes the code and removes a superfluous TLB flush.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: reflow comment to 80 cols, fix grammar and typo (beacuse)]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181013002430.698-2-aarcange@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Reported-by: Aaron Tomlin <atomlin@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/kasan/quarantine.c: make quarantine_lock a raw_spinlock_t
Clark Williams [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:32 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm/kasan/quarantine.c: make quarantine_lock a raw_spinlock_t

The static lock quarantine_lock is used in quarantine.c to protect the
quarantine queue datastructures.  It is taken inside quarantine queue
manipulation routines (quarantine_put(), quarantine_reduce() and
quarantine_remove_cache()), with IRQs disabled.  This is not a problem on
a stock kernel but is problematic on an RT kernel where spin locks are
sleeping spinlocks, which can sleep and can not be acquired with disabled
interrupts.

Convert the quarantine_lock to a raw spinlock_t.  The usage of
quarantine_lock is confined to quarantine.c and the work performed while
the lock is held is used for debug purpose.

[bigeasy@linutronix.de: slightly altered the commit message]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010214945.5owshc3mlrh74z4b@linutronix.de
Signed-off-by: Clark Williams <williams@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Acked-by: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Acked-by: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/gup: cache dev_pagemap while pinning pages
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:28 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm/gup: cache dev_pagemap while pinning pages

Getting pages from ZONE_DEVICE memory needs to check the backing device's
live-ness, which is tracked in the device's dev_pagemap metadata.  This
metadata is stored in a radix tree and looking it up adds measurable
software overhead.

This patch avoids repeating this relatively costly operation when
dev_pagemap is used by caching the last dev_pagemap while getting user
pages.  The gup_benchmark kernel self test reports this reduces time to
get user pages to as low as 1/3 of the previous time.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181012173040.15669-1-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agoRevert "x86/e820: put !E820_TYPE_RAM regions into memblock.reserved"
Masayoshi Mizuma [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:24 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
Revert "x86/e820: put !E820_TYPE_RAM regions into memblock.reserved"

commit 124049decbb1 ("x86/e820: put !E820_TYPE_RAM regions into
memblock.reserved") breaks movable_node kernel option because it changed
the memory gap range to reserved memblock.  So, the node is marked as
Normal zone even if the SRAT has Hot pluggable affinity.

    =====================================================================
    kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000180000000000-0x0000180fffffffff] usable
    kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00001c0000000000-0x00001c0fffffffff] usable
    ...
    kernel: reserved[0x12]#011[0x0000181000000000-0x00001bffffffffff], 0x000003f000000000 bytes flags: 0x0
    ...
    kernel: ACPI: SRAT: Node 2 PXM 6 [mem 0x180000000000-0x1bffffffffff] hotplug
    kernel: ACPI: SRAT: Node 3 PXM 7 [mem 0x1c0000000000-0x1fffffffffff] hotplug
    ...
    kernel: Movable zone start for each node
    kernel:  Node 3: 0x00001c0000000000
    kernel: Early memory node ranges
    ...
    =====================================================================

The original issue is fixed by the former patches, so let's revert commit
124049decbb1 ("x86/e820: put !E820_TYPE_RAM regions into
memblock.reserved").

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181002143821.5112-4-msys.mizuma@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Masayoshi Mizuma <m.mizuma@jp.fujitsu.com>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: return zero_resv_unavail optimization
Pavel Tatashin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:21 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: return zero_resv_unavail optimization

When checking for valid pfns in zero_resv_unavail(), it is not necessary
to verify that pfns within pageblock_nr_pages ranges are valid, only the
first one needs to be checked.  This is because memory for pages are
allocated in contiguous chunks that contain pageblock_nr_pages struct
pages.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181002143821.5112-3-msys.mizuma@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Masayoshi Mizuma <m.mizuma@jp.fujitsu.com>
Reviewed-by: Masayoshi Mizuma <m.mizuma@jp.fujitsu.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: zero remaining unavailable struct pages
Naoya Horiguchi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:15 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
mm: zero remaining unavailable struct pages

Patch series "mm: Fix for movable_node boot option", v3.

This patch series contains a fix for the movable_node boot option issue
which was introduced by commit 124049decbb1 ("x86/e820: put !E820_TYPE_RAM
regions into memblock.reserved").

The commit breaks the option because it changed the memory gap range to
reserved memblock.  So, the node is marked as Normal zone even if the SRAT
has Hot pluggable affinity.

First and second patch fix the original issue which the commit tried to
fix, then revert the commit.

This patch (of 3):

There is a kernel panic that is triggered when reading /proc/kpageflags on
the kernel booted with kernel parameter 'memmap=nn[KMG]!ss[KMG]':

  BUG: unable to handle kernel paging request at fffffffffffffffe
  PGD 9b20e067 P4D 9b20e067 PUD 9b210067 PMD 0
  Oops: 0000 [#1] SMP PTI
  CPU: 2 PID: 1728 Comm: page-types Not tainted 4.17.0-rc6-mm1-v4.17-rc6-180605-0816-00236-g2dfb086ef02c+ #160
  Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996), BIOS 1.11.0-2.fc28 04/01/2014
  RIP: 0010:stable_page_flags+0x27/0x3c0
  Code: 00 00 00 0f 1f 44 00 00 48 85 ff 0f 84 a0 03 00 00 41 54 55 49 89 fc 53 48 8b 57 08 48 8b 2f 48 8d 42 ff 83 e2 01 48 0f 44 c7 <48> 8b 00 f6 c4 01 0f 84 10 03 00 00 31 db 49 8b 54 24 08 4c 89 e7
  RSP: 0018:ffffbbd44111fde0 EFLAGS: 00010202
  RAX: fffffffffffffffe RBX: 00007fffffffeff9 RCX: 0000000000000000
  RDX: 0000000000000001 RSI: 0000000000000202 RDI: ffffed1182fff5c0
  RBP: ffffffffffffffff R08: 0000000000000001 R09: 0000000000000001
  R10: ffffbbd44111fed8 R11: 0000000000000000 R12: ffffed1182fff5c0
  R13: 00000000000bffd7 R14: 0000000002fff5c0 R15: ffffbbd44111ff10
  FS:  00007efc4335a500(0000) GS:ffff93a5bfc00000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000
  CS:  0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033
  CR2: fffffffffffffffe CR3: 00000000b2a58000 CR4: 00000000001406e0
  Call Trace:
   kpageflags_read+0xc7/0x120
   proc_reg_read+0x3c/0x60
   __vfs_read+0x36/0x170
   vfs_read+0x89/0x130
   ksys_pread64+0x71/0x90
   do_syscall_64+0x5b/0x160
   entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9
  RIP: 0033:0x7efc42e75e23
  Code: 09 00 ba 9f 01 00 00 e8 ab 81 f4 ff 66 2e 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 90 83 3d 29 0a 2d 00 00 75 13 49 89 ca b8 11 00 00 00 0f 05 <48> 3d 01 f0 ff ff 73 34 c3 48 83 ec 08 e8 db d3 01 00 48 89 04 24

According to kernel bisection, this problem became visible due to commit
f7f99100d8d9 which changes how struct pages are initialized.

Memblock layout affects the pfn ranges covered by node/zone.  Consider
that we have a VM with 2 NUMA nodes and each node has 4GB memory, and the
default (no memmap= given) memblock layout is like below:

  MEMBLOCK configuration:
   memory size = 0x00000001fff75c00 reserved size = 0x000000000300c000
   memory.cnt  = 0x4
   memory[0x0]     [0x0000000000001000-0x000000000009efff], 0x000000000009e000 bytes on node 0 flags: 0x0
   memory[0x1]     [0x0000000000100000-0x00000000bffd6fff], 0x00000000bfed7000 bytes on node 0 flags: 0x0
   memory[0x2]     [0x0000000100000000-0x000000013fffffff], 0x0000000040000000 bytes on node 0 flags: 0x0
   memory[0x3]     [0x0000000140000000-0x000000023fffffff], 0x0000000100000000 bytes on node 1 flags: 0x0
   ...

If you give memmap=1G!4G (so it just covers memory[0x2]),
the range [0x100000000-0x13fffffff] is gone:

  MEMBLOCK configuration:
   memory size = 0x00000001bff75c00 reserved size = 0x000000000300c000
   memory.cnt  = 0x3
   memory[0x0]     [0x0000000000001000-0x000000000009efff], 0x000000000009e000 bytes on node 0 flags: 0x0
   memory[0x1]     [0x0000000000100000-0x00000000bffd6fff], 0x00000000bfed7000 bytes on node 0 flags: 0x0
   memory[0x2]     [0x0000000140000000-0x000000023fffffff], 0x0000000100000000 bytes on node 1 flags: 0x0
   ...

This causes shrinking node 0's pfn range because it is calculated by the
address range of memblock.memory.  So some of struct pages in the gap
range are left uninitialized.

We have a function zero_resv_unavail() which does zeroing the struct pages
outside memblock.memory, but currently it covers only the reserved
unavailable range (i.e.  memblock.memory && !memblock.reserved).  This
patch extends it to cover all unavailable range, which fixes the reported
issue.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181002143821.5112-2-msys.mizuma@gmail.com
Fixes: f7f99100d8d9 ("mm: stop zeroing memory during allocation in vmemmap")
Signed-off-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Signed-off-by-by: Masayoshi Mizuma <m.mizuma@jp.fujitsu.com>
Tested-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Tested-by: Masayoshi Mizuma <m.mizuma@jp.fujitsu.com>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agotools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: add MAP_HUGETLB option
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:12 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: add MAP_HUGETLB option

Add a new option '-H' to the gup benchmark to help understand how hugetlb
mapping pages compare with the default.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010195605.10689-6-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Kirill Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agotools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: add MAP_SHARED option
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:08 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: add MAP_SHARED option

Add a new benchmark option, -S, to request MAP_SHARED.  This can be used
to compare with MAP_PRIVATE, or for files that require this option, like
dax.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010195605.10689-5-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Kirill Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agotools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: allow user specified file
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:10:02 +0000 (15:10 -0700)]
tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: allow user specified file

Allow a user to specify a file to map by adding a new option, '-f',
providing a means to test various file backings.

If not specified, the benchmark will use a private mapping of /dev/zero,
which produces an anonymous mapping as before.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: avoid using comma operator]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010195605.10689-4-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Kirill Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agotools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: fix 'write' flag usage
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:59 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
tools/testing/selftests/vm/gup_benchmark.c: fix 'write' flag usage

If the '-w' parameter was provided, the benchmark would exit due to a
mssing 'break'.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010195605.10689-3-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/gup_benchmark.c: add additional pinning methods
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:56 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/gup_benchmark.c: add additional pinning methods

Provide new gup benchmark ioctl commands to run different user page
pinning methods, get_user_pages_longterm() and get_user_pages(), in
addition to the existing get_user_pages_fast().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010195605.10689-2-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/gup_benchmark.c: time put_page()
Keith Busch [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:52 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/gup_benchmark.c: time put_page()

We'd like to measure time to unpin user pages, so this adds a second
benchmark timer on put_page, separate from get_page.

Adding the field breaks this ioctl ABI, but should be okay since this an
in-tree kernel selftest.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: add expansion to struct gup_benchmark for future use]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010195605.10689-1-keith.busch@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: don't raise MEMCG_OOM event due to failed high-order allocation
Roman Gushchin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:48 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm: don't raise MEMCG_OOM event due to failed high-order allocation

It was reported that on some of our machines containers were restarted
with OOM symptoms without an obvious reason.  Despite there were almost no
memory pressure and plenty of page cache, MEMCG_OOM event was raised
occasionally, causing the container management software to think, that OOM
has happened.  However, no tasks have been killed.

The following investigation showed that the problem is caused by a failing
attempt to charge a high-order page.  In such case, the OOM killer is
never invoked.  As shown below, it can happen under conditions, which are
very far from a real OOM: e.g.  there is plenty of clean page cache and no
memory pressure.

There is no sense in raising an OOM event in this case, as it might
confuse a user and lead to wrong and excessive actions (e.g.  restart the
workload, as in my case).

Let's look at the charging path in try_charge().  If the memory usage is
about memory.max, which is absolutely natural for most memory cgroups, we
try to reclaim some pages.  Even if we were able to reclaim enough memory
for the allocation, the following check can fail due to a race with
another concurrent allocation:

    if (mem_cgroup_margin(mem_over_limit) >= nr_pages)
        goto retry;

For regular pages the following condition will save us from triggering
the OOM:

   if (nr_reclaimed && nr_pages <= (1 << PAGE_ALLOC_COSTLY_ORDER))
       goto retry;

But for high-order allocation this condition will intentionally fail.  The
reason behind is that we'll likely fall to regular pages anyway, so it's
ok and even preferred to return ENOMEM.

In this case the idea of raising MEMCG_OOM looks dubious.

Fix this by moving MEMCG_OOM raising to mem_cgroup_oom() after allocation
order check, so that the event won't be raised for high order allocations.
This change doesn't affect regular pages allocation and charging.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181004214050.7417-1-guro@fb.com
Signed-off-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/page-writeback.c: fix range_cyclic writeback vs writepages deadlock
Dave Chinner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:45 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/page-writeback.c: fix range_cyclic writeback vs writepages deadlock

We've recently seen a workload on XFS filesystems with a repeatable
deadlock between background writeback and a multi-process application
doing concurrent writes and fsyncs to a small range of a file.

range_cyclic
writeback Process 1 Process 2

xfs_vm_writepages
  write_cache_pages
    writeback_index = 2
    cycled = 0
    ....
    find page 2 dirty
    lock Page 2
    ->writepage
      page 2 writeback
      page 2 clean
      page 2 added to bio
    no more pages
write()
locks page 1
dirties page 1
locks page 2
dirties page 1
fsync()
....
xfs_vm_writepages
write_cache_pages
  start index 0
  find page 1 towrite
  lock Page 1
  ->writepage
    page 1 writeback
    page 1 clean
    page 1 added to bio
  find page 2 towrite
  lock Page 2
  page 2 is writeback
  <blocks>
write()
locks page 1
dirties page 1
fsync()
....
xfs_vm_writepages
write_cache_pages
  start index 0

    !done && !cycled
      sets index to 0, restarts lookup
    find page 1 dirty
  find page 1 towrite
  lock Page 1
  page 1 is writeback
  <blocks>

    lock Page 1
    <blocks>

DEADLOCK because:

- process 1 needs page 2 writeback to complete to make
  enough progress to issue IO pending for page 1
- writeback needs page 1 writeback to complete so process 2
  can progress and unlock the page it is blocked on, then it
  can issue the IO pending for page 2
- process 2 can't make progress until process 1 issues IO
  for page 1

The underlying cause of the problem here is that range_cyclic writeback is
processing pages in descending index order as we hold higher index pages
in a structure controlled from above write_cache_pages().  The
write_cache_pages() caller needs to be able to submit these pages for IO
before write_cache_pages restarts writeback at mapping index 0 to avoid
wcp inverting the page lock/writeback wait order.

generic_writepages() is not susceptible to this bug as it has no private
context held across write_cache_pages() - filesystems using this
infrastructure always submit pages in ->writepage immediately and so there
is no problem with range_cyclic going back to mapping index 0.

However:
mpage_writepages() has a private bio context,
exofs_writepages() has page_collect
fuse_writepages() has fuse_fill_wb_data
nfs_writepages() has nfs_pageio_descriptor
xfs_vm_writepages() has xfs_writepage_ctx

All of these ->writepages implementations can hold pages under writeback
in their private structures until write_cache_pages() returns, and hence
they are all susceptible to this deadlock.

Also worth noting is that ext4 has it's own bastardised version of
write_cache_pages() and so it /may/ have an equivalent deadlock.  I looked
at the code long enough to understand that it has a similar retry loop for
range_cyclic writeback reaching the end of the file and then promptly ran
away before my eyes bled too much.  I'll leave it for the ext4 developers
to determine if their code is actually has this deadlock and how to fix it
if it has.

There's a few ways I can see avoid this deadlock.  There's probably more,
but these are the first I've though of:

1. get rid of range_cyclic altogether

2. range_cyclic always stops at EOF, and we start again from
writeback index 0 on the next call into write_cache_pages()

2a. wcp also returns EAGAIN to ->writepages implementations to
indicate range cyclic has hit EOF. writepages implementations can
then flush the current context and call wpc again to continue. i.e.
lift the retry into the ->writepages implementation

3. range_cyclic uses trylock_page() rather than lock_page(), and it
skips pages it can't lock without blocking. It will already do this
for pages under writeback, so this seems like a no-brainer

3a. all non-WB_SYNC_ALL writeback uses trylock_page() to avoid
blocking as per pages under writeback.

I don't think #1 is an option - range_cyclic prevents frequently
dirtied lower file offset from starving background writeback of
rarely touched higher file offsets.

#2 is simple, and I don't think it will have any impact on
performance as going back to the start of the file implies an
immediate seek. We'll have exactly the same number of seeks if we
switch writeback to another inode, and then come back to this one
later and restart from index 0.

#2a is pretty much "status quo without the deadlock". Moving the
retry loop up into the wcp caller means we can issue IO on the
pending pages before calling wcp again, and so avoid locking or
waiting on pages in the wrong order. I'm not convinced we need to do
this given that we get the same thing from #2 on the next writeback
call from the writeback infrastructure.

#3 is really just a band-aid - it doesn't fix the access/wait
inversion problem, just prevents it from becoming a deadlock
situation. I'd prefer we fix the inversion, not sweep it under the
carpet like this.

#3a is really an optimisation that just so happens to include the
band-aid fix of #3.

So it seems that the simplest way to fix this issue is to implement
solution #2

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181005054526.21507-1-david@fromorbit.com
Signed-off-by: Dave Chinner <dchinner@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.de>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: move mirrored memory specific code outside of memmap_init_zone
Pavel Tatashin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:40 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm: move mirrored memory specific code outside of memmap_init_zone

memmap_init_zone, is getting complex, because it is called from different
contexts: hotplug, and during boot, and also because it must handle some
architecture quirks.  One of them is mirrored memory.

Move the code that decides whether to skip mirrored memory outside of
memmap_init_zone, into a separate function.

[pasha.tatashin@oracle.com: uninline overlap_memmap_init()]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180726193509.3326-4-pasha.tatashin@oracle.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180724235520.10200-4-pasha.tatashin@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pasha Tatashin <Pavel.Tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Steven Sistare <steven.sistare@oracle.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: calculate deferred pages after skipping mirrored memory
Pavel Tatashin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:37 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm: calculate deferred pages after skipping mirrored memory

update_defer_init() should be called only when struct page is about to be
initialized. Because it counts number of initialized struct pages, but
there we may skip struct pages if there is some mirrored memory.

So move, update_defer_init() after checking for mirrored memory.

Also, rename update_defer_init() to defer_init() and reverse the return
boolean to emphasize that this is a boolean function, that tells that the
reset of memmap initialization should be deferred.

Make this function self-contained: do not pass number of already
initialized pages in this zone by using static counters.

I found this bug by reading the code.  The effect is that fewer than
expected struct pages are initialized early in boot, and it is possible
that in some corner cases we may fail to boot when mirrored pages are
used.  The deferred on demand code should somewhat mitigate this.  But
this still brings some inconsistencies compared to when booting without
mirrored pages, so it is better to fix.

[pasha.tatashin@oracle.com: add comment about defer_init's lack of locking]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180726193509.3326-3-pasha.tatashin@oracle.com
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: make defer_init non-inline, __meminit]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180724235520.10200-3-pasha.tatashin@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Steven Sistare <steven.sistare@oracle.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Pasha Tatashin <Pavel.Tatashin@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: make memmap_init a proper function
Pavel Tatashin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:32 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm: make memmap_init a proper function

memmap_init is sometimes a macro sometimes a function based on
__HAVE_ARCH_MEMMAP_INIT.  It is only a function on ia64.  Make memmap_init
a weak function instead, and let ia64 redefine it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180724235520.10200-2-pasha.tatashin@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Steven Sistare <steven.sistare@oracle.com>
Cc: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@oracle.com>
Cc: Abdul Haleem <abdhalee@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Pasha Tatashin <Pavel.Tatashin@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memcontrol.c: convert mem_cgroup_id::ref to refcount_t type
Kirill Tkhai [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:28 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/memcontrol.c: convert mem_cgroup_id::ref to refcount_t type

This will allow to use generic refcount_t interfaces to check counters
overflow instead of currently existing VM_BUG_ON().  The only difference
after the patch is VM_BUG_ON() may cause BUG(), while refcount_t fires
with WARN().  But this seems not to be significant here, since such the
problems are usually caught by syzbot with panic-on-warn enabled.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/153910718919.7006.13400779039257185427.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrea Parri <andrea.parri@amarulasolutions.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/page_alloc.c: initialize num_movable in move_freepages()
David Rientjes [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:24 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/page_alloc.c: initialize num_movable in move_freepages()

If move_freepages_block() returns 0 because !zone_spans_pfn(),
*num_movable can hold the value from the stack because it does not get
initialized in move_freepages().

Move the initialization to move_freepages_block() to guarantee the value
actually makes sense.

This currently doesn't affect its only caller where num_movable != NULL,
so no bug fix, but just more robust.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/alpine.DEB.2.21.1810051355490.212229@chino.kir.corp.google.com
Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/zsmalloc.c: fix fall-through annotation
Gustavo A. R. Silva [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:20 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/zsmalloc.c: fix fall-through annotation

Replace "fallthru" with a proper "fall through" annotation.

This fix is part of the ongoing efforts to enabling
-Wimplicit-fallthrough

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181003105114.GA24423@embeddedor.com
Signed-off-by: Gustavo A. R. Silva <gustavo@embeddedor.com>
Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agouserfaultfd: selftest: recycle lock threads first
Peter Xu [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:17 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
userfaultfd: selftest: recycle lock threads first

Now we recycle the uffd servicing threads earlier than the lock threads.
It might happen that when the lock thread is still blocked at a pthread
mutex lock while the servicing thread has already quitted for the cpu so
the lock thread will be blocked forever and hang the test program.  To fix
the possible race, recycle the lock threads first.

This never happens with current missing-only tests, but when I start to
run the write-protection tests (the feature is not yet posted upstream) it
happens every time of the run possibly because in that new test we'll need
to service two page faults for each lock operation.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180930074259.18229-4-peterx@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <zi.yan@cs.rutgers.edu>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agouserfaultfd: selftest: generalize read and poll
Peter Xu [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:13 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
userfaultfd: selftest: generalize read and poll

We do very similar things in read and poll modes, but we're copying the
codes around.  Share the codes properly on reading the message and
handling the page fault to make the code cleaner.  Meanwhile this solves
previous mismatch of behaviors between the two modes on that the old code:

- did not check EAGAIN case in read() mode
- ignored BOUNCE_VERIFY check in read() mode

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180930074259.18229-3-peterx@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <zi.yan@cs.rutgers.edu>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agouserfaultfd: selftest: cleanup help messages
Peter Xu [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:09 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
userfaultfd: selftest: cleanup help messages

Firstly, the help in the comment region is obsolete, now we support
three parameters.  Since at it, change it and move it into the help
message of the program.

Also, the help messages dumped here and there is obsolete too.  Use a
single usage() helper.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180930074259.18229-2-peterx@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <zi.yan@cs.rutgers.edu>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/vmstat.c: assert that vmstat_text is in sync with stat_items_size
Jann Horn [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:05 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/vmstat.c: assert that vmstat_text is in sync with stat_items_size

Having two gigantic arrays that must manually be kept in sync, including
ifdefs, isn't exactly robust.  To make it easier to catch such issues in
the future, add a BUILD_BUG_ON().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181001143138.95119-3-jannh@google.com
Signed-off-by: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <clameter@sgi.com>
Cc: Kemi Wang <kemi.wang@intel.com>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memory.c: recheck page table entry with page table lock held
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:09:01 +0000 (15:09 -0700)]
mm/memory.c: recheck page table entry with page table lock held

We clear the pte temporarily during read/modify/write update of the pte.
If we take a page fault while the pte is cleared, the application can get
SIGBUS.  One such case is with remap_pfn_range without a backing
vm_ops->fault callback.  do_fault will return SIGBUS in that case.

cpu 0   cpu1
mprotect()
ptep_modify_prot_start()/pte cleared.
.
. page fault.
.
.
prep_modify_prot_commit()

Fix this by taking page table lock and rechecking for pte_none.

[aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com: fix crash observed with syzkaller run]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/87va6bwlfg.fsf@linux.ibm.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180926031858.9692-1-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Willem de Bruijn <willemdebruijn.kernel@gmail.com>
Cc: Eric Dumazet <eric.dumazet@gmail.com>
Cc: Ido Schimmel <idosch@idosch.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: dax: add comment for PFN_SPECIAL
Yang Shi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:57 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
mm: dax: add comment for PFN_SPECIAL

The comment for PFN_SPECIAL is missed in pfn_t.h. Add comment to get
consistent with other pfn flags.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1538086549-100536-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Suggested-by: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: brk: downgrade mmap_sem to read when shrinking
Yang Shi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:54 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
mm: brk: downgrade mmap_sem to read when shrinking

brk might be used to shrink memory mapping too other than munmap().  So,
it may hold write mmap_sem for long time when shrinking large mapping, as
what commit ("mm: mmap: zap pages with read mmap_sem in munmap")
described.

The brk() will not manipulate vmas anymore after __do_munmap() call for
the mapping shrink use case.  But, it may set mm->brk after __do_munmap(),
which needs hold write mmap_sem.

However, a simple trick can workaround this by setting mm->brk before
__do_munmap().  Then restore the original value if __do_munmap() fails.
With this trick, it is safe to downgrade to read mmap_sem.

So, the same optimization, which downgrades mmap_sem to read for zapping
pages, is also feasible and reasonable to this case.

The period of holding exclusive mmap_sem for shrinking large mapping would
be reduced significantly with this optimization.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: tweak comment]
[yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com: fix unsigned compare against 0 issue]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1538687672-17795-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1538067582-60038-2-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: mremap: downgrade mmap_sem to read when shrinking
Yang Shi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:50 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
mm: mremap: downgrade mmap_sem to read when shrinking

Other than munmap, mremap might be used to shrink memory mapping too.
So, it may hold write mmap_sem for long time when shrinking large
mapping, as what commit ("mm: mmap: zap pages with read mmap_sem in
munmap") described.

The mremap() will not manipulate vmas anymore after __do_munmap() call for
the mapping shrink use case, so it is safe to downgrade to read mmap_sem.

So, the same optimization, which downgrades mmap_sem to read for zapping
pages, is also feasible and reasonable to this case.

The period of holding exclusive mmap_sem for shrinking large mapping
would be reduced significantly with this optimization.

MREMAP_FIXED and MREMAP_MAYMOVE are more complicated to adopt this
optimization since they need manipulate vmas after do_munmap(),
downgrading mmap_sem may create race window.

Simple mapping shrink is the low hanging fruit, and it may cover the
most cases of unmap with munmap together.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: tweak comment]
[yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com: fix unsigned compare against 0 issue]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1538687672-17795-2-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1538067582-60038-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/filemap.c: use vmf_error()
Souptick Joarder [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:47 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
mm/filemap.c: use vmf_error()

These codes can be replaced with new inline vmf_error().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180927171411.GA23331@jordon-HP-15-Notebook-PC
Signed-off-by: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_get
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:43 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_get

ia64, mips, parisc, powerpc, sh, sparc, x86 architectures use the same
version of huge_ptep_get, so move this generic implementation into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

[arnd@arndb.de: fix ARM 3level page tables]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181005161722.904274-1-arnd@arndb.de
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-12-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_set_access_flags()
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:39 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_set_access_flags()

arm, ia64, sh, x86 architectures use the same version
of huge_ptep_set_access_flags, so move this generic implementation
into asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-11-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_set_wrprotect()
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:35 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_set_wrprotect()

arm, ia64, mips, powerpc, sh, x86 architectures use the same version of
huge_ptep_set_wrprotect, so move this generic implementation into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-10-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of prepare_hugepage_range
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:31 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of prepare_hugepage_range

arm, arm64, powerpc, sparc, x86 architectures use the same version of
prepare_hugepage_range, so move this generic implementation into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-9-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_pte_wrprotect
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:26 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_pte_wrprotect

arm, arm64, ia64, mips, parisc, powerpc, sh, sparc, x86 architectures use
the same version of huge_pte_wrprotect, so move this generic
implementation into asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-8-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_pte_none()
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:22 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_pte_none()

arm, arm64, ia64, mips, parisc, powerpc, sh, sparc, x86 architectures use
the same version of huge_pte_none, so move this generic implementation
into asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-7-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_clear_flush
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:17 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_clear_flush

arm, x86 architectures use the same version of huge_ptep_clear_flush, so
move this generic implementation into asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-6-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_get_and_clear()
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:12 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of huge_ptep_get_and_clear()

arm, ia64, sh, x86 architectures use the same version of
huge_ptep_get_and_clear, so move this generic implementation into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-5-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of set_huge_pte_at()
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:07 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of set_huge_pte_at()

arm, ia64, mips, powerpc, sh, x86 architectures use the same version of
set_huge_pte_at, so move this generic implementation into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-4-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: introduce generic version of hugetlb_free_pgd_range
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:08:03 +0000 (15:08 -0700)]
hugetlb: introduce generic version of hugetlb_free_pgd_range

arm, arm64, mips, parisc, sh, x86 architectures use the same version of
hugetlb_free_pgd_range, so move this generic implementation into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-3-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> [parisc]
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com> [MIPS]
Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agohugetlb: harmonize hugetlb.h arch specific defines with pgtable.h
Alexandre Ghiti [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:59 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
hugetlb: harmonize hugetlb.h arch specific defines with pgtable.h

In order to reduce copy/paste of functions across architectures and then
make riscv hugetlb port (and future ports) simpler and smaller, this
patchset intends to factorize the numerous hugetlb primitives that are
defined across all the architectures.

Except for prepare_hugepage_range, this patchset moves the versions that
are just pass-through to standard pte primitives into
asm-generic/hugetlb.h by using the same #ifdef semantic that can be found
in asm-generic/pgtable.h, i.e.  __HAVE_ARCH_***.

s390 architecture has not been tackled in this serie since it does not use
asm-generic/hugetlb.h at all.

This patchset has been compiled on all addressed architectures with
success (except for parisc, but the problem does not come from this
series).

This patch (of 11):

asm-generic/hugetlb.h proposes generic implementations of hugetlb related
functions: use __HAVE_ARCH_HUGE* defines in order to make arch specific
implementations of hugetlb functions consistent with pgtable.h scheme.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180920060358.16606-2-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Luiz Capitulino <lcapitulino@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Paul Burton <paul.burton@mips.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: James E.J. Bottomley <jejb@parisc-linux.org>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> [x86]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: remove unnecessary local variable addr in __get_user_pages_fast()
Wei Yang [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:55 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: remove unnecessary local variable addr in __get_user_pages_fast()

The local variable `addr' in __get_user_pages_fast() is just a shadow of
`start'.  Since `start' never changes after assignment to `addr', it is
fine to replace `start' with it.

Also the meaning of [start, end] is more obvious than [addr, end] when
passed to gup_pgd_range().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180925021448.20265-1-richard.weiyang@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: defer ZONE_DEVICE page initialization to the point where we init pgmap
Alexander Duyck [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:52 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: defer ZONE_DEVICE page initialization to the point where we init pgmap

The ZONE_DEVICE pages were being initialized in two locations.  One was
with the memory_hotplug lock held and another was outside of that lock.
The problem with this is that it was nearly doubling the memory
initialization time.  Instead of doing this twice, once while holding a
global lock and once without, I am opting to defer the initialization to
the one outside of the lock.  This allows us to avoid serializing the
overhead for memory init and we can instead focus on per-node init times.

One issue I encountered is that devm_memremap_pages and
hmm_devmmem_pages_create were initializing only the pgmap field the same
way.  One wasn't initializing hmm_data, and the other was initializing it
to a poison value.  Since this is something that is exposed to the driver
in the case of hmm I am opting for a third option and just initializing
hmm_data to 0 since this is going to be exposed to unknown third party
drivers.

[alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com: fix reference count for pgmap in devm_memremap_pages]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181008233404.1909.37302.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180925202053.3576.66039.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Tested-by: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: create non-atomic version of SetPageReserved for init use
Alexander Duyck [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:48 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: create non-atomic version of SetPageReserved for init use

It doesn't make much sense to use the atomic SetPageReserved at init time
when we are using memset to clear the memory and manipulating the page
flags via simple "&=" and "|=" operations in __init_single_page.

This patch adds a non-atomic version __SetPageReserved that can be used
during page init and shows about a 10% improvement in initialization times
on the systems I have available for testing.  On those systems I saw
initialization times drop from around 35 seconds to around 32 seconds to
initialize a 3TB block of persistent memory.  I believe the main advantage
of this is that it allows for more compiler optimization as the __set_bit
operation can be reordered whereas the atomic version cannot.

I tried adding a bit of documentation based on f1dd2cd13c4 ("mm,
memory_hotplug: do not associate hotadded memory to zones until online").

Ideally the reserved flag should be set earlier since there is a brief
window where the page is initialization via __init_single_page and we have
not set the PG_Reserved flag.  I'm leaving that for a future patch set as
that will require a more significant refactor.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180925202018.3576.11607.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: provide kernel parameter to allow disabling page init poisoning
Alexander Duyck [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:45 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: provide kernel parameter to allow disabling page init poisoning

Patch series "Address issues slowing persistent memory initialization", v5.

The main thing this patch set achieves is that it allows us to initialize
each node worth of persistent memory independently.  As a result we reduce
page init time by about 2 minutes because instead of taking 30 to 40
seconds per node and going through each node one at a time, we process all
4 nodes in parallel in the case of a 12TB persistent memory setup spread
evenly over 4 nodes.

This patch (of 3):

On systems with a large amount of memory it can take a significant amount
of time to initialize all of the page structs with the PAGE_POISON_PATTERN
value.  I have seen it take over 2 minutes to initialize a system with
over 12TB of RAM.

In order to work around the issue I had to disable CONFIG_DEBUG_VM and
then the boot time returned to something much more reasonable as the
arch_add_memory call completed in milliseconds versus seconds.  However in
doing that I had to disable all of the other VM debugging on the system.

In order to work around a kernel that might have CONFIG_DEBUG_VM enabled
on a system that has a large amount of memory I have added a new kernel
parameter named "vm_debug" that can be set to "-" in order to disable it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180925201921.3576.84239.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomemcg: remove memcg_kmem_skip_account
Shakeel Butt [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:41 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
memcg: remove memcg_kmem_skip_account

The flag memcg_kmem_skip_account was added during the era of opt-out kmem
accounting.  There is no need for such flag in the opt-in world as there
aren't any __GFP_ACCOUNT allocations within memcg_create_cache_enqueue().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180919004501.178023-1-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memory_hotplug.c: clean up node_states_check_changes_offline()
Oscar Salvador [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:38 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm/memory_hotplug.c: clean up node_states_check_changes_offline()

This patch, as the previous one, gets rid of the wrong if statements.
While at it, I realized that the comments are sometimes very confusing,
to say the least, and wrong.
For example:

___
zone_last = ZONE_MOVABLE;

/*
 * check whether node_states[N_HIGH_MEMORY] will be changed
 * If we try to offline the last present @nr_pages from the node,
 * we can determind we will need to clear the node from
 * node_states[N_HIGH_MEMORY].
 */

for (; zt <= zone_last; zt++)
        present_pages += pgdat->node_zones[zt].present_pages;
if (nr_pages >= present_pages)
        arg->status_change_nid = zone_to_nid(zone);
else
        arg->status_change_nid = -1;
___

In case the node gets empry, it must be removed from N_MEMORY.  We already
check N_HIGH_MEMORY a bit above within the CONFIG_HIGHMEM ifdef code.  Not
to say that status_change_nid is for N_MEMORY, and not for N_HIGH_MEMORY.

So I re-wrote some of the comments to what I think is better.

[osalvador@suse.de: address feedback from Pavel]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180921132634.10103-5-osalvador@techadventures.net
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180919100819.25518-6-osalvador@techadventures.net
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: <yasu.isimatu@gmail.com>
Cc: Mathieu Malaterre <malat@debian.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memory_hotplug.c: simplify node_states_check_changes_online
Oscar Salvador [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:34 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm/memory_hotplug.c: simplify node_states_check_changes_online

While looking at node_states_check_changes_online, I stumbled upon some
confusing things.

Right after entering the function, we find this:

if (N_MEMORY == N_NORMAL_MEMORY)
        zone_last = ZONE_MOVABLE;

This is wrong.
N_MEMORY cannot really be equal to N_NORMAL_MEMORY.
My guess is that this wanted to be something like:

if (N_NORMAL_MEMORY == N_HIGH_MEMORY)

to check if we have CONFIG_HIGHMEM.

Later on, in the CONFIG_HIGHMEM block, we have:

if (N_MEMORY == N_HIGH_MEMORY)
        zone_last = ZONE_MOVABLE;

Again, this is wrong, and will never be evaluated to true.

Besides removing these wrong if statements, I simplified the function a
bit.

[osalvador@suse.de: address feedback from Pavel]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180921132634.10103-4-osalvador@techadventures.net
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180919100819.25518-5-osalvador@techadventures.net
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Mathieu Malaterre <malat@debian.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: <yasu.isimatu@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memory_hotplug.c: tidy up node_states_clear_node()
Oscar Salvador [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:28 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm/memory_hotplug.c: tidy up node_states_clear_node()

node_states_clear has the following if statements:

if ((N_MEMORY != N_NORMAL_MEMORY) &&
    (arg->status_change_nid_high >= 0))
        ...

if ((N_MEMORY != N_HIGH_MEMORY) &&
    (arg->status_change_nid >= 0))
        ...

N_MEMORY can never be equal to neither N_NORMAL_MEMORY nor
N_HIGH_MEMORY.

Similar problem was found in [1].
Since this is wrong, let us get rid of it.

[1] https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/10579155/

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180919100819.25518-4-osalvador@techadventures.net
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Mathieu Malaterre <malat@debian.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: <yasu.isimatu@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memory_hotplug.c: spare unnecessary calls to node_set_state
Oscar Salvador [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:25 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm/memory_hotplug.c: spare unnecessary calls to node_set_state

In node_states_check_changes_online, we check if the node will have to be
set for any of the N_*_MEMORY states after the pages have been onlined.

Later on, we perform the activation in node_states_set_node.  Currently,
in node_states_set_node we set the node to N_MEMORY unconditionally.

This means that we call node_set_state for N_MEMORY every time pages go
online, but we only need to do it if the node has not yet been set for
N_MEMORY.

Fix this by checking status_change_nid.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180919100819.25518-2-osalvador@techadventures.net
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: <yasu.isimatu@gmail.com>
Cc: Mathieu Malaterre <malat@debian.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/filemap.c: Use existing variable
haiqing.shq [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:22 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm/filemap.c: Use existing variable

Use the variable write_len instead of ov_iter_count(from).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1537375855-2088-1-git-send-email-leviathan0992@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: haiqing.shq <leviathan0992@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: unmap VM_PFNMAP mappings with optimized path
Yang Shi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:18 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: unmap VM_PFNMAP mappings with optimized path

When unmapping VM_PFNMAP mappings, vm flags need to be updated.  Since the
vmas have been detached, so it sounds safe to update vm flags with read
mmap_sem.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1537376621-51150-4-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: unmap VM_HUGETLB mappings with optimized path
Yang Shi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:15 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: unmap VM_HUGETLB mappings with optimized path

When unmapping VM_HUGETLB mappings, vm flags need to be updated.  Since
the vmas have been detached, so it sounds safe to update vm flags with
read mmap_sem.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1537376621-51150-3-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: mmap: zap pages with read mmap_sem in munmap
Yang Shi [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:11 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm: mmap: zap pages with read mmap_sem in munmap

Patch series "mm: zap pages with read mmap_sem in munmap for large
mapping", v11.

Background:
Recently, when we ran some vm scalability tests on machines with large memory,
we ran into a couple of mmap_sem scalability issues when unmapping large memory
space, please refer to https://lkml.org/lkml/2017/12/14/733 and
https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/2/20/576.

History:
Then akpm suggested to unmap large mapping section by section and drop mmap_sem
at a time to mitigate it (see https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/3/6/784).

V1 patch series was submitted to the mailing list per Andrew's suggestion
(see https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/3/20/786).  Then I received a lot great
feedback and suggestions.

Then this topic was discussed on LSFMM summit 2018.  In the summit, Michal
Hocko suggested (also in the v1 patches review) to try "two phases"
approach.  Zapping pages with read mmap_sem, then doing via cleanup with
write mmap_sem (for discussion detail, see
https://lwn.net/Articles/753269/)

Approach:
Zapping pages is the most time consuming part, according to the suggestion from
Michal Hocko [1], zapping pages can be done with holding read mmap_sem, like
what MADV_DONTNEED does. Then re-acquire write mmap_sem to cleanup vmas.

But, we can't call MADV_DONTNEED directly, since there are two major drawbacks:
  * The unexpected state from PF if it wins the race in the middle of munmap.
    It may return zero page, instead of the content or SIGSEGV.
  * Can't handle VM_LOCKED | VM_HUGETLB | VM_PFNMAP and uprobe mappings, which
    is a showstopper from akpm

But, some part may need write mmap_sem, for example, vma splitting. So,
the design is as follows:
        acquire write mmap_sem
        lookup vmas (find and split vmas)
        deal with special mappings
        detach vmas
        downgrade_write

        zap pages
        free page tables
        release mmap_sem

The vm events with read mmap_sem may come in during page zapping, but
since vmas have been detached before, they, i.e.  page fault, gup, etc,
will not be able to find valid vma, then just return SIGSEGV or -EFAULT as
expected.

If the vma has VM_HUGETLB | VM_PFNMAP, they are considered as special
mappings.  They will be handled by falling back to regular do_munmap()
with exclusive mmap_sem held in this patch since they may update vm flags.

But, with the "detach vmas first" approach, the vmas have been detached
when vm flags are updated, so it sounds safe to update vm flags with read
mmap_sem for this specific case.  So, VM_HUGETLB and VM_PFNMAP will be
handled by using the optimized path in the following separate patches for
bisectable sake.

Unmapping uprobe areas may need update mm flags (MMF_RECALC_UPROBES).
However it is fine to have false-positive MMF_RECALC_UPROBES according to
uprobes developer.  So, uprobe unmap will not be handled by the regular
path.

With the "detach vmas first" approach we don't have to re-acquire mmap_sem
again to clean up vmas to avoid race window which might get the address
space changed since downgrade_write() doesn't release the lock to lead
regression, which simply downgrades to read lock.

And, since the lock acquire/release cost is managed to the minimum and
almost as same as before, the optimization could be extended to any size
of mapping without incurring significant penalty to small mappings.

For the time being, just do this in munmap syscall path.  Other
vm_munmap() or do_munmap() call sites (i.e mmap, mremap, etc) remain
intact due to some implementation difficulties since they acquire write
mmap_sem from very beginning and hold it until the end, do_munmap() might
be called in the middle.  But, the optimized do_munmap would like to be
called without mmap_sem held so that we can do the optimization.  So, if
we want to do the similar optimization for mmap/mremap path, I'm afraid we
would have to redesign them.  mremap might be called on very large area
depending on the usecases, the optimization to it will be considered in
the future.

This patch (of 3):

When running some mmap/munmap scalability tests with large memory (i.e.
> 300GB), the below hung task issue may happen occasionally.

INFO: task ps:14018 blocked for more than 120 seconds.
       Tainted: G            E 4.9.79-009.ali3000.alios7.x86_64 #1
 "echo 0 > /proc/sys/kernel/hung_task_timeout_secs" disables this
message.
 ps              D    0 14018      1 0x00000004
  ffff885582f84000 ffff885e8682f000 ffff880972943000 ffff885ebf499bc0
  ffff8828ee120000 ffffc900349bfca8 ffffffff817154d0 0000000000000040
  00ffffff812f872a ffff885ebf499bc0 024000d000948300 ffff880972943000
 Call Trace:
  [<ffffffff817154d0>] ? __schedule+0x250/0x730
  [<ffffffff817159e6>] schedule+0x36/0x80
  [<ffffffff81718560>] rwsem_down_read_failed+0xf0/0x150
  [<ffffffff81390a28>] call_rwsem_down_read_failed+0x18/0x30
  [<ffffffff81717db0>] down_read+0x20/0x40
  [<ffffffff812b9439>] proc_pid_cmdline_read+0xd9/0x4e0
  [<ffffffff81253c95>] ? do_filp_open+0xa5/0x100
  [<ffffffff81241d87>] __vfs_read+0x37/0x150
  [<ffffffff812f824b>] ? security_file_permission+0x9b/0xc0
  [<ffffffff81242266>] vfs_read+0x96/0x130
  [<ffffffff812437b5>] SyS_read+0x55/0xc0
  [<ffffffff8171a6da>] entry_SYSCALL_64_fastpath+0x1a/0xc5

It is because munmap holds mmap_sem exclusively from very beginning to all
the way down to the end, and doesn't release it in the middle.  When
unmapping large mapping, it may take long time (take ~18 seconds to unmap
320GB mapping with every single page mapped on an idle machine).

Zapping pages is the most time consuming part, according to the suggestion
from Michal Hocko [1], zapping pages can be done with holding read
mmap_sem, like what MADV_DONTNEED does.  Then re-acquire write mmap_sem to
cleanup vmas.

But, some part may need write mmap_sem, for example, vma splitting. So,
the design is as follows:
        acquire write mmap_sem
        lookup vmas (find and split vmas)
        deal with special mappings
        detach vmas
        downgrade_write

        zap pages
        free page tables
        release mmap_sem

The vm events with read mmap_sem may come in during page zapping, but
since vmas have been detached before, they, i.e.  page fault, gup, etc,
will not be able to find valid vma, then just return SIGSEGV or -EFAULT as
expected.

If the vma has VM_HUGETLB | VM_PFNMAP, they are considered as special
mappings.  They will be handled by without downgrading mmap_sem in this
patch since they may update vm flags.

But, with the "detach vmas first" approach, the vmas have been detached
when vm flags are updated, so it sounds safe to update vm flags with read
mmap_sem for this specific case.  So, VM_HUGETLB and VM_PFNMAP will be
handled by using the optimized path in the following separate patches for
bisectable sake.

Unmapping uprobe areas may need update mm flags (MMF_RECALC_UPROBES).
However it is fine to have false-positive MMF_RECALC_UPROBES according to
uprobes developer.

With the "detach vmas first" approach we don't have to re-acquire mmap_sem
again to clean up vmas to avoid race window which might get the address
space changed since downgrade_write() doesn't release the lock to lead
regression, which simply downgrades to read lock.

And, since the lock acquire/release cost is managed to the minimum and
almost as same as before, the optimization could be extended to any size
of mapping without incurring significant penalty to small mappings.

For the time being, just do this in munmap syscall path.  Other
vm_munmap() or do_munmap() call sites (i.e mmap, mremap, etc) remain
intact due to some implementation difficulties since they acquire write
mmap_sem from very beginning and hold it until the end, do_munmap() might
be called in the middle.  But, the optimized do_munmap would like to be
called without mmap_sem held so that we can do the optimization.  So, if
we want to do the similar optimization for mmap/mremap path, I'm afraid we
would have to redesign them.  mremap might be called on very large area
depending on the usecases, the optimization to it will be considered in
the future.

With the patches, exclusive mmap_sem hold time when munmap a 80GB address
space on a machine with 32 cores of E5-2680 @ 2.70GHz dropped to us level
from second.

munmap_test-15002 [008]   594.380138: funcgraph_entry: |
__vm_munmap() {
munmap_test-15002 [008]   594.380146: funcgraph_entry:      !2485684 us
|    unmap_region();
munmap_test-15002 [008]   596.865836: funcgraph_exit:       !2485692 us
|  }

Here the execution time of unmap_region() is used to evaluate the time of
holding read mmap_sem, then the remaining time is used with holding
exclusive lock.

[1] https://lwn.net/Articles/753269/

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1537376621-51150-2-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Suggested-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Suggested-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agovfree: add debug might_sleep()
Andrey Ryabinin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:07 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
vfree: add debug might_sleep()

Add might_sleep() call to vfree() to catch potential sleep-in-atomic bugs
earlier.

[aryabinin@virtuozzo.com: drop might_sleep_if() from kvfree()]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/7e19e4df-b1a6-29bd-9ae7-0266d50bef1d@virtuozzo.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180914130512.10394-3-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com
Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/vmalloc.c: improve vfree() kerneldoc
Andrey Ryabinin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:03 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
mm/vmalloc.c: improve vfree() kerneldoc

vfree() might sleep if called not in interrupt context.  Explain that in
the comment.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180914130512.10394-2-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com
Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agokvfree(): fix misleading comment
Andrey Ryabinin [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:07:00 +0000 (15:07 -0700)]
kvfree(): fix misleading comment

vfree() might sleep if called not in interrupt context.  So does kvfree()
too.  Fix misleading kvfree()'s comment about allowed context.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180914130512.10394-1-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com
Fixes: 04b8e946075d ("mm/util.c: improve kvfree() kerneldoc")
Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/mempolicy.c: use match_string() helper to simplify the code
zhong jiang [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:57 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm/mempolicy.c: use match_string() helper to simplify the code

match_string() returns the index of an array for a matching string, which
can be used intead of open coded implementation.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1536988365-50310-1-git-send-email-zhongjiang@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: zhong jiang <zhongjiang@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/swap.c: remove duplicated include
YueHaibing [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:53 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm/swap.c: remove duplicated include

Remove duplicated include linux/memremap.h

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180917131308.16420-1-yuehaibing@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm, page_alloc: drop should_suppress_show_mem
Michal Hocko [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:49 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm, page_alloc: drop should_suppress_show_mem

should_suppress_show_mem() was introduced to reduce the overhead of
show_mem on large NUMA systems.  Things have changed since then though.
Namely c78e93630d15 ("mm: do not walk all of system memory during
show_mem") has reduced the overhead considerably.

Moreover warn_alloc_show_mem clears SHOW_MEM_FILTER_NODES when called from
the IRQ context already so we are not printing per node stats.

Remove should_suppress_show_mem because we are losing potentially
interesting information about allocation failures.  We have seen a bug
report where system gets unresponsive under memory pressure and there is
only

kernel: [2032243.696888] qlge 0000:8b:00.1 ql1: Could not get a page chunk, i=8, clean_idx =200 .
kernel: [2032243.710725] swapper/7: page allocation failure: order:1, mode:0x1084120(GFP_ATOMIC|__GFP_COLD|__GFP_COMP)

without an additional information for debugging.  It would be great to see
the state of the page allocator at the moment.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180907114334.7088-1-mhocko@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm/memcontrol.c: fix memory.stat item ordering
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:45 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm/memcontrol.c: fix memory.stat item ordering

The refault stats go better with the page fault stats, and are of
higher interest than the stats on LRU operations. In fact they used to
be grouped together; when the LRU operation stats were added later on,
they were wedged in between.

Move them back together. Documentation/admin-guide/cgroup-v2.rst
already lists them in the right order.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181010140239.GA2527@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: zero-seek shrinkers
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:42 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm: zero-seek shrinkers

The page cache and most shrinkable slab caches hold data that has been
read from disk, but there are some caches that only cache CPU work, such
as the dentry and inode caches of procfs and sysfs, as well as the subset
of radix tree nodes that track non-resident page cache.

Currently, all these are shrunk at the same rate: using DEFAULT_SEEKS for
the shrinker's seeks setting tells the reclaim algorithm that for every
two page cache pages scanned it should scan one slab object.

This is a bogus setting.  A virtual inode that required no IO to create is
not twice as valuable as a page cache page; shadow cache entries with
eviction distances beyond the size of memory aren't either.

In most cases, the behavior in practice is still fine.  Such virtual
caches don't tend to grow and assert themselves aggressively, and usually
get picked up before they cause problems.  But there are scenarios where
that's not true.

Our database workloads suffer from two of those.  For one, their file
workingset is several times bigger than available memory, which has the
kernel aggressively create shadow page cache entries for the non-resident
parts of it.  The workingset code does tell the VM that most of these are
expendable, but the VM ends up balancing them 2:1 to cache pages as per
the seeks setting.  This is a huge waste of memory.

These workloads also deal with tens of thousands of open files and use
/proc for introspection, which ends up growing the proc_inode_cache to
absurdly large sizes - again at the cost of valuable cache space, which
isn't a reasonable trade-off, given that proc inodes can be re-created
without involving the disk.

This patch implements a "zero-seek" setting for shrinkers that results in
a target ratio of 0:1 between their objects and IO-backed caches.  This
allows such virtual caches to grow when memory is available (they do
cache/avoid CPU work after all), but effectively disables them as soon as
IO-backed objects are under pressure.

It then switches the shrinkers for procfs and sysfs metadata, as well as
excess page cache shadow nodes, to the new zero-seek setting.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181009184732.762-5-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reported-by: Domas Mituzas <dmituzas@fb.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: workingset: add vmstat counter for shadow nodes
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:39 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm: workingset: add vmstat counter for shadow nodes

Make it easier to catch bugs in the shadow node shrinker by adding a
counter for the shadow nodes in circulation.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: assert that irqs are disabled, for __inc_lruvec_page_state()]
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: s/WARN_ON_ONCE/VM_WARN_ON_ONCE/, per Johannes]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181009184732.762-4-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: workingset: use cheaper __inc_lruvec_state in irqsafe node reclaim
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:35 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm: workingset: use cheaper __inc_lruvec_state in irqsafe node reclaim

No need to use the preemption-safe lruvec state function inside the
reclaim region that has irqs disabled.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181009184732.762-3-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agopsi: cgroup support
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:31 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
psi: cgroup support

On a system that executes multiple cgrouped jobs and independent
workloads, we don't just care about the health of the overall system, but
also that of individual jobs, so that we can ensure individual job health,
fairness between jobs, or prioritize some jobs over others.

This patch implements pressure stall tracking for cgroups.  In kernels
with CONFIG_PSI=y, cgroup2 groups will have cpu.pressure, memory.pressure,
and io.pressure files that track aggregate pressure stall times for only
the tasks inside the cgroup.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-10-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agopsi: pressure stall information for CPU, memory, and IO
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:27 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
psi: pressure stall information for CPU, memory, and IO

When systems are overcommitted and resources become contended, it's hard
to tell exactly the impact this has on workload productivity, or how close
the system is to lockups and OOM kills.  In particular, when machines work
multiple jobs concurrently, the impact of overcommit in terms of latency
and throughput on the individual job can be enormous.

In order to maximize hardware utilization without sacrificing individual
job health or risk complete machine lockups, this patch implements a way
to quantify resource pressure in the system.

A kernel built with CONFIG_PSI=y creates files in /proc/pressure/ that
expose the percentage of time the system is stalled on CPU, memory, or IO,
respectively.  Stall states are aggregate versions of the per-task delay
accounting delays:

       cpu: some tasks are runnable but not executing on a CPU
       memory: tasks are reclaiming, or waiting for swapin or thrashing cache
       io: tasks are waiting for io completions

These percentages of walltime can be thought of as pressure percentages,
and they give a general sense of system health and productivity loss
incurred by resource overcommit.  They can also indicate when the system
is approaching lockup scenarios and OOMs.

To do this, psi keeps track of the task states associated with each CPU
and samples the time they spend in stall states.  Every 2 seconds, the
samples are averaged across CPUs - weighted by the CPUs' non-idle time to
eliminate artifacts from unused CPUs - and translated into percentages of
walltime.  A running average of those percentages is maintained over 10s,
1m, and 5m periods (similar to the loadaverage).

[hannes@cmpxchg.org: doc fixlet, per Randy]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828205625.GA14030@cmpxchg.org
[hannes@cmpxchg.org: code optimization]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180907175015.GA8479@cmpxchg.org
[hannes@cmpxchg.org: rename psi_clock() to psi_update_work(), per Peter]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180907145404.GB11088@cmpxchg.org
[hannes@cmpxchg.org: fix build]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180913014222.GA2370@cmpxchg.org
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-9-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agosched: introduce this_rq_lock_irq()
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:23 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
sched: introduce this_rq_lock_irq()

do_sched_yield() disables IRQs, looks up this_rq() and locks it.  The next
patch is adding another site with the same pattern, so provide a
convenience function for it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-8-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agosched: sched.h: make rq locking and clock functions available in stats.h
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:19 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
sched: sched.h: make rq locking and clock functions available in stats.h

kernel/sched/sched.h includes "stats.h" half-way through the file.  The
next patch introduces users of sched.h's rq locking functions and
update_rq_clock() in kernel/sched/stats.h.  Move those definitions up in
the file so they are available in stats.h.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-7-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agosched: loadavg: make calc_load_n() public
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:16 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
sched: loadavg: make calc_load_n() public

It's going to be used in a later patch. Keep the churn separate.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-6-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agosched: loadavg: consolidate LOAD_INT, LOAD_FRAC, CALC_LOAD
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:11 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
sched: loadavg: consolidate LOAD_INT, LOAD_FRAC, CALC_LOAD

There are several definitions of those functions/macros in places that
mess with fixed-point load averages.  Provide an official version.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix missed conversion in block/blk-iolatency.c]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-5-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agodelayacct: track delays from thrashing cache pages
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:08 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
delayacct: track delays from thrashing cache pages

Delay accounting already measures the time a task spends in direct reclaim
and waiting for swapin, but in low memory situations tasks spend can spend
a significant amount of their time waiting on thrashing page cache.  This
isn't tracked right now.

To know the full impact of memory contention on an individual task,
measure the delay when waiting for a recently evicted active cache page to
read back into memory.

Also update tools/accounting/getdelays.c:

     [hannes@computer accounting]$ sudo ./getdelays -d -p 1
     print delayacct stats ON
     PID     1

     CPU             count     real total  virtual total    delay total  delay average
                     50318      745000000      847346785      400533713          0.008ms
     IO              count    delay total  delay average
                       435      122601218              0ms
     SWAP            count    delay total  delay average
                         0              0              0ms
     RECLAIM         count    delay total  delay average
                         0              0              0ms
     THRASHING       count    delay total  delay average
                        19       12621439              0ms

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-4-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: workingset: tell cache transitions from workingset thrashing
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:06:04 +0000 (15:06 -0700)]
mm: workingset: tell cache transitions from workingset thrashing

Refaults happen during transitions between workingsets as well as in-place
thrashing.  Knowing the difference between the two has a range of
applications, including measuring the impact of memory shortage on the
system performance, as well as the ability to smarter balance pressure
between the filesystem cache and the swap-backed workingset.

During workingset transitions, inactive cache refaults and pushes out
established active cache.  When that active cache isn't stale, however,
and also ends up refaulting, that's bonafide thrashing.

Introduce a new page flag that tells on eviction whether the page has been
active or not in its lifetime.  This bit is then stored in the shadow
entry, to classify refaults as transitioning or thrashing.

How many page->flags does this leave us with on 32-bit?

20 bits are always page flags

21 if you have an MMU

23 with the zone bits for DMA, Normal, HighMem, Movable

29 with the sparsemem section bits

30 if PAE is enabled

31 with this patch.

So on 32-bit PAE, that leaves 1 bit for distinguishing two NUMA nodes.  If
that's not enough, the system can switch to discontigmem and re-gain the 6
or 7 sparsemem section bits.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-3-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: workingset: don't drop refault information prematurely
Johannes Weiner [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:59 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
mm: workingset: don't drop refault information prematurely

Patch series "psi: pressure stall information for CPU, memory, and IO", v4.

Overview

PSI reports the overall wallclock time in which the tasks in a system (or
cgroup) wait for (contended) hardware resources.

This helps users understand the resource pressure their workloads are
under, which allows them to rootcause and fix throughput and latency
problems caused by overcommitting, underprovisioning, suboptimal job
placement in a grid; as well as anticipate major disruptions like OOM.

Real-world applications

We're using the data collected by PSI (and its previous incarnation,
memdelay) quite extensively at Facebook, and with several success stories.

One usecase is avoiding OOM hangs/livelocks.  The reason these happen is
because the OOM killer is triggered by reclaim not being able to free
pages, but with fast flash devices there is *always* some clean and
uptodate cache to reclaim; the OOM killer never kicks in, even as tasks
spend 90% of the time thrashing the cache pages of their own executables.
There is no situation where this ever makes sense in practice.  We wrote a
<100 line POC python script to monitor memory pressure and kill stuff way
before such pathological thrashing leads to full system losses that would
require forcible hard resets.

We've since extended and deployed this code into other places to guarantee
latency and throughput SLAs, since they're usually violated way before the
kernel OOM killer would ever kick in.

It is available here: https://github.com/facebookincubator/oomd

Eventually we probably want to trigger the in-kernel OOM killer based on
extreme sustained pressure as well, so that Linux can avoid memory
livelocks - which technically aren't deadlocks, but to the user
indistinguishable from them - out of the box.  We'd continue using OOMD as
the first line of defense to ensure workload health and implement complex
kill policies that are beyond the scope of the kernel.

We also use PSI memory pressure for loadshedding.  Our batch job
infrastructure used to use heuristics based on various VM stats to
anticipate OOM situations, with lackluster success.  We switched it to PSI
and managed to anticipate and avoid OOM kills and lockups fairly reliably.
The reduction of OOM outages in the worker pool raised the pool's
aggregate productivity, and we were able to switch that service to smaller
machines.

Lastly, we use cgroups to isolate a machine's main workload from
maintenance crap like package upgrades, logging, configuration, as well as
to prevent multiple workloads on a machine from stepping on each others'
toes.  We were not able to configure this properly without the pressure
metrics; we would see latency or bandwidth drops, but it would often be
hard to impossible to rootcause it post-mortem.

We now log and graph pressure for the containers in our fleet and can
trivially link latency spikes and throughput drops to shortages of
specific resources after the fact, and fix the job config/scheduling.

PSI has also received testing, feedback, and feature requests from Android
and EndlessOS for the purpose of low-latency OOM killing, to intervene in
pressure situations before the UI starts hanging.

How do you use this feature?

A kernel with CONFIG_PSI=y will create a /proc/pressure directory with 3
files: cpu, memory, and io.  If using cgroup2, cgroups will also have
cpu.pressure, memory.pressure and io.pressure files, which simply
aggregate task stalls at the cgroup level instead of system-wide.

The cpu file contains one line:

some avg10=2.04 avg60=0.75 avg300=0.40 total=157656722

The averages give the percentage of walltime in which one or more tasks
are delayed on the runqueue while another task has the CPU.  They're
recent averages over 10s, 1m, 5m windows, so you can tell short term
trends from long term ones, similarly to the load average.

The total= value gives the absolute stall time in microseconds.  This
allows detecting latency spikes that might be too short to sway the
running averages.  It also allows custom time averaging in case the
10s/1m/5m windows aren't adequate for the usecase (or are too coarse with
future hardware).

What to make of this "some" metric?  If CPU utilization is at 100% and CPU
pressure is 0, it means the system is perfectly utilized, with one
runnable thread per CPU and nobody waiting.  At two or more runnable tasks
per CPU, the system is 100% overcommitted and the pressure average will
indicate as much.  From a utilization perspective this is a great state of
course: no CPU cycles are being wasted, even when 50% of the threads were
to go idle (as most workloads do vary).  From the perspective of the
individual job it's not great, however, and they would do better with more
resources.  Depending on what your priority and options are, raised "some"
numbers may or may not require action.

The memory file contains two lines:

some avg10=70.24 avg60=68.52 avg300=69.91 total=3559632828
full avg10=57.59 avg60=58.06 avg300=60.38 total=3300487258

The some line is the same as for cpu, the time in which at least one task
is stalled on the resource.  In the case of memory, this includes waiting
on swap-in, page cache refaults and page reclaim.

The full line, however, indicates time in which *nobody* is using the CPU
productively due to pressure: all non-idle tasks are waiting for memory in
one form or another.  Significant time spent in there is a good trigger
for killing things, moving jobs to other machines, or dropping incoming
requests, since neither the jobs nor the machine overall are making too
much headway.

The io file is similar to memory.  Because the block layer doesn't have a
concept of hardware contention right now (how much longer is my IO request
taking due to other tasks?), it reports CPU potential lost on all IO
delays, not just the potential lost due to competition.

FAQ

Q: How is PSI's CPU component different from the load average?

A: There are several quirks in the load average that make it hard to
   impossible to tell how overcommitted the CPU really is.

   1. The load average is reported as a raw number of active tasks.
      You need to know how many CPUs there are in the system, how many
      CPUs the workload is allowed to use, then think about what the
      proportion between load and the number of CPUs mean for the
      tasks trying to run.

      PSI reports the percentage of wallclock time in which tasks are
      waiting for a CPU to run on. It doesn't matter how many CPUs are
      present or usable. The number always tells the quality of life
      of tasks in the system or in a particular cgroup.

   2. The shortest averaging window is 1m, which is extremely coarse,
      and it's sampled in 5s intervals. A *lot* can happen on a CPU in
      5 seconds. This *may* be able to identify persistent long-term
      trends and very clear and obvious overloads, but it's unusable
      for latency spikes and more subtle overutilization.

      PSI's shortest window is 10s. It also exports the cumulative
      stall times (in microseconds) of synchronously recorded events.

   3. On Linux, the load average for historical reasons includes all
      TASK_UNINTERRUPTIBLE tasks. This gives a broader sense of how
      busy the system is, but on the flipside it doesn't distinguish
      whether tasks are likely to contend over the CPU or IO - which
      obviously requires very different interventions from a sys admin
      or a job scheduler.

      PSI reports independent metrics for CPU and IO. You can tell
      which resource is making the tasks wait, but in conjunction
      still see how overloaded the system is overall.

Q: What's the cost / performance impact of this feature?

A: PSI's primary cost is in the scheduler, in particular task wakeups
   and sleeps.

   I benchmarked this code using Facebook's two most scheduling
   sensitive workloads: memcache and webserver. They handle a ton of
   small requests - lots of wakeups and sleeps with little actual work
   in between - so they tend to be canaries for scheduler regressions.

   In the tests, the boxes were handling live traffic over the course
   of several hours. Half the machines, the control, ran with
   CONFIG_PSI=n.

   For memcache I used eight machines total. They're 2-socket, 14
   core, 56 thread boxes. The test runs for half the test period,
   flips the test and control kernels on the hardware to rule out HW
   factors, DC location etc., then runs the other half of the test.

   For the webservers, I used 32 machines total. They're single
   socket, 16 core, 32 thread machines.

   During the memcache test, CPU load was nopsi=78.05% psi=78.98% in
   the first half and nopsi=77.52% psi=78.25%, so PSI added between
   0.7 and 0.9 percentage points to the CPU load, a difference of
   about 1%.

   UPDATE: I re-ran this test with the v3 version of this patch set
   and the CPU utilization was equivalent between test and control.

   UPDATE: v4 is on par with v3.

   As far as end-to-end request latency from the client perspective
   goes, we don't sample those finely enough to capture the requests
   going to those particular machines during the test, but we know the
   p50 turnaround time in this workload is 54us, and perf bench sched
   pipe on those machines show nopsi=5.232666 us/op and psi=5.587347
   us/op, so this doesn't add much here either.

   The profile for the pipe benchmark shows:

        0.87%  sched-pipe  [kernel.vmlinux]    [k] psi_group_change
        0.83%  perf.real   [kernel.vmlinux]    [k] psi_group_change
        0.82%  perf.real   [kernel.vmlinux]    [k] psi_task_change
        0.58%  sched-pipe  [kernel.vmlinux]    [k] psi_task_change

   The webserver load is running inside 4 nested cgroup levels. The
   CPU load with both nopsi and psi kernels was indistinguishable at
   81%.

   For comparison, we had to disable the cgroup cpu controller on the
   webservers because it added 4 percentage points to the CPU% during
   this same exact test.

   Versions of this accounting code now run on 80% of our fleet. None
   of our workloads have reported regressions during the rollout.

Daniel Drake said:

: I just retested the latest version at
: http://git.cmpxchg.org/cgit.cgi/linux-psi.git (Linux 4.18) and the results
: are great.
:
: Test setup:
: Endless OS
: GeminiLake N4200 low end laptop
: 2GB RAM
: swap (and zram swap) disabled
:
: Baseline test: open a handful of large-ish apps and several website
: tabs in Google Chrome.
:
: Results: after a couple of minutes, system is excessively thrashing, mouse
: cursor can barely be moved, UI is not responding to mouse clicks, so it's
: impractical to recover from this situation as an ordinary user
:
: Add my simple killer:
: https://gist.github.com/dsd/a8988bf0b81a6163475988120fe8d9cd
:
: Results: when the thrashing causes the UI to become sluggish, the killer
: steps in and kills something (usually a chrome tab), and the system
: remains usable.  I repeatedly opened more apps and more websites over a 15
: minute period but I wasn't able to get the system to a point of UI
: unresponsiveness.

Suren said:

: Backported to 4.9 and retested on ARMv8 8 code system running Android.
: Signals behave as expected reacting to memory pressure, no jumps in
: "total" counters that would indicate an overflow/underflow issues.  Nicely
: done!

This patch (of 9):

If we keep just enough refault information to match the *current* page
cache during reclaim time, we could lose a lot of events when there is
only a temporary spike in non-cache memory consumption that pushes out all
the cache.  Once cache comes back, we won't see those refaults.  They
might not be actionable for LRU aging, but we want to know about them for
measuring memory pressure.

[hannes@cmpxchg.org: switch to NUMA-aware lru and slab counters]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20181009184732.762-2-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180828172258.3185-2-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <jweiner@fb.com>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Tested-by: Daniel Drake <drake@endlessm.com>
Tested-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Peter Enderborg <peter.enderborg@sony.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm, slab: shorten kmalloc cache names for large sizes
Vlastimil Babka [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:55 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
mm, slab: shorten kmalloc cache names for large sizes

Kmalloc cache names can get quite long for large object sizes, when the
sizes are expressed in bytes.  Use 'k' and 'M' prefixes to make the names
as short as possible e.g.  in /proc/slabinfo.  This works, as we mostly
use power-of-two sizes, with exceptions only below 1k.

Example: 'kmalloc-4194304' becomes 'kmalloc-4M'

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180731090649.16028-7-vbabka@suse.cz
Suggested-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sumit Semwal <sumit.semwal@linaro.org>
Cc: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm, proc: add KReclaimable to /proc/meminfo
Vlastimil Babka [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:50 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
mm, proc: add KReclaimable to /proc/meminfo

The vmstat NR_KERNEL_MISC_RECLAIMABLE counter is for kernel non-slab
allocations that can be reclaimed via shrinker.  In /proc/meminfo, we can
show the sum of all reclaimable kernel allocations (including slab) as
"KReclaimable".  Add the same counter also to per-node meminfo under /sys

With this counter, users will have more complete information about kernel
memory usage.  Non-slab reclaimable pages (currently just the ION
allocator) will not be missing from /proc/meminfo, making users wonder
where part of their memory went.  More precisely, they already appear in
MemAvailable, but without the new counter, it's not obvious why the value
in MemAvailable doesn't fully correspond with the sum of other counters
participating in it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180731090649.16028-6-vbabka@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sumit Semwal <sumit.semwal@linaro.org>
Cc: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm: rename and change semantics of nr_indirectly_reclaimable_bytes
Vlastimil Babka [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:46 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
mm: rename and change semantics of nr_indirectly_reclaimable_bytes

The vmstat counter NR_INDIRECTLY_RECLAIMABLE_BYTES was introduced by
commit eb59254608bc ("mm: introduce NR_INDIRECTLY_RECLAIMABLE_BYTES") with
the goal of accounting objects that can be reclaimed, but cannot be
allocated via a SLAB_RECLAIM_ACCOUNT cache.  This is now possible via
kmalloc() with __GFP_RECLAIMABLE flag, and the dcache external names user
is converted.

The counter is however still useful for accounting direct page allocations
(i.e.  not slab) with a shrinker, such as the ION page pool.  So keep it,
and:

- change granularity to pages to be more like other counters; sub-page
  allocations should be able to use kmalloc
- rename the counter to NR_KERNEL_MISC_RECLAIMABLE
- expose the counter again in vmstat as "nr_kernel_misc_reclaimable"; we can
  again remove the check for not printing "hidden" counters

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180731090649.16028-5-vbabka@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Sumit Semwal <sumit.semwal@linaro.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agodcache: allocate external names from reclaimable kmalloc caches
Vlastimil Babka [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:41 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
dcache: allocate external names from reclaimable kmalloc caches

We can use the newly introduced kmalloc-reclaimable-X caches, to allocate
external names in dcache, which will take care of the proper accounting
automatically, and also improve anti-fragmentation page grouping.

This effectively reverts commit f1782c9bc547 ("dcache: account external
names as indirectly reclaimable memory") and instead passes
__GFP_RECLAIMABLE to kmalloc().  The accounting thus moves from
NR_INDIRECTLY_RECLAIMABLE_BYTES to NR_SLAB_RECLAIMABLE, which is also
considered in MemAvailable calculation and overcommit decisions.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180731090649.16028-4-vbabka@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sumit Semwal <sumit.semwal@linaro.org>
Cc: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm, slab/slub: introduce kmalloc-reclaimable caches
Vlastimil Babka [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:38 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
mm, slab/slub: introduce kmalloc-reclaimable caches

Kmem caches can be created with a SLAB_RECLAIM_ACCOUNT flag, which
indicates they contain objects which can be reclaimed under memory
pressure (typically through a shrinker).  This makes the slab pages
accounted as NR_SLAB_RECLAIMABLE in vmstat, which is reflected also the
MemAvailable meminfo counter and in overcommit decisions.  The slab pages
are also allocated with __GFP_RECLAIMABLE, which is good for
anti-fragmentation through grouping pages by mobility.

The generic kmalloc-X caches are created without this flag, but sometimes
are used also for objects that can be reclaimed, which due to varying size
cannot have a dedicated kmem cache with SLAB_RECLAIM_ACCOUNT flag.  A
prominent example are dcache external names, which prompted the creation
of a new, manually managed vmstat counter NR_INDIRECTLY_RECLAIMABLE_BYTES
in commit f1782c9bc547 ("dcache: account external names as indirectly
reclaimable memory").

To better handle this and any other similar cases, this patch introduces
SLAB_RECLAIM_ACCOUNT variants of kmalloc caches, named kmalloc-rcl-X.
They are used whenever the kmalloc() call passes __GFP_RECLAIMABLE among
gfp flags.  They are added to the kmalloc_caches array as a new type.
Allocations with both __GFP_DMA and __GFP_RECLAIMABLE will use a dma type
cache.

This change only applies to SLAB and SLUB, not SLOB.  This is fine, since
SLOB's target are tiny system and this patch does add some overhead of
kmem management objects.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180731090649.16028-3-vbabka@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sumit Semwal <sumit.semwal@linaro.org>
Cc: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agomm, slab: combine kmalloc_caches and kmalloc_dma_caches
Vlastimil Babka [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:34 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
mm, slab: combine kmalloc_caches and kmalloc_dma_caches

Patch series "kmalloc-reclaimable caches", v4.

As discussed at LSF/MM [1] here's a patchset that introduces
kmalloc-reclaimable caches (more details in the second patch) and uses
them for dcache external names.  That allows us to repurpose the
NR_INDIRECTLY_RECLAIMABLE_BYTES counter later in the series.

With patch 3/6, dcache external names are allocated from kmalloc-rcl-*
caches, eliminating the need for manual accounting.  More importantly, it
also ensures the reclaimable kmalloc allocations are grouped in pages
separate from the regular kmalloc allocations.  The need for proper
accounting of dcache external names has shown it's easy for misbehaving
process to allocate lots of them, causing premature OOMs.  Without the
added grouping, it's likely that a similar workload can interleave the
dcache external names allocations with regular kmalloc allocations (note:
I haven't searched myself for an example of such regular kmalloc
allocation, but I would be very surprised if there wasn't some).  A
pathological case would be e.g.  one 64byte regular allocations with 63
external dcache names in a page (64x64=4096), which means the page is not
freed even after reclaiming after all dcache names, and the process can
thus "steal" the whole page with single 64byte allocation.

If other kmalloc users similar to dcache external names become identified,
they can also benefit from the new functionality simply by adding
__GFP_RECLAIMABLE to the kmalloc calls.

Side benefits of the patchset (that could be also merged separately)
include removed branch for detecting __GFP_DMA kmalloc(), and shortening
kmalloc cache names in /proc/slabinfo output.  The latter is potentially
an ABI break in case there are tools parsing the names and expecting the
values to be in bytes.

This is how /proc/slabinfo looks like after booting in virtme:

...
kmalloc-rcl-4M         0      0 4194304    1 1024 : tunables    1    1    0 : slabdata      0      0      0
...
kmalloc-rcl-96         7     32    128   32    1 : tunables  120   60    8 : slabdata      1      1      0
kmalloc-rcl-64        25    128     64   64    1 : tunables  120   60    8 : slabdata      2      2      0
kmalloc-rcl-32         0      0     32  124    1 : tunables  120   60    8 : slabdata      0      0      0
kmalloc-4M             0      0 4194304    1 1024 : tunables    1    1    0 : slabdata      0      0      0
kmalloc-2M             0      0 2097152    1  512 : tunables    1    1    0 : slabdata      0      0      0
kmalloc-1M             0      0 1048576    1  256 : tunables    1    1    0 : slabdata      0      0      0
...

/proc/vmstat with renamed nr_indirectly_reclaimable_bytes counter:

...
nr_slab_reclaimable 2817
nr_slab_unreclaimable 1781
...
nr_kernel_misc_reclaimable 0
...

/proc/meminfo with new KReclaimable counter:

...
Shmem:               564 kB
KReclaimable:      11260 kB
Slab:              18368 kB
SReclaimable:      11260 kB
SUnreclaim:         7108 kB
KernelStack:        1248 kB
...

This patch (of 6):

The kmalloc caches currently mainain separate (optional) array
kmalloc_dma_caches for __GFP_DMA allocations.  There are tests for
__GFP_DMA in the allocation hotpaths.  We can avoid the branches by
combining kmalloc_caches and kmalloc_dma_caches into a single
two-dimensional array where the outer dimension is cache "type".  This
will also allow to add kmalloc-reclaimable caches as a third type.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180731090649.16028-2-vbabka@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Sumit Semwal <sumit.semwal@linaro.org>
Cc: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agouserfaultfd: allow get_mempolicy(MPOL_F_NODE|MPOL_F_ADDR) to trigger userfaults
Andrea Arcangeli [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:16 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
userfaultfd: allow get_mempolicy(MPOL_F_NODE|MPOL_F_ADDR) to trigger userfaults

get_mempolicy(MPOL_F_NODE|MPOL_F_ADDR) called a get_user_pages that would
not be waiting for userfaults before failing and it would hit on a SIGBUS
instead.  Using get_user_pages_locked/unlocked instead will allow
get_mempolicy to allow userfaults to resolve the fault and fill the hole,
before grabbing the node id of the page.

If the user calls get_mempolicy() with MPOL_F_ADDR | MPOL_F_NODE for an
address inside an area managed by uffd and there is no page at that
address, the page allocation from within get_mempolicy() will fail
because get_user_pages() does not allow for page fault retry required
for uffd; the user will get SIGBUS.

With this patch, the page fault will be resolved by the uffd and the
get_mempolicy() will continue normally.

Background:

Via code review, previously the syscall would have returned -EFAULT
(vm_fault_to_errno), now it will block and wait for an userfault (if
it's waken before the fault is resolved it'll still -EFAULT).

This way get_mempolicy will give a chance to an "unaware" app to be
compliant with userfaults.

The reason this visible change is that becoming "userfault compliant"
cannot regress anything: all other syscalls including read(2)/write(2)
had to become "userfault compliant" long time ago (that's one of the
things userfaultfd can do that PROT_NONE and trapping segfaults can't).

So this is just one more syscall that become "userfault compliant" like
all other major ones already were.

This has been happening on virtio-bridge dpdk process which just called
get_mempolicy on the guest space post live migration, but before the
memory had a chance to be migrated to destination.

I didn't run an strace to be able to show the -EFAULT going away, but
I've the confirmation of the below debug aid information (only visible
with CONFIG_DEBUG_VM=y) going away with the patch:

    [20116.371461] FAULT_FLAG_ALLOW_RETRY missing 0
    [20116.371464] CPU: 1 PID: 13381 Comm: vhost-events Not tainted 4.17.12-200.fc28.x86_64 #1
    [20116.371465] Hardware name: LENOVO 20FAS2BN0A/20FAS2BN0A, BIOS N1CET54W (1.22 ) 02/10/2017
    [20116.371466] Call Trace:
    [20116.371473]  dump_stack+0x5c/0x80
    [20116.371476]  handle_userfault.cold.37+0x1b/0x22
    [20116.371479]  ? remove_wait_queue+0x20/0x60
    [20116.371481]  ? poll_freewait+0x45/0xa0
    [20116.371483]  ? do_sys_poll+0x31c/0x520
    [20116.371485]  ? radix_tree_lookup_slot+0x1e/0x50
    [20116.371488]  shmem_getpage_gfp+0xce7/0xe50
    [20116.371491]  ? page_add_file_rmap+0x1a/0x2c0
    [20116.371493]  shmem_fault+0x78/0x1e0
    [20116.371495]  ? filemap_map_pages+0x3a1/0x450
    [20116.371498]  __do_fault+0x1f/0xc0
    [20116.371500]  __handle_mm_fault+0xe2e/0x12f0
    [20116.371502]  handle_mm_fault+0xda/0x200
    [20116.371504]  __get_user_pages+0x238/0x790
    [20116.371506]  get_user_pages+0x3e/0x50
    [20116.371510]  kernel_get_mempolicy+0x40b/0x700
    [20116.371512]  ? vfs_write+0x170/0x1a0
    [20116.371515]  __x64_sys_get_mempolicy+0x21/0x30
    [20116.371517]  do_syscall_64+0x5b/0x160
    [20116.371520]  entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

The above harmless debug message (not a kernel crash, just a
dump_stack()) is shown with CONFIG_DEBUG_VM=y to more quickly identify
and improve kernel spots that may have to become "userfaultfd
compliant" like this one (without having to run an strace and search
for syscall misbehavior).  Spots like the above are more closer to a
kernel bug for the non-cooperative usages that Mike focuses on, than
for for dpdk qemu-cooperative usages that reproduced it, but it's still
nicer to get this fixed for dpdk too.

The part of the patch that caused me to think is only the
implementation issue of mpol_get, but it looks like it should work safe
no matter the kind of mempolicy structure that is (the default static
policy also starts at 1 so it'll go to 2 and back to 1 without crashing
everything at 0).

[rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com: changelog addition]
  http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180904073718.GA26916@rapoport-lnx
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20180831214848.23676-1-aarcange@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Reported-by: Maxime Coquelin <maxime.coquelin@redhat.com>
Tested-by: Dr. David Alan Gilbert <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agoalpha: switch to NO_BOOTMEM
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:10 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
alpha: switch to NO_BOOTMEM

Replace bootmem allocator with memblock and enable use of NO_BOOTMEM like
on most other architectures.

Alpha gets the description of the physical memory from the firmware as an
array of memory clusters.  Each cluster that is not reserved by the
firmware is added to memblock.memory.

Once the memblock.memory is set up, we reserve the kernel and initrd pages
with memblock reserve.

Since we don't need the bootmem bitmap anymore, the code that finds an
appropriate place is removed.

The conversion does not take care of NUMA support which is marked broken
for more than 10 years now.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1535952894-10967-1-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agounicore32: switch to NO_BOOTMEM
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:05 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
unicore32: switch to NO_BOOTMEM

The unicore32 architecture already supports memblock and uses it for some
early memory reservations, e.g initrd and the page tables.

At some point unicore32 allocates the bootmem bitmap from the memblock and
then hands over the memory reservations from memblock to bootmem.

This patch removes the bootmem initialization and leaves memblock as the
only boot time memory manager for unicore32.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1533326330-31677-8-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at>
Cc: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agoum: switch to NO_BOOTMEM
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:05:02 +0000 (15:05 -0700)]
um: switch to NO_BOOTMEM

Replace bootmem initialization with memblock_add and memblock_reserve calls
and explicit initialization of {min,max}_low_pfn.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1533326330-31677-7-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agoum: setup_physmem: stop using global variables
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:04:58 +0000 (15:04 -0700)]
um: setup_physmem: stop using global variables

The setup_physmem() function receives uml_physmem and uml_reserved as
parameters and still used these global variables.  Replace such usage with
local variables.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1533326330-31677-6-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agonios2: switch to NO_BOOTMEM
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:04:55 +0000 (15:04 -0700)]
nios2: switch to NO_BOOTMEM

Remove bootmem bitmap initialization and replace reserve_bootmem() with
memblock_reserve().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1533326330-31677-5-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at>
Cc: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agonios2: use generic early_init_dt_add_memory_arch
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:04:51 +0000 (15:04 -0700)]
nios2: use generic early_init_dt_add_memory_arch

All we have to do is to enable memblock, the generic FDT code will take
care of the rest.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1533326330-31677-4-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at>
Cc: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
17 months agoof: ignore sub-page memory regions
Mike Rapoport [Fri, 26 Oct 2018 22:04:48 +0000 (15:04 -0700)]
of: ignore sub-page memory regions

Memory region size is rounded down to page boundary and with sub-page
region it becomes 0 and there is no point to add an empty region.
Moreover, when the base is less than PAGE_SIZE we get a bogus size as
(base + size - 1) evaluates to -1.

8cccffc52694 ("of: check for size < 0 after rounding in
early_init_dt_add_memory_arch") introduced a test for wrap around for the
case when base is not page aligned, the same test can be used to ignore
sub-page region sizes.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1533326330-31677-3-git-send-email-rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>