sfrench/cifs-2.6.git
5 months agomm: drop meminit_pfn_in_nid as it is redundant
Alexander Duyck [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:21:13 +0000 (17:21 -0700)]
mm: drop meminit_pfn_in_nid as it is redundant

As best as I can tell the meminit_pfn_in_nid call is completely redundant.
The deferred memory initialization is already making use of
for_each_free_mem_range which in turn will call into __next_mem_range
which will only return a memory range if it matches the node ID provided
assuming it is not NUMA_NO_NODE.

I am operating on the assumption that there are no zones or pgdata_t
structures that have a NUMA node of NUMA_NO_NODE associated with them.  If
that is the case then __next_mem_range will never return a memory range
that doesn't match the zone's node ID and as such the check is redundant.

So one piece I would like to verify on this is if this works for ia64.
Technically it was using a different approach to get the node ID, but it
seems to have the node ID also encoded into the memblock.  So I am
assuming this is okay, but would like to get confirmation on that.

On my x86_64 test system with 384GB of memory per node I saw a reduction
in initialization time from 2.80s to 1.85s as a result of this patch.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190405221219.12227.93957.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Jiang <dave.jiang@intel.com>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: <yi.z.zhang@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: use mm_zero_struct_page from SPARC on all 64b architectures
Alexander Duyck [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:21:10 +0000 (17:21 -0700)]
mm: use mm_zero_struct_page from SPARC on all 64b architectures

Patch series "Deferred page init improvements", v7.

This patchset is essentially a refactor of the page initialization logic
that is meant to provide for better code reuse while providing a
significant improvement in deferred page initialization performance.

In my testing on an x86_64 system with 384GB of RAM I have seen the
following.  In the case of regular memory initialization the deferred init
time was decreased from 3.75s to 1.38s on average.  This amounts to a 172%
improvement for the deferred memory initialization performance.

I have called out the improvement observed with each patch.

This patch (of 4):

Use the same approach that was already in use on Sparc on all the
architectures that support a 64b long.

This is mostly motivated by the fact that 7 to 10 store/move instructions
are likely always going to be faster than having to call into a function
that is not specialized for handling page init.

An added advantage to doing it this way is that the compiler can get away
with combining writes in the __init_single_page call.  As a result the
memset call will be reduced to only about 4 write operations, or at least
that is what I am seeing with GCC 6.2 as the flags, LRU pointers, and
count/mapcount seem to be cancelling out at least 4 of the 8 assignments
on my system.

One change I had to make to the function was to reduce the minimum page
size to 56 to support some powerpc64 configurations.

This change should introduce no change on SPARC since it already had this
code.  In the case of x86_64 I saw a reduction from 3.75s to 2.80s when
initializing 384GB of RAM per node.  Pavel Tatashin tested on a system
with Broadcom's Stingray CPU and 48GB of RAM and found that
__init_single_page() takes 19.30ns / 64-byte struct page before this patch
and with this patch it takes 17.33ns / 64-byte struct page.  Mike Rapoport
ran a similar test on a OpenPower (S812LC 8348-21C) with Power8 processor
and 128GB or RAM.  His results per 64-byte struct page were 4.68ns before,
and 4.59ns after this patch.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190405221213.12227.9392.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Jiang <dave.jiang@intel.com>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: <yi.z.zhang@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/rmap.c: use the pra.mapcount to do the check
Huang Shijie [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:21:07 +0000 (17:21 -0700)]
mm/rmap.c: use the pra.mapcount to do the check

We have the pra.mapcount already, and there is no need to call the
page_mapped() which may do some complicated computing for compound page.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190404054828.2731-1-sjhuang@iluvatar.ai
Signed-off-by: Huang Shijie <sjhuang@iluvatar.ai>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/filemap.c: enable error injection at add_to_page_cache()
Josef Bacik [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:21:04 +0000 (17:21 -0700)]
mm/filemap.c: enable error injection at add_to_page_cache()

Recently I messed up the error handling in filemap_fault() because of an
unexpected ENOMEM (related to cgroup memory limits) in add_to_page_cache.
Enable error injection at this point so I can add a testcase to xfstests
to verify I don't mess this up again.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: include linux/error-injection.h]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403152604.14008-1-josef@toxicpanda.com
Signed-off-by: Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: mmu_notifier_range_update_to_read_only() helper
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:21:00 +0000 (17:21 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: mmu_notifier_range_update_to_read_only() helper

Helper to test if a range is updated to read only (it is still valid to
read from the range).  This is useful for device driver or anyone who wish
to optimize out update when they know that they already have the range map
read only.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-9-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: pass down vma and reasons why mmu notifier is happening
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:57 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: pass down vma and reasons why mmu notifier is happening

CPU page table update can happens for many reasons, not only as a result
of a syscall (munmap(), mprotect(), mremap(), madvise(), ...) but also as
a result of kernel activities (memory compression, reclaim, migration,
...).

Users of mmu notifier API track changes to the CPU page table and take
specific action for them.  While current API only provide range of virtual
address affected by the change, not why the changes is happening

This patch is just passing down the new informations by adding it to the
mmu_notifier_range structure.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-8-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: use correct mmu_notifier events for each invalidation
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:53 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: use correct mmu_notifier events for each invalidation

This updates each existing invalidation to use the correct mmu notifier
event that represent what is happening to the CPU page table.  See the
patch which introduced the events to see the rational behind this.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-7-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: contextual information for event triggering invalidation
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:49 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: contextual information for event triggering invalidation

CPU page table update can happens for many reasons, not only as a result
of a syscall (munmap(), mprotect(), mremap(), madvise(), ...) but also as
a result of kernel activities (memory compression, reclaim, migration,
...).

Users of mmu notifier API track changes to the CPU page table and take
specific action for them.  While current API only provide range of virtual
address affected by the change, not why the changes is happening.

This patchset do the initial mechanical convertion of all the places that
calls mmu_notifier_range_init to also provide the default MMU_NOTIFY_UNMAP
event as well as the vma if it is know (most invalidation happens against
a given vma).  Passing down the vma allows the users of mmu notifier to
inspect the new vma page protection.

The MMU_NOTIFY_UNMAP is always the safe default as users of mmu notifier
should assume that every for the range is going away when that event
happens.  A latter patch do convert mm call path to use a more appropriate
events for each call.

This is done as 2 patches so that no call site is forgotten especialy
as it uses this following coccinelle patch:

%<----------------------------------------------------------------------
@@
identifier I1, I2, I3, I4;
@@
static inline void mmu_notifier_range_init(struct mmu_notifier_range *I1,
+enum mmu_notifier_event event,
+unsigned flags,
+struct vm_area_struct *vma,
struct mm_struct *I2, unsigned long I3, unsigned long I4) { ... }

@@
@@
-#define mmu_notifier_range_init(range, mm, start, end)
+#define mmu_notifier_range_init(range, event, flags, vma, mm, start, end)

@@
expression E1, E3, E4;
identifier I1;
@@
<...
mmu_notifier_range_init(E1,
+MMU_NOTIFY_UNMAP, 0, I1,
I1->vm_mm, E3, E4)
...>

@@
expression E1, E2, E3, E4;
identifier FN, VMA;
@@
FN(..., struct vm_area_struct *VMA, ...) {
<...
mmu_notifier_range_init(E1,
+MMU_NOTIFY_UNMAP, 0, VMA,
E2, E3, E4)
...> }

@@
expression E1, E2, E3, E4;
identifier FN, VMA;
@@
FN(...) {
struct vm_area_struct *VMA;
<...
mmu_notifier_range_init(E1,
+MMU_NOTIFY_UNMAP, 0, VMA,
E2, E3, E4)
...> }

@@
expression E1, E2, E3, E4;
identifier FN;
@@
FN(...) {
<...
mmu_notifier_range_init(E1,
+MMU_NOTIFY_UNMAP, 0, NULL,
E2, E3, E4)
...> }
---------------------------------------------------------------------->%

Applied with:
spatch --all-includes --sp-file mmu-notifier.spatch fs/proc/task_mmu.c --in-place
spatch --sp-file mmu-notifier.spatch --dir kernel/events/ --in-place
spatch --sp-file mmu-notifier.spatch --dir mm --in-place

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-6-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: contextual information for event enums
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:45 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: contextual information for event enums

CPU page table update can happens for many reasons, not only as a result
of a syscall (munmap(), mprotect(), mremap(), madvise(), ...) but also as
a result of kernel activities (memory compression, reclaim, migration,
...).

This patch introduce a set of enums that can be associated with each of
the events triggering a mmu notifier.  Latter patches take advantages of
those enum values.

    - UNMAP: munmap() or mremap()
    - CLEAR: page table is cleared (migration, compaction, reclaim, ...)
    - PROTECTION_VMA: change in access protections for the range
    - PROTECTION_PAGE: change in access protections for page in the range
    - SOFT_DIRTY: soft dirtyness tracking

Being able to identify munmap() and mremap() from other reasons why the
page table is cleared is important to allow user of mmu notifier to update
their own internal tracking structure accordingly (on munmap or mremap it
is not longer needed to track range of virtual address as it becomes
invalid).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-5-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: convert mmu_notifier_range->blockable to a flags
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:42 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: convert mmu_notifier_range->blockable to a flags

Use an unsigned field for flags other than blockable and convert the
blockable field to be one of those flags.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-4-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: convert user range->blockable to helper function
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:38 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: convert user range->blockable to helper function

Use the mmu_notifier_range_blockable() helper function instead of directly
dereferencing the range->blockable field.  This is done to make it easier
to change the mmu_notifier range field.

This patch is the outcome of the following coccinelle patch:

%<-------------------------------------------------------------------
@@
identifier I1, FN;
@@
FN(..., struct mmu_notifier_range *I1, ...) {
<...
-I1->blockable
+mmu_notifier_range_blockable(I1)
...>
}
------------------------------------------------------------------->%

spatch --in-place --sp-file blockable.spatch --dir .

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-3-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/mmu_notifier: helper to test if a range invalidation is blockable
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:34 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/mmu_notifier: helper to test if a range invalidation is blockable

Patch series "mmu notifier provide context informations", v6.

Here I am not posting users of this, they already have been posted to
appropriate mailing list [6] and will be merge through the appropriate
tree once this patchset is upstream.

Note that this serie does not change any behavior for any existing code.
It just pass down more information to mmu notifier listener.

The rationale for this patchset:

CPU page table update can happens for many reasons, not only as a result
of a syscall (munmap(), mprotect(), mremap(), madvise(), ...) but also as
a result of kernel activities (memory compression, reclaim, migration,
...).

This patchset introduce a set of enums that can be associated with each of
the events triggering a mmu notifier:

    - UNMAP: munmap() or mremap()
    - CLEAR: page table is cleared (migration, compaction, reclaim, ...)
    - PROTECTION_VMA: change in access protections for the range
    - PROTECTION_PAGE: change in access protections for page in the range
    - SOFT_DIRTY: soft dirtyness tracking

Being able to identify munmap() and mremap() from other reasons why the
page table is cleared is important to allow user of mmu notifier to update
their own internal tracking structure accordingly (on munmap or mremap it
is not longer needed to track range of virtual address as it becomes
invalid).  Without this serie, driver are force to assume that every
notification is an munmap which triggers useless trashing within drivers
that associate structure with range of virtual address.  Each driver is
force to free up its tracking structure and then restore it on next device
page fault.  With this series we can also optimize device page table update.  Patches to use this are at

https://lkml.org/lkml/2019/1/23/833
https://lkml.org/lkml/2019/1/23/834
https://lkml.org/lkml/2019/1/23/832
https://lkml.org/lkml/2019/1/23/831

Moreover this can also be used to optimize out some page table updates
such as for KVM where we can update the secondary MMU directly from the
callback instead of clearing it.

ACKS AMD/RADEON https://lkml.org/lkml/2019/2/1/395
ACKS RDMA https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/12/6/1473

This patch (of 8):

Simple helpers to test if range invalidation is blockable.  Latter patches
use cocinnelle to convert all direct dereference of range-> blockable to
use this function instead so that we can convert the blockable field to an
unsigned for more flags.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326164747.24405-2-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: Joonas Lahtinen <joonas.lahtinen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jani Nikula <jani.nikula@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Rodrigo Vivi <rodrigo.vivi@intel.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Felix Kuehling <Felix.Kuehling@amd.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@mellanox.com>
Cc: Ross Zwisler <zwisler@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Radim Krcmar <rkrcmar@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Koenig <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: convert various hmm_pfn_* to device_entry which is a better name
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:31 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: convert various hmm_pfn_* to device_entry which is a better name

Convert hmm_pfn_* to device_entry_* as here we are dealing with device
driver specific entry format and hmm provide helpers to allow differents
components (including HMM) to create/parse device entry.

We keep wrapper with the old name so that we can convert driver to use the
new API in stages in each device driver tree.  This will get remove once
all driver are converted.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-13-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: add a helper function that fault pages and map them to a device
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:28 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: add a helper function that fault pages and map them to a device

This is a all in one helper that fault pages in a range and map them to a
device so that every single device driver do not have to re-implement this
common pattern.

This is taken from ODP RDMA in preparation of ODP RDMA convertion.  It
will be use by nouveau and other drivers.

[jglisse@redhat.com: Was using wrong field and wrong enum]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190409175340.26614-1-jglisse@redhat.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-12-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: add helpers to test if mm is still alive or not
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:24 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: add helpers to test if mm is still alive or not

The device driver can have kernel thread or worker doing work against a
process mm and it is useful for those to test wether the mm is dead or
alive to avoid doing useless work.  Add an helper to test that so that
driver can bail out early if a process is dying.

Note that the helper does not perform any lock synchronization and thus is
just a hint ie a process might be dying but the helper might still return
the process as alive.  All HMM functions are safe to use in that case as
HMM internal properly protect itself with lock.  If driver use this helper
with non HMM functions it should ascertain that it is safe to do so.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-11-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: allow to mirror vma of a file on a DAX backed filesystem
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:21 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: allow to mirror vma of a file on a DAX backed filesystem

HMM mirror is a device driver helpers to mirror range of virtual address.
It means that the process jobs running on the device can access the same
virtual address as the CPU threads of that process.  This patch adds
support for mirroring mapping of file that are on a DAX block device (ie
range of virtual address that is an mmap of a file in a filesystem on a
DAX block device).  There is no reason to not support such case when
mirroring virtual address on a device.

Note that unlike GUP code we do not take page reference hence when we
back-off we have nothing to undo.

[jglisse@redhat.com: move THP and hugetlbfs code path behind #if KCONFIG]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190422163741.13029-1-jglisse@redhat.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-10-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: mirror hugetlbfs (snapshoting, faulting and DMA mapping)
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:18 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: mirror hugetlbfs (snapshoting, faulting and DMA mapping)

HMM mirror is a device driver helpers to mirror range of virtual address.
It means that the process jobs running on the device can access the same
virtual address as the CPU threads of that process.  This patch adds
support for hugetlbfs mapping (ie range of virtual address that are mmap
of a hugetlbfs).

[rcampbell@nvidia.com: fix initial PFN for hugetlbfs pages]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190419233536.8080-1-rcampbell@nvidia.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-9-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: add default fault flags to avoid the need to pre-fill pfns arrays
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:05 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: add default fault flags to avoid the need to pre-fill pfns arrays

The HMM mirror API can be use in two fashions.  The first one where the
HMM user coalesce multiple page faults into one request and set flags per
pfns for of those faults.  The second one where the HMM user want to
pre-fault a range with specific flags.  For the latter one it is a waste
to have the user pre-fill the pfn arrays with a default flags value.

This patch adds a default flags value allowing user to set them for a
range without having to pre-fill the pfn array.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-8-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: improve driver API to work and wait over a range
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:20:01 +0000 (17:20 -0700)]
mm/hmm: improve driver API to work and wait over a range

A common use case for HMM mirror is user trying to mirror a range and
before they could program the hardware it get invalidated by some core mm
event.  Instead of having user re-try right away to mirror the range
provide a completion mechanism for them to wait for any active
invalidation affecting the range.

This also changes how hmm_range_snapshot() and hmm_range_fault() works by
not relying on vma so that we can drop the mmap_sem when waiting and
lookup the vma again on retry.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-7-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: improve and rename hmm_vma_fault() to hmm_range_fault()
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:58 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/hmm: improve and rename hmm_vma_fault() to hmm_range_fault()

Minor optimization around hmm_pte_need_fault().  Rename for consistency
between code, comments and documentation.  Also improves the comments on
all the possible returns values.  Improve the function by returning the
number of populated entries in pfns array.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-6-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: improve and rename hmm_vma_get_pfns() to hmm_range_snapshot()
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:55 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/hmm: improve and rename hmm_vma_get_pfns() to hmm_range_snapshot()

Rename for consistency between code, comments and documentation.  Also
improves the comments on all the possible returns values.  Improve the
function by returning the number of populated entries in pfns array.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-5-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: do not erase snapshot when a range is invalidated
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:52 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/hmm: do not erase snapshot when a range is invalidated

Users of HMM might be using the snapshot information to do preparatory
step like dma mapping pages to a device before checking for invalidation
through hmm_vma_range_done() so do not erase that information and assume
users will do the right thing.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-4-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: use reference counting for HMM struct
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:48 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/hmm: use reference counting for HMM struct

Every time I read the code to check that the HMM structure does not vanish
before it should thanks to the many lock protecting its removal i get a
headache.  Switch to reference counting instead it is much easier to
follow and harder to break.  This also remove some code that is no longer
needed with refcounting.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-3-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hmm: select mmu notifier when selecting HMM
Jérôme Glisse [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:45 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/hmm: select mmu notifier when selecting HMM

To avoid random config build issue, select mmu notifier when HMM is
selected.  In any cases when HMM get selected it will be by users that
will also wants the mmu notifier.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190403193318.16478-2-jglisse@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agohugetlb: use same fault hash key for shared and private mappings
Mike Kravetz [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:41 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
hugetlb: use same fault hash key for shared and private mappings

hugetlb uses a fault mutex hash table to prevent page faults of the
same pages concurrently.  The key for shared and private mappings is
different.  Shared keys off address_space and file index.  Private keys
off mm and virtual address.  Consider a private mappings of a populated
hugetlbfs file.  A fault will map the page from the file and if needed
do a COW to map a writable page.

Hugetlbfs hole punch uses the fault mutex to prevent mappings of file
pages.  It uses the address_space file index key.  However, private
mappings will use a different key and could race with this code to map
the file page.  This causes problems (BUG) for the page cache remove
code as it expects the page to be unmapped.  A sample stack is:

page dumped because: VM_BUG_ON_PAGE(page_mapped(page))
kernel BUG at mm/filemap.c:169!
...
RIP: 0010:unaccount_page_cache_page+0x1b8/0x200
...
Call Trace:
__delete_from_page_cache+0x39/0x220
delete_from_page_cache+0x45/0x70
remove_inode_hugepages+0x13c/0x380
? __add_to_page_cache_locked+0x162/0x380
hugetlbfs_fallocate+0x403/0x540
? _cond_resched+0x15/0x30
? __inode_security_revalidate+0x5d/0x70
? selinux_file_permission+0x100/0x130
vfs_fallocate+0x13f/0x270
ksys_fallocate+0x3c/0x80
__x64_sys_fallocate+0x1a/0x20
do_syscall_64+0x5b/0x180
entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

There seems to be another potential COW issue/race with this approach
of different private and shared keys as noted in commit 8382d914ebf7
("mm, hugetlb: improve page-fault scalability").

Since every hugetlb mapping (even anon and private) is actually a file
mapping, just use the address_space index key for all mappings.  This
results in potentially more hash collisions.  However, this should not
be the common case.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328234704.27083-3-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190412165235.t4sscoujczfhuiyt@linux-r8p5
Fixes: b5cec28d36f5 ("hugetlbfs: truncate_hugepages() takes a range of pages")
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agohugetlbfs: on restore reserve error path retain subpool reservation
Mike Kravetz [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:38 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
hugetlbfs: on restore reserve error path retain subpool reservation

When a huge page is allocated, PagePrivate() is set if the allocation
consumed a reservation.  When freeing a huge page, PagePrivate is checked.
If set, it indicates the reservation should be restored.  PagePrivate
being set at free huge page time mostly happens on error paths.

When huge page reservations are created, a check is made to determine if
the mapping is associated with an explicitly mounted filesystem.  If so,
pages are also reserved within the filesystem.  The default action when
freeing a huge page is to decrement the usage count in any associated
explicitly mounted filesystem.  However, if the reservation is to be
restored the reservation/use count within the filesystem should not be
decrementd.  Otherwise, a subsequent page allocation and free for the same
mapping location will cause the file filesystem usage to go 'negative'.

Filesystem                         Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
nodev                              4.0G -4.0M  4.1G    - /opt/hugepool

To fix, when freeing a huge page do not adjust filesystem usage if
PagePrivate() is set to indicate the reservation should be restored.

I did not cc stable as the problem has been around since reserves were
added to hugetlbfs and nobody has noticed.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328234704.27083-2-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Davidlohr Bueso <dave@stgolabs.net>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agodrivers/base/memory.c: clean up relics in function parameters
Baoquan He [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:35 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
drivers/base/memory.c: clean up relics in function parameters

The input parameter 'phys_index' of memory_block_action() is actually the
section number, but not the phys_index of memory_block.  This is a relic
from the past when one memory block could only contain one section.
Rename it to start_section_nr.

And also in remove_memory_section(), the 'node_id' and 'phys_device'
arguments are not used by anyone.  Remove them.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190329144250.14315-2-bhe@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Mukesh Ojha <mojha@codeaurora.org>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/sparse.c: clean up obsolete code comment
Baoquan He [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:32 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/sparse.c: clean up obsolete code comment

The code comment above sparse_add_one_section() is obsolete and incorrect.
Clean it up and write a new one.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190329144250.14315-1-bhe@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Mukesh Ojha <mojha@codeaurora.org>
Reviewed-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinclude/linux/balloon_compaction.h: drop unused function stubs
David Hildenbrand [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:29 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
include/linux/balloon_compaction.h: drop unused function stubs

These are leftovers from the pre-"general non-lru movable page" era.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190329122649.28404-1-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Mukesh Ojha <mojha@codeaurora.org>
Acked-by: Michael S. Tsirkin <mst@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Pankaj Gupta <pagupta@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Rafael Aquini <aquini@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/swap.c: __pagevec_lru_add_fn: typo fix
Peng Fan [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:26 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/swap.c: __pagevec_lru_add_fn: typo fix

There is no function named munlock_vma_pages().  Correct it to
munlock_vma_page().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402095609.27181-1-peng.fan@nxp.com
Signed-off-by: Peng Fan <peng.fan@nxp.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Mukesh Ojha <mojha@codeaurora.org>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hugetlb: get rid of NODEMASK_ALLOC
Oscar Salvador [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:23 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/hugetlb: get rid of NODEMASK_ALLOC

NODEMASK_ALLOC is used to allocate a nodemask bitmap, and it does it by
first determining whether it should be allocated on the stack or
dynamically, depending on NODES_SHIFT.  Right now, it goes the dynamic
path whenever the nodemask_t is above 32 bytes.

Although we could bump it to a reasonable value, the largest a nodemask_t
can get is 128 bytes, so since __nr_hugepages_store_common is called from
a rather short stack we can just get rid of the NODEMASK_ALLOC call here.

This reduces some code churn and complexity.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402133415.21983-1-osalvador@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Cc: Alex Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Jing Xiangfeng <jingxiangfeng@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agohugetlbfs: fix potential over/underflow setting node specific nr_hugepages
Mike Kravetz [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:20 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
hugetlbfs: fix potential over/underflow setting node specific nr_hugepages

The number of node specific huge pages can be set via a file such as:
/sys/devices/system/node/node1/hugepages/hugepages-2048kB/nr_hugepages
When a node specific value is specified, the global number of huge pages
must also be adjusted.  This adjustment is calculated as the specified
node specific value + (global value - current node value).  If the node
specific value provided by the user is large enough, this calculation
could overflow an unsigned long leading to a smaller than expected number
of huge pages.

To fix, check the calculation for overflow.  If overflow is detected, use
ULONG_MAX as the requested value.  This is inline with the user request to
allocate as many huge pages as possible.

It was also noticed that the above calculation was done outside the
hugetlb_lock.  Therefore, the values could be inconsistent and result in
underflow.  To fix, the calculation is moved within the routine
set_max_huge_pages() where the lock is held.

In addition, the code in __nr_hugepages_store_common() which tries to
handle the case of not being able to allocate a node mask would likely
result in incorrect behavior.  Luckily, it is very unlikely we will ever
take this path.  If we do, simply return ENOMEM.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328220533.19884-1-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reported-by: Jing Xiangfeng <jingxiangfeng@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Alex Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Cc: Jing Xiangfeng <jingxiangfeng@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomem-hotplug: fix node spanned pages when we have a node with only ZONE_MOVABLE
Linxu Fang [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:17 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mem-hotplug: fix node spanned pages when we have a node with only ZONE_MOVABLE

342332e6a925 ("mm/page_alloc.c: introduce kernelcore=mirror option") and
later patches rewrote the calculation of node spanned pages.

e506b99696a2 ("mem-hotplug: fix node spanned pages when we have a movable
node"), but the current code still has problems,

When we have a node with only zone_movable and the node id is not zero,
the size of node spanned pages is double added.

That's because we have an empty normal zone, and zone_start_pfn or
zone_end_pfn is not between arch_zone_lowest_possible_pfn and
arch_zone_highest_possible_pfn, so we need to use clamp to constrain the
range just like the commit <96e907d13602> (bootmem: Reimplement
__absent_pages_in_range() using for_each_mem_pfn_range()).

e.g.
Zone ranges:
  DMA      [mem 0x0000000000001000-0x0000000000ffffff]
  DMA32    [mem 0x0000000001000000-0x00000000ffffffff]
  Normal   [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x000000023fffffff]
Movable zone start for each node
  Node 0: 0x0000000100000000
  Node 1: 0x0000000140000000
Early memory node ranges
  node   0: [mem 0x0000000000001000-0x000000000009efff]
  node   0: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x00000000bffdffff]
  node   0: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x000000013fffffff]
  node   1: [mem 0x0000000140000000-0x000000023fffffff]

node 0 DMA spanned:0xfff   present:0xf9e   absent:0x61
node 0 DMA32 spanned:0xff000 present:0xbefe0 absent:0x40020
node 0 Normal spanned:0 present:0 absent:0
node 0 Movable spanned:0x40000 present:0x40000 absent:0
On node 0 totalpages(node_present_pages): 1048446
node_spanned_pages:1310719
node 1 DMA spanned:0     present:0 absent:0
node 1 DMA32 spanned:0     present:0 absent:0
node 1 Normal spanned:0x100000    present:0x100000 absent:0
node 1 Movable spanned:0x100000    present:0x100000 absent:0
On node 1 totalpages(node_present_pages): 2097152
node_spanned_pages:2097152
Memory: 6967796K/12582392K available (16388K kernel code, 3686K rwdata,
4468K rodata, 2160K init, 10444K bss, 5614596K reserved, 0K
cma-reserved)

It shows that the current memory of node 1 is double added.
After this patch, the problem is fixed.

node 0 DMA spanned:0xfff   present:0xf9e   absent:0x61
node 0 DMA32 spanned:0xff000 present:0xbefe0 absent:0x40020
node 0 Normal spanned:0 present:0 absent:0
node 0 Movable spanned:0x40000 present:0x40000 absent:0
On node 0 totalpages(node_present_pages): 1048446
node_spanned_pages:1310719
node 1 DMA spanned:0     present:0 absent:0
node 1 DMA32 spanned:0     present:0 absent:0
node 1 Normal spanned:0     present:0 absent:0
node 1 Movable spanned:0x100000    present:0x100000 absent:0
On node 1 totalpages(node_present_pages): 1048576
node_spanned_pages:1048576
memory: 6967796K/8388088K available (16388K kernel code, 3686K rwdata,
4468K rodata, 2160K init, 10444K bss, 1420292K reserved, 0K
cma-reserved)

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1554178276-10372-1-git-send-email-fanglinxu@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Linxu Fang <fanglinxu@huawei.com>
Cc: Taku Izumi <izumi.taku@jp.fujitsu.com>
Cc: Xishi Qiu <qiuxishi@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pavel.tatashin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/vmscan: drop may_writepage and classzone_idx from direct reclaim begin template
Yafang Shao [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:14 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm/vmscan: drop may_writepage and classzone_idx from direct reclaim begin template

There are three tracepoints using this template, which are
mm_vmscan_direct_reclaim_begin,
mm_vmscan_memcg_reclaim_begin,
mm_vmscan_memcg_softlimit_reclaim_begin.

Regarding mm_vmscan_direct_reclaim_begin,
sc.may_writepage is !laptop_mode, that's a static setting, and
reclaim_idx is derived from gfp_mask which is already show in this
tracepoint.

Regarding mm_vmscan_memcg_reclaim_begin,
may_writepage is !laptop_mode too, and reclaim_idx is (MAX_NR_ZONES-1),
which are both static value.

mm_vmscan_memcg_softlimit_reclaim_begin is the same with
mm_vmscan_memcg_reclaim_begin.

So we can drop them all.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1553736322-32235-1-git-send-email-laoar.shao@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yafang Shao <laoar.shao@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: page_mkclean vs MADV_DONTNEED race
Aneesh Kumar K.V [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:11 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm: page_mkclean vs MADV_DONTNEED race

MADV_DONTNEED is handled with mmap_sem taken in read mode.  We call
page_mkclean without holding mmap_sem.

MADV_DONTNEED implies that pages in the region are unmapped and subsequent
access to the pages in that range is handled as a new page fault.  This
implies that if we don't have parallel access to the region when
MADV_DONTNEED is run we expect those range to be unallocated.

w.r.t page_mkclean() we need to make sure that we don't break the
MADV_DONTNEED semantics.  MADV_DONTNEED check for pmd_none without holding
pmd_lock.  This implies we skip the pmd if we temporarily mark pmd none.
Avoid doing that while marking the page clean.

Keep the sequence same for dax too even though we don't support
MADV_DONTNEED for dax mapping

The bug was noticed by code review and I didn't observe any failures w.r.t
test run.  This is similar to

commit 58ceeb6bec86d9140f9d91d71a710e963523d063
Author: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Date:   Thu Apr 13 14:56:26 2017 -0700

    thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs. MADV_FREE race

commit ced108037c2aa542b3ed8b7afd1576064ad1362a
Author: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Date:   Thu Apr 13 14:56:20 2017 -0700

    thp: fix MADV_DONTNEED vs. numa balancing race

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190321040610.14226-1-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc:"Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: introduce put_user_page*(), placeholder versions
John Hubbard [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:08 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm: introduce put_user_page*(), placeholder versions

A discussion of the overall problem is below.

As mentioned in patch 0001, the steps are to fix the problem are:

1) Provide put_user_page*() routines, intended to be used
   for releasing pages that were pinned via get_user_pages*().

2) Convert all of the call sites for get_user_pages*(), to
   invoke put_user_page*(), instead of put_page(). This involves dozens of
   call sites, and will take some time.

3) After (2) is complete, use get_user_pages*() and put_user_page*() to
   implement tracking of these pages. This tracking will be separate from
   the existing struct page refcounting.

4) Use the tracking and identification of these pages, to implement
   special handling (especially in writeback paths) when the pages are
   backed by a filesystem.

Overview
========

Some kernel components (file systems, device drivers) need to access
memory that is specified via process virtual address.  For a long time,
the API to achieve that was get_user_pages ("GUP") and its variations.
However, GUP has critical limitations that have been overlooked; in
particular, GUP does not interact correctly with filesystems in all
situations.  That means that file-backed memory + GUP is a recipe for
potential problems, some of which have already occurred in the field.

GUP was first introduced for Direct IO (O_DIRECT), allowing filesystem
code to get the struct page behind a virtual address and to let storage
hardware perform a direct copy to or from that page.  This is a
short-lived access pattern, and as such, the window for a concurrent
writeback of GUP'd page was small enough that there were not (we think)
any reported problems.  Also, userspace was expected to understand and
accept that Direct IO was not synchronized with memory-mapped access to
that data, nor with any process address space changes such as munmap(),
mremap(), etc.

Over the years, more GUP uses have appeared (virtualization, device
drivers, RDMA) that can keep the pages they get via GUP for a long period
of time (seconds, minutes, hours, days, ...).  This long-term pinning
makes an underlying design problem more obvious.

In fact, there are a number of key problems inherent to GUP:

Interactions with file systems
==============================

File systems expect to be able to write back data, both to reclaim pages,
and for data integrity.  Allowing other hardware (NICs, GPUs, etc) to gain
write access to the file memory pages means that such hardware can dirty
the pages, without the filesystem being aware.  This can, in some cases
(depending on filesystem, filesystem options, block device, block device
options, and other variables), lead to data corruption, and also to kernel
bugs of the form:

    kernel BUG at /build/linux-fQ94TU/linux-4.4.0/fs/ext4/inode.c:1899!
    backtrace:
        ext4_writepage
        __writepage
        write_cache_pages
        ext4_writepages
        do_writepages
        __writeback_single_inode
        writeback_sb_inodes
        __writeback_inodes_wb
        wb_writeback
        wb_workfn
        process_one_work
        worker_thread
        kthread
        ret_from_fork

...which is due to the file system asserting that there are still buffer
heads attached:

        ({                                                      \
                BUG_ON(!PagePrivate(page));                     \
                ((struct buffer_head *)page_private(page));     \
        })

Dave Chinner's description of this is very clear:

    "The fundamental issue is that ->page_mkwrite must be called on every
    write access to a clean file backed page, not just the first one.
    How long the GUP reference lasts is irrelevant, if the page is clean
    and you need to dirty it, you must call ->page_mkwrite before it is
    marked writeable and dirtied. Every. Time."

This is just one symptom of the larger design problem: real filesystems
that actually write to a backing device, do not actually support
get_user_pages() being called on their pages, and letting hardware write
directly to those pages--even though that pattern has been going on since
about 2005 or so.

Long term GUP
=============

Long term GUP is an issue when FOLL_WRITE is specified to GUP (so, a
writeable mapping is created), and the pages are file-backed.  That can
lead to filesystem corruption.  What happens is that when a file-backed
page is being written back, it is first mapped read-only in all of the CPU
page tables; the file system then assumes that nobody can write to the
page, and that the page content is therefore stable.  Unfortunately, the
GUP callers generally do not monitor changes to the CPU pages tables; they
instead assume that the following pattern is safe (it's not):

    get_user_pages()

    Hardware can keep a reference to those pages for a very long time,
    and write to it at any time.  Because "hardware" here means "devices
    that are not a CPU", this activity occurs without any interaction with
    the kernel's file system code.

    for each page
        set_page_dirty
        put_page()

In fact, the GUP documentation even recommends that pattern.

Anyway, the file system assumes that the page is stable (nothing is
writing to the page), and that is a problem: stable page content is
necessary for many filesystem actions during writeback, such as checksum,
encryption, RAID striping, etc.  Furthermore, filesystem features like COW
(copy on write) or snapshot also rely on being able to use a new page for
as memory for that memory range inside the file.

Corruption during write back is clearly possible here.  To solve that, one
idea is to identify pages that have active GUP, so that we can use a
bounce page to write stable data to the filesystem.  The filesystem would
work on the bounce page, while any of the active GUP might write to the
original page.  This would avoid the stable page violation problem, but
note that it is only part of the overall solution, because other problems
remain.

Other filesystem features that need to replace the page with a new one can
be inhibited for pages that are GUP-pinned.  This will, however, alter and
limit some of those filesystem features.  The only fix for that would be
to require GUP users to monitor and respond to CPU page table updates.
Subsystems such as ODP and HMM do this, for example.  This aspect of the
problem is still under discussion.

Direct IO
=========

Direct IO can cause corruption, if userspace does Direct-IO that writes to
a range of virtual addresses that are mmap'd to a file.  The pages written
to are file-backed pages that can be under write back, while the Direct IO
is taking place.  Here, Direct IO races with a write back: it calls GUP
before page_mkclean() has replaced the CPU pte with a read-only entry.
The race window is pretty small, which is probably why years have gone by
before we noticed this problem: Direct IO is generally very quick, and
tends to finish up before the filesystem gets around to do anything with
the page contents.  However, it's still a real problem.  The solution is
to never let GUP return pages that are under write back, but instead,
force GUP to take a write fault on those pages.  That way, GUP will
properly synchronize with the active write back.  This does not change the
required GUP behavior, it just avoids that race.

Details
=======

Introduces put_user_page(), which simply calls put_page().  This provides
a way to update all get_user_pages*() callers, so that they call
put_user_page(), instead of put_page().

Also introduces put_user_pages(), and a few dirty/locked variations, as a
replacement for release_pages(), and also as a replacement for open-coded
loops that release multiple pages.  These may be used for subsequent
performance improvements, via batching of pages to be released.

This is the first step of fixing a problem (also described in [1] and [2])
with interactions between get_user_pages ("gup") and filesystems.

Problem description: let's start with a bug report.  Below, is what
happens sometimes, under memory pressure, when a driver pins some pages
via gup, and then marks those pages dirty, and releases them.  Note that
the gup documentation actually recommends that pattern.  The problem is
that the filesystem may do a writeback while the pages were gup-pinned,
and then the filesystem believes that the pages are clean.  So, when the
driver later marks the pages as dirty, that conflicts with the
filesystem's page tracking and results in a BUG(), like this one that I
experienced:

    kernel BUG at /build/linux-fQ94TU/linux-4.4.0/fs/ext4/inode.c:1899!
    backtrace:
        ext4_writepage
        __writepage
        write_cache_pages
        ext4_writepages
        do_writepages
        __writeback_single_inode
        writeback_sb_inodes
        __writeback_inodes_wb
        wb_writeback
        wb_workfn
        process_one_work
        worker_thread
        kthread
        ret_from_fork

...which is due to the file system asserting that there are still buffer
heads attached:

        ({                                                      \
                BUG_ON(!PagePrivate(page));                     \
                ((struct buffer_head *)page_private(page));     \
        })

Dave Chinner's description of this is very clear:

    "The fundamental issue is that ->page_mkwrite must be called on
    every write access to a clean file backed page, not just the first
    one.  How long the GUP reference lasts is irrelevant, if the page is
    clean and you need to dirty it, you must call ->page_mkwrite before it
    is marked writeable and dirtied.  Every.  Time."

This is just one symptom of the larger design problem: real filesystems
that actually write to a backing device, do not actually support
get_user_pages() being called on their pages, and letting hardware write
directly to those pages--even though that pattern has been going on since
about 2005 or so.

The steps are to fix it are:

1) (This patch): provide put_user_page*() routines, intended to be used
   for releasing pages that were pinned via get_user_pages*().

2) Convert all of the call sites for get_user_pages*(), to
   invoke put_user_page*(), instead of put_page(). This involves dozens of
   call sites, and will take some time.

3) After (2) is complete, use get_user_pages*() and put_user_page*() to
   implement tracking of these pages. This tracking will be separate from
   the existing struct page refcounting.

4) Use the tracking and identification of these pages, to implement
   special handling (especially in writeback paths) when the pages are
   backed by a filesystem.

[1] https://lwn.net/Articles/774411/ : "DMA and get_user_pages()"
[2] https://lwn.net/Articles/753027/ : "The Trouble with get_user_pages()"

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190327023632.13307-2-jhubbard@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com> [docs]
Reviewed-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Jérôme Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Tested-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Chinner <david@fromorbit.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agohugetlb: allow to free gigantic pages regardless of the configuration
Alexandre Ghiti [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:04 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
hugetlb: allow to free gigantic pages regardless of the configuration

On systems without CONTIG_ALLOC activated but that support gigantic pages,
boottime reserved gigantic pages can not be freed at all.  This patch
simply enables the possibility to hand back those pages to memory
allocator.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190327063626.18421-5-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Acked-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net> [sparc]
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Andy Lutomirsky <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H . Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: simplify MEMORY_ISOLATION && COMPACTION || CMA into CONTIG_ALLOC
Alexandre Ghiti [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:19:00 +0000 (17:19 -0700)]
mm: simplify MEMORY_ISOLATION && COMPACTION || CMA into CONTIG_ALLOC

This condition allows to define alloc_contig_range, so simplify it into a
more accurate naming.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190327063626.18421-4-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Suggested-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andy Lutomirsky <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H . Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agosparc: advertise gigantic page support
Alexandre Ghiti [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:56 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
sparc: advertise gigantic page support

sparc actually supports gigantic pages and selecting
ARCH_HAS_GIGANTIC_PAGE allows it to allocate and free gigantic pages at
runtime.

sparc allows configuration such as huge pages of 16GB, pages of 8KB and
MAX_ORDER = 13 (default): HPAGE_SHIFT (34) - PAGE_SHIFT (13) = 21 >=
MAX_ORDER (13)

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190327063626.18421-3-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Acked-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Andy Lutomirsky <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: "H . Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agosh: advertise gigantic page support
Alexandre Ghiti [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:53 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
sh: advertise gigantic page support

Patch series "Fix free/allocation of runtime gigantic pages", v8.

This series fixes sh and sparc that did not advertise their gigantic page
support and then were not able to allocate and free those pages at
runtime.  It renames MEMORY_ISOLATION && COMPACTION || CMA condition into
the more accurate CONTIG_ALLOC, since it allows the definition of
alloc_contig_range function.

Finally, it then fixes the wrong definition of ARCH_HAS_GIGANTIC_PAGE
config that, without MEMORY_ISOLATION && COMPACTION || CMA defined, did
not allow architectures to free boottime allocated gigantic pages although
unrelated.

This patch (of 4):

sh actually supports gigantic pages and selecting ARCH_HAS_GIGANTIC_PAGE
allows it to allocate and free gigantic pages at runtime.

At least sdk7786_defconfig exposes such a configuration with huge pages of
64MB, pages of 4KB and MAX_ORDER = 11: HPAGE_SHIFT (26) - PAGE_SHIFT (12)
= 14 >= MAX_ORDER (11)

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190327063626.18421-2-alex@ghiti.fr
Signed-off-by: Alexandre Ghiti <alex@ghiti.fr>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: "H . Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andy Lutomirsky <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoriscv: switch over to generic free_initmem()
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:49 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
riscv: switch over to generic free_initmem()

The riscv version of free_initmem() differs from the generic one only in
that it sets the freed memory to zero.

Make ricsv use the generic version and poison the freed memory.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1550515285-17446-5-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@sifive.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinit: free_initmem: poison freed init memory
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:46 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
init: free_initmem: poison freed init memory

Various architectures including x86 poison the freed init memory.  Do the
same in the generic free_initmem implementation and switch sparc32
architecture that is identical to the generic code over to it now.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1550515285-17446-4-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@sifive.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agohexagon: switch over to generic free_initmem()
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:43 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
hexagon: switch over to generic free_initmem()

hexagon implementation of free_initmem() is currently empty and marked
with comment

 * Todo:  free pages between __init_begin and __init_end; possibly
 * some devtree related stuff as well.

Switch it to the generic implementation.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1550515285-17446-3-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@sifive.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinit: provide a generic free_initmem implementation
Mike Rapoport [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:40 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
init: provide a generic free_initmem implementation

Patch series "provide a generic free_initmem implementation", v2.

Many architectures implement free_initmem() in exactly the same or very
similar way: they wrap the call to free_initmem_default() with sometimes
different 'poison' parameter.

These patches switch those architectures to use a generic implementation
that does free_initmem_default(POISON_FREE_INITMEM).

This was inspired by Christoph's patches for free_initrd_mem [1] and I
shamelessly copied changelog entries from his patches :)

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20190213174621.29297-1-hch@lst.de/

This patch (of 2):

For most architectures free_initmem just a wrapper for the same
free_initmem_default(-1) call.  Provide that as a generic implementation
marked __weak.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1550515285-17446-2-git-send-email-rppt@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@sifive.com>
Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: poison freed initrd memory
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:37 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: poison freed initrd memory

Various architectures including x86 poison the freed initrd memory.  Do
the same in the generic free_initrd_mem implementation and switch a few
more architectures that are identical to the generic code over to it now.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-9-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: provide a generic free_initrd_mem implementation
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:34 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: provide a generic free_initrd_mem implementation

For most architectures free_initrd_mem just expands to the same
free_reserved_area call.  Provide that as a generic implementation marked
__weak.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-8-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Acked-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: move the legacy keepinitrd parameter to core code
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:30 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: move the legacy keepinitrd parameter to core code

No need to handle the freeing disable in arch code when we already have a
core hook (and a different name for the option) for it.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-7-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: cleanup populate_rootfs
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:27 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: cleanup populate_rootfs

The code for kernels that support ramdisks or not is mostly the same.
Unify it by using an IS_ENABLED for the info message, and moving the error
message into a stub for populate_initrd_image.

[cai@lca.pw: fix a compilation error]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328014806.36375-1-cai@lca.pw
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-6-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Signed-off-by: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: factor out a helper to populate the initrd image
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:24 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: factor out a helper to populate the initrd image

This will allow for cleaner code sharing in the caller.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-5-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: cleanup initrd freeing
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:21 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: cleanup initrd freeing

Factor the kexec logic into a separate helper, and then inline the rest of
free_initrd into the only caller.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-4-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinitramfs: free initrd memory if opening /initrd.image fails
Christoph Hellwig [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:17 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
initramfs: free initrd memory if opening /initrd.image fails

Patch series "initramfs tidyups".

I've spent some time chasing down behavior in initramfs and found
plenty of opportunity to improve the code.  A first stab on that is
contained in this series.

This patch (of 7):

We free the initrd memory for all successful or error cases except for the
case where opening /initrd.image fails, which looks like an oversight.

Steven said:

: This also changes the behaviour when CONFIG_INITRAMFS_FORCE is enabled
: - specifically it means that the initrd is freed (previously it was
: ignored and never freed).  But that seems like reasonable behaviour and
: the previous behaviour looks like another oversight.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190213174621.29297-3-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@pku.edu.cn>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/cma.c: fix crash on CMA allocation if bitmap allocation fails
Yue Hu [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:14 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
mm/cma.c: fix crash on CMA allocation if bitmap allocation fails

f022d8cb7ec7 ("mm: cma: Don't crash on allocation if CMA area can't be
activated") fixes the crash issue when activation fails via setting
cma->count as 0, same logic exists if bitmap allocation fails.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190325081309.6004-1-zbestahu@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yue Hu <huyue2@yulong.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: memcontrol: quarantine the mem_cgroup_[node_]nr_lru_pages() API
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:11 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
mm: memcontrol: quarantine the mem_cgroup_[node_]nr_lru_pages() API

Only memcg_numa_stat_show() uses those wrappers and the lru bitmasks,
group them together.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190228163020.24100-7-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: memcontrol: push down mem_cgroup_nr_lru_pages()
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:08 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
mm: memcontrol: push down mem_cgroup_nr_lru_pages()

mem_cgroup_nr_lru_pages() is just a convenience wrapper around
memcg_page_state() that takes bitmasks of lru indexes and aggregates the
counts for those.

Replace callsites where the bitmask is simple enough with direct
memcg_page_state() call(s).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190228163020.24100-6-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: memcontrol: push down mem_cgroup_node_nr_lru_pages()
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:05 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
mm: memcontrol: push down mem_cgroup_node_nr_lru_pages()

mem_cgroup_node_nr_lru_pages() is just a convenience wrapper around
lruvec_page_state() that takes bitmasks of lru indexes and aggregates the
counts for those.

Replace callsites where the bitmask is simple enough with direct
lruvec_page_state() calls.

This removes the last extern user of mem_cgroup_node_nr_lru_pages(), so
make that function private again, too.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190228163020.24100-5-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: memcontrol: replace node summing with memcg_page_state()
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:03 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
mm: memcontrol: replace node summing with memcg_page_state()

Instead of adding up the node counters, use memcg_page_state() to get the
memcg state directly.  This is a bit cheaper and more stream-lined.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190228163020.24100-4-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: memcontrol: replace zone summing with lruvec_page_state()
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:18:00 +0000 (17:18 -0700)]
mm: memcontrol: replace zone summing with lruvec_page_state()

Instead of adding up the zone counters, use lruvec_page_state() to get the
node state directly.  This is a bit cheaper and more stream-lined.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190228163020.24100-3-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: memcontrol: track LRU counts in the vmstats array
Johannes Weiner [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:57 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm: memcontrol: track LRU counts in the vmstats array

Patch series "mm: memcontrol: clean up the LRU counts tracking".

The memcg LRU stats usage is currently a bit messy.  Memcg has private
per-zone counters because reclaim needs zone granularity sometimes, but we
also have plenty of users that need to awkwardly sum them up to node or
memcg granularity.  Meanwhile the canonical per-memcg vmstats do not track
the LRU counts (NR_INACTIVE_ANON etc.) as you'd expect.

This series enables LRU count tracking in the per-memcg vmstats array such
that lruvec_page_state() and memcg_page_state() work on the enum
node_stat_item items for the LRU counters.  Then it converts all the
callers that don't specifically need per-zone numbers over to that.

This patch (of 6):

The memcg code currently maintains private per-zone breakdowns of the LRU
counters.  This is necessary for reclaim decisions which are still
zone-based, but there are a variety of users of these counters that only
want the aggregate per-lruvec or per-memcg LRU counts, and they need to
painfully sum up the zone counters on each request for that.

These would be better served using the memcg vmstats arrays, which track
VM statistics at the desired scope already.  They just don't have the LRU
counts right now.

So to kick off the conversion, begin tracking LRU counts in those.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190228163020.24100-2-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/vmscan: add tracepoints for node reclaim
Yafang Shao [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:53 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/vmscan: add tracepoints for node reclaim

The page alloc fast path it may perform node reclaim, which may cause a
latency spike.  We should add tracepoint for this event, and also measure
the latency it causes.

So bellow two tracepoints are introduced,
mm_vmscan_node_reclaim_begin
mm_vmscan_node_reclaim_end

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1551421452-5385-1-git-send-email-laoar.shao@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yafang Shao <laoar.shao@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: <shaoyafang@didiglobal.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/page_isolation.c: remove redundant pfn_valid_within() in __first_valid_page()
Anshuman Khandual [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:50 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/page_isolation.c: remove redundant pfn_valid_within() in __first_valid_page()

pfn_valid_within() calls pfn_valid() when CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE making it
redundant for both definitions (w/wo CONFIG_MEMORY_HOTPLUG) of the helper
pfn_to_online_page() which either calls pfn_valid() or pfn_valid_within().
pfn_valid_within() being 1 when !CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE is irrelevant
either way.  This does not change functionality.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1553141595-26907-1-git-send-email-anshuman.khandual@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm, compaction: some tracepoints should be defined only when CONFIG_COMPACTION is set
Yafang Shao [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:47 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm, compaction: some tracepoints should be defined only when CONFIG_COMPACTION is set

Only mm_compaction_isolate_{free, migrate}pages may be used when
CONFIG_COMPACTION is not set.  All others are used only when
CONFIG_COMPACTION is set.

After this change, if CONFIG_COMPACTION is not set, the tracepoints that
only work when CONFIG_COMPACTION is set will not be exposed to userspace.
Without this change, they will always be exposed in debugfs whether
CONFIG_COMPACTION is set or not.  This is an improvement.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1552440403-11780-1-git-send-email-laoar.shao@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yafang Shao <laoar.shao@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: compaction: show gfp flag names in try_to_compact_pages tracepoint
Yafang Shao [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:44 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm: compaction: show gfp flag names in try_to_compact_pages tracepoint

Showing the gfp flag names instead of the gfp_mask makes trace more
convenient.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1552527998-13162-1-git-send-email-laoar.shao@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yafang Shao <laoar.shao@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/cma.c: fix the bitmap status to show failed allocation reason
Yue Hu [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:41 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/cma.c: fix the bitmap status to show failed allocation reason

Currently one bit in cma bitmap represents number of pages rather than
one page, cma->count means cma size in pages. So to find available pages
via find_next_zero_bit()/find_next_bit() we should use cma size not in
pages but in bits although current free pages number is correct due to
zero value of order_per_bit. Once order_per_bit is changed the bitmap
status will be incorrect.

The size input in cma_debug_show_areas() is not correct.  It will
affect the available pages at some position to debug the failure issue.

This is an example with order_per_bit = 1

Before this change:
[    4.120060] cma: number of available pages: 1@93+4@108+7@121+7@137+7@153+7@169+7@185+7@201+3@213+3@221+3@229+3@237+3@245+3@253+3@261+3@269+3@277+3@285+3@293+3@301+3@309+3@317+3@325+19@333+15@369+512@512=> 638 free of 1024 total pages

After this change:
[    4.143234] cma: number of available pages: 2@93+8@108+14@121+14@137+14@153+14@169+14@185+14@201+6@213+6@221+6@229+6@237+6@245+6@253+6@261+6@269+6@277+6@285+6@293+6@301+6@309+6@317+6@325+38@333+30@369=> 252 free of 1024 total pages

Obviously the bitmap status before is incorrect.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190320060829.9144-1-zbestahu@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yue Hu <huyue2@yulong.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/compaction.c: fix an undefined behaviour
Qian Cai [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:38 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/compaction.c: fix an undefined behaviour

In a low-memory situation, cc->fast_search_fail can keep increasing as it
is unable to find an available page to isolate in
fast_isolate_freepages().  As the result, it could trigger an error below,
so just compare with the maximum bits can be shifted first.

UBSAN: Undefined behaviour in mm/compaction.c:1160:30
shift exponent 64 is too large for 64-bit type 'unsigned long'
CPU: 131 PID: 1308 Comm: kcompactd1 Kdump: loaded Tainted: G
W    L    5.0.0+ #17
Call trace:
 dump_backtrace+0x0/0x450
 show_stack+0x20/0x2c
 dump_stack+0xc8/0x14c
 __ubsan_handle_shift_out_of_bounds+0x7e8/0x8c4
 compaction_alloc+0x2344/0x2484
 unmap_and_move+0xdc/0x1dbc
 migrate_pages+0x274/0x1310
 compact_zone+0x26ec/0x43bc
 kcompactd+0x15b8/0x1a24
 kthread+0x374/0x390
 ret_from_fork+0x10/0x18

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: code cleanup]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190320203338.53367-1-cai@lca.pw
Fixes: 70b44595eafe ("mm, compaction: use free lists to quickly locate a migration source")
Signed-off-by: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/memory_hotplug.c: fix the wrong usage of N_HIGH_MEMORY
Baoquan He [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:35 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/memory_hotplug.c: fix the wrong usage of N_HIGH_MEMORY

In node_states_check_changes_online(), N_HIGH_MEMORY is used to substitute
ZONE_HIGHMEM directly.  This is not right.  N_HIGH_MEMORY is to mark the
memory state of node.  Here zone index is checked, which should be
compared with 'ZONE_HIGHMEM' accordingly.

Replace it with ZONE_HIGHMEM.

This is a code cleanup - no known runtime effects.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190320080732.14933-1-bhe@redhat.com
Fixes: 8efe33f40f3e ("mm/memory_hotplug.c: simplify node_states_check_changes_online")
Signed-off-by: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm,memory_hotplug: drop redundant hugepage_migration_supported check
Oscar Salvador [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:32 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm,memory_hotplug: drop redundant hugepage_migration_supported check

has_unmovable_pages() already checks whether the hugetlb page supports
migration, so all non-migratable hugetlb pages should have been caught
there.  Let us drop the check from scan_movable_pages() as is redundant.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190320152658.10855-3-osalvador@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm,memory_hotplug: unlock 1GB-hugetlb on x86_64
Oscar Salvador [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:29 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm,memory_hotplug: unlock 1GB-hugetlb on x86_64

On x86_64, 1GB-hugetlb pages could never be offlined due to the fact
that hugepage_migration_supported() returned false for PUD_SHIFT.
So whenever we wanted to offline a memblock containing a gigantic
hugetlb page, we never got beyond has_unmovable_pages() check.
This changed with [1], where now we also return true for PUD_SHIFT.

After that patch, the check in has_unmovable_pages() and scan_movable_pages()
returned true, but we still had a final barrier in do_migrate_range():

if (compound_order(head) > PFN_SECTION_SHIFT) {
ret = -EBUSY;
break;
}

This is not really nice, and we do not really need it.
It is perfectly possible to migrate a gigantic page as long as another node has
a spare gigantic page for us.
In alloc_huge_page_nodemask(), we calculate the __real__ number of free pages,
and if any, we try to dequeue one from another node.

This all works fine when we do have another node with a spare gigantic page,
but if that is not the case, alloc_huge_page_nodemask() ends up calling
alloc_migrate_huge_page() which bails out if the wanted page is gigantic.
That is mainly because finding a 1GB (or even 16GB on powerpc) contiguous
memory is quite unlikely when the system has been running for a while.

In that situation, we will keep looping forever because scan_movable_pages()
will give us the same page and we will fail again because there is no node
where we can dequeue a gigantic page from.
This is not nice, and it has been raised that we might want to treat -ENOMEM
as a fatal error in do_migrate_range(), but this has to be checked further.

Anyway, I would tend say that this is the administrator's job, to make sure
that the system can keep up with the memory to be offlined, so that would mean
that if we want to use gigantic pages, make sure that the other nodes have at
least enough gigantic pages to keep up in case we need to offline memory.

Just for the sake of completeness, this is one of the tests done:

 # echo 1 > /sys/devices/system/node/node1/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/nr_hugepages
 # echo 1 > /sys/devices/system/node/node2/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/nr_hugepages

 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node1/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/nr_hugepages
   1
 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node1/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/free_hugepages
   1

 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node2/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/nr_hugepages
   1
 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node2/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/free_hugepages
   1

 (hugetlb1gb is a program that maps 1GB region using MAP_HUGE_1GB)

 # numactl -m 1 ./hugetlb1gb
 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node1/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/free_hugepages
   0
 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node2/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/free_hugepages
   1

 # offline node1 memory
 # cat /sys/devices/system/node/node2/hugepages/hugepages-1048576kB/free_hugepages
   0

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/patchwork/patch/998796/

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190320152658.10855-2-osalvador@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoIB/mthca: use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to get_user_pages_fast()
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:25 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
IB/mthca: use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to get_user_pages_fast()

Use the new FOLL_LONGTERM to get_user_pages_fast() to protect against FS
DAX pages being mapped.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-8-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-8-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoIB/qib: use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to get_user_pages_fast()
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:21 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
IB/qib: use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to get_user_pages_fast()

Use the new FOLL_LONGTERM to get_user_pages_fast() to protect against FS
DAX pages being mapped.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-7-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-7-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoIB/hfi1: use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to get_user_pages_fast()
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:18 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
IB/hfi1: use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to get_user_pages_fast()

Use the new FOLL_LONGTERM to get_user_pages_fast() to protect against FS
DAX pages being mapped.

[ira.weiny@intel.com: v3]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-6-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-6-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-6-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/gup: add FOLL_LONGTERM capability to GUP fast
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:14 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/gup: add FOLL_LONGTERM capability to GUP fast

DAX pages were previously unprotected from longterm pins when users called
get_user_pages_fast().

Use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag to check for DEVMAP pages and fall back to
regular GUP processing if a DEVMAP page is encountered.

[ira.weiny@intel.com: v3]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-5-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-5-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-5-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/gup: change GUP fast to use flags rather than a write 'bool'
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:11 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/gup: change GUP fast to use flags rather than a write 'bool'

To facilitate additional options to get_user_pages_fast() change the
singular write parameter to be gup_flags.

This patch does not change any functionality.  New functionality will
follow in subsequent patches.

Some of the get_user_pages_fast() call sites were unchanged because they
already passed FOLL_WRITE or 0 for the write parameter.

NOTE: It was suggested to change the ordering of the get_user_pages_fast()
arguments to ensure that callers were converted.  This breaks the current
GUP call site convention of having the returned pages be the final
parameter.  So the suggestion was rejected.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-4-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-4-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/gup: change write parameter to flags in fast walk
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:07 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/gup: change write parameter to flags in fast walk

In order to support more options in the GUP fast walk, change the write
parameter to flags throughout the call stack.

This patch does not change functionality and passes FOLL_WRITE where write
was previously used.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-3-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-3-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/gup: replace get_user_pages_longterm() with FOLL_LONGTERM
Ira Weiny [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:03 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm/gup: replace get_user_pages_longterm() with FOLL_LONGTERM

Pach series "Add FOLL_LONGTERM to GUP fast and use it".

HFI1, qib, and mthca, use get_user_pages_fast() due to its performance
advantages.  These pages can be held for a significant time.  But
get_user_pages_fast() does not protect against mapping FS DAX pages.

Introduce FOLL_LONGTERM and use this flag in get_user_pages_fast() which
retains the performance while also adding the FS DAX checks.  XDP has also
shown interest in using this functionality.[1]

In addition we change get_user_pages() to use the new FOLL_LONGTERM flag
and remove the specialized get_user_pages_longterm call.

[1] https://lkml.org/lkml/2019/3/19/939

"longterm" is a relative thing and at this point is probably a misnomer.
This is really flagging a pin which is going to be given to hardware and
can't move.  I've thought of a couple of alternative names but I think we
have to settle on if we are going to use FL_LAYOUT or something else to
solve the "longterm" problem.  Then I think we can change the flag to a
better name.

Secondly, it depends on how often you are registering memory.  I have
spoken with some RDMA users who consider MR in the performance path...
For the overall application performance.  I don't have the numbers as the
tests for HFI1 were done a long time ago.  But there was a significant
advantage.  Some of which is probably due to the fact that you don't have
to hold mmap_sem.

Finally, architecturally I think it would be good for everyone to use
*_fast.  There are patches submitted to the RDMA list which would allow
the use of *_fast (they reworking the use of mmap_sem) and as soon as they
are accepted I'll submit a patch to convert the RDMA core as well.  Also
to this point others are looking to use *_fast.

As an aside, Jasons pointed out in my previous submission that *_fast and
*_unlocked look very much the same.  I agree and I think further cleanup
will be coming.  But I'm focused on getting the final solution for DAX at
the moment.

This patch (of 7):

This patch starts a series which aims to support FOLL_LONGTERM in
get_user_pages_fast().  Some callers who would like to do a longterm (user
controlled pin) of pages with the fast variant of GUP for performance
purposes.

Rather than have a separate get_user_pages_longterm() call, introduce
FOLL_LONGTERM and change the longterm callers to use it.

This patch does not change any functionality.  In the short term
"longterm" or user controlled pins are unsafe for Filesystems and FS DAX
in particular has been blocked.  However, callers of get_user_pages_fast()
were not "protected".

FOLL_LONGTERM can _only_ be supported with get_user_pages[_fast]() as it
requires vmas to determine if DAX is in use.

NOTE: In merging with the CMA changes we opt to change the
get_user_pages() call in check_and_migrate_cma_pages() to a call of
__get_user_pages_locked() on the newly migrated pages.  This makes the
code read better in that we are calling __get_user_pages_locked() on the
pages before and after a potential migration.

As a side affect some of the interfaces are cleaned up but this is not the
primary purpose of the series.

In review[1] it was asked:

<quote>
> This I don't get - if you do lock down long term mappings performance
> of the actual get_user_pages call shouldn't matter to start with.
>
> What do I miss?

A couple of points.

First "longterm" is a relative thing and at this point is probably a
misnomer.  This is really flagging a pin which is going to be given to
hardware and can't move.  I've thought of a couple of alternative names
but I think we have to settle on if we are going to use FL_LAYOUT or
something else to solve the "longterm" problem.  Then I think we can
change the flag to a better name.

Second, It depends on how often you are registering memory.  I have spoken
with some RDMA users who consider MR in the performance path...  For the
overall application performance.  I don't have the numbers as the tests
for HFI1 were done a long time ago.  But there was a significant
advantage.  Some of which is probably due to the fact that you don't have
to hold mmap_sem.

Finally, architecturally I think it would be good for everyone to use
*_fast.  There are patches submitted to the RDMA list which would allow
the use of *_fast (they reworking the use of mmap_sem) and as soon as they
are accepted I'll submit a patch to convert the RDMA core as well.  Also
to this point others are looking to use *_fast.

As an asside, Jasons pointed out in my previous submission that *_fast and
*_unlocked look very much the same.  I agree and I think further cleanup
will be coming.  But I'm focused on getting the final solution for DAX at
the moment.

</quote>

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20190220180255.GA12020@iweiny-DESK2.sc.intel.com/T/#md6abad2569f3bf6c1f03686c8097ab6563e94965

[ira.weiny@intel.com: v3]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-2-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190328084422.29911-2-ira.weiny@intel.com
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190317183438.2057-2-ira.weiny@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ira Weiny <ira.weiny@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
Cc: James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Mike Marshall <hubcap@omnibond.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: generalize putback scan functions
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:17:00 +0000 (17:17 -0700)]
mm: generalize putback scan functions

This combines two similar functions move_active_pages_to_lru() and
putback_inactive_pages() into single move_pages_to_lru().  This remove
duplicate code and makes object file size smaller.

Before:
   text    data     bss     dec     hex filename
  57082    4732     128   61942    f1f6 mm/vmscan.o
After:
   text    data     bss     dec     hex filename
  55112    4600     128   59840    e9c0 mm/vmscan.o

Note, that now we are checking for !page_evictable() coming from
shrink_active_list(), which shouldn't change any behavior since that path
works with evictable pages only.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/155290129627.31489.8321971028677203248.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: remove pages_to_free argument of move_active_pages_to_lru()
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:57 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm: remove pages_to_free argument of move_active_pages_to_lru()

We may use input argument list as output argument too.  This makes the
function more similar to putback_inactive_pages().

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/155290129079.31489.16180612694090502942.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: move nr_deactivate accounting to shrink_active_list()
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:54 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm: move nr_deactivate accounting to shrink_active_list()

We know which LRU is not active.

[chris@chrisdown.name: fix build on !CONFIG_MEMCG]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190322150513.GA22021@chrisdown.name
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/155290128498.31489.18250485448913338607.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Reviewed-by: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: move recent_rotated pages calculation to shrink_inactive_list()
Kirill Tkhai [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:51 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm: move recent_rotated pages calculation to shrink_inactive_list()

Patch series "mm: Generalize putback functions"]

putback_inactive_pages() and move_active_pages_to_lru() are almost
similar, so this patchset merges them ina single function.

This patch (of 4):

The patch moves the calculation from putback_inactive_pages() to
shrink_inactive_list().  This makes putback_inactive_pages() looking more
similar to move_active_pages_to_lru().

To do that, we account activated pages in reclaim_stat::nr_activate.
Since a page may change its LRU type from anon to file cache inside
shrink_page_list() (see ClearPageSwapBacked()), we have to account pages
for the both types.  So, nr_activate becomes an array.

Previously we used nr_activate to account PGACTIVATE events, but now we
account them into pgactivate variable (since they are about number of
pages in general, not about sum of hpage_nr_pages).

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/155290127956.31489.3393586616054413298.stgit@localhost.localdomain
Signed-off-by: Kirill Tkhai <ktkhai@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Daniel Jordan <daniel.m.jordan@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm, page_alloc: disallow __GFP_COMP in alloc_pages_exact()
Vlastimil Babka [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:47 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm, page_alloc: disallow __GFP_COMP in alloc_pages_exact()

alloc_pages_exact*() allocates a page of sufficient order and then splits
it to return only the number of pages requested.  That makes it
incompatible with __GFP_COMP, because compound pages cannot be split.

As shown by [1] things may silently work until the requested size
(possibly depending on user) stops being power of two.  Then for
CONFIG_DEBUG_VM, BUG_ON() triggers in split_page().  Without
CONFIG_DEBUG_VM, consequences are unclear.

There are several options here, none of them great:

1) Don't do the splitting when __GFP_COMP is passed, and return the
   whole compound page.  However if caller then returns it via
   free_pages_exact(), that will be unexpected and the freeing actions
   there will be wrong.

2) Warn and remove __GFP_COMP from the flags.  But the caller may have
   really wanted it, so things may break later somewhere.

3) Warn and return NULL.  However NULL may be unexpected, especially
   for small sizes.

This patch picks option 2, because as Michal Hocko put it: "callers wanted
it" is much less probable than "caller is simply confused and more gfp
flags is surely better than fewer".

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20181126002805.GI18977@shao2-debian/T/#u

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/0c6393eb-b28d-4607-c386-862a71f09de6@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Takashi Iwai <tiwai@suse.de>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: page cache: store only head pages in i_pages
Matthew Wilcox [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:44 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm: page cache: store only head pages in i_pages

Transparent Huge Pages are currently stored in i_pages as pointers to
consecutive subpages.  This patch changes that to storing consecutive
pointers to the head page in preparation for storing huge pages more
efficiently in i_pages.

Large parts of this are "inspired" by Kirill's patch
https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20170126115819.58875-2-kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com/

[willy@infradead.org: fix swapcache pages]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190324155441.GF10344@bombadil.infradead.org
[kirill@shutemov.name: hugetlb stores pages in page cache differently]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190404134553.vuvhgmghlkiw2hgl@kshutemo-mobl1
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190307153051.18815-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Kirill Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Reviewed-and-tested-by: Song Liu <songliubraving@fb.com>
Tested-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Tested-by: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Song Liu <liu.song.a23@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agouserfaultfd/sysctl: add vm.unprivileged_userfaultfd
Peter Xu [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:41 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
userfaultfd/sysctl: add vm.unprivileged_userfaultfd

Userfaultfd can be misued to make it easier to exploit existing
use-after-free (and similar) bugs that might otherwise only make a
short window or race condition available.  By using userfaultfd to
stall a kernel thread, a malicious program can keep some state that it
wrote, stable for an extended period, which it can then access using an
existing exploit.  While it doesn't cause the exploit itself, and while
it's not the only thing that can stall a kernel thread when accessing a
memory location, it's one of the few that never needs privilege.

We can add a flag, allowing userfaultfd to be restricted, so that in
general it won't be useable by arbitrary user programs, but in
environments that require userfaultfd it can be turned back on.

Add a global sysctl knob "vm.unprivileged_userfaultfd" to control
whether userfaultfd is allowed by unprivileged users.  When this is
set to zero, only privileged users (root user, or users with the
CAP_SYS_PTRACE capability) will be able to use the userfaultfd
syscalls.

Andrea said:

: The only difference between the bpf sysctl and the userfaultfd sysctl
: this way is that the bpf sysctl adds the CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability
: requirement, while userfaultfd adds the CAP_SYS_PTRACE requirement,
: because the userfaultfd monitor is more likely to need CAP_SYS_PTRACE
: already if it's doing other kind of tracking on processes runtime, in
: addition of userfaultfd.  In other words both syscalls works only for
: root, when the two sysctl are opt-in set to 1.

[dgilbert@redhat.com: changelog additions]
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: documentation tweak, per Mike]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190319030722.12441-2-peterx@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Suggested-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Suggested-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Luis Chamberlain <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Maxime Coquelin <maxime.coquelin@redhat.com>
Cc: Maya Gokhale <gokhale2@llnl.gov>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Martin Cracauer <cracauer@cons.org>
Cc: Denis Plotnikov <dplotnikov@virtuozzo.com>
Cc: Marty McFadden <mcfadden8@llnl.gov>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/cma_debug.c: fix the break condition in cma_maxchunk_get()
Yue Hu [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:37 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm/cma_debug.c: fix the break condition in cma_maxchunk_get()

If not find zero bit in find_next_zero_bit(), it will return the size
parameter passed in, so the start bit should be compared with bitmap_maxno
rather than cma->count.  Although getting maxchunk is working fine due to
zero value of order_per_bit currently, the operation will be stuck if
order_per_bit is set as non-zero.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190319092734.276-1-zbestahu@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yue Hu <huyue2@yulong.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Safonov <d.safonov@partner.samsung.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoinclude/trace/events/vmscan.h: drop zone id from kswapd tracepoints
Yafang Shao [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:34 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
include/trace/events/vmscan.h: drop zone id from kswapd tracepoints

It is not clear how the zone id is useful in kswapd tracepoints and the id
itself is not really easy to process because it depends on the
configuration (available zones).  Let's drop the id for now.  If somebody
really needs that information then the zone name should be used instead.

[mhocko@suse.com: new changelog]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1552451813-10833-1-git-send-email-laoar.shao@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yafang Shao <laoar.shao@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/slab.c: fix an infinite loop in leaks_show()
Qian Cai [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:31 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm/slab.c: fix an infinite loop in leaks_show()

"cat /proc/slab_allocators" could hang forever on SMP machines with
kmemleak or object debugging enabled due to other CPUs running do_drain()
will keep making kmemleak_object or debug_objects_cache dirty and unable
to escape the first loop in leaks_show(),

do {
set_store_user_clean(cachep);
drain_cpu_caches(cachep);
...

} while (!is_store_user_clean(cachep));

For example,

do_drain
  slabs_destroy
    slab_destroy
      kmem_cache_free
        __cache_free
          ___cache_free
            kmemleak_free_recursive
              delete_object_full
                __delete_object
                  put_object
                    free_object_rcu
                      kmem_cache_free
                        cache_free_debugcheck --> dirty kmemleak_object

One approach is to check cachep->name and skip both kmemleak_object and
debug_objects_cache in leaks_show().  The other is to set store_user_clean
after drain_cpu_caches() which leaves a small window between
drain_cpu_caches() and set_store_user_clean() where per-CPU caches could
be dirty again lead to slightly wrong information has been stored but
could also speed up things significantly which sounds like a good
compromise.  For example,

 # cat /proc/slab_allocators
 0m42.778s # 1st approach
 0m0.737s  # 2nd approach

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: tweak comment]
Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190411032635.10325-1-cai@lca.pw
Fixes: d31676dfde25 ("mm/slab: alternative implementation for DEBUG_SLAB_LEAK")
Signed-off-by: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/slub.c: update the comment about slab frozen
Liu Xiang [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:28 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm/slub.c: update the comment about slab frozen

Now frozen slab can only be on the per cpu partial list.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1554022325-11305-1-git-send-email-liu.xiang6@zte.com.cn
Signed-off-by: Liu Xiang <liu.xiang6@zte.com.cn>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/slab.c: remove unneed check in cpuup_canceled
Li RongQing [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:25 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm/slab.c: remove unneed check in cpuup_canceled

nc is a member of percpu allocation memory, and cannot be NULL.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1553159353-5056-1-git-send-email-lirongqing@baidu.com
Signed-off-by: Li RongQing <lirongqing@baidu.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoslub: remove useless kmem_cache_debug() before remove_full()
Liu Xiang [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:22 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
slub: remove useless kmem_cache_debug() before remove_full()

When CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG is not enabled, remove_full() is empty.
While CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG is enabled, remove_full() can check
s->flags by itself. So kmem_cache_debug() is useless and
can be removed.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1552577313-2830-1-git-send-email-liu.xiang6@zte.com.cn
Signed-off-by: Liu Xiang <liu.xiang6@zte.com.cn>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm: remove stale comment from page struct
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:19 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
mm: remove stale comment from page struct

We now use the slab_list list_head instead of the lru list_head.  This
comment has become stale.

Remove stale comment from page struct slab_list list_head.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-8-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoslab: use slab_list instead of lru
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:15 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
slab: use slab_list instead of lru

Currently we use the page->lru list for maintaining lists of slabs.  We
have a list in the page structure (slab_list) that can be used for this
purpose.  Doing so makes the code cleaner since we are not overloading the
lru list.

Use the slab_list instead of the lru list for maintaining lists of slabs.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-7-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoslub: use slab_list instead of lru
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:12 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
slub: use slab_list instead of lru

Currently we use the page->lru list for maintaining lists of slabs.  We
have a list in the page structure (slab_list) that can be used for this
purpose.  Doing so makes the code cleaner since we are not overloading the
lru list.

Use the slab_list instead of the lru list for maintaining lists of slabs.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-6-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoslub: add comments to endif pre-processor macros
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:09 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
slub: add comments to endif pre-processor macros

SLUB allocator makes heavy use of ifdef/endif pre-processor macros.  The
pairing of these statements is at times hard to follow e.g.  if the pair
are further than a screen apart or if there are nested pairs.  We can
reduce cognitive load by adding a comment to the endif statement of form

       #ifdef CONFIG_FOO
       ...
       #endif /* CONFIG_FOO */

Add comments to endif pre-processor macros if ifdef/endif pair is not
immediately apparent.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-5-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoslob: use slab_list instead of lru
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:06 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
slob: use slab_list instead of lru

Currently we use the page->lru list for maintaining lists of slabs.  We
have a list_head in the page structure (slab_list) that can be used for
this purpose.  Doing so makes the code cleaner since we are not
overloading the lru list.

The slab_list is part of a union within the page struct (included here
stripped down):

union {
struct { /* Page cache and anonymous pages */
struct list_head lru;
...
};
struct {
dma_addr_t dma_addr;
};
struct { /* slab, slob and slub */
union {
struct list_head slab_list;
struct { /* Partial pages */
struct page *next;
int pages; /* Nr of pages left */
int pobjects; /* Approximate count */
};
};
...

Here we see that slab_list and lru are the same bits.  We can verify that
this change is safe to do by examining the object file produced from
slob.c before and after this patch is applied.

Steps taken to verify:

 1. checkout current tip of Linus' tree

    commit a667cb7a94d4 ("Merge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)")

 2. configure and build (select SLOB allocator)

    CONFIG_SLOB=y
    CONFIG_SLAB_MERGE_DEFAULT=y

 3. dissasemble object file `objdump -dr mm/slub.o > before.s
 4. apply patch
 5. build
 6. dissasemble object file `objdump -dr mm/slub.o > after.s
 7. diff before.s after.s

Use slab_list list_head instead of the lru list_head for maintaining
lists of slabs.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-4-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoslob: respect list_head abstraction layer
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:16:03 +0000 (17:16 -0700)]
slob: respect list_head abstraction layer

Currently we reach inside the list_head.  This is a violation of the layer
of abstraction provided by the list_head.  It makes the code fragile.
More importantly it makes the code wicked hard to understand.

The code reaches into the list_head structure to counteract the fact that
the list _may_ have been changed during slob_page_alloc().  Instead of
this we can add a return parameter to slob_page_alloc() to signal that the
list was modified (list_del() called with page->lru to remove page from
the freelist).

This code is concerned with an optimisation that counters the tendency for
first fit allocation algorithm to fragment memory into many small chunks
at the front of the memory pool.  Since the page is only removed from the
list when an allocation uses _all_ the remaining memory in the page then
in this special case fragmentation does not occur and we therefore do not
need the optimisation.

Add a return parameter to slob_page_alloc() to signal that the allocation
used up the whole page and that the page was removed from the free list.
After calling slob_page_alloc() check the return value just added and only
attempt optimisation if the page is still on the list.

Use list_head API instead of reaching into the list_head structure to
check if sp is at the front of the list.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-3-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agolist: add function list_rotate_to_front()
Tobin C. Harding [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:59 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
list: add function list_rotate_to_front()

Patch series "mm: Use slab_list list_head instead of lru", v5.

Currently the slab allocators (ab)use the struct page 'lru' list_head.  We
have a list head for slab allocators to use, 'slab_list'.

During v2 it was noted by Christoph that the SLOB allocator was reaching
into a list_head, this version adds 2 patches to the front of the set to
fix that.

Clean up all three allocators by using the 'slab_list' list_head instead
of overloading the 'lru' list_head.

This patch (of 7):

Currently if we wish to rotate a list until a specific item is at the
front of the list we can call list_move_tail(head, list).  Note that the
arguments are the reverse way to the usual use of list_move_tail(list,
head).  This is a hack, it depends on the developer knowing how the
list_head operates internally which violates the layer of abstraction
offered by the list_head.  Also, it is not intuitive so the next developer
to come along must study list.h in order to fully understand what is meant
by the call, while this is 'good for' the developer it makes reading the
code harder.  We should have an function appropriately named that does
this if there are users for it intree.

By grep'ing the tree for list_move_tail() and list_tail() and attempting
to guess the argument order from the names it seems there is only one
place currently in the tree that does this - the slob allocatator.

Add function list_rotate_to_front() to rotate a list until the specified
item is at the front of the list.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190402230545.2929-2-tobin@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Tobin C. Harding <tobin@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Reviewed-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoocfs2: fix ocfs2 read inode data panic in ocfs2_iget
Shuning Zhang [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:56 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
ocfs2: fix ocfs2 read inode data panic in ocfs2_iget

In some cases, ocfs2_iget() reads the data of inode, which has been
deleted for some reason.  That will make the system panic.  So We should
judge whether this inode has been deleted, and tell the caller that the
inode is a bad inode.

For example, the ocfs2 is used as the backed of nfs, and the client is
nfsv3.  This issue can be reproduced by the following steps.

on the nfs server side,
..../patha/pathb

Step 1: The process A was scheduled before calling the function fh_verify.

Step 2: The process B is removing the 'pathb', and just completed the call
to function dput.  Then the dentry of 'pathb' has been deleted from the
dcache, and all ancestors have been deleted also.  The relationship of
dentry and inode was deleted through the function hlist_del_init.  The
following is the call stack.
dentry_iput->hlist_del_init(&dentry->d_u.d_alias)

At this time, the inode is still in the dcache.

Step 3: The process A call the function ocfs2_get_dentry, which get the
inode from dcache.  Then the refcount of inode is 1.  The following is the
call stack.
nfsd3_proc_getacl->fh_verify->exportfs_decode_fh->fh_to_dentry(ocfs2_get_dentry)

Step 4: Dirty pages are flushed by bdi threads.  So the inode of 'patha'
is evicted, and this directory was deleted.  But the inode of 'pathb'
can't be evicted, because the refcount of the inode was 1.

Step 5: The process A keep running, and call the function
reconnect_path(in exportfs_decode_fh), which call function
ocfs2_get_parent of ocfs2.  Get the block number of parent
directory(patha) by the name of ...  Then read the data from disk by the
block number.  But this inode has been deleted, so the system panic.

Process A                                             Process B
1. in nfsd3_proc_getacl                   |
2.                                        |        dput
3. fh_to_dentry(ocfs2_get_dentry)         |
4. bdi flush dirty cache                  |
5. ocfs2_iget                             |

[283465.542049] OCFS2: ERROR (device sdp): ocfs2_validate_inode_block:
Invalid dinode #580640: OCFS2_VALID_FL not set

[283465.545490] Kernel panic - not syncing: OCFS2: (device sdp): panic forced
after error

[283465.546889] CPU: 5 PID: 12416 Comm: nfsd Tainted: G        W
4.1.12-124.18.6.el6uek.bug28762940v3.x86_64 #2
[283465.548382] Hardware name: VMware, Inc. VMware Virtual Platform/440BX
Desktop Reference Platform, BIOS 6.00 09/21/2015
[283465.549657]  0000000000000000 ffff8800a56fb7b8 ffffffff816e839c
ffffffffa0514758
[283465.550392]  000000000008dc20 ffff8800a56fb838 ffffffff816e62d3
0000000000000008
[283465.551056]  ffff880000000010 ffff8800a56fb848 ffff8800a56fb7e8
ffff88005df9f000
[283465.551710] Call Trace:
[283465.552516]  [<ffffffff816e839c>] dump_stack+0x63/0x81
[283465.553291]  [<ffffffff816e62d3>] panic+0xcb/0x21b
[283465.554037]  [<ffffffffa04e66b0>] ocfs2_handle_error+0xf0/0xf0 [ocfs2]
[283465.554882]  [<ffffffffa04e7737>] __ocfs2_error+0x67/0x70 [ocfs2]
[283465.555768]  [<ffffffffa049c0f9>] ocfs2_validate_inode_block+0x229/0x230
[ocfs2]
[283465.556683]  [<ffffffffa047bcbc>] ocfs2_read_blocks+0x46c/0x7b0 [ocfs2]
[283465.557408]  [<ffffffffa049bed0>] ? ocfs2_inode_cache_io_unlock+0x20/0x20
[ocfs2]
[283465.557973]  [<ffffffffa049f0eb>] ocfs2_read_inode_block_full+0x3b/0x60
[ocfs2]
[283465.558525]  [<ffffffffa049f5ba>] ocfs2_iget+0x4aa/0x880 [ocfs2]
[283465.559082]  [<ffffffffa049146e>] ocfs2_get_parent+0x9e/0x220 [ocfs2]
[283465.559622]  [<ffffffff81297c05>] reconnect_path+0xb5/0x300
[283465.560156]  [<ffffffff81297f46>] exportfs_decode_fh+0xf6/0x2b0
[283465.560708]  [<ffffffffa062faf0>] ? nfsd_proc_getattr+0xa0/0xa0 [nfsd]
[283465.561262]  [<ffffffff810a8196>] ? prepare_creds+0x26/0x110
[283465.561932]  [<ffffffffa0630860>] fh_verify+0x350/0x660 [nfsd]
[283465.562862]  [<ffffffffa0637804>] ? nfsd_cache_lookup+0x44/0x630 [nfsd]
[283465.563697]  [<ffffffffa063a8b9>] nfsd3_proc_getattr+0x69/0xf0 [nfsd]
[283465.564510]  [<ffffffffa062cf60>] nfsd_dispatch+0xe0/0x290 [nfsd]
[283465.565358]  [<ffffffffa05eb892>] ? svc_tcp_adjust_wspace+0x12/0x30
[sunrpc]
[283465.566272]  [<ffffffffa05ea652>] svc_process_common+0x412/0x6a0 [sunrpc]
[283465.567155]  [<ffffffffa05eaa03>] svc_process+0x123/0x210 [sunrpc]
[283465.568020]  [<ffffffffa062c90f>] nfsd+0xff/0x170 [nfsd]
[283465.568962]  [<ffffffffa062c810>] ? nfsd_destroy+0x80/0x80 [nfsd]
[283465.570112]  [<ffffffff810a622b>] kthread+0xcb/0xf0
[283465.571099]  [<ffffffff810a6160>] ? kthread_create_on_node+0x180/0x180
[283465.572114]  [<ffffffff816f11b8>] ret_from_fork+0x58/0x90
[283465.573156]  [<ffffffff810a6160>] ? kthread_create_on_node+0x180/0x180

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1554185919-3010-1-git-send-email-sunny.s.zhang@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Shuning Zhang <sunny.s.zhang@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Joseph Qi <jiangqi903@gmail.com>
Cc: Mark Fasheh <mark@fasheh.com>
Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org>
Cc: Junxiao Bi <junxiao.bi@oracle.com>
Cc: Changwei Ge <gechangwei@live.cn>
Cc: piaojun <piaojun@huawei.com>
Cc: "Gang He" <ghe@suse.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoocfs2: use common file type conversion
Phillip Potter [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:53 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
ocfs2: use common file type conversion

Deduplicate the ocfs2 file type conversion implementation and remove
OCFS2_FT_* definitions - file systems that use the same file types as
defined by POSIX do not need to define their own versions and can use the
common helper functions decared in fs_types.h and implemented in
fs_types.c

Common implementation can be found via bbe7449e2599 ("fs: common
implementation of file type").

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190326213919.GA20878@pathfinder
Signed-off-by: Amir Goldstein <amir73il@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Phillip Potter <phil@philpotter.co.uk>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Mark Fasheh <mark@fasheh.com>
Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org>
Cc: Junxiao Bi <junxiao.bi@oracle.com>
Cc: Joseph Qi <jiangqi903@gmail.com>
Cc: Changwei Ge <gechangwei@live.cn>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoMAINTAINERS: add Joseph as ocfs2 co-maintainer
Joseph Qi [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:49 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
MAINTAINERS: add Joseph as ocfs2 co-maintainer

I have been contributing and reviewing to the ocfs2 filesystem for recent
years and I'm willing to continue doing so.  Volunteer as a co-maintainer
for ocfs2 filesystem.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/f56d75b3-2be5-25c2-51f2-c3f5423d4f14@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Joseph Qi <joseph.qi@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com>
Cc: piaojun <piaojun@huawei.com>
Cc: "Gang He" <ghe@suse.com>
Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org>
Cc: Junxiao Bi <junxiao.bi@oracle.com>
Cc: Joseph Qi <jiangqi903@gmail.com>
Cc: Changwei Ge <gechangwei@live.cn>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agoarch/sh/boards/mach-dreamcast/irq.c: Remove duplicate header
Sabyasachi Gupta [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:46 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
arch/sh/boards/mach-dreamcast/irq.c: Remove duplicate header

Remove linux/irq.h which is included more than once.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/5c8682ef.1c69fb81.5a1ea.2e7f@mx.google.com
Signed-off-by: Sabyasachi Gupta <sabyasachi.linux@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Mukesh Ojha <mojha@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agokernel/sys.c: prctl: fix false positive in validate_prctl_map()
Cyrill Gorcunov [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:40 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
kernel/sys.c: prctl: fix false positive in validate_prctl_map()

While validating new map we require the @start_data to be strictly less
than @end_data, which is fine for regular applications (this is why this
nit didn't trigger for that long).  These members are set from executable
loaders such as elf handers, still it is pretty valid to have a loadable
data section with zero size in file, in such case the start_data is equal
to end_data once kernel loader finishes.

As a result when we're trying to restore such programs the procedure fails
and the kernel returns -EINVAL.  From the image dump of a program:

 | "mm_start_code": "0x400000",
 | "mm_end_code": "0x8f5fb4",
 | "mm_start_data": "0xf1bfb0",
 | "mm_end_data": "0xf1bfb0",

Thus we need to change validate_prctl_map from strictly less to less or
equal operator use.

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190408143554.GY1421@uranus.lan
Fixes: f606b77f1a9e3 ("prctl: PR_SET_MM -- introduce PR_SET_MM_MAP operation")
Signed-off-by: Cyrill Gorcunov <gorcunov@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Vagin <avagin@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Safonov <0x7f454c46@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
5 months agomm/hugetlb.c: don't put_page in lock of hugetlb_lock
Kai Shen [Tue, 14 May 2019 00:15:37 +0000 (17:15 -0700)]
mm/hugetlb.c: don't put_page in lock of hugetlb_lock

spinlock recursion happened when do LTP test:
#!/bin/bash
./runltp -p -f hugetlb &
./runltp -p -f hugetlb &
./runltp -p -f hugetlb &
./runltp -p -f hugetlb &
./runltp -p -f hugetlb &

The dtor returned by get_compound_page_dtor in __put_compound_page may be
the function of free_huge_page which will lock the hugetlb_lock, so don't
put_page in lock of hugetlb_lock.

 BUG: spinlock recursion on CPU#0, hugemmap05/1079
  lock: hugetlb_lock+0x0/0x18, .magic: dead4ead, .owner: hugemmap05/1079, .owner_cpu: 0
 Call trace:
  dump_backtrace+0x0/0x198
  show_stack+0x24/0x30
  dump_stack+0xa4/0xcc
  spin_dump+0x84/0xa8
  do_raw_spin_lock+0xd0/0x108
  _raw_spin_lock+0x20/0x30
  free_huge_page+0x9c/0x260
  __put_compound_page+0x44/0x50
  __put_page+0x2c/0x60
  alloc_surplus_huge_page.constprop.19+0xf0/0x140
  hugetlb_acct_memory+0x104/0x378
  hugetlb_reserve_pages+0xe0/0x250
  hugetlbfs_file_mmap+0xc0/0x140
  mmap_region+0x3e8/0x5b0
  do_mmap+0x280/0x460
  vm_mmap_pgoff+0xf4/0x128
  ksys_mmap_pgoff+0xb4/0x258
  __arm64_sys_mmap+0x34/0x48
  el0_svc_common+0x78/0x130
  el0_svc_handler+0x38/0x78
  el0_svc+0x8/0xc

Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/b8ade452-2d6b-0372-32c2-703644032b47@huawei.com
Fixes: 9980d744a0 ("mm, hugetlb: get rid of surplus page accounting tricks")
Signed-off-by: Kai Shen <shenkai8@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Feilong Lin <linfeilong@huawei.com>
Reported-by: Wang Wang <wangwang2@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>