Merge branch 'thorsten' into docs-next
[sfrench/cifs-2.6.git] / Documentation / sysctl / kernel.txt
1 Documentation for /proc/sys/kernel/*    kernel version 2.2.10
2         (c) 1998, 1999,  Rik van Riel <riel@nl.linux.org>
3         (c) 2009,        Shen Feng<shen@cn.fujitsu.com>
4
5 For general info and legal blurb, please look in README.
6
7 ==============================================================
8
9 This file contains documentation for the sysctl files in
10 /proc/sys/kernel/ and is valid for Linux kernel version 2.2.
11
12 The files in this directory can be used to tune and monitor
13 miscellaneous and general things in the operation of the Linux
14 kernel. Since some of the files _can_ be used to screw up your
15 system, it is advisable to read both documentation and source
16 before actually making adjustments.
17
18 Currently, these files might (depending on your configuration)
19 show up in /proc/sys/kernel:
20
21 - acct
22 - acpi_video_flags
23 - auto_msgmni
24 - bootloader_type            [ X86 only ]
25 - bootloader_version         [ X86 only ]
26 - callhome                   [ S390 only ]
27 - cap_last_cap
28 - core_pattern
29 - core_pipe_limit
30 - core_uses_pid
31 - ctrl-alt-del
32 - dmesg_restrict
33 - domainname
34 - hostname
35 - hotplug
36 - hardlockup_all_cpu_backtrace
37 - hardlockup_panic
38 - hung_task_panic
39 - hung_task_check_count
40 - hung_task_timeout_secs
41 - hung_task_check_interval_secs
42 - hung_task_warnings
43 - hyperv_record_panic_msg
44 - kexec_load_disabled
45 - kptr_restrict
46 - l2cr                        [ PPC only ]
47 - modprobe                    ==> Documentation/debugging-modules.txt
48 - modules_disabled
49 - msg_next_id                 [ sysv ipc ]
50 - msgmax
51 - msgmnb
52 - msgmni
53 - nmi_watchdog
54 - osrelease
55 - ostype
56 - overflowgid
57 - overflowuid
58 - panic
59 - panic_on_oops
60 - panic_on_stackoverflow
61 - panic_on_unrecovered_nmi
62 - panic_on_warn
63 - panic_print
64 - panic_on_rcu_stall
65 - perf_cpu_time_max_percent
66 - perf_event_paranoid
67 - perf_event_max_stack
68 - perf_event_mlock_kb
69 - perf_event_max_contexts_per_stack
70 - pid_max
71 - powersave-nap               [ PPC only ]
72 - printk
73 - printk_delay
74 - printk_ratelimit
75 - printk_ratelimit_burst
76 - pty                         ==> Documentation/filesystems/devpts.txt
77 - randomize_va_space
78 - real-root-dev               ==> Documentation/admin-guide/initrd.rst
79 - reboot-cmd                  [ SPARC only ]
80 - rtsig-max
81 - rtsig-nr
82 - seccomp/                    ==> Documentation/userspace-api/seccomp_filter.rst
83 - sem
84 - sem_next_id                 [ sysv ipc ]
85 - sg-big-buff                 [ generic SCSI device (sg) ]
86 - shm_next_id                 [ sysv ipc ]
87 - shm_rmid_forced
88 - shmall
89 - shmmax                      [ sysv ipc ]
90 - shmmni
91 - softlockup_all_cpu_backtrace
92 - soft_watchdog
93 - stack_erasing
94 - stop-a                      [ SPARC only ]
95 - sysrq                       ==> Documentation/admin-guide/sysrq.rst
96 - sysctl_writes_strict
97 - tainted                     ==> Documentation/admin-guide/tainted-kernels.rst
98 - threads-max
99 - unknown_nmi_panic
100 - watchdog
101 - watchdog_thresh
102 - version
103
104 ==============================================================
105
106 acct:
107
108 highwater lowwater frequency
109
110 If BSD-style process accounting is enabled these values control
111 its behaviour. If free space on filesystem where the log lives
112 goes below <lowwater>% accounting suspends. If free space gets
113 above <highwater>% accounting resumes. <Frequency> determines
114 how often do we check the amount of free space (value is in
115 seconds). Default:
116 4 2 30
117 That is, suspend accounting if there left <= 2% free; resume it
118 if we got >=4%; consider information about amount of free space
119 valid for 30 seconds.
120
121 ==============================================================
122
123 acpi_video_flags:
124
125 flags
126
127 See Doc*/kernel/power/video.txt, it allows mode of video boot to be
128 set during run time.
129
130 ==============================================================
131
132 auto_msgmni:
133
134 This variable has no effect and may be removed in future kernel
135 releases. Reading it always returns 0.
136 Up to Linux 3.17, it enabled/disabled automatic recomputing of msgmni
137 upon memory add/remove or upon ipc namespace creation/removal.
138 Echoing "1" into this file enabled msgmni automatic recomputing.
139 Echoing "0" turned it off. auto_msgmni default value was 1.
140
141
142 ==============================================================
143
144 bootloader_type:
145
146 x86 bootloader identification
147
148 This gives the bootloader type number as indicated by the bootloader,
149 shifted left by 4, and OR'd with the low four bits of the bootloader
150 version.  The reason for this encoding is that this used to match the
151 type_of_loader field in the kernel header; the encoding is kept for
152 backwards compatibility.  That is, if the full bootloader type number
153 is 0x15 and the full version number is 0x234, this file will contain
154 the value 340 = 0x154.
155
156 See the type_of_loader and ext_loader_type fields in
157 Documentation/x86/boot.txt for additional information.
158
159 ==============================================================
160
161 bootloader_version:
162
163 x86 bootloader version
164
165 The complete bootloader version number.  In the example above, this
166 file will contain the value 564 = 0x234.
167
168 See the type_of_loader and ext_loader_ver fields in
169 Documentation/x86/boot.txt for additional information.
170
171 ==============================================================
172
173 callhome:
174
175 Controls the kernel's callhome behavior in case of a kernel panic.
176
177 The s390 hardware allows an operating system to send a notification
178 to a service organization (callhome) in case of an operating system panic.
179
180 When the value in this file is 0 (which is the default behavior)
181 nothing happens in case of a kernel panic. If this value is set to "1"
182 the complete kernel oops message is send to the IBM customer service
183 organization in case the mainframe the Linux operating system is running
184 on has a service contract with IBM.
185
186 ==============================================================
187
188 cap_last_cap
189
190 Highest valid capability of the running kernel.  Exports
191 CAP_LAST_CAP from the kernel.
192
193 ==============================================================
194
195 core_pattern:
196
197 core_pattern is used to specify a core dumpfile pattern name.
198 . max length 128 characters; default value is "core"
199 . core_pattern is used as a pattern template for the output filename;
200   certain string patterns (beginning with '%') are substituted with
201   their actual values.
202 . backward compatibility with core_uses_pid:
203         If core_pattern does not include "%p" (default does not)
204         and core_uses_pid is set, then .PID will be appended to
205         the filename.
206 . corename format specifiers:
207         %<NUL>  '%' is dropped
208         %%      output one '%'
209         %p      pid
210         %P      global pid (init PID namespace)
211         %i      tid
212         %I      global tid (init PID namespace)
213         %u      uid (in initial user namespace)
214         %g      gid (in initial user namespace)
215         %d      dump mode, matches PR_SET_DUMPABLE and
216                 /proc/sys/fs/suid_dumpable
217         %s      signal number
218         %t      UNIX time of dump
219         %h      hostname
220         %e      executable filename (may be shortened)
221         %E      executable path
222         %<OTHER> both are dropped
223 . If the first character of the pattern is a '|', the kernel will treat
224   the rest of the pattern as a command to run.  The core dump will be
225   written to the standard input of that program instead of to a file.
226
227 ==============================================================
228
229 core_pipe_limit:
230
231 This sysctl is only applicable when core_pattern is configured to pipe
232 core files to a user space helper (when the first character of
233 core_pattern is a '|', see above).  When collecting cores via a pipe
234 to an application, it is occasionally useful for the collecting
235 application to gather data about the crashing process from its
236 /proc/pid directory.  In order to do this safely, the kernel must wait
237 for the collecting process to exit, so as not to remove the crashing
238 processes proc files prematurely.  This in turn creates the
239 possibility that a misbehaving userspace collecting process can block
240 the reaping of a crashed process simply by never exiting.  This sysctl
241 defends against that.  It defines how many concurrent crashing
242 processes may be piped to user space applications in parallel.  If
243 this value is exceeded, then those crashing processes above that value
244 are noted via the kernel log and their cores are skipped.  0 is a
245 special value, indicating that unlimited processes may be captured in
246 parallel, but that no waiting will take place (i.e. the collecting
247 process is not guaranteed access to /proc/<crashing pid>/).  This
248 value defaults to 0.
249
250 ==============================================================
251
252 core_uses_pid:
253
254 The default coredump filename is "core".  By setting
255 core_uses_pid to 1, the coredump filename becomes core.PID.
256 If core_pattern does not include "%p" (default does not)
257 and core_uses_pid is set, then .PID will be appended to
258 the filename.
259
260 ==============================================================
261
262 ctrl-alt-del:
263
264 When the value in this file is 0, ctrl-alt-del is trapped and
265 sent to the init(1) program to handle a graceful restart.
266 When, however, the value is > 0, Linux's reaction to a Vulcan
267 Nerve Pinch (tm) will be an immediate reboot, without even
268 syncing its dirty buffers.
269
270 Note: when a program (like dosemu) has the keyboard in 'raw'
271 mode, the ctrl-alt-del is intercepted by the program before it
272 ever reaches the kernel tty layer, and it's up to the program
273 to decide what to do with it.
274
275 ==============================================================
276
277 dmesg_restrict:
278
279 This toggle indicates whether unprivileged users are prevented
280 from using dmesg(8) to view messages from the kernel's log buffer.
281 When dmesg_restrict is set to (0) there are no restrictions. When
282 dmesg_restrict is set set to (1), users must have CAP_SYSLOG to use
283 dmesg(8).
284
285 The kernel config option CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT sets the
286 default value of dmesg_restrict.
287
288 ==============================================================
289
290 domainname & hostname:
291
292 These files can be used to set the NIS/YP domainname and the
293 hostname of your box in exactly the same way as the commands
294 domainname and hostname, i.e.:
295 # echo "darkstar" > /proc/sys/kernel/hostname
296 # echo "mydomain" > /proc/sys/kernel/domainname
297 has the same effect as
298 # hostname "darkstar"
299 # domainname "mydomain"
300
301 Note, however, that the classic darkstar.frop.org has the
302 hostname "darkstar" and DNS (Internet Domain Name Server)
303 domainname "frop.org", not to be confused with the NIS (Network
304 Information Service) or YP (Yellow Pages) domainname. These two
305 domain names are in general different. For a detailed discussion
306 see the hostname(1) man page.
307
308 ==============================================================
309 hardlockup_all_cpu_backtrace:
310
311 This value controls the hard lockup detector behavior when a hard
312 lockup condition is detected as to whether or not to gather further
313 debug information. If enabled, arch-specific all-CPU stack dumping
314 will be initiated.
315
316 0: do nothing. This is the default behavior.
317
318 1: on detection capture more debug information.
319 ==============================================================
320
321 hardlockup_panic:
322
323 This parameter can be used to control whether the kernel panics
324 when a hard lockup is detected.
325
326    0 - don't panic on hard lockup
327    1 - panic on hard lockup
328
329 See Documentation/lockup-watchdogs.txt for more information.  This can
330 also be set using the nmi_watchdog kernel parameter.
331
332 ==============================================================
333
334 hotplug:
335
336 Path for the hotplug policy agent.
337 Default value is "/sbin/hotplug".
338
339 ==============================================================
340
341 hung_task_panic:
342
343 Controls the kernel's behavior when a hung task is detected.
344 This file shows up if CONFIG_DETECT_HUNG_TASK is enabled.
345
346 0: continue operation. This is the default behavior.
347
348 1: panic immediately.
349
350 ==============================================================
351
352 hung_task_check_count:
353
354 The upper bound on the number of tasks that are checked.
355 This file shows up if CONFIG_DETECT_HUNG_TASK is enabled.
356
357 ==============================================================
358
359 hung_task_timeout_secs:
360
361 When a task in D state did not get scheduled
362 for more than this value report a warning.
363 This file shows up if CONFIG_DETECT_HUNG_TASK is enabled.
364
365 0: means infinite timeout - no checking done.
366 Possible values to set are in range {0..LONG_MAX/HZ}.
367
368 ==============================================================
369
370 hung_task_check_interval_secs:
371
372 Hung task check interval. If hung task checking is enabled
373 (see hung_task_timeout_secs), the check is done every
374 hung_task_check_interval_secs seconds.
375 This file shows up if CONFIG_DETECT_HUNG_TASK is enabled.
376
377 0 (default): means use hung_task_timeout_secs as checking interval.
378 Possible values to set are in range {0..LONG_MAX/HZ}.
379
380 ==============================================================
381
382 hung_task_warnings:
383
384 The maximum number of warnings to report. During a check interval
385 if a hung task is detected, this value is decreased by 1.
386 When this value reaches 0, no more warnings will be reported.
387 This file shows up if CONFIG_DETECT_HUNG_TASK is enabled.
388
389 -1: report an infinite number of warnings.
390
391 ==============================================================
392
393 hyperv_record_panic_msg:
394
395 Controls whether the panic kmsg data should be reported to Hyper-V.
396
397 0: do not report panic kmsg data.
398
399 1: report the panic kmsg data. This is the default behavior.
400
401 ==============================================================
402
403 kexec_load_disabled:
404
405 A toggle indicating if the kexec_load syscall has been disabled. This
406 value defaults to 0 (false: kexec_load enabled), but can be set to 1
407 (true: kexec_load disabled). Once true, kexec can no longer be used, and
408 the toggle cannot be set back to false. This allows a kexec image to be
409 loaded before disabling the syscall, allowing a system to set up (and
410 later use) an image without it being altered. Generally used together
411 with the "modules_disabled" sysctl.
412
413 ==============================================================
414
415 kptr_restrict:
416
417 This toggle indicates whether restrictions are placed on
418 exposing kernel addresses via /proc and other interfaces.
419
420 When kptr_restrict is set to 0 (the default) the address is hashed before
421 printing. (This is the equivalent to %p.)
422
423 When kptr_restrict is set to (1), kernel pointers printed using the %pK
424 format specifier will be replaced with 0's unless the user has CAP_SYSLOG
425 and effective user and group ids are equal to the real ids. This is
426 because %pK checks are done at read() time rather than open() time, so
427 if permissions are elevated between the open() and the read() (e.g via
428 a setuid binary) then %pK will not leak kernel pointers to unprivileged
429 users. Note, this is a temporary solution only. The correct long-term
430 solution is to do the permission checks at open() time. Consider removing
431 world read permissions from files that use %pK, and using dmesg_restrict
432 to protect against uses of %pK in dmesg(8) if leaking kernel pointer
433 values to unprivileged users is a concern.
434
435 When kptr_restrict is set to (2), kernel pointers printed using
436 %pK will be replaced with 0's regardless of privileges.
437
438 ==============================================================
439
440 l2cr: (PPC only)
441
442 This flag controls the L2 cache of G3 processor boards. If
443 0, the cache is disabled. Enabled if nonzero.
444
445 ==============================================================
446
447 modules_disabled:
448
449 A toggle value indicating if modules are allowed to be loaded
450 in an otherwise modular kernel.  This toggle defaults to off
451 (0), but can be set true (1).  Once true, modules can be
452 neither loaded nor unloaded, and the toggle cannot be set back
453 to false.  Generally used with the "kexec_load_disabled" toggle.
454
455 ==============================================================
456
457 msg_next_id, sem_next_id, and shm_next_id:
458
459 These three toggles allows to specify desired id for next allocated IPC
460 object: message, semaphore or shared memory respectively.
461
462 By default they are equal to -1, which means generic allocation logic.
463 Possible values to set are in range {0..INT_MAX}.
464
465 Notes:
466 1) kernel doesn't guarantee, that new object will have desired id. So,
467 it's up to userspace, how to handle an object with "wrong" id.
468 2) Toggle with non-default value will be set back to -1 by kernel after
469 successful IPC object allocation. If an IPC object allocation syscall
470 fails, it is undefined if the value remains unmodified or is reset to -1.
471
472 ==============================================================
473
474 nmi_watchdog:
475
476 This parameter can be used to control the NMI watchdog
477 (i.e. the hard lockup detector) on x86 systems.
478
479    0 - disable the hard lockup detector
480    1 - enable the hard lockup detector
481
482 The hard lockup detector monitors each CPU for its ability to respond to
483 timer interrupts. The mechanism utilizes CPU performance counter registers
484 that are programmed to generate Non-Maskable Interrupts (NMIs) periodically
485 while a CPU is busy. Hence, the alternative name 'NMI watchdog'.
486
487 The NMI watchdog is disabled by default if the kernel is running as a guest
488 in a KVM virtual machine. This default can be overridden by adding
489
490    nmi_watchdog=1
491
492 to the guest kernel command line (see Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.rst).
493
494 ==============================================================
495
496 numa_balancing
497
498 Enables/disables automatic page fault based NUMA memory
499 balancing. Memory is moved automatically to nodes
500 that access it often.
501
502 Enables/disables automatic NUMA memory balancing. On NUMA machines, there
503 is a performance penalty if remote memory is accessed by a CPU. When this
504 feature is enabled the kernel samples what task thread is accessing memory
505 by periodically unmapping pages and later trapping a page fault. At the
506 time of the page fault, it is determined if the data being accessed should
507 be migrated to a local memory node.
508
509 The unmapping of pages and trapping faults incur additional overhead that
510 ideally is offset by improved memory locality but there is no universal
511 guarantee. If the target workload is already bound to NUMA nodes then this
512 feature should be disabled. Otherwise, if the system overhead from the
513 feature is too high then the rate the kernel samples for NUMA hinting
514 faults may be controlled by the numa_balancing_scan_period_min_ms,
515 numa_balancing_scan_delay_ms, numa_balancing_scan_period_max_ms,
516 numa_balancing_scan_size_mb, and numa_balancing_settle_count sysctls.
517
518 ==============================================================
519
520 numa_balancing_scan_period_min_ms, numa_balancing_scan_delay_ms,
521 numa_balancing_scan_period_max_ms, numa_balancing_scan_size_mb
522
523 Automatic NUMA balancing scans tasks address space and unmaps pages to
524 detect if pages are properly placed or if the data should be migrated to a
525 memory node local to where the task is running.  Every "scan delay" the task
526 scans the next "scan size" number of pages in its address space. When the
527 end of the address space is reached the scanner restarts from the beginning.
528
529 In combination, the "scan delay" and "scan size" determine the scan rate.
530 When "scan delay" decreases, the scan rate increases.  The scan delay and
531 hence the scan rate of every task is adaptive and depends on historical
532 behaviour. If pages are properly placed then the scan delay increases,
533 otherwise the scan delay decreases.  The "scan size" is not adaptive but
534 the higher the "scan size", the higher the scan rate.
535
536 Higher scan rates incur higher system overhead as page faults must be
537 trapped and potentially data must be migrated. However, the higher the scan
538 rate, the more quickly a tasks memory is migrated to a local node if the
539 workload pattern changes and minimises performance impact due to remote
540 memory accesses. These sysctls control the thresholds for scan delays and
541 the number of pages scanned.
542
543 numa_balancing_scan_period_min_ms is the minimum time in milliseconds to
544 scan a tasks virtual memory. It effectively controls the maximum scanning
545 rate for each task.
546
547 numa_balancing_scan_delay_ms is the starting "scan delay" used for a task
548 when it initially forks.
549
550 numa_balancing_scan_period_max_ms is the maximum time in milliseconds to
551 scan a tasks virtual memory. It effectively controls the minimum scanning
552 rate for each task.
553
554 numa_balancing_scan_size_mb is how many megabytes worth of pages are
555 scanned for a given scan.
556
557 ==============================================================
558
559 osrelease, ostype & version:
560
561 # cat osrelease
562 2.1.88
563 # cat ostype
564 Linux
565 # cat version
566 #5 Wed Feb 25 21:49:24 MET 1998
567
568 The files osrelease and ostype should be clear enough. Version
569 needs a little more clarification however. The '#5' means that
570 this is the fifth kernel built from this source base and the
571 date behind it indicates the time the kernel was built.
572 The only way to tune these values is to rebuild the kernel :-)
573
574 ==============================================================
575
576 overflowgid & overflowuid:
577
578 if your architecture did not always support 32-bit UIDs (i.e. arm,
579 i386, m68k, sh, and sparc32), a fixed UID and GID will be returned to
580 applications that use the old 16-bit UID/GID system calls, if the
581 actual UID or GID would exceed 65535.
582
583 These sysctls allow you to change the value of the fixed UID and GID.
584 The default is 65534.
585
586 ==============================================================
587
588 panic:
589
590 The value in this file represents the number of seconds the kernel
591 waits before rebooting on a panic. When you use the software watchdog,
592 the recommended setting is 60.
593
594 ==============================================================
595
596 panic_on_io_nmi:
597
598 Controls the kernel's behavior when a CPU receives an NMI caused by
599 an IO error.
600
601 0: try to continue operation (default)
602
603 1: panic immediately. The IO error triggered an NMI. This indicates a
604    serious system condition which could result in IO data corruption.
605    Rather than continuing, panicking might be a better choice. Some
606    servers issue this sort of NMI when the dump button is pushed,
607    and you can use this option to take a crash dump.
608
609 ==============================================================
610
611 panic_on_oops:
612
613 Controls the kernel's behaviour when an oops or BUG is encountered.
614
615 0: try to continue operation
616
617 1: panic immediately.  If the `panic' sysctl is also non-zero then the
618    machine will be rebooted.
619
620 ==============================================================
621
622 panic_on_stackoverflow:
623
624 Controls the kernel's behavior when detecting the overflows of
625 kernel, IRQ and exception stacks except a user stack.
626 This file shows up if CONFIG_DEBUG_STACKOVERFLOW is enabled.
627
628 0: try to continue operation.
629
630 1: panic immediately.
631
632 ==============================================================
633
634 panic_on_unrecovered_nmi:
635
636 The default Linux behaviour on an NMI of either memory or unknown is
637 to continue operation. For many environments such as scientific
638 computing it is preferable that the box is taken out and the error
639 dealt with than an uncorrected parity/ECC error get propagated.
640
641 A small number of systems do generate NMI's for bizarre random reasons
642 such as power management so the default is off. That sysctl works like
643 the existing panic controls already in that directory.
644
645 ==============================================================
646
647 panic_on_warn:
648
649 Calls panic() in the WARN() path when set to 1.  This is useful to avoid
650 a kernel rebuild when attempting to kdump at the location of a WARN().
651
652 0: only WARN(), default behaviour.
653
654 1: call panic() after printing out WARN() location.
655
656 ==============================================================
657
658 panic_print:
659
660 Bitmask for printing system info when panic happens. User can chose
661 combination of the following bits:
662
663 bit 0: print all tasks info
664 bit 1: print system memory info
665 bit 2: print timer info
666 bit 3: print locks info if CONFIG_LOCKDEP is on
667 bit 4: print ftrace buffer
668
669 So for example to print tasks and memory info on panic, user can:
670   echo 3 > /proc/sys/kernel/panic_print
671
672 ==============================================================
673
674 panic_on_rcu_stall:
675
676 When set to 1, calls panic() after RCU stall detection messages. This
677 is useful to define the root cause of RCU stalls using a vmcore.
678
679 0: do not panic() when RCU stall takes place, default behavior.
680
681 1: panic() after printing RCU stall messages.
682
683 ==============================================================
684
685 perf_cpu_time_max_percent:
686
687 Hints to the kernel how much CPU time it should be allowed to
688 use to handle perf sampling events.  If the perf subsystem
689 is informed that its samples are exceeding this limit, it
690 will drop its sampling frequency to attempt to reduce its CPU
691 usage.
692
693 Some perf sampling happens in NMIs.  If these samples
694 unexpectedly take too long to execute, the NMIs can become
695 stacked up next to each other so much that nothing else is
696 allowed to execute.
697
698 0: disable the mechanism.  Do not monitor or correct perf's
699    sampling rate no matter how CPU time it takes.
700
701 1-100: attempt to throttle perf's sample rate to this
702    percentage of CPU.  Note: the kernel calculates an
703    "expected" length of each sample event.  100 here means
704    100% of that expected length.  Even if this is set to
705    100, you may still see sample throttling if this
706    length is exceeded.  Set to 0 if you truly do not care
707    how much CPU is consumed.
708
709 ==============================================================
710
711 perf_event_paranoid:
712
713 Controls use of the performance events system by unprivileged
714 users (without CAP_SYS_ADMIN).  The default value is 2.
715
716  -1: Allow use of (almost) all events by all users
717      Ignore mlock limit after perf_event_mlock_kb without CAP_IPC_LOCK
718 >=0: Disallow ftrace function tracepoint by users without CAP_SYS_ADMIN
719      Disallow raw tracepoint access by users without CAP_SYS_ADMIN
720 >=1: Disallow CPU event access by users without CAP_SYS_ADMIN
721 >=2: Disallow kernel profiling by users without CAP_SYS_ADMIN
722
723 ==============================================================
724
725 perf_event_max_stack:
726
727 Controls maximum number of stack frames to copy for (attr.sample_type &
728 PERF_SAMPLE_CALLCHAIN) configured events, for instance, when using
729 'perf record -g' or 'perf trace --call-graph fp'.
730
731 This can only be done when no events are in use that have callchains
732 enabled, otherwise writing to this file will return -EBUSY.
733
734 The default value is 127.
735
736 ==============================================================
737
738 perf_event_mlock_kb:
739
740 Control size of per-cpu ring buffer not counted agains mlock limit.
741
742 The default value is 512 + 1 page
743
744 ==============================================================
745
746 perf_event_max_contexts_per_stack:
747
748 Controls maximum number of stack frame context entries for
749 (attr.sample_type & PERF_SAMPLE_CALLCHAIN) configured events, for
750 instance, when using 'perf record -g' or 'perf trace --call-graph fp'.
751
752 This can only be done when no events are in use that have callchains
753 enabled, otherwise writing to this file will return -EBUSY.
754
755 The default value is 8.
756
757 ==============================================================
758
759 pid_max:
760
761 PID allocation wrap value.  When the kernel's next PID value
762 reaches this value, it wraps back to a minimum PID value.
763 PIDs of value pid_max or larger are not allocated.
764
765 ==============================================================
766
767 ns_last_pid:
768
769 The last pid allocated in the current (the one task using this sysctl
770 lives in) pid namespace. When selecting a pid for a next task on fork
771 kernel tries to allocate a number starting from this one.
772
773 ==============================================================
774
775 powersave-nap: (PPC only)
776
777 If set, Linux-PPC will use the 'nap' mode of powersaving,
778 otherwise the 'doze' mode will be used.
779
780 ==============================================================
781
782 printk:
783
784 The four values in printk denote: console_loglevel,
785 default_message_loglevel, minimum_console_loglevel and
786 default_console_loglevel respectively.
787
788 These values influence printk() behavior when printing or
789 logging error messages. See 'man 2 syslog' for more info on
790 the different loglevels.
791
792 - console_loglevel: messages with a higher priority than
793   this will be printed to the console
794 - default_message_loglevel: messages without an explicit priority
795   will be printed with this priority
796 - minimum_console_loglevel: minimum (highest) value to which
797   console_loglevel can be set
798 - default_console_loglevel: default value for console_loglevel
799
800 ==============================================================
801
802 printk_delay:
803
804 Delay each printk message in printk_delay milliseconds
805
806 Value from 0 - 10000 is allowed.
807
808 ==============================================================
809
810 printk_ratelimit:
811
812 Some warning messages are rate limited. printk_ratelimit specifies
813 the minimum length of time between these messages (in jiffies), by
814 default we allow one every 5 seconds.
815
816 A value of 0 will disable rate limiting.
817
818 ==============================================================
819
820 printk_ratelimit_burst:
821
822 While long term we enforce one message per printk_ratelimit
823 seconds, we do allow a burst of messages to pass through.
824 printk_ratelimit_burst specifies the number of messages we can
825 send before ratelimiting kicks in.
826
827 ==============================================================
828
829 printk_devkmsg:
830
831 Control the logging to /dev/kmsg from userspace:
832
833 ratelimit: default, ratelimited
834 on: unlimited logging to /dev/kmsg from userspace
835 off: logging to /dev/kmsg disabled
836
837 The kernel command line parameter printk.devkmsg= overrides this and is
838 a one-time setting until next reboot: once set, it cannot be changed by
839 this sysctl interface anymore.
840
841 ==============================================================
842
843 randomize_va_space:
844
845 This option can be used to select the type of process address
846 space randomization that is used in the system, for architectures
847 that support this feature.
848
849 0 - Turn the process address space randomization off.  This is the
850     default for architectures that do not support this feature anyways,
851     and kernels that are booted with the "norandmaps" parameter.
852
853 1 - Make the addresses of mmap base, stack and VDSO page randomized.
854     This, among other things, implies that shared libraries will be
855     loaded to random addresses.  Also for PIE-linked binaries, the
856     location of code start is randomized.  This is the default if the
857     CONFIG_COMPAT_BRK option is enabled.
858
859 2 - Additionally enable heap randomization.  This is the default if
860     CONFIG_COMPAT_BRK is disabled.
861
862     There are a few legacy applications out there (such as some ancient
863     versions of libc.so.5 from 1996) that assume that brk area starts
864     just after the end of the code+bss.  These applications break when
865     start of the brk area is randomized.  There are however no known
866     non-legacy applications that would be broken this way, so for most
867     systems it is safe to choose full randomization.
868
869     Systems with ancient and/or broken binaries should be configured
870     with CONFIG_COMPAT_BRK enabled, which excludes the heap from process
871     address space randomization.
872
873 ==============================================================
874
875 reboot-cmd: (Sparc only)
876
877 ??? This seems to be a way to give an argument to the Sparc
878 ROM/Flash boot loader. Maybe to tell it what to do after
879 rebooting. ???
880
881 ==============================================================
882
883 rtsig-max & rtsig-nr:
884
885 The file rtsig-max can be used to tune the maximum number
886 of POSIX realtime (queued) signals that can be outstanding
887 in the system.
888
889 rtsig-nr shows the number of RT signals currently queued.
890
891 ==============================================================
892
893 sched_schedstats:
894
895 Enables/disables scheduler statistics. Enabling this feature
896 incurs a small amount of overhead in the scheduler but is
897 useful for debugging and performance tuning.
898
899 ==============================================================
900
901 sg-big-buff:
902
903 This file shows the size of the generic SCSI (sg) buffer.
904 You can't tune it just yet, but you could change it on
905 compile time by editing include/scsi/sg.h and changing
906 the value of SG_BIG_BUFF.
907
908 There shouldn't be any reason to change this value. If
909 you can come up with one, you probably know what you
910 are doing anyway :)
911
912 ==============================================================
913
914 shmall:
915
916 This parameter sets the total amount of shared memory pages that
917 can be used system wide. Hence, SHMALL should always be at least
918 ceil(shmmax/PAGE_SIZE).
919
920 If you are not sure what the default PAGE_SIZE is on your Linux
921 system, you can run the following command:
922
923 # getconf PAGE_SIZE
924
925 ==============================================================
926
927 shmmax:
928
929 This value can be used to query and set the run time limit
930 on the maximum shared memory segment size that can be created.
931 Shared memory segments up to 1Gb are now supported in the
932 kernel.  This value defaults to SHMMAX.
933
934 ==============================================================
935
936 shm_rmid_forced:
937
938 Linux lets you set resource limits, including how much memory one
939 process can consume, via setrlimit(2).  Unfortunately, shared memory
940 segments are allowed to exist without association with any process, and
941 thus might not be counted against any resource limits.  If enabled,
942 shared memory segments are automatically destroyed when their attach
943 count becomes zero after a detach or a process termination.  It will
944 also destroy segments that were created, but never attached to, on exit
945 from the process.  The only use left for IPC_RMID is to immediately
946 destroy an unattached segment.  Of course, this breaks the way things are
947 defined, so some applications might stop working.  Note that this
948 feature will do you no good unless you also configure your resource
949 limits (in particular, RLIMIT_AS and RLIMIT_NPROC).  Most systems don't
950 need this.
951
952 Note that if you change this from 0 to 1, already created segments
953 without users and with a dead originative process will be destroyed.
954
955 ==============================================================
956
957 sysctl_writes_strict:
958
959 Control how file position affects the behavior of updating sysctl values
960 via the /proc/sys interface:
961
962   -1 - Legacy per-write sysctl value handling, with no printk warnings.
963        Each write syscall must fully contain the sysctl value to be
964        written, and multiple writes on the same sysctl file descriptor
965        will rewrite the sysctl value, regardless of file position.
966    0 - Same behavior as above, but warn about processes that perform writes
967        to a sysctl file descriptor when the file position is not 0.
968    1 - (default) Respect file position when writing sysctl strings. Multiple
969        writes will append to the sysctl value buffer. Anything past the max
970        length of the sysctl value buffer will be ignored. Writes to numeric
971        sysctl entries must always be at file position 0 and the value must
972        be fully contained in the buffer sent in the write syscall.
973
974 ==============================================================
975
976 softlockup_all_cpu_backtrace:
977
978 This value controls the soft lockup detector thread's behavior
979 when a soft lockup condition is detected as to whether or not
980 to gather further debug information. If enabled, each cpu will
981 be issued an NMI and instructed to capture stack trace.
982
983 This feature is only applicable for architectures which support
984 NMI.
985
986 0: do nothing. This is the default behavior.
987
988 1: on detection capture more debug information.
989
990 ==============================================================
991
992 soft_watchdog
993
994 This parameter can be used to control the soft lockup detector.
995
996    0 - disable the soft lockup detector
997    1 - enable the soft lockup detector
998
999 The soft lockup detector monitors CPUs for threads that are hogging the CPUs
1000 without rescheduling voluntarily, and thus prevent the 'watchdog/N' threads
1001 from running. The mechanism depends on the CPUs ability to respond to timer
1002 interrupts which are needed for the 'watchdog/N' threads to be woken up by
1003 the watchdog timer function, otherwise the NMI watchdog - if enabled - can
1004 detect a hard lockup condition.
1005
1006 ==============================================================
1007
1008 stack_erasing
1009
1010 This parameter can be used to control kernel stack erasing at the end
1011 of syscalls for kernels built with CONFIG_GCC_PLUGIN_STACKLEAK.
1012
1013 That erasing reduces the information which kernel stack leak bugs
1014 can reveal and blocks some uninitialized stack variable attacks.
1015 The tradeoff is the performance impact: on a single CPU system kernel
1016 compilation sees a 1% slowdown, other systems and workloads may vary.
1017
1018   0: kernel stack erasing is disabled, STACKLEAK_METRICS are not updated.
1019
1020   1: kernel stack erasing is enabled (default), it is performed before
1021      returning to the userspace at the end of syscalls.
1022 ==============================================================
1023
1024 tainted
1025
1026 Non-zero if the kernel has been tainted. Numeric values, which can be
1027 ORed together. The letters are seen in "Tainted" line of Oops reports.
1028
1029      1 (P): proprietary module was loaded
1030      2 (F): module was force loaded
1031      4 (S): SMP kernel oops on an officially SMP incapable processor
1032      8 (R): module was force unloaded
1033     16 (M): processor reported a Machine Check Exception (MCE)
1034     32 (B): bad page referenced or some unexpected page flags
1035     64 (U): taint requested by userspace application
1036    128 (D): kernel died recently, i.e. there was an OOPS or BUG
1037    256 (A): an ACPI table was overridden by user
1038    512 (W): kernel issued warning
1039   1024 (C): staging driver was loaded
1040   2048 (I): workaround for bug in platform firmware applied
1041   4096 (O): externally-built ("out-of-tree") module was loaded
1042   8192 (E): unsigned module was loaded
1043  16384 (L): soft lockup occurred
1044  32768 (K): kernel has been live patched
1045  65536 (X): Auxiliary taint, defined and used by for distros
1046 131072 (T): The kernel was built with the struct randomization plugin
1047
1048 See Documentation/admin-guide/tainted-kernels.rst for more information.
1049
1050 ==============================================================
1051
1052 threads-max
1053
1054 This value controls the maximum number of threads that can be created
1055 using fork().
1056
1057 During initialization the kernel sets this value such that even if the
1058 maximum number of threads is created, the thread structures occupy only
1059 a part (1/8th) of the available RAM pages.
1060
1061 The minimum value that can be written to threads-max is 20.
1062 The maximum value that can be written to threads-max is given by the
1063 constant FUTEX_TID_MASK (0x3fffffff).
1064 If a value outside of this range is written to threads-max an error
1065 EINVAL occurs.
1066
1067 The value written is checked against the available RAM pages. If the
1068 thread structures would occupy too much (more than 1/8th) of the
1069 available RAM pages threads-max is reduced accordingly.
1070
1071 ==============================================================
1072
1073 unknown_nmi_panic:
1074
1075 The value in this file affects behavior of handling NMI. When the
1076 value is non-zero, unknown NMI is trapped and then panic occurs. At
1077 that time, kernel debugging information is displayed on console.
1078
1079 NMI switch that most IA32 servers have fires unknown NMI up, for
1080 example.  If a system hangs up, try pressing the NMI switch.
1081
1082 ==============================================================
1083
1084 watchdog:
1085
1086 This parameter can be used to disable or enable the soft lockup detector
1087 _and_ the NMI watchdog (i.e. the hard lockup detector) at the same time.
1088
1089    0 - disable both lockup detectors
1090    1 - enable both lockup detectors
1091
1092 The soft lockup detector and the NMI watchdog can also be disabled or
1093 enabled individually, using the soft_watchdog and nmi_watchdog parameters.
1094 If the watchdog parameter is read, for example by executing
1095
1096    cat /proc/sys/kernel/watchdog
1097
1098 the output of this command (0 or 1) shows the logical OR of soft_watchdog
1099 and nmi_watchdog.
1100
1101 ==============================================================
1102
1103 watchdog_cpumask:
1104
1105 This value can be used to control on which cpus the watchdog may run.
1106 The default cpumask is all possible cores, but if NO_HZ_FULL is
1107 enabled in the kernel config, and cores are specified with the
1108 nohz_full= boot argument, those cores are excluded by default.
1109 Offline cores can be included in this mask, and if the core is later
1110 brought online, the watchdog will be started based on the mask value.
1111
1112 Typically this value would only be touched in the nohz_full case
1113 to re-enable cores that by default were not running the watchdog,
1114 if a kernel lockup was suspected on those cores.
1115
1116 The argument value is the standard cpulist format for cpumasks,
1117 so for example to enable the watchdog on cores 0, 2, 3, and 4 you
1118 might say:
1119
1120   echo 0,2-4 > /proc/sys/kernel/watchdog_cpumask
1121
1122 ==============================================================
1123
1124 watchdog_thresh:
1125
1126 This value can be used to control the frequency of hrtimer and NMI
1127 events and the soft and hard lockup thresholds. The default threshold
1128 is 10 seconds.
1129
1130 The softlockup threshold is (2 * watchdog_thresh). Setting this
1131 tunable to zero will disable lockup detection altogether.
1132
1133 ==============================================================