Merge tag 'bitmain-soc-5.2' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mani...
[sfrench/cifs-2.6.git] / Documentation / acpi / gpio-properties.txt
1 _DSD Device Properties Related to GPIO
2 --------------------------------------
3
4 With the release of ACPI 5.1, the _DSD configuration object finally
5 allows names to be given to GPIOs (and other things as well) returned
6 by _CRS.  Previously, we were only able to use an integer index to find
7 the corresponding GPIO, which is pretty error prone (it depends on
8 the _CRS output ordering, for example).
9
10 With _DSD we can now query GPIOs using a name instead of an integer
11 index, like the ASL example below shows:
12
13   // Bluetooth device with reset and shutdown GPIOs
14   Device (BTH)
15   {
16       Name (_HID, ...)
17
18       Name (_CRS, ResourceTemplate ()
19       {
20           GpioIo (Exclusive, PullUp, 0, 0, IoRestrictionInputOnly,
21                   "\\_SB.GPO0", 0, ResourceConsumer) {15}
22           GpioIo (Exclusive, PullUp, 0, 0, IoRestrictionInputOnly,
23                   "\\_SB.GPO0", 0, ResourceConsumer) {27, 31}
24       })
25
26       Name (_DSD, Package ()
27       {
28           ToUUID("daffd814-6eba-4d8c-8a91-bc9bbf4aa301"),
29           Package ()
30           {
31               Package () {"reset-gpios", Package() {^BTH, 1, 1, 0 }},
32               Package () {"shutdown-gpios", Package() {^BTH, 0, 0, 0 }},
33           }
34       })
35   }
36
37 The format of the supported GPIO property is:
38
39   Package () { "name", Package () { ref, index, pin, active_low }}
40
41   ref - The device that has _CRS containing GpioIo()/GpioInt() resources,
42         typically this is the device itself (BTH in our case).
43   index - Index of the GpioIo()/GpioInt() resource in _CRS starting from zero.
44   pin - Pin in the GpioIo()/GpioInt() resource. Typically this is zero.
45   active_low - If 1 the GPIO is marked as active_low.
46
47 Since ACPI GpioIo() resource does not have a field saying whether it is
48 active low or high, the "active_low" argument can be used here.  Setting
49 it to 1 marks the GPIO as active low.
50
51 In our Bluetooth example the "reset-gpios" refers to the second GpioIo()
52 resource, second pin in that resource with the GPIO number of 31.
53
54 It is possible to leave holes in the array of GPIOs. This is useful in
55 cases like with SPI host controllers where some chip selects may be
56 implemented as GPIOs and some as native signals. For example a SPI host
57 controller can have chip selects 0 and 2 implemented as GPIOs and 1 as
58 native:
59
60   Package () {
61       "cs-gpios",
62       Package () {
63           ^GPIO, 19, 0, 0, // chip select 0: GPIO
64           0,               // chip select 1: native signal
65           ^GPIO, 20, 0, 0, // chip select 2: GPIO
66       }
67   }
68
69 Other supported properties
70 --------------------------
71
72 Following Device Tree compatible device properties are also supported by
73 _DSD device properties for GPIO controllers:
74
75 - gpio-hog
76 - output-high
77 - output-low
78 - input
79 - line-name
80
81 Example:
82
83   Name (_DSD, Package () {
84       // _DSD Hierarchical Properties Extension UUID
85       ToUUID("dbb8e3e6-5886-4ba6-8795-1319f52a966b"),
86       Package () {
87           Package () {"hog-gpio8", "G8PU"}
88       }
89   })
90
91   Name (G8PU, Package () {
92       ToUUID("daffd814-6eba-4d8c-8a91-bc9bbf4aa301"),
93       Package () {
94           Package () {"gpio-hog", 1},
95           Package () {"gpios", Package () {8, 0}},
96           Package () {"output-high", 1},
97           Package () {"line-name", "gpio8-pullup"},
98       }
99   })
100
101 - gpio-line-names
102
103 Example:
104
105   Package () {
106       "gpio-line-names",
107       Package () {
108           "SPI0_CS_N", "EXP2_INT", "MUX6_IO", "UART0_RXD", "MUX7_IO",
109           "LVL_C_A1", "MUX0_IO", "SPI1_MISO"
110       }
111   }
112
113 See Documentation/devicetree/bindings/gpio/gpio.txt for more information
114 about these properties.
115
116 ACPI GPIO Mappings Provided by Drivers
117 --------------------------------------
118
119 There are systems in which the ACPI tables do not contain _DSD but provide _CRS
120 with GpioIo()/GpioInt() resources and device drivers still need to work with
121 them.
122
123 In those cases ACPI device identification objects, _HID, _CID, _CLS, _SUB, _HRV,
124 available to the driver can be used to identify the device and that is supposed
125 to be sufficient to determine the meaning and purpose of all of the GPIO lines
126 listed by the GpioIo()/GpioInt() resources returned by _CRS.  In other words,
127 the driver is supposed to know what to use the GpioIo()/GpioInt() resources for
128 once it has identified the device.  Having done that, it can simply assign names
129 to the GPIO lines it is going to use and provide the GPIO subsystem with a
130 mapping between those names and the ACPI GPIO resources corresponding to them.
131
132 To do that, the driver needs to define a mapping table as a NULL-terminated
133 array of struct acpi_gpio_mapping objects that each contain a name, a pointer
134 to an array of line data (struct acpi_gpio_params) objects and the size of that
135 array.  Each struct acpi_gpio_params object consists of three fields,
136 crs_entry_index, line_index, active_low, representing the index of the target
137 GpioIo()/GpioInt() resource in _CRS starting from zero, the index of the target
138 line in that resource starting from zero, and the active-low flag for that line,
139 respectively, in analogy with the _DSD GPIO property format specified above.
140
141 For the example Bluetooth device discussed previously the data structures in
142 question would look like this:
143
144 static const struct acpi_gpio_params reset_gpio = { 1, 1, false };
145 static const struct acpi_gpio_params shutdown_gpio = { 0, 0, false };
146
147 static const struct acpi_gpio_mapping bluetooth_acpi_gpios[] = {
148   { "reset-gpios", &reset_gpio, 1 },
149   { "shutdown-gpios", &shutdown_gpio, 1 },
150   { },
151 };
152
153 Next, the mapping table needs to be passed as the second argument to
154 acpi_dev_add_driver_gpios() that will register it with the ACPI device object
155 pointed to by its first argument.  That should be done in the driver's .probe()
156 routine.  On removal, the driver should unregister its GPIO mapping table by
157 calling acpi_dev_remove_driver_gpios() on the ACPI device object where that
158 table was previously registered.
159
160 Using the _CRS fallback
161 -----------------------
162
163 If a device does not have _DSD or the driver does not create ACPI GPIO
164 mapping, the Linux GPIO framework refuses to return any GPIOs. This is
165 because the driver does not know what it actually gets. For example if we
166 have a device like below:
167
168   Device (BTH)
169   {
170       Name (_HID, ...)
171
172       Name (_CRS, ResourceTemplate () {
173           GpioIo (Exclusive, PullNone, 0, 0, IoRestrictionNone,
174                   "\\_SB.GPO0", 0, ResourceConsumer) {15}
175           GpioIo (Exclusive, PullNone, 0, 0, IoRestrictionNone,
176                   "\\_SB.GPO0", 0, ResourceConsumer) {27}
177       })
178   }
179
180 The driver might expect to get the right GPIO when it does:
181
182   desc = gpiod_get(dev, "reset", GPIOD_OUT_LOW);
183
184 but since there is no way to know the mapping between "reset" and
185 the GpioIo() in _CRS desc will hold ERR_PTR(-ENOENT).
186
187 The driver author can solve this by passing the mapping explictly
188 (the recommended way and documented in the above chapter).
189
190 The ACPI GPIO mapping tables should not contaminate drivers that are not
191 knowing about which exact device they are servicing on. It implies that
192 the ACPI GPIO mapping tables are hardly linked to ACPI ID and certain
193 objects, as listed in the above chapter, of the device in question.
194
195 Getting GPIO descriptor
196 -----------------------
197
198 There are two main approaches to get GPIO resource from ACPI:
199         desc = gpiod_get(dev, connection_id, flags);
200         desc = gpiod_get_index(dev, connection_id, index, flags);
201
202 We may consider two different cases here, i.e. when connection ID is
203 provided and otherwise.
204
205 Case 1:
206         desc = gpiod_get(dev, "non-null-connection-id", flags);
207         desc = gpiod_get_index(dev, "non-null-connection-id", index, flags);
208
209 Case 2:
210         desc = gpiod_get(dev, NULL, flags);
211         desc = gpiod_get_index(dev, NULL, index, flags);
212
213 Case 1 assumes that corresponding ACPI device description must have
214 defined device properties and will prevent to getting any GPIO resources
215 otherwise.
216
217 Case 2 explicitly tells GPIO core to look for resources in _CRS.
218
219 Be aware that gpiod_get_index() in cases 1 and 2, assuming that there
220 are two versions of ACPI device description provided and no mapping is
221 present in the driver, will return different resources. That's why a
222 certain driver has to handle them carefully as explained in previous
223 chapter.