Preparing for release of 3.0.0pre7
[rsync.git] / rsyncd.conf.yo
1 mailto(rsync-bugs@samba.org)
2 manpage(rsyncd.conf)(5)(16 Dec 2007)()()
3 manpagename(rsyncd.conf)(configuration file for rsync in daemon mode)
4 manpagesynopsis()
5
6 rsyncd.conf
7
8 manpagedescription()
9
10 The rsyncd.conf file is the runtime configuration file for rsync when
11 run as an rsync daemon.
12
13 The rsyncd.conf file controls authentication, access, logging and
14 available modules.
15
16 manpagesection(FILE FORMAT)
17
18 The file consists of modules and parameters. A module begins with the
19 name of the module in square brackets and continues until the next
20 module begins. Modules contain parameters of the form "name = value".
21
22 The file is line-based -- that is, each newline-terminated line represents
23 either a comment, a module name or a parameter.
24
25 Only the first equals sign in a parameter is significant. Whitespace before
26 or after the first equals sign is discarded. Leading, trailing and internal
27 whitespace in module and parameter names is irrelevant. Leading and
28 trailing whitespace in a parameter value is discarded. Internal whitespace
29 within a parameter value is retained verbatim.
30
31 Any line beginning with a hash (#) is ignored, as are lines containing
32 only whitespace.
33
34 Any line ending in a \ is "continued" on the next line in the
35 customary UNIX fashion.
36
37 The values following the equals sign in parameters are all either a string
38 (no quotes needed) or a boolean, which may be given as yes/no, 0/1 or
39 true/false. Case is not significant in boolean values, but is preserved
40 in string values.
41
42 manpagesection(LAUNCHING THE RSYNC DAEMON)
43
44 The rsync daemon is launched by specifying the bf(--daemon) option to
45 rsync.
46
47 The daemon must run with root privileges if you wish to use chroot, to
48 bind to a port numbered under 1024 (as is the default 873), or to set
49 file ownership.  Otherwise, it must just have permission to read and
50 write the appropriate data, log, and lock files.
51
52 You can launch it either via inetd, as a stand-alone daemon, or from
53 an rsync client via a remote shell.  If run as a stand-alone daemon then
54 just run the command "bf(rsync --daemon)" from a suitable startup script.
55
56 When run via inetd you should add a line like this to /etc/services:
57
58 verb(  rsync           873/tcp)
59
60 and a single line something like this to /etc/inetd.conf:
61
62 verb(  rsync   stream  tcp     nowait  root   /usr/bin/rsync rsyncd --daemon)
63
64 Replace "/usr/bin/rsync" with the path to where you have rsync installed on
65 your system.  You will then need to send inetd a HUP signal to tell it to
66 reread its config file.
67
68 Note that you should bf(not) send the rsync daemon a HUP signal to force
69 it to reread the tt(rsyncd.conf) file. The file is re-read on each client
70 connection.
71
72 manpagesection(GLOBAL OPTIONS)
73
74 The first parameters in the file (before a [module] header) are the
75 global parameters.
76
77 You may also include any module parameters in the global part of the
78 config file in which case the supplied value will override the
79 default for that parameter.
80
81 startdit()
82 dit(bf(motd file)) The "motd file" option allows you to specify a
83 "message of the day" to display to clients on each connect. This
84 usually contains site information and any legal notices. The default
85 is no motd file.
86
87 dit(bf(pid file)) The "pid file" option tells the rsync daemon to write
88 its process ID to that file.  If the file already exists, the rsync
89 daemon will abort rather than overwrite the file.
90
91 dit(bf(port)) You can override the default port the daemon will listen on
92 by specifying this value (defaults to 873).  This is ignored if the daemon
93 is being run by inetd, and is superseded by the bf(--port) command-line option.
94
95 dit(bf(address)) You can override the default IP address the daemon
96 will listen on by specifying this value.  This is ignored if the daemon is
97 being run by inetd, and is superseded by the bf(--address) command-line option.
98
99 dit(bf(socket options)) This option can provide endless fun for people
100 who like to tune their systems to the utmost degree. You can set all
101 sorts of socket options which may make transfers faster (or
102 slower!). Read the man page for the code(setsockopt()) system call for
103 details on some of the options you may be able to set. By default no
104 special socket options are set.  These settings are superseded by the
105 bf(--sockopts) command-line option.
106
107 enddit()
108
109
110 manpagesection(MODULE OPTIONS)
111
112 After the global options you should define a number of modules, each
113 module exports a directory tree as a symbolic name. Modules are
114 exported by specifying a module name in square brackets [module]
115 followed by the options for that module.
116
117 startdit()
118
119 dit(bf(comment)) The "comment" option specifies a description string
120 that is displayed next to the module name when clients obtain a list
121 of available modules. The default is no comment.
122
123 dit(bf(path)) The "path" option specifies the directory in the daemon's
124 filesystem to make available in this module.  You must specify this option
125 for each module in tt(rsyncd.conf).
126
127 dit(bf(use chroot)) If "use chroot" is true, the rsync daemon will chroot
128 to the "path" before starting the file transfer with the client.  This has
129 the advantage of extra protection against possible implementation security
130 holes, but it has the disadvantages of requiring super-user privileges,
131 of not being able to follow symbolic links that are either absolute or outside
132 of the new root path, and of complicating the preservation of usernames and groups
133 (see below).  When "use chroot" is false, rsync will: (1) munge symlinks by
134 default for security reasons (see "munge symlinks" for a way to turn this
135 off, but only if you trust your users), (2) substitute leading slashes in
136 absolute paths with the module's path (so that options such as
137 bf(--backup-dir), bf(--compare-dest), etc. interpret an absolute path as
138 rooted in the module's "path" dir), and (3) trim ".." path elements from
139 args if rsync believes they would escape the chroot.
140 The default for "use chroot" is true, and is the safer choice (especially
141 if the module is not read-only).
142
143 In order to preserve usernames and groupnames, rsync needs to be able to
144 use the standard library functions for looking up names and IDs (i.e.
145 code(getpwuid()), code(getgrgid()), code(getpwname()), and code(getgrnam())).  This means a
146 process in the chroot namespace will need to have access to the resources
147 used by these library functions (traditionally /etc/passwd and
148 /etc/group).  If these resources are not available, rsync will only be
149 able to copy the IDs, just as if the bf(--numeric-ids) option had been
150 specified.
151
152 Note that you are free to setup user/group information in the chroot area
153 differently from your normal system.  For example, you could abbreviate
154 the list of users and groups.  Also, you can protect this information from
155 being downloaded/uploaded by adding an exclude rule to the rsyncd.conf file
156 (e.g. "bf(exclude = /etc/**)").  Note that having the exclusion affect uploads
157 is a relatively new feature in rsync, so make sure your daemon is
158 at least 2.6.3 to effect this.  Also note that it is safest to exclude a
159 directory and all its contents combining the rule "/some/dir/" with the
160 rule "/some/dir/**" just to be sure that rsync will not allow deeper
161 access to some of the excluded files inside the directory (rsync tries to
162 do this automatically, but you might as well specify both to be extra
163 sure).
164
165 dit(bf(munge symlinks))  The "munge symlinks" option tells rsync to modify
166 all incoming symlinks in a way that makes them unusable but recoverable
167 (see below).  This should help protect your files from user trickery when
168 your daemon module is writable.  The default is disabled when "use chroot"
169 is on and enabled when "use chroot" is off.
170
171 If you disable this option on a daemon that is not read-only, there
172 are tricks that a user can play with uploaded symlinks to access
173 daemon-excluded items (if your module has any), and, if "use chroot"
174 is off, rsync can even be tricked into showing or changing data that
175 is outside the module's path (as access-permissions allow).
176
177 The way rsync disables the use of symlinks is to prefix each one with
178 the string "/rsyncd-munged/".  This prevents the links from being used
179 as long as that directory does not exist.  When this option is enabled,
180 rsync will refuse to run if that path is a directory or a symlink to
181 a directory.  When using the "munge symlinks" option in a chroot area,
182 you should add this path to the exclude setting for the module so that
183 the user can't try to create it.
184
185 Note:  rsync makes no attempt to verify that any pre-existing symlinks in
186 the hierarchy are as safe as you want them to be.  If you setup an rsync
187 daemon on a new area or locally add symlinks, you can manually protect your
188 symlinks from being abused by prefixing "/rsyncd-munged/" to the start of
189 every symlink's value.  There is a perl script in the support directory
190 of the source code named "munge-symlinks" that can be used to add or remove
191 this prefix from your symlinks.
192
193 When this option is disabled on a writable module and "use chroot" is off,
194 incoming symlinks will be modified to drop a leading slash and to remove ".."
195 path elements that rsync believes will allow a symlink to escape the module's
196 hierarchy.  There are tricky ways to work around this, though, so you had
197 better trust your users if you choose this combination of options.
198
199 dit(bf(max connections)) The "max connections" option allows you to
200 specify the maximum number of simultaneous connections you will allow.
201 Any clients connecting when the maximum has been reached will receive a
202 message telling them to try later.  The default is 0, which means no limit.
203 A negative value disables the module.
204 See also the "lock file" option.
205
206 dit(bf(log file)) When the "log file" option is set to a non-empty
207 string, the rsync daemon will log messages to the indicated file rather
208 than using syslog. This is particularly useful on systems (such as AIX)
209 where code(syslog()) doesn't work for chrooted programs.  The file is
210 opened before code(chroot()) is called, allowing it to be placed outside
211 the transfer.  If this value is set on a per-module basis instead of
212 globally, the global log will still contain any authorization failures
213 or config-file error messages.
214
215 If the daemon fails to open to specified file, it will fall back to
216 using syslog and output an error about the failure.  (Note that the
217 failure to open the specified log file used to be a fatal error.)
218
219 dit(bf(syslog facility)) The "syslog facility" option allows you to
220 specify the syslog facility name to use when logging messages from the
221 rsync daemon. You may use any standard syslog facility name which is
222 defined on your system. Common names are auth, authpriv, cron, daemon,
223 ftp, kern, lpr, mail, news, security, syslog, user, uucp, local0,
224 local1, local2, local3, local4, local5, local6 and local7. The default
225 is daemon.  This setting has no effect if the "log file" setting is a
226 non-empty string (either set in the per-modules settings, or inherited
227 from the global settings).
228
229 dit(bf(max verbosity)) The "max verbosity" option allows you to control
230 the maximum amount of verbose information that you'll allow the daemon to
231 generate (since the information goes into the log file). The default is 1,
232 which allows the client to request one level of verbosity.
233
234 dit(bf(lock file)) The "lock file" option specifies the file to use to
235 support the "max connections" option. The rsync daemon uses record
236 locking on this file to ensure that the max connections limit is not
237 exceeded for the modules sharing the lock file.
238 The default is tt(/var/run/rsyncd.lock).
239
240 dit(bf(read only)) The "read only" option determines whether clients
241 will be able to upload files or not. If "read only" is true then any
242 attempted uploads will fail. If "read only" is false then uploads will
243 be possible if file permissions on the daemon side allow them. The default
244 is for all modules to be read only.
245
246 dit(bf(write only)) The "write only" option determines whether clients
247 will be able to download files or not. If "write only" is true then any
248 attempted downloads will fail. If "write only" is false then downloads
249 will be possible if file permissions on the daemon side allow them.  The
250 default is for this option to be disabled.
251
252 dit(bf(list)) The "list" option determines if this module should be
253 listed when the client asks for a listing of available modules. By
254 setting this to false you can create hidden modules. The default is
255 for modules to be listable.
256
257 dit(bf(uid)) The "uid" option specifies the user name or user ID that
258 file transfers to and from that module should take place as when the daemon
259 was run as root. In combination with the "gid" option this determines what
260 file permissions are available. The default is uid -2, which is normally
261 the user "nobody".
262
263 dit(bf(gid)) The "gid" option specifies the group name or group ID that
264 file transfers to and from that module should take place as when the daemon
265 was run as root. This complements the "uid" option. The default is gid -2,
266 which is normally the group "nobody".
267
268 dit(bf(fake super)) Setting "fake super = yes" for a module causes the
269 daemon side to behave as if the bf(--fake-user) command-line option had
270 been specified.  This allows the full attributes of a file to be stored
271 without having to have the daemon actually running as root.
272
273 dit(bf(filter)) The "filter" option allows you to specify a space-separated
274 list of filter rules that the daemon will not allow to be read or written.
275 This is only superficially equivalent to the client specifying these
276 patterns with the bf(--filter) option.  Only one "filter" option may be
277 specified, but it may contain as many rules as you like, including
278 merge-file rules.  Note that per-directory merge-file rules do not provide
279 as much protection as global rules, but they can be used to make bf(--delete)
280 work better when a client downloads the daemon's files (if the per-dir
281 merge files are included in the transfer).
282
283 dit(bf(exclude)) The "exclude" option allows you to specify a
284 space-separated list of patterns that the daemon will not allow to be read
285 or written.  This is only superficially equivalent to the client
286 specifying these patterns with the bf(--exclude) option.  Only one "exclude"
287 option may be specified, but you can use "-" and "+" before patterns to
288 specify exclude/include.
289
290 Because this exclude list is not passed to the client it only applies on
291 the daemon: that is, it excludes files received by a client when receiving
292 from a daemon and files deleted on a daemon when sending to a daemon, but
293 it doesn't exclude files from being deleted on a client when receiving
294 from a daemon.
295
296 dit(bf(exclude from)) The "exclude from" option specifies a filename
297 on the daemon that contains exclude patterns, one per line.
298 This is only superficially equivalent
299 to the client specifying the bf(--exclude-from) option with an equivalent file.
300 See the "exclude" option above.
301
302 dit(bf(include)) The "include" option allows you to specify a
303 space-separated list of patterns which rsync should not exclude. This is
304 only superficially equivalent to the client specifying these patterns with
305 the bf(--include) option because it applies only on the daemon.  This is
306 useful as it allows you to build up quite complex exclude/include rules.
307 Only one "include" option may be specified, but you can use "+" and "-"
308 before patterns to switch include/exclude.  See the "exclude" option
309 above.
310
311 dit(bf(include from)) The "include from" option specifies a filename
312 on the daemon that contains include patterns, one per line. This is
313 only superficially equivalent to the client specifying the
314 bf(--include-from) option with a equivalent file.
315 See the "exclude" option above.
316
317 dit(bf(incoming chmod)) This option allows you to specify a set of
318 comma-separated chmod strings that will affect the permissions of all
319 incoming files (files that are being received by the daemon).  These
320 changes happen after all other permission calculations, and this will
321 even override destination-default and/or existing permissions when the
322 client does not specify bf(--perms).
323 See the description of the bf(--chmod) rsync option and the bf(chmod)(1)
324 manpage for information on the format of this string.
325
326 dit(bf(outgoing chmod)) This option allows you to specify a set of
327 comma-separated chmod strings that will affect the permissions of all
328 outgoing files (files that are being sent out from the daemon).  These
329 changes happen first, making the sent permissions appear to be different
330 than those stored in the filesystem itself.  For instance, you could
331 disable group write permissions on the server while having it appear to
332 be on to the clients.
333 See the description of the bf(--chmod) rsync option and the bf(chmod)(1)
334 manpage for information on the format of this string.
335
336 dit(bf(auth users)) The "auth users" option specifies a comma and
337 space-separated list of usernames that will be allowed to connect to
338 this module. The usernames do not need to exist on the local
339 system. The usernames may also contain shell wildcard characters. If
340 "auth users" is set then the client will be challenged to supply a
341 username and password to connect to the module. A challenge response
342 authentication protocol is used for this exchange. The plain text
343 usernames and passwords are stored in the file specified by the
344 "secrets file" option. The default is for all users to be able to
345 connect without a password (this is called "anonymous rsync").
346
347 See also the "CONNECTING TO AN RSYNC DAEMON OVER A REMOTE SHELL
348 PROGRAM" section in bf(rsync)(1) for information on how handle an
349 rsyncd.conf-level username that differs from the remote-shell-level
350 username when using a remote shell to connect to an rsync daemon.
351
352 dit(bf(secrets file)) The "secrets file" option specifies the name of
353 a file that contains the username:password pairs used for
354 authenticating this module. This file is only consulted if the "auth
355 users" option is specified. The file is line based and contains
356 username:password pairs separated by a single colon. Any line starting
357 with a hash (#) is considered a comment and is skipped. The passwords
358 can contain any characters but be warned that many operating systems
359 limit the length of passwords that can be typed at the client end, so
360 you may find that passwords longer than 8 characters don't work.
361
362 There is no default for the "secrets file" option, you must choose a name
363 (such as tt(/etc/rsyncd.secrets)).  The file must normally not be readable
364 by "other"; see "strict modes".
365
366 dit(bf(strict modes)) The "strict modes" option determines whether or not
367 the permissions on the secrets file will be checked.  If "strict modes" is
368 true, then the secrets file must not be readable by any user ID other
369 than the one that the rsync daemon is running under.  If "strict modes" is
370 false, the check is not performed.  The default is true.  This option
371 was added to accommodate rsync running on the Windows operating system.
372
373 dit(bf(hosts allow)) The "hosts allow" option allows you to specify a
374 list of patterns that are matched against a connecting clients
375 hostname and IP address. If none of the patterns match then the
376 connection is rejected.
377
378 Each pattern can be in one of five forms:
379
380 quote(itemization(
381   it() a dotted decimal IPv4 address of the form a.b.c.d, or an IPv6 address
382   of the form a:b:c::d:e:f. In this case the incoming machine's IP address
383   must match exactly.
384   it() an address/mask in the form ipaddr/n where ipaddr is the IP address
385   and n is the number of one bits in the netmask.  All IP addresses which
386   match the masked IP address will be allowed in.
387   it() an address/mask in the form ipaddr/maskaddr where ipaddr is the
388   IP address and maskaddr is the netmask in dotted decimal notation for IPv4,
389   or similar for IPv6, e.g. ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:: instead of /64. All IP
390   addresses which match the masked IP address will be allowed in.
391   it() a hostname. The hostname as determined by a reverse lookup will
392   be matched (case insensitive) against the pattern. Only an exact
393   match is allowed in.
394   it() a hostname pattern using wildcards. These are matched using the
395   same rules as normal unix filename matching. If the pattern matches
396   then the client is allowed in.
397 ))
398
399 Note IPv6 link-local addresses can have a scope in the address specification:
400
401 quote(
402 tt(    fe80::1%link1)nl()
403 tt(    fe80::%link1/64)nl()
404 tt(    fe80::%link1/ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff::)nl()
405 )
406
407 You can also combine "hosts allow" with a separate "hosts deny"
408 option. If both options are specified then the "hosts allow" option s
409 checked first and a match results in the client being able to
410 connect. The "hosts deny" option is then checked and a match means
411 that the host is rejected. If the host does not match either the
412 "hosts allow" or the "hosts deny" patterns then it is allowed to
413 connect.
414
415 The default is no "hosts allow" option, which means all hosts can connect.
416
417 dit(bf(hosts deny)) The "hosts deny" option allows you to specify a
418 list of patterns that are matched against a connecting clients
419 hostname and IP address. If the pattern matches then the connection is
420 rejected. See the "hosts allow" option for more information.
421
422 The default is no "hosts deny" option, which means all hosts can connect.
423
424 dit(bf(ignore errors)) The "ignore errors" option tells rsyncd to
425 ignore I/O errors on the daemon when deciding whether to run the delete
426 phase of the transfer. Normally rsync skips the bf(--delete) step if any
427 I/O errors have occurred in order to prevent disastrous deletion due
428 to a temporary resource shortage or other I/O error. In some cases this
429 test is counter productive so you can use this option to turn off this
430 behavior.
431
432 dit(bf(ignore nonreadable)) This tells the rsync daemon to completely
433 ignore files that are not readable by the user. This is useful for
434 public archives that may have some non-readable files among the
435 directories, and the sysadmin doesn't want those files to be seen at all.
436
437 dit(bf(transfer logging)) The "transfer logging" option enables per-file
438 logging of downloads and uploads in a format somewhat similar to that
439 used by ftp daemons.  The daemon always logs the transfer at the end, so
440 if a transfer is aborted, no mention will be made in the log file.
441
442 If you want to customize the log lines, see the "log format" option.
443
444 dit(bf(log format)) The "log format" option allows you to specify the
445 format used for logging file transfers when transfer logging is enabled.
446 The format is a text string containing embedded single-character escape
447 sequences prefixed with a percent (%) character.  An optional numeric
448 field width may also be specified between the percent and the escape
449 letter (e.g. "bf(%-50n %8l %07p)").
450
451 The default log format is "%o %h [%a] %m (%u) %f %l", and a "%t [%p] "
452 is always prefixed when using the "log file" option.
453 (A perl script that will summarize this default log format is included
454 in the rsync source code distribution in the "support" subdirectory:
455 rsyncstats.)
456
457 The single-character escapes that are understood are as follows:
458
459 quote(itemization(
460   it() %a the remote IP address
461   it() %b the number of bytes actually transferred
462   it() %B the permission bits of the file (e.g. rwxrwxrwt)
463   it() %c the checksum bytes received for this file (only when sending)
464   it() %f the filename (long form on sender; no trailing "/")
465   it() %G the gid of the file (decimal) or "DEFAULT"
466   it() %h the remote host name
467   it() %i an itemized list of what is being updated
468   it() %l the length of the file in bytes
469   it() %L the string " -> SYMLINK", " => HARDLINK", or "" (where bf(SYMLINK) or bf(HARDLINK) is a filename)
470   it() %m the module name
471   it() %M the last-modified time of the file
472   it() %n the filename (short form; trailing "/" on dir)
473   it() %o the operation, which is "send", "recv", or "del." (the latter includes the trailing period)
474   it() %p the process ID of this rsync session
475   it() %P the module path
476   it() %t the current date time
477   it() %u the authenticated username or an empty string
478   it() %U the uid of the file (decimal)
479 ))
480
481 For a list of what the characters mean that are output by "%i", see the
482 bf(--itemize-changes) option in the rsync manpage.
483
484 Note that some of the logged output changes when talking with older
485 rsync versions.  For instance, deleted files were only output as verbose
486 messages prior to rsync 2.6.4.
487
488 dit(bf(timeout)) The "timeout" option allows you to override the
489 clients choice for I/O timeout for this module. Using this option you
490 can ensure that rsync won't wait on a dead client forever. The timeout
491 is specified in seconds. A value of zero means no timeout and is the
492 default. A good choice for anonymous rsync daemons may be 600 (giving
493 a 10 minute timeout).
494
495 dit(bf(refuse options)) The "refuse options" option allows you to
496 specify a space-separated list of rsync command line options that will
497 be refused by your rsync daemon.
498 You may specify the full option name, its one-letter abbreviation, or a
499 wild-card string that matches multiple options.
500 For example, this would refuse bf(--checksum) (bf(-c)) and all the various
501 delete options:
502
503 quote(tt(    refuse options = c delete))
504
505 The reason the above refuses all delete options is that the options imply
506 bf(--delete), and implied options are refused just like explicit options.
507 As an additional safety feature, the refusal of "delete" also refuses
508 bf(remove-sent-files) when the daemon is the sender; if you want the latter
509 without the former, instead refuse "delete-*" -- that refuses all the
510 delete modes without affecting bf(--remove-sent-files).
511
512 When an option is refused, the daemon prints an error message and exits.
513 To prevent all compression when serving files,
514 you can use "dont compress = *" (see below)
515 instead of "refuse options = compress" to avoid returning an error to a
516 client that requests compression.
517
518 dit(bf(dont compress)) The "dont compress" option allows you to select
519 filenames based on wildcard patterns that should not be compressed
520 when pulling files from the daemon (no analogous option exists to
521 govern the pushing of files to a daemon).
522 Compression is expensive in terms of CPU usage, so it
523 is usually good to not try to compress files that won't compress well,
524 such as already compressed files.
525
526 The "dont compress" option takes a space-separated list of
527 case-insensitive wildcard patterns. Any source filename matching one
528 of the patterns will not be compressed during transfer.
529
530 See the bf(--skip-compress) option in the bf(rsync)(1) manpage for the list
531 of file suffixes that are not compressed by default.  Specifying a value
532 for the bf(dont compress) option changes the default when the daemon is
533 the sender.
534
535 dit(bf(pre-xfer exec), bf(post-xfer exec)) You may specify a command to be run
536 before and/or after the transfer.  If the bf(pre-xfer exec) command fails, the
537 transfer is aborted before it begins.
538
539 The following environment variables will be set, though some are
540 specific to the pre-xfer or the post-xfer environment:
541
542 quote(itemization(
543   it() bf(RSYNC_MODULE_NAME): The name of the module being accessed.
544   it() bf(RSYNC_MODULE_PATH): The path configured for the module.
545   it() bf(RSYNC_HOST_ADDR): The accessing host's IP address.
546   it() bf(RSYNC_HOST_NAME): The accessing host's name.
547   it() bf(RSYNC_USER_NAME): The accessing user's name (empty if no user).
548   it() bf(RSYNC_PID): A unique number for this transfer.
549   it() bf(RSYNC_REQUEST): (pre-xfer only) The module/path info specified
550   by the user (note that the user can specify multiple source files,
551   so the request can be something like "mod/path1 mod/path2", etc.).
552   it() bf(RSYNC_ARG#): (pre-xfer only) The pre-request arguments are set
553   in these numbered values. RSYNC_ARG0 is always "rsyncd", and the last
554   value contains a single period.
555   it() bf(RSYNC_EXIT_STATUS): (post-xfer only) the server side's exit value.
556   This will be 0 for a successful run, a positive value for an error that the
557   server generated, or a -1 if rsync failed to exit properly.  Note that an
558   error that occurs on the client side does not currently get sent to the
559   server side, so this is not the final exit status for the whole transfer.
560   it() bf(RSYNC_RAW_STATUS): (post-xfer only) the raw exit value from code(waitpid()).
561 ))
562
563 Even though the commands can be associated with a particular module, they
564 are run using the permissions of the user that started the daemon (not the
565 module's uid/gid setting) without any chroot restrictions.
566
567 enddit()
568
569 manpagesection(AUTHENTICATION STRENGTH)
570
571 The authentication protocol used in rsync is a 128 bit MD4 based
572 challenge response system. This is fairly weak protection, though (with
573 at least one brute-force hash-finding algorithm publicly available), so
574 if you want really top-quality security, then I recommend that you run
575 rsync over ssh.  (Yes, a future version of rsync will switch over to a
576 stronger hashing method.)
577
578 Also note that the rsync daemon protocol does not currently provide any
579 encryption of the data that is transferred over the connection. Only
580 authentication is provided. Use ssh as the transport if you want
581 encryption.
582
583 Future versions of rsync may support SSL for better authentication and
584 encryption, but that is still being investigated.
585
586 manpagesection(EXAMPLES)
587
588 A simple rsyncd.conf file that allow anonymous rsync to a ftp area at
589 tt(/home/ftp) would be:
590
591 verb(
592 [ftp]
593         path = /home/ftp
594         comment = ftp export area
595 )
596
597 A more sophisticated example would be:
598
599 verb(
600 uid = nobody
601 gid = nobody
602 use chroot = no
603 max connections = 4
604 syslog facility = local5
605 pid file = /var/run/rsyncd.pid
606
607 [ftp]
608         path = /var/ftp/pub
609         comment = whole ftp area (approx 6.1 GB)
610
611 [sambaftp]
612         path = /var/ftp/pub/samba
613         comment = Samba ftp area (approx 300 MB)
614
615 [rsyncftp]
616         path = /var/ftp/pub/rsync
617         comment = rsync ftp area (approx 6 MB)
618
619 [sambawww]
620         path = /public_html/samba
621         comment = Samba WWW pages (approx 240 MB)
622
623 [cvs]
624         path = /data/cvs
625         comment = CVS repository (requires authentication)
626         auth users = tridge, susan
627         secrets file = /etc/rsyncd.secrets
628 )
629
630 The /etc/rsyncd.secrets file would look something like this:
631
632 quote(
633 tt(tridge:mypass)nl()
634 tt(susan:herpass)nl()
635 )
636
637 manpagefiles()
638
639 /etc/rsyncd.conf or rsyncd.conf
640
641 manpageseealso()
642
643 bf(rsync)(1)
644
645 manpagediagnostics()
646
647 manpagebugs()
648
649 Please report bugs! The rsync bug tracking system is online at
650 url(http://rsync.samba.org/)(http://rsync.samba.org/)
651
652 manpagesection(VERSION)
653
654 This man page is current for version 3.0.0pre7 of rsync.
655
656 manpagesection(CREDITS)
657
658 rsync is distributed under the GNU public license.  See the file
659 COPYING for details.
660
661 The primary ftp site for rsync is
662 url(ftp://rsync.samba.org/pub/rsync)(ftp://rsync.samba.org/pub/rsync).
663
664 A WEB site is available at
665 url(http://rsync.samba.org/)(http://rsync.samba.org/)
666
667 We would be delighted to hear from you if you like this program.
668
669 This program uses the zlib compression library written by Jean-loup
670 Gailly and Mark Adler.
671
672 manpagesection(THANKS)
673
674 Thanks to Warren Stanley for his original idea and patch for the rsync
675 daemon. Thanks to Karsten Thygesen for his many suggestions and
676 documentation!
677
678 manpageauthor()
679
680 rsync was written by Andrew Tridgell and Paul Mackerras.
681 Many people have later contributed to it.
682
683 Mailing lists for support and development are available at
684 url(http://lists.samba.org)(lists.samba.org)