3717b9e552003242e5927b53284f4bbf3cf0dcaf
[rsync.git] / rsync.yo
1 mailto(rsync-bugs@samba.org)
2 manpage(rsync)(1)(29 May 2001)()()
3 manpagename(rsync)(faster, flexible replacement for rcp)
4 manpagesynopsis()
5
6 rsync [OPTION]... SRC [SRC]... [USER@]HOST:DEST
7
8 rsync [OPTION]... [USER@]HOST:SRC DEST
9
10 rsync [OPTION]... SRC [SRC]... DEST
11
12 rsync [OPTION]... [USER@]HOST::SRC [DEST]
13
14 rsync [OPTION]... SRC [SRC]... [USER@]HOST::DEST
15
16 rsync [OPTION]... rsync://[USER@]HOST[:PORT]/SRC [DEST]
17
18 manpagedescription()
19
20 rsync is a program that behaves in much the same way that rcp does,
21 but has many more options and uses the rsync remote-update protocol to
22 greatly speedup file transfers when the destination file already
23 exists.
24
25 The rsync remote-update protocol allows rsync to transfer just the
26 differences between two sets of files across the network link, using
27 an efficient checksum-search algorithm described in the technical
28 report that accompanies this package.
29
30 Some of the additional features of rsync are:
31
32 itemize(
33   it() support for copying links, devices, owners, groups and permissions
34   it() exclude and exclude-from options similar to GNU tar
35   it() a CVS exclude mode for ignoring the same files that CVS would ignore
36   it() can use any transparent remote shell, including rsh or ssh
37   it() does not require root privileges
38   it() pipelining of file transfers to minimize latency costs
39   it() support for anonymous or authenticated rsync servers (ideal for
40        mirroring)
41 )
42
43 manpagesection(GENERAL)
44
45 There are six different ways of using rsync. They are:
46
47 itemize(
48         it() for copying local files. This is invoked when neither
49              source nor destination path contains a : separator
50
51         it() for copying from the local machine to a remote machine using
52         a remote shell program as the transport (such as rsh or
53         ssh). This is invoked when the destination path contains a
54         single : separator.
55
56         it() for copying from a remote machine to the local machine
57         using a remote shell program. This is invoked when the source
58         contains a : separator.
59
60         it() for copying from a remote rsync server to the local
61         machine. This is invoked when the source path contains a ::
62         separator or a rsync:// URL.
63
64         it() for copying from the local machine to a remote rsync
65         server. This is invoked when the destination path contains a ::
66         separator. 
67
68         it() for listing files on a remote machine. This is done the
69         same way as rsync transfers except that you leave off the
70         local destination.  
71 )
72
73 Note that in all cases (other than listing) at least one of the source
74 and destination paths must be local.
75
76 manpagesection(SETUP)
77
78 See the file README for installation instructions.
79
80 Once installed you can use rsync to any machine that you can use rsh
81 to.  rsync uses rsh for its communications, unless both the source and
82 destination are local.
83
84 You can also specify an alternative to rsh, by either using the -e
85 command line option, or by setting the RSYNC_RSH environment variable.
86
87 One common substitute is to use ssh, which offers a high degree of
88 security.
89
90 Note that rsync must be installed on both the source and destination
91 machines. 
92
93 manpagesection(USAGE)
94
95 You use rsync in the same way you use rcp. You must specify a source
96 and a destination, one of which may be remote.
97
98 Perhaps the best way to explain the syntax is some examples:
99
100 quote(rsync *.c foo:src/)
101
102 this would transfer all files matching the pattern *.c from the
103 current directory to the directory src on the machine foo. If any of
104 the files already exist on the remote system then the rsync
105 remote-update protocol is used to update the file by sending only the
106 differences. See the tech report for details.
107
108 quote(rsync -avz foo:src/bar /data/tmp)
109
110 this would recursively transfer all files from the directory src/bar on the
111 machine foo into the /data/tmp/bar directory on the local machine. The
112 files are transferred in "archive" mode, which ensures that symbolic
113 links, devices, attributes, permissions, ownerships etc are preserved
114 in the transfer.  Additionally, compression will be used to reduce the
115 size of data portions of the transfer.
116
117 quote(rsync -avz foo:src/bar/ /data/tmp)
118
119 a trailing slash on the source changes this behavior to transfer
120 all files from the directory src/bar on the machine foo into the
121 /data/tmp/.  A trailing / on a source name means "copy the
122 contents of this directory".  Without a trailing slash it means "copy
123 the directory". This difference becomes particularly important when
124 using the --delete option.
125
126 You can also use rsync in local-only mode, where both the source and
127 destination don't have a ':' in the name. In this case it behaves like
128 an improved copy command.
129
130 quote(rsync somehost.mydomain.com::)
131
132 this would list all the anonymous rsync modules available on the host
133 somehost.mydomain.com.  (See the following section for more details.)
134
135
136 manpagesection(CONNECTING TO AN RSYNC SERVER)
137
138 It is also possible to use rsync without using rsh or ssh as the
139 transport. In this case you will connect to a remote rsync server
140 running on TCP port 873. 
141
142 You may establish the connetcion via a web proxy by setting the
143 environment variable RSYNC_PROXY to a hostname:port pair pointing to
144 your web proxy. Note that your web proxy must allow proxying to port
145 873, this must be configured in your proxy servers ruleset.
146
147 Using rsync in this way is the same as using it with rsh or ssh except
148 that:
149
150 itemize(
151         it() you use a double colon :: instead of a single colon to
152         separate the hostname from the path. 
153
154         it() the remote server may print a message of the day when you
155         connect.
156
157         it() if you specify no path name on the remote server then the
158         list of accessible paths on the server will be shown.
159
160         it() if you specify no local destination then a listing of the
161         specified files on the remote server is provided.
162 )
163
164 Some paths on the remote server may require authentication. If so then
165 you will receive a password prompt when you connect. You can avoid the
166 password prompt by setting the environment variable RSYNC_PASSWORD to
167 the password you want to use or using the --password-file option. This
168 may be useful when scripting rsync.
169
170 WARNING: On some systems environment variables are visible to all
171 users. On those systems using --password-file is recommended.
172
173 manpagesection(RUNNING AN RSYNC SERVER)
174
175 An rsync server is configured using a config file which by default is
176 called /etc/rsyncd.conf. Please see the rsyncd.conf(5) man page for more
177 information. 
178
179 manpagesection(EXAMPLES)
180
181 Here are some examples of how I use rsync.
182
183 To backup my wife's home directory, which consists of large MS Word
184 files and mail folders, I use a cron job that runs
185
186 quote(rsync -Cavz . arvidsjaur:backup)
187
188 each night over a PPP link to a duplicate directory on my machine
189 "arvidsjaur".
190
191 To synchronize my samba source trees I use the following Makefile
192 targets:
193
194 quote(      get:nl()
195        rsync -avuzb --exclude '*~' samba:samba/ .
196
197       put:nl()
198        rsync -Cavuzb . samba:samba/
199
200       sync: get put)
201
202 this allows me to sync with a CVS directory at the other end of the
203 link. I then do cvs operations on the remote machine, which saves a
204 lot of time as the remote cvs protocol isn't very efficient.
205
206 I mirror a directory between my "old" and "new" ftp sites with the
207 command
208
209 quote(rsync -az -e ssh --delete ~ftp/pub/samba/ nimbus:"~ftp/pub/tridge/samba")
210
211 this is launched from cron every few hours.
212
213 manpagesection(OPTIONS SUMMARY)
214
215 Here is a short summary of the options available in rsync. Please refer
216 to the detailed description below for a complete description.
217
218 verb(
219  -v, --verbose               increase verbosity
220  -q, --quiet                 decrease verbosity
221  -c, --checksum              always checksum
222  -a, --archive               archive mode
223  -r, --recursive             recurse into directories
224  -R, --relative              use relative path names
225  -b, --backup                make backups (default ~ suffix)
226      --backup-dir            make backups into this directory
227      --suffix=SUFFIX         override backup suffix
228  -u, --update                update only (don't overwrite newer files)
229  -l, --links                 preserve soft links
230  -L, --copy-links            treat soft links like regular files
231      --copy-unsafe-links     copy links outside the source tree
232      --safe-links            ignore links outside the destination tree
233  -H, --hard-links            preserve hard links
234  -p, --perms                 preserve permissions
235  -o, --owner                 preserve owner (root only)
236  -g, --group                 preserve group
237  -D, --devices               preserve devices (root only)
238  -t, --times                 preserve times
239  -S, --sparse                handle sparse files efficiently
240  -n, --dry-run               show what would have been transferred
241  -W, --whole-file            copy whole files, no incremental checks
242  -x, --one-file-system       don't cross filesystem boundaries
243  -B, --block-size=SIZE       checksum blocking size (default 700)
244  -e, --rsh=COMMAND           specify rsh replacement
245      --rsync-path=PATH       specify path to rsync on the remote machine
246  -C, --cvs-exclude           auto ignore files in the same way CVS does
247      --existing              only update files that already exist
248      --delete                delete files that don't exist on the sending side
249      --delete-excluded       also delete excluded files on the receiving side
250      --delete-after          delete after transferring, not before
251      --ignore-errors         delete even if there are IO errors
252      --max-delete=NUM        don't delete more than NUM files
253      --partial               keep partially transferred files
254      --force                 force deletion of directories even if not empty
255      --numeric-ids           don't map uid/gid values by user/group name
256      --timeout=TIME          set IO timeout in seconds
257  -I, --ignore-times          don't exclude files that match length and time
258      --size-only             only use file size when determining if a file should be transferred
259      --modify-window=NUM     Timestamp window (seconds) for file match (default=0)
260  -T  --temp-dir=DIR          create temporary files in directory DIR
261      --compare-dest=DIR      also compare destination files relative to DIR
262  -P                          equivalent to --partial --progress
263  -z, --compress              compress file data
264      --exclude=PATTERN       exclude files matching PATTERN
265      --exclude-from=FILE     exclude patterns listed in FILE
266      --include=PATTERN       don't exclude files matching PATTERN
267      --include-from=FILE     don't exclude patterns listed in FILE
268      --version               print version number
269      --daemon                run as a rsync daemon
270      --address               bind to the specified address
271      --config=FILE           specify alternate rsyncd.conf file
272      --port=PORT             specify alternate rsyncd port number
273      --blocking-io           use blocking IO for the remote shell
274      --stats                 give some file transfer stats
275      --progress              show progress during transfer
276      --log-format=FORMAT     log file transfers using specified format
277      --password-file=FILE    get password from FILE
278      --bwlimit=KBPS          limit I/O bandwidth, KBytes per second
279  -h, --help                  show this help screen
280 )
281
282 manpageoptions()
283
284 rsync uses the GNU long options package. Many of the command line
285 options have two variants, one short and one long.  These are shown
286 below, separated by commas. Some options only have a long variant.
287 The '=' for options that take a parameter is optional; whitespace
288 can be used instead.
289
290 startdit()
291 dit(bf(-h, --help)) Print a short help page describing the options
292 available in rsync
293
294 dit(bf(--version)) print the rsync version number and exit
295
296 dit(bf(-v, --verbose)) This option increases the amount of information you
297 are given during the transfer.  By default, rsync works silently. A
298 single -v will give you information about what files are being
299 transferred and a brief summary at the end. Two -v flags will give you
300 information on what files are being skipped and slightly more
301 information at the end. More than two -v flags should only be used if
302 you are debugging rsync.
303
304 dit(bf(-q, --quiet)) This option decreases the amount of information you
305 are given during the transfer, notably suppressing information messages
306 from the remote server. This flag is useful when invoking rsync from
307 cron.
308
309 dit(bf(-I, --ignore-times)) Normally rsync will skip any files that are
310 already the same length and have the same time-stamp. This option turns
311 off this behavior.
312
313 dit(bf(--size-only)) Normally rsync will skip any files that are
314 already the same length and have the same time-stamp. With the
315 --size-only option files will be skipped if they have the same size,
316 regardless of timestamp. This is useful when starting to use rsync
317 after using another mirroring system which may not preserve timestamps
318 exactly.
319
320 dit(bf(--modify-window)) When comparing two timestamps rsync treats
321 the timestamps as being equal if they are within the value of
322 modify_window. This is normally zero, but you may find it useful to
323 set this to a larger value in some situations. In particular, when
324 transferring to/from FAT filesystems which cannot represent times with
325 a 1 second resolution this option is useful.
326
327 dit(bf(-c, --checksum)) This forces the sender to checksum all files using
328 a 128-bit MD4 checksum before transfer. The checksum is then
329 explicitly checked on the receiver and any files of the same name
330 which already exist and have the same checksum and size on the
331 receiver are skipped.  This option can be quite slow.
332
333 dit(bf(-a, --archive)) This is equivalent to -rlptgoD. It is a quick way
334 of saying you want recursion and want to preserve everything.
335
336 dit(bf(-r, --recursive)) This tells rsync to copy directories
337 recursively. If you don't specify this then rsync won't copy
338 directories at all.
339
340 dit(bf(-R, --relative)) Use relative paths. This means that the full path
341 names specified on the command line are sent to the server rather than
342 just the last parts of the filenames. This is particularly useful when
343 you want to send several different directories at the same time. For
344 example, if you used the command
345
346 verb(rsync foo/bar/foo.c remote:/tmp/)
347
348 then this would create a file called foo.c in /tmp/ on the remote
349 machine. If instead you used
350
351 verb(rsync -R foo/bar/foo.c remote:/tmp/)
352
353 then a file called /tmp/foo/bar/foo.c would be created on the remote
354 machine. The full path name is preserved.
355
356 dit(bf(-b, --backup)) With this option preexisting destination files are
357 renamed with a ~ extension as each file is transferred.  You can
358 control the backup suffix using the --suffix option.
359
360 dit(bf(--backup-dir=DIR)) In combination with the --backup option, this
361 tells rsync to store all backups in the specified directory. This is
362 very useful for incremental backups.
363
364 dit(bf(--suffix=SUFFIX)) This option allows you to override the default
365 backup suffix used with the -b option. The default is a ~.
366
367 dit(bf(-u, --update)) This forces rsync to skip any files for which the
368 destination file already exists and has a date later than the source
369 file.
370
371 dit(bf(-l, --links)) This tells rsync to recreate symbolic links on the
372 remote system  to  be the same as the local system. Without this
373 option, all symbolic links are skipped.
374
375 dit(bf(-L, --copy-links)) This tells rsync to treat symbolic links just
376 like ordinary files.
377
378 dit(bf(--copy-unsafe-links)) This tells rsync to treat symbolic links that
379 point outside the source tree like ordinary files.  Absolute symlinks are
380 also treated like ordinary files, and so are any symlinks in the source
381 path itself when --relative is used.
382
383 dit(bf(--safe-links)) This tells rsync to ignore any symbolic links
384 which point outside the destination tree. All absolute symlinks are
385 also ignored. Using this option in conjunction with --relative may
386 give unexpected results. 
387
388 dit(bf(-H, --hard-links)) This tells rsync to recreate hard  links  on
389 the  remote system  to  be the same as the local system. Without this
390 option hard links are treated like regular files.
391
392 Note that rsync can only detect hard links if both parts of the link
393 are in the list of files being sent.
394
395 This option can be quite slow, so only use it if you need it.
396
397 dit(bf(-W, --whole-file)) With this option the incremental rsync algorithm
398 is not used and the whole file is sent as-is instead.  The transfer may be
399 faster if this option is used when the bandwidth between the source and
400 target machines is higher than the bandwidth to disk (especially when the
401 "disk" is actually a networked file system).  This is the default when both
402 the source and target are on the local machine.
403
404 dit(bf(-p, --perms)) This option causes rsync to update the remote
405 permissions to be the same as the local permissions.
406
407 dit(bf(-o, --owner)) This option causes rsync to update the  remote  owner
408 of the  file to be the same as the local owner. This is only available
409 to the super-user.  Note that if the source system is a daemon using chroot,
410 the --numeric-ids option is implied because the source system cannot get
411 access to the usernames.
412
413 dit(bf(-g, --group)) This option causes rsync to update the  remote  group
414 of the file to be the same as the local group.  If the receving system is
415 not running as the super-user, only groups that the receiver is a member of
416 will be preserved (by group name, not group id number).
417
418 dit(bf(-D, --devices)) This option causes rsync to transfer character and
419 block device information to the remote system to recreate these
420 devices. This option is only available to the super-user.
421
422 dit(bf(-t, --times)) This tells rsync to transfer modification times along
423 with the files and update them on the remote system.  Note that if this
424 option is not used, the optimization that excludes files that have not been
425 modified cannot be effective; in other words, a missing -t or -a will
426 cause the next transfer to behave as if it used -I, and all files will have
427 their checksums compared and show up in log messages even if they haven't
428 changed.
429
430 dit(bf(-n, --dry-run)) This tells rsync to not do any file transfers,
431 instead it will just report the actions it would have taken.
432
433 dit(bf(-S, --sparse)) Try to handle sparse files efficiently so they take
434 up less space on the destination.
435
436 NOTE: Don't use this option when the destination is a Solaris "tmpfs"
437 filesystem. It doesn't seem to handle seeks over null regions
438 correctly and ends up corrupting the files.
439
440 dit(bf(-x, --one-file-system)) This tells rsync not to cross filesystem
441 boundaries  when recursing.  This  is useful for transferring the
442 contents of only one filesystem.
443
444 dit(bf(--existing)) This tells rsync not to create any new files -
445 only update files that already exist on the destination.
446
447 dit(bf(--max-delete=NUM)) This tells rsync not to delete more than NUM
448 files or directories. This is useful when mirroring very large trees
449 to prevent disasters.
450
451 dit(bf(--delete)) This tells rsync to delete any files on the receiving
452 side that aren't on the sending side.   Files that are excluded from
453 transfer are excluded from being deleted unless you use --delete-excluded.
454
455 This option has no effect if directory recursion is not selected.
456
457 This option can be dangerous if used incorrectly!  It is a very good idea
458 to run first using the dry run option (-n) to see what files would be
459 deleted to make sure important files aren't listed.
460
461 If the sending side detects any IO errors then the deletion of any
462 files at the destination will be automatically disabled. This is to
463 prevent temporary filesystem failures (such as NFS errors) on the
464 sending side causing a massive deletion of files on the
465 destination.  You can override this with the --ignore-errors option.
466
467 dit(bf(--delete-excluded)) In addition to deleting the files on the
468 receiving side that are not on the sending side, this tells rsync to also
469 delete any files on the receiving side that are excluded (see --exclude).
470
471 dit(bf(--delete-after)) By default rsync does file deletions before
472 transferring files to try to ensure that there is sufficient space on
473 the receiving filesystem. If you want to delete after transferring
474 then use the --delete-after switch.
475
476 dit(bf(--ignore-errors)) Tells --delete to go ahead and delete files
477 even when there are IO errors.
478
479 dit(bf(--force)) This options tells rsync to delete directories even if
480 they are not empty.  This applies to both the --delete option and to
481 cases where rsync tries to copy a normal file but the destination
482 contains a directory of the same name. 
483
484 Since this option was added, deletions were reordered to be done depth-first
485 so it is hardly ever needed anymore except in very obscure cases.
486
487 dit(bf(-B , --block_size=BLOCKSIZE)) This controls the block size used in
488 the rsync algorithm. See the technical report for details.
489
490 dit(bf(-e, --rsh=COMMAND)) This option allows you to choose an alternative
491 remote shell program to use for communication between the local and
492 remote copies of rsync. By default, rsync will use rsh, but you may
493 like to instead use ssh because of its high security.
494
495 You can also choose the remote shell program using the RSYNC_RSH
496 environment variable.
497
498 See also the --blocking-io option which is affected by this option.
499
500 dit(bf(--rsync-path=PATH)) Use this to specify the path to the copy of
501 rsync on the remote machine. Useful when it's not in your path. Note
502 that this is the full path to the binary, not just the directory that
503 the binary is in.
504
505 dit(bf(--exclude=PATTERN)) This option allows you to selectively exclude
506 certain files from the list of files to be transferred. This is most
507 useful in combination with a recursive transfer.
508
509 You may use as many --exclude options on the command line as you like
510 to build up the list of files to exclude.
511
512 See the section on exclude patterns for information on the syntax of 
513 this option.
514
515 dit(bf(--exclude-from=FILE)) This option is similar to the --exclude
516 option, but instead it adds all exclude patterns listed in the file
517 FILE to the exclude list.  Blank lines in FILE and lines starting with
518 ';' or '#' are ignored.
519
520 dit(bf(--include=PATTERN)) This option tells rsync to not exclude the
521 specified pattern of filenames. This is useful as it allows you to
522 build up quite complex exclude/include rules.
523
524 See the section of exclude patterns for information on the syntax of 
525 this option.
526
527 dit(bf(--include-from=FILE)) This specifies a list of include patterns
528 from a file.
529
530 dit(bf(-C, --cvs-exclude)) This is a useful shorthand for excluding a
531 broad range of files that you often don't want to transfer between
532 systems. It uses the same algorithm that CVS uses to determine if
533 a file should be ignored.
534
535 The exclude list is initialized to:
536
537 quote(RCS SCCS CVS CVS.adm RCSLOG cvslog.* tags TAGS .make.state
538 .nse_depinfo *~ #* .#* ,* *.old *.bak *.BAK *.orig *.rej .del-*
539 *.a *.o *.obj *.so *.Z *.elc *.ln core)
540
541 then files listed in a $HOME/.cvsignore are added to the list and any
542 files listed in the CVSIGNORE environment variable (space delimited).
543
544 Finally in each directory any files listed in the .cvsignore file in
545 that directory are added to the list.
546
547 dit(bf(--csum-length=LENGTH)) By default the primary checksum used in
548 rsync is a very strong 16 byte MD4 checksum. In most cases you will
549 find that a truncated version of this checksum is quite efficient, and
550 this will decrease the size of the checksum data sent over the link,
551 making things faster. 
552
553 You can choose the number of bytes in the truncated checksum using the
554 --csum-length option. Any value less than or equal to 16 is valid.
555
556 Note that if you use this option then you run the risk of ending up
557 with an incorrect target file. The risk with a value of 16 is
558 microscopic and can be safely ignored (the universe will probably end
559 before it fails) but with smaller values the risk is higher.
560
561 Current versions of rsync actually use an adaptive algorithm for the
562 checksum length by default, using a 16 byte file checksum to determine
563 if a 2nd pass is required with a longer block checksum. Only use this
564 option if you have read the source code and know what you are doing.
565
566 dit(bf(-T, --temp-dir=DIR)) This option instructs rsync to use DIR as a
567 scratch directory when creating temporary copies of the files
568 transferred on the receiving side.  The default behavior is to create
569 the temporary files in the receiving directory.
570
571 dit(bf(--compare-dest=DIR)) This option instructs rsync to use DIR on
572 the destination machine as an additional directory to compare destination
573 files against when doing transfers.  This is useful for doing transfers to
574 a new destination while leaving existing files intact, and then doing a
575 flash-cutover when all files have been successfully transferred (for
576 example by moving directories around and removing the old directory,
577 although this requires also doing the transfer with -I to avoid skipping
578 files that haven't changed).  This option increases the usefulness of
579 --partial because partially transferred files will remain in the new
580 temporary destination until they have a chance to be completed.  If DIR is
581 a relative path, it is relative to the destination directory.
582
583 dit(bf(-z, --compress)) With this option, rsync compresses any data from
584 the files that it sends to the destination machine.  This
585 option is useful on slow links.  The compression method used is the
586 same method that gzip uses.
587
588 Note this this option typically achieves better compression ratios
589 that can be achieved by using a compressing remote shell, or a
590 compressing transport, as it takes advantage of the implicit
591 information sent for matching data blocks.
592
593 dit(bf(--numeric-ids)) With this option rsync will transfer numeric group
594 and user ids rather than using user and group names and mapping them
595 at both ends.
596
597 By default rsync will use the user name and group name to determine
598 what ownership to give files. The special uid 0 and the special group
599 0 are never mapped via user/group names even if the --numeric-ids
600 option is not specified.
601
602 If the source system is a daemon using chroot, or if a user or group name
603 does not exist on the destination system, then the numeric id from the
604 source system is used instead.
605
606 dit(bf(--timeout=TIMEOUT)) This option allows you to set a maximum IO
607 timeout in seconds. If no data is transferred for the specified time
608 then rsync will exit. The default is 0, which means no timeout.
609
610 dit(bf(--daemon)) This tells rsync that it is to run as a rsync
611 daemon. If standard input is a socket then rsync will assume that it
612 is being run via inetd, otherwise it will detach from the current
613 terminal and become a background daemon. The daemon will read the
614 config file (/etc/rsyncd.conf) on each connect made by a client and
615 respond to requests accordingly. See the rsyncd.conf(5) man page for more
616 details. 
617
618 dit(bf(--address)) By default rsync will bind to the wildcard address
619 when run as a daemon with the --daemon option or when connecting to a
620 rsync server. The --address option allows you to specify a specific IP
621 address (or hostname) to bind to. This makes virtual hosting possible
622 in conjunction with the --config option.
623
624 dit(bf(--config=FILE)) This specifies an alternate config file than
625 the default /etc/rsyncd.conf. This is only relevant when --daemon is
626 specified. 
627
628 dit(bf(--port=PORT)) This specifies an alternate TCP port number to use
629 rather than the default port 873.
630
631 dit(bf(--blocking-io)) This tells rsync to use blocking IO when launching
632 a remote shell transport.  If -e or --rsh are not specified or are set to
633 the default "rsh", this defaults to blocking IO, otherwise it defaults to
634 non-blocking IO.  You may find the --blocking-io option is needed for some
635 remote shells that can't handle non-blocking IO.  Ssh prefers blocking IO.
636
637 dit(bf(--log-format=FORMAT)) This allows you to specify exactly what the
638 rsync client logs to stdout on a per-file basis. The log format is
639 specified using the same format conventions as the log format option in
640 rsyncd.conf.
641
642 dit(bf(--stats)) This tells rsync to print a verbose set of statistics
643 on the file transfer, allowing you to tell how effective the rsync
644 algorithm is for your data.
645
646 dit(bf(--partial)) By default, rsync will delete any partially
647 transferred file if the transfer is interrupted. In some circumstances
648 it is more desirable to keep partially transferred files. Using the
649 --partial option tells rsync to keep the partial file which should
650 make a subsequent transfer of the rest of the file much faster.
651
652 dit(bf(--progress)) This option tells rsync to print information
653 showing the progress of the transfer. This gives a bored user
654 something to watch.
655
656 This option is normally combined with -v. Using this option without
657 the -v option will produce weird results on your display.
658
659 dit(bf(-P)) The -P option is equivalent to --partial --progress. I
660 found myself typing that combination quite often so I created an
661 option to make it easier.
662
663 dit(bf(--password-file)) This option allows you to provide a password
664 in a file for accessing a remote rsync server. Note that this option
665 is only useful when accessing a rsync server using the built in
666 transport, not when using a remote shell as the transport. The file
667 must not be world readable. It should contain just the password as a
668 single line.
669
670 dit(bf(--bwlimit=KBPS)) This option allows you to specify a maximum
671 transfer rate in kilobytes per second. This option is most effective when
672 using rsync with large files (several megabytes and up). Due to the nature
673 of rsync transfers, blocks of data are sent, then if rsync determines the
674 transfer was too fast, it will wait before sending the next data block. The
675 result is an average transfer rate equalling the specified limit. A value
676 of zero specifies no limit.
677
678 enddit()
679
680 manpagesection(EXCLUDE PATTERNS)
681
682 The exclude and include patterns specified to rsync allow for flexible
683 selection of which files to transfer and which files to skip.
684
685 rsync builds a ordered list of include/exclude options as specified on
686 the command line. When a filename is encountered, rsync checks the
687 name against each exclude/include pattern in turn. The first matching
688 pattern is acted on. If it is an exclude pattern, then that file is
689 skipped. If it is an include pattern then that filename is not
690 skipped. If no matching include/exclude pattern is found then the
691 filename is not skipped.
692
693 Note that when used with -r (which is implied by -a), every subcomponent of
694 every path is visited from top down, so include/exclude patterns get
695 applied recursively to each subcomponent.
696
697 Note also that the --include and --exclude options take one pattern
698 each. To add multiple patterns use the --include-from and
699 --exclude-from options or multiple --include and --exclude options. 
700
701 The patterns can take several forms. The rules are:
702
703 itemize(
704   it() if the pattern starts with a / then it is matched against the
705   start of the filename, otherwise it is matched against the end of
706   the filename.  Thus "/foo" would match a file called "foo" at the base of
707   the tree.  On the other hand, "foo" would match any file called "foo"
708   anywhere in the tree because the algorithm is applied recursively from
709   top down; it behaves as if each path component gets a turn at being the
710   end of the file name.
711
712   it() if the pattern ends with a / then it will only match a
713   directory, not a file, link or device.
714
715   it() if the pattern contains a wildcard character from the set
716   *?[ then expression matching is applied using the shell filename
717   matching rules. Otherwise a simple string match is used.
718
719   it() if the pattern includes a double asterisk "**" then all wildcards in
720   the pattern will match slashes, otherwise they will stop at slashes.
721
722   it() if the pattern contains a / (not counting a trailing /) then it
723   is matched against the full filename, including any leading
724   directory. If the pattern doesn't contain a / then it is matched
725   only against the final component of the filename.  Again, remember
726   that the algorithm is applied recursively so "full filename" can 
727   actually be any portion of a path.
728
729   it() if the pattern starts with "+ " (a plus followed by a space)
730   then it is always considered an include pattern, even if specified as
731   part of an exclude option. The "+ " part is discarded before matching.
732
733   it() if the pattern starts with "- " (a minus followed by a space)
734   then it is always considered an exclude pattern, even if specified as
735   part of an include option. The "- " part is discarded before matching.
736
737   it() if the pattern is a single exclamation mark ! then the current
738   exclude list is reset, removing all previous exclude patterns.
739 )
740
741 The +/- rules are most useful in exclude lists, allowing you to have a
742 single exclude list that contains both include and exclude options.
743
744 If you end an exclude list with --exclude '*', note that since the
745 algorithm is applied recursively that unless you explicitly include
746 parent directories of files you want to include then the algorithm
747 will stop at the parent directories and never see the files below
748 them.  To include all directories, use --include '*/' before the
749 --exclude '*'.
750
751 Here are some exclude/include examples:
752
753 itemize(
754   it() --exclude "*.o" would exclude all filenames matching *.o
755   it() --exclude "/foo" would exclude a file in the base directory called foo
756   it() --exclude "foo/" would exclude any directory called foo
757   it() --exclude "/foo/*/bar" would exclude any file called bar two
758   levels below a base directory called foo
759   it() --exclude "/foo/**/bar" would exclude any file called bar two
760   or more levels below a base directory called foo
761   it() --include "*/" --include "*.c" --exclude "*" would include all 
762   directories and C source files
763   it() --include "foo/" --include "foo/bar.c" --exclude "*" would include
764   only foo/bar.c (the foo/ directory must be explicitly included or
765   it would be excluded by the "*")
766 )
767
768 manpagesection(DIAGNOSTICS)
769
770 rsync occasionally produces error messages that may seem a little
771 cryptic. The one that seems to cause the most confusion is "protocol
772 version mismatch - is your shell clean?".
773
774 This message is usually caused by your startup scripts or remote shell
775 facility producing unwanted garbage on the stream that rsync is using
776 for its transport. The way to diagnose this problem is to run your
777 remote shell like this:
778
779 verb(
780    rsh remotehost /bin/true > out.dat
781 )
782        
783 then look at out.dat. If everything is working correctly then out.dat
784 should be a zero length file. If you are getting the above error from
785 rsync then you will probably find that out.dat contains some text or
786 data. Look at the contents and try to work out what is producing
787 it. The most common cause is incorrectly configured shell startup
788 scripts (such as .cshrc or .profile) that contain output statements
789 for non-interactive logins.
790
791 If you are having trouble debugging include and exclude patterns, then
792 try specifying the -vv option.  At this level of verbosity rsync will
793 show why each individual file is included or excluded.
794
795 manpagesection(EXIT VALUES)
796
797 startdit()
798 dit(bf(RERR_SYNTAX     1))       Syntax or usage error 
799 dit(bf(RERR_PROTOCOL   2))       Protocol incompatibility 
800 dit(bf(RERR_FILESELECT 3))       Errors selecting input/output files, dirs
801
802 dit(bf(RERR_UNSUPPORTED 4)) Requested action not supported: an attempt
803 was made to manipulate 64-bit files on a platform that cannot support
804 them; or an option was speciifed that is supported by the client and
805 not by the server.
806
807 dit(bf(RERR_SOCKETIO   10))      Error in socket IO 
808 dit(bf(RERR_FILEIO     11))      Error in file IO 
809 dit(bf(RERR_STREAMIO   12))      Error in rsync protocol data stream 
810 dit(bf(RERR_MESSAGEIO  13))      Errors with program diagnostics 
811 dit(bf(RERR_IPC        14))      Error in IPC code 
812 dit(bf(RERR_SIGNAL     20))      Received SIGUSR1 or SIGINT 
813 dit(bf(RERR_WAITCHILD  21))      Some error returned by waitpid() 
814 dit(bf(RERR_MALLOC     22))      Error allocating core memory buffers 
815 dit(bf(RERR_TIMEOUT    30))      Timeout in data send/receive 
816 enddit()
817
818 manpagesection(ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES)
819
820 startdit()
821
822 dit(bf(CVSIGNORE)) The CVSIGNORE environment variable supplements any
823 ignore patterns in .cvsignore files. See the --cvs-exclude option for
824 more details.
825
826 dit(bf(RSYNC_RSH)) The RSYNC_RSH environment variable allows you to
827 override the default shell used as the transport for rsync. This can
828 be used instead of the -e option.
829
830 dit(bf(RSYNC_PROXY)) The RSYNC_PROXY environment variable allows you to
831 redirect your rsync client to use a web proxy when connecting to a
832 rsync daemon. You should set RSYNC_PROXY to a hostname:port pair.
833
834 dit(bf(RSYNC_PASSWORD)) Setting RSYNC_PASSWORD to the required
835 password allows you to run authenticated rsync connections to a rsync
836 daemon without user intervention. Note that this does not supply a
837 password to a shell transport such as ssh.
838
839 dit(bf(USER) or bf(LOGNAME)) The USER or LOGNAME environment variables
840 are used to determine the default username sent to a rsync server.
841
842 dit(bf(HOME)) The HOME environment variable is used to find the user's
843 default .cvsignore file.
844
845 enddit()
846
847 manpagefiles()
848
849 /etc/rsyncd.conf
850
851 manpageseealso()
852
853 rsyncd.conf(5)
854
855 manpagediagnostics()
856
857 manpagebugs()
858
859 times are transferred as unix time_t values
860
861 file permissions, devices etc are transferred as native numerical
862 values
863
864 see also the comments on the --delete option
865
866 Please report bugs! The rsync bug tracking system is online at
867 url(http://rsync.samba.org/rsync/)(http://rsync.samba.org/rsync/)
868
869 manpagesection(VERSION)
870 This man page is current for version 2.0 of rsync
871
872 manpagesection(CREDITS)
873
874 rsync is distributed under the GNU public license.  See the file
875 COPYING for details.
876
877 A WEB site is available at
878 url(http://rsync.samba.org/)(http://rsync.samba.org/).  The site
879 includes an FAQ-O-Matic which may cover questions unanswered by this
880 manual page.
881
882 The primary ftp site for rsync is
883 url(ftp://rsync.samba.org/pub/rsync)(ftp://rsync.samba.org/pub/rsync).
884
885 We would be delighted to hear from you if you like this program.
886
887 This program uses the excellent zlib compression library written by
888 Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler.
889
890 manpagesection(THANKS)
891
892 Thanks to Richard Brent, Brendan Mackay, Bill Waite, Stephen Rothwell
893 and David Bell for helpful suggestions and testing of rsync. I've
894 probably missed some people, my apologies if I have.
895
896
897 manpageauthor()
898
899 rsync was written by Andrew Tridgell and Paul Mackerras.  They may be
900 contacted via email at tridge@samba.org and
901 Paul.Mackerras@cs.anu.edu.au
902
903 rsync is now also maintained by Martin Pool <mbp@samba.org>
904
905