Further cleanup of Wireshark User Guide
[obnox/wireshark/wip.git] / docbook / wsug_src / WSUG_chapter_introduction.xml
index 5f59f99903e6ebff4ff2fa92efd9e54dde7dd7fe..1dda50d412a875c91532893456e420d8db822369 100644 (file)
     </para>
   </section>
   
-  <section id="ChIntroPronounce">
-    <title>A rose by any other name</title>
-    <para>
-      William Shakespeare wrote: 
-      <emphasis>
-       &quot;A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.&quot;
-      </emphasis>  
-      And so it is with Wireshark, as there appears to be two different 
-      ways that people pronounce the name. 
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Some people pronounce it ether-real, while others pronounce it 
-      e-the-real, as in ghostly, insubstantial, etc.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      You are welcome to call it what you like, as long as you find it 
-      useful. The FAQ gives the official pronunciation as "e-the-real".
-    </para>
-  </section>
-  
   <section id="ChIntroHistory">
     <title>A brief history of Wireshark</title>
     <para>
       In late 1997, Gerald Combs needed a tool for tracking down 
       networking problems and wanted to learn more about networking, so 
-      he started writing Wireshark as a way to solve both problems.
+      he started writing Ethereal as a way to solve both problems.
     </para>
     <para>
-      Wireshark was initially released, after several pauses in development, 
+      Ethereal was initially released, after several pauses in development, 
       in July 1998 as version 0.2.0.  Within days, patches, bug reports, 
-      and words of encouragement started arriving, so Wireshark was on its 
+      and words of encouragement started arriving, so Ethereal was on its 
       way to success.
     </para>
     <para>
     <para>
       In October, 1998, Guy Harris of Network Appliance was looking for 
          something better than tcpview, so he started applying patches and 
-         contributing dissectors to Wireshark.
+         contributing dissectors to Ethereal.
     </para>
     <para>
       In late 1998, Richard Sharpe, who was giving TCP/IP courses, saw its 
       dissectors and contributing patches.
     </para>
     <para>
-      The list of people who have contributed to Wireshark has become very long 
+      The list of people who have contributed to Ethereal has become very long 
          since then, and almost all of them started with a protocol that they 
-         needed that Wireshark did not already handle. So they copied an existing 
+         needed that Ethereal did not already handle. So they copied an existing 
          dissector and contributed the code back to the team.
     </para>
+    <para>
+       In 2006 the project moved house and re-emerged as Wireshark.
+    </para>
   </section>
   
   <section id="ChIntroMaintenance">
        Help/Contents and selecting the FAQ page in the upcoming dialog. 
     </para>
     <para>
-       An online version is available at the ethereal website:
+       An online version is available at the Wireshark website:
        <ulink url="&WiresharkFAQPage;">&WiresharkFAQPage;</ulink>. You might 
        prefer this online version, as it's typically more up to date and the HTML 
        format is easier to use.
          <para>
            The version number of Wireshark and the dependent libraries linked with 
                it, eg GTK+, etc. You can obtain this with the command 
-           <command>ethereal -v</command>.
+           <command>wireshark -v</command>.
          </para>
        </listitem>
        <listitem>
            You can obtain this traceback information with the following commands:
            <programlisting>
 <![CDATA[
-$ gdb `whereis ethereal | cut -f2 -d: | cut -d' ' -f2` core >& bt.txt
+$ gdb `whereis wireshark | cut -f2 -d: | cut -d' ' -f2` core >& bt.txt
 backtrace
 ^D
 $