Put the "-s" option in the SYNOPSIS section.
[obnox/wireshark/wip.git] / doc / text2pcap.pod
1
2 =head1 NAME
3
4 text2pcap - Generate a capture file from an ASCII hexdump of packets
5
6 =head1 SYNOPSYS
7
8 B<text2pcap>
9 S<[ B<-d> ]>
10 S<[ B<-q> ]>
11 S<[ B<-o> hex|oct ]>
12 S<[ B<-l> typenum ]>
13 S<[ B<-e> l3pid ]>
14 S<[ B<-i> proto ]>
15 S<[ B<-u> srcport,destport ]>
16 S<[ B<-s> srcport,destport,tag ]>
17 S<[ B<-t> timefmt ]>
18 I<infile>
19 I<outfile>
20
21 =head1 DESCRIPTION
22
23 B<Text2pcap> is a program that reads in an ASCII hex dump and writes
24 the data described into a B<libpcap>-style capture file. B<text2pcap>
25 can read hexdumps with multiple packets in them, and build a capture
26 file of multiple packets. B<text2pcap> is also capable of generating
27 dummy Ethernet, IP and UDP headers, in order to build fully
28 processable packet dumps from hexdumps of application-level data
29 only. 
30
31 B<Text2pcap> understands a hexdump of the form generated by I<od -t
32 x1>. In other words, each byte is individually displayed and
33 surrounded with a space. Each line begins with an offset describing
34 the position in the file. The offset is a hex number (can also be
35 octal - see B<-o>), of more than two hex digits. Here is a sample dump
36 that B<text2pcap> can recognize:
37
38     000000 00 e0 1e a7 05 6f 00 10 ........
39     000008 5a a0 b9 12 08 00 46 00 ........
40     000010 03 68 00 00 00 00 0a 2e ........
41     000018 ee 33 0f 19 08 7f 0f 19 ........
42     000020 03 80 94 04 00 00 10 01 ........
43     000028 16 a2 0a 00 03 50 00 0c ........
44     000030 01 01 0f 19 03 80 11 01 ........
45
46 There is no limit on the width or number of bytes per line. Also the
47 text dump at the end of the line is ignored. Bytes/hex numbers can be
48 uppercase or lowercase. Any text before the offset is ignored,
49 including email forwarding characters '>'. Any lines of text between
50 the bytestring lines is ignored. The offsets are used to track the
51 bytes, so offsets must be correct. Any line which has only bytes
52 without a leading offset is ignored. An offset is recognized as being
53 a hex number longer than two characters. Any text after the bytes is
54 ignored (e.g. the character dump). Any hex numbers in this text are
55 also ignored. An offset of zero is indicative of starting a new
56 packet, so a single text file with a series of hexdumps can be
57 converted into a packet capture with multiple packets. Multiple
58 packets are read in with timestamps differing by one second each. In
59 general, short of these restrictions, B<text2pcap> is pretty liberal
60 about reading in hexdumps and has been tested with a variety of
61 mangled outputs (including being forwarded through email multiple
62 times, with limited line wrap etc.)
63
64 There are a couple of other special features to note. Any line where
65 the first non-whitespace character is '#' will be ignored as a
66 comment. Any line beginning with #TEXT2PCAP is a directive and options
67 can be inserted after this command to be processed by
68 B<text2pcap>. Currently there are no directives implemented; in the
69 future, these may be used to give more fine grained control on the
70 dump and the way it should be processed e.g. timestamps, encapsulation
71 type etc.
72
73 B<Text2pcap> also allows the user to read in dumps of
74 application-level data, by inserting dummy L2, L3 and L4 headers
75 before each packet. The user can elect to insert Ethernet headers,
76 Ethernet and IP, or Ethernet, IP and UDP headers before each
77 packet. This allows Ethereal or any other full-packet decoder to
78 handle these dumps.
79
80 =head1 OPTIONS
81
82 =over 4
83
84 =item -d
85
86 Displays debugging information during the process. Can be used
87 multiple times to generate more debugging information.
88
89 =item -q
90
91 Be completely quiet during the process.
92
93 =item -o hex|oct
94
95 Specify the radix for the offsets (hex or octal). Defaults to
96 hex. This corresponds to the C<-A> option for I<od>.
97
98 =item -l
99
100 Specify the link-layer type of this packet. Default is Ethernet
101 (1). See I<net/bpf.h> for the complete list of possible
102 encapsulations. Note that this option should be used if your dump is a
103 complete hex dump of an encapsulated packet and you wish to specify
104 the exact type of encapsulation. Example: I<-l 7> for ARCNet packets.
105
106 =item -e l3pid
107
108 Include a dummy Ethernet header before each packet. Specify the L3PID
109 for the Ethernet header in hex. Use this option if your dump has Layer
110 3 header and payload (e.g. IP header), but no Layer 2
111 encapsulation. Example: I<-e 0x806> to specify an ARP packet. 
112
113 For IP packets, instead of generating a fake Ethernet header you can
114 also use I<-l 12> to indicate a raw IP packet to Ethereal. Note that
115 I<-l 12> does not work for any non-IP Layer 3 packet (e.g. ARP),
116 whereas generating a dummy Ethernet header with I<-e> works for any
117 sort of L3 packet.
118
119 =item -i proto
120
121 Include dummy IP headers before each packet. Specify the IP protocol
122 for the packet in decimal. Use this option if your dump is the payload
123 of an IP packet (i.e. has complete L4 information) but does not have
124 an IP header. Note that this automatically includes an appropriate
125 Ethernet header as well. Example: I<-i 46> to specify an RSVP packet
126 (IP protocol 46).
127
128 =item -u srcport,destport
129
130 Include dummy UDP headers before each packet. Specify the source and
131 destination UDP ports for the packet in decimal. Use this option if
132 your dump is the UDP payload of a packet but does not include any UDP,
133 IP or Ethernet headers. Note that this automatically includes
134 appropriate Ethernet and IP headers with each packet. Example: I<-u
135 1000,69> to make the packets look like TFTP/UDP packets.
136
137 =item -s srcport,destport,tag
138
139 Include dummy SCTP headers before each packet.  Specify the source and
140 destination SCTP ports, and verification tag, for the packet in decimal. 
141 Use this option if your dump is the SCTP payload of a packet but does not
142 include any SCTP, IP or Ethernet headers.  Note that this automatically
143 includes appropriate Ethernet and IP headers with each packet.  The SCTP
144 checksum will be set to 0, rather than being calculated.
145
146 =item -t timefmt
147
148 Treats the text before the packet as a date/time code; I<timefmt> is a
149 format string of the sort supported by B<strptime(3)>.
150 Example: The time "10:15:14.5476" has the format code "%H:%M:%S."
151
152 B<NOTE:> The subsecond component delimiter must be specified (.) but no
153 pattern is required; the remaining number is assumed to be fractions of
154 a second.
155
156 =head1 SEE ALSO
157
158 L<tcpdump(8)>, L<pcap(3)>, L<ethereal(1)>, L<editcap(1)>, L<strptime(3)>.
159
160 =head1 NOTES
161
162 B<Text2pcap> is part of the B<Ethereal> distribution.  The latest version
163 of B<Ethereal> can be found at B<http://www.ethereal.com>.
164
165 =head1 AUTHORS
166
167   Ashok Narayanan          <ashokn@cisco.com>