818e2aed7ef477a77c282a7ae7c43f9d0774c4ed
[obnox/wireshark/wip.git] / doc / README.developer
1 $Revision$
2 $Date$
3 $Author$
4
5 This file is a HOWTO for Wireshark developers. It describes how to start coding
6 a Wireshark protocol dissector and the use of some of the important functions
7 and variables.
8
9 This file is compiled to give in depth information on Wireshark.
10 It is by no means all inclusive and complete. Please feel free to send
11 remarks and patches to the developer mailing list.
12
13 0. Prerequisites.
14
15 Before starting to develop a new dissector, a "running" Wireshark build
16 environment is required - there's no such thing as a standalone "dissector
17 build toolkit".
18
19 How to setup such an environment is platform dependent, detailed information
20 about these steps can be found in the "Developer's Guide" (available from:
21 http://www.wireshark.org) and in the INSTALL and README files of the sources
22 root dir.
23
24 0.1. General README files.
25
26 You'll find additional information in the following README files:
27
28 - README.capture - the capture engine internals
29 - README.design - Wireshark software design - incomplete
30 - README.developer - this file
31 - README.display_filter - Display Filter Engine
32 - README.idl2wrs - CORBA IDL converter
33 - README.packaging - how to distribute a software package containing WS
34 - README.regression - regression testing of WS and TS
35 - README.stats_tree - a tree statistics counting specific packets
36 - README.tapping - "tap" a dissector to get protocol specific events
37 - README.xml-output - how to work with the PDML exported output
38 - wiretap/README.developer - how to add additional capture file types to
39   Wiretap
40
41 0.2. Dissector related README files.
42
43 You'll find additional dissector related information in the following README
44 files:
45
46 - README.binarytrees - fast access to large data collections
47 - README.malloc - how to obtain "memory leak free" memory
48 - README.plugins - how to "pluginize" a dissector
49 - README.request_response_tracking - how to track req./resp. times and such
50
51 0.3 Contributors
52
53 James Coe <jammer[AT]cin.net>
54 Gilbert Ramirez <gram[AT]alumni.rice.edu>
55 Jeff Foster <jfoste[AT]woodward.com>
56 Olivier Abad <oabad[AT]cybercable.fr>
57 Laurent Deniel <laurent.deniel[AT]free.fr>
58 Gerald Combs <gerald[AT]wireshark.org>
59 Guy Harris <guy[AT]alum.mit.edu>
60 Ulf Lamping <ulf.lamping[AT]web.de>
61
62 1. Setting up your protocol dissector code.
63
64 This section provides skeleton code for a protocol dissector. It also explains
65 the basic functions needed to enter values in the traffic summary columns,
66 add to the protocol tree, and work with registered header fields.
67
68 1.1 Code style.
69
70 1.1.1 Portability.
71
72 Wireshark runs on many platforms, and can be compiled with a number of
73 different compilers; here are some rules for writing code that will work
74 on multiple platforms.
75
76 Don't use C++-style comments (comments beginning with "//" and running
77 to the end of the line); Wireshark's dissectors are written in C, and
78 thus run through C rather than C++ compilers, and not all C compilers
79 support C++-style comments (GCC does, but IBM's C compiler for AIX, for
80 example, doesn't do so by default).
81
82 Don't initialize variables in their declaration with non-constant
83 values. Not all compilers support this. E.g. don't use
84         guint32 i = somearray[2];
85 use
86         guint32 i;
87         i = somearray[2];
88 instead.
89
90 Don't use zero-length arrays; not all compilers support them.  If an
91 array would have no members, just leave it out.
92
93 Don't declare variables in the middle of executable code; not all C
94 compilers support that.  Variables should be declared outside a
95 function, or at the beginning of a function or compound statement.
96
97 Don't use anonymous unions; not all compilers support it. 
98 Example:
99 typedef struct foo {
100   guint32 foo;
101   union {
102     guint32 foo_l;
103     guint16 foo_s;
104   } u;  /* have a name here */
105 } foo_t;
106
107 Don't use "uchar", "u_char", "ushort", "u_short", "uint", "u_int",
108 "ulong", "u_long" or "boolean"; they aren't defined on all platforms.
109 If you want an 8-bit unsigned quantity, use "guint8"; if you want an
110 8-bit character value with the 8th bit not interpreted as a sign bit,
111 use "guchar"; if you want a 16-bit unsigned quantity, use "guint16";
112 if you want a 32-bit unsigned quantity, use "guint32"; and if you want
113 an "int-sized" unsigned quantity, use "guint"; if you want a boolean,
114 use "gboolean".  Use "%d", "%u", "%x", and "%o" to print those types;
115 don't use "%ld", "%lu", "%lx", or "%lo", as longs are 64 bits long on
116 many platforms, but "guint32" is 32 bits long.
117
118 Don't use "long" to mean "signed 32-bit integer", and don't use
119 "unsigned long" to mean "unsigned 32-bit integer"; "long"s are 64 bits
120 long on many platforms.  Use "gint32" for signed 32-bit integers and use
121 "guint32" for unsigned 32-bit integers.
122
123 Don't use "long" to mean "signed 64-bit integer" and don't use "unsigned
124 long" to mean "unsigned 64-bit integer"; "long"s are 32 bits long on
125 many other platforms.  Don't use "long long" or "unsigned long long",
126 either, as not all platforms support them; use "gint64" or "guint64",
127 which will be defined as the appropriate types for 64-bit signed and
128 unsigned integers.
129
130 When printing or displaying the values of 64-bit integral data types,
131 don't use "%lld", "%llu", "%llx", or "%llo" - not all platforms
132 support "%ll" for printing 64-bit integral data types.  Instead, for
133 GLib routines, and routines that use them, such as all the routines in
134 Wireshark that take format arguments, use G_GINT64_MODIFIER, for example:
135
136     proto_tree_add_text(tree, tvb, offset, 8,
137                         "Sequence Number: %" G_GINT64_MODIFIER "u",
138                         sequence_number);
139
140 When using standard C routines, such as printf and scanf, use
141 PRId64, PRIu64, PRIx64, PRIX64, and PRIo64, for example:
142
143    printf("Sequence Number: %" PRIu64 "\n", sequence_number);
144
145 When specifying an integral constant that doesn't fit in 32 bits, don't
146 use "LL" at the end of the constant - not all compilers use "LL" for
147 that.  Instead, put the constant in a call to the "G_GINT64_CONSTANT()"
148 macro, e.g.
149
150         G_GINT64_CONSTANT(11644473600U)
151
152 rather than
153
154         11644473600ULL
155
156 Don't use a label without a statement following it.  For example,
157 something such as
158
159         if (...) {
160
161                 ...
162
163         done:
164         }
165
166 will not work with all compilers - you have to do
167
168         if (...) {
169
170                 ...
171
172         done:
173                 ;
174         }
175
176 with some statement, even if it's a null statement, after the label.
177
178 Don't use "bzero()", "bcopy()", or "bcmp()"; instead, use the ANSI C
179 routines
180
181         "memset()" (with zero as the second argument, so that it sets
182         all the bytes to zero);
183
184         "memcpy()" or "memmove()" (note that the first and second
185         arguments to "memcpy()" are in the reverse order to the
186         arguments to "bcopy()"; note also that "bcopy()" is typically
187         guaranteed to work on overlapping memory regions, while
188         "memcpy()" isn't, so if you may be copying from one region to a
189         region that overlaps it, use "memmove()", not "memcpy()" - but
190         "memcpy()" might be faster as a result of not guaranteeing
191         correct operation on overlapping memory regions);
192
193         and "memcmp()" (note that "memcmp()" returns 0, 1, or -1, doing
194         an ordered comparison, rather than just returning 0 for "equal"
195         and 1 for "not equal", as "bcmp()" does).
196
197 Not all platforms necessarily have "bzero()"/"bcopy()"/"bcmp()", and
198 those that do might not declare them in the header file on which they're
199 declared on your platform.
200
201 Don't use "index()" or "rindex()"; instead, use the ANSI C equivalents,
202 "strchr()" and "strrchr()".  Not all platforms necessarily have
203 "index()" or "rindex()", and those that do might not declare them in the
204 header file on which they're declared on your platform.
205
206 Don't fetch data from packets by getting a pointer to data in the packet
207 with "tvb_get_ptr()", casting that pointer to a pointer to a structure,
208 and dereferencing that pointer.  That pointer won't necessarily be aligned
209 on the proper boundary, which can cause crashes on some platforms (even
210 if it doesn't crash on an x86-based PC); furthermore, the data in a
211 packet is not necessarily in the byte order of the machine on which
212 Wireshark is running.  Use the tvbuff routines to extract individual
213 items from the packet, or use "proto_tree_add_item()" and let it extract
214 the items for you.
215
216 Don't use structures that overlay packet data, or into which you copy
217 packet data; the C programming language does not guarantee any
218 particular alignment of fields within a structure, and even the
219 extensions that try to guarantee that are compiler-specific and not
220 necessarily supported by all compilers used to build Wireshark.  Using
221 bitfields in those structures is even worse; the order of bitfields
222 is not guaranteed.
223
224 Don't use "ntohs()", "ntohl()", "htons()", or "htonl()"; the header
225 files required to define or declare them differ between platforms, and
226 you might be able to get away with not including the appropriate header
227 file on your platform but that might not work on other platforms.
228 Instead, use "g_ntohs()", "g_ntohl()", "g_htons()", and "g_htonl()";
229 those are declared by <glib.h>, and you'll need to include that anyway,
230 as Wireshark header files that all dissectors must include use stuff from
231 <glib.h>.
232
233 Don't fetch a little-endian value using "tvb_get_ntohs() or
234 "tvb_get_ntohl()" and then using "g_ntohs()", "g_htons()", "g_ntohl()",
235 or "g_htonl()" on the resulting value - the g_ routines in question
236 convert between network byte order (big-endian) and *host* byte order,
237 not *little-endian* byte order; not all machines on which Wireshark runs
238 are little-endian, even though PCs are.  Fetch those values using
239 "tvb_get_letohs()" and "tvb_get_letohl()".
240
241 Don't put a comma after the last element of an enum - some compilers may
242 either warn about it (producing extra noise) or refuse to accept it.
243
244 Don't include <unistd.h> without protecting it with
245
246         #ifdef HAVE_UNISTD_H
247
248                 ...
249
250         #endif
251
252 and, if you're including it to get routines such as "open()", "close()",
253 "read()", and "write()" declared, also include <io.h> if present:
254
255         #ifdef HAVE_IO_H
256         #include <io.h>
257         #endif
258
259 in order to declare the Windows C library routines "_open()",
260 "_close()", "_read()", and "_write()".  Your file must include <glib.h>
261 - which many of the Wireshark header files include, so you might not have
262 to include it explicitly - in order to get "open()", "close()",
263 "read()", "write()", etc. mapped to "_open()", "_close()", "_read()",
264 "_write()", etc..
265
266 Do not use "open()", "rename()", "mkdir()", "stat()", "unlink()", "remove()",
267 "fopen()", "freopen()" directly.  Instead use "ws_open()", "ws_rename()",
268 "ws_mkdir()", "ws_stat()", "ws_unlink()", "ws_remove()", "ws_fopen()",
269 "ws_freopen()": these wrapper functions change the path and file name from
270 UTF8 to UTF16 on Windows allowing the functions to work correctly when the
271 path or file name contain non-ASCII characters.
272
273 When opening a file with "ws_fopen()", "ws_freopen()", or "ws_fdopen()", if
274 the file contains ASCII text, use "r", "w", "a", and so on as the open mode
275 - but if it contains binary data, use "rb", "wb", and so on.  On
276 Windows, if a file is opened in a text mode, writing a byte with the
277 value of octal 12 (newline) to the file causes two bytes, one with the
278 value octal 15 (carriage return) and one with the value octal 12, to be
279 written to the file, and causes bytes with the value octal 15 to be
280 discarded when reading the file (to translate between C's UNIX-style
281 lines that end with newline and Windows' DEC-style lines that end with
282 carriage return/line feed).
283
284 In addition, that also means that when opening or creating a binary
285 file, you must use "ws_open()" (with O_CREAT and possibly O_TRUNC if the
286 file is to be created if it doesn't exist), and OR in the O_BINARY flag.
287 That flag is not present on most, if not all, UNIX systems, so you must
288 also do
289
290         #ifndef O_BINARY
291         #define O_BINARY        0
292         #endif
293
294 to properly define it for UNIX (it's not necessary on UNIX).
295
296 Don't use forward declarations of static arrays without a specified size
297 in a fashion such as this:
298
299         static const value_string foo_vals[];
300
301                 ...
302
303         static const value_string foo_vals[] = {
304                 { 0,            "Red" },
305                 { 1,            "Green" },
306                 { 2,            "Blue" },
307                 { 0,            NULL }
308         };
309
310 as some compilers will reject the first of those statements.  Instead,
311 initialize the array at the point at which it's first declared, so that
312 the size is known.
313
314 Don't put a comma after the last tuple of an initializer of an array.
315
316 For #define names and enum member names, prefix the names with a tag so
317 as to avoid collisions with other names - this might be more of an issue
318 on Windows, as it appears to #define names such as DELETE and
319 OPTIONAL.
320
321 Don't use the "numbered argument" feature that many UNIX printf's
322 implement, e.g.:
323
324         g_snprintf(add_string, 30, " - (%1$d) (0x%1$04x)", value);
325
326 as not all UNIX printf's implement it, and Windows printf doesn't appear
327 to implement it.  Use something like
328
329         g_snprintf(add_string, 30, " - (%d) (0x%04x)", value, value);
330
331 instead.
332
333 Don't use "variadic macros", such as
334
335         #define DBG(format, args...)    fprintf(stderr, format, ## args)
336
337 as not all C compilers support them.  Use macros that take a fixed
338 number of arguments, such as
339
340         #define DBG0(format)            fprintf(stderr, format)
341         #define DBG1(format, arg1)      fprintf(stderr, format, arg1)
342         #define DBG2(format, arg1, arg2) fprintf(stderr, format, arg1, arg2)
343
344                 ...
345
346 or something such as
347
348         #define DBG(args)               printf args
349
350 Don't use
351
352         case N ... M:
353
354 as that's not supported by all compilers.
355
356 snprintf() -> g_snprintf()
357 snprintf() is not available on all platforms, so it's a good idea to use the
358 g_snprintf() function declared by <glib.h> instead.
359
360 tmpnam() -> mkstemp()
361 tmpnam is insecure and should not be used any more. Wireshark brings its
362 own mkstemp implementation for use on platforms that lack mkstemp.
363 Note: mkstemp does not accept NULL as a parameter.
364
365 The pointer returned by a call to "tvb_get_ptr()" is not guaranteed to be
366 aligned on any particular byte boundary; this means that you cannot
367 safely cast it to any data type other than a pointer to "char",
368 "unsigned char", "guint8", or other one-byte data types.  You cannot,
369 for example, safely cast it to a pointer to a structure, and then access
370 the structure members directly; on some systems, unaligned accesses to
371 integral data types larger than 1 byte, and floating-point data types,
372 cause a trap, which will, at best, result in the OS slowly performing an
373 unaligned access for you, and will, on at least some platforms, cause
374 the program to be terminated.
375
376 Wireshark supports platforms with GLib 2.4[.x]/GTK+ 2.4[.x] or newer. 
377 If a Glib/GTK+ mechanism is available only in Glib/GTK+ versions 
378 newer than 2.4/2.4 then use "#if GTK_CHECK_VERSION(...)" to conditionally
379 compile code using that mechanism. 
380
381 When different code must be used on UN*X and Win32, use a #if or #ifdef
382 that tests _WIN32, not WIN32.  Try to write code portably whenever
383 possible, however; note that there are some routines in Wireshark with
384 platform-dependent implementations and platform-independent APIs, such
385 as the routines in epan/filesystem.c, allowing the code that calls it to
386 be written portably without #ifdefs.
387
388 1.1.2 String handling
389
390 Do not use functions such as strcat() or strcpy().
391 A lot of work has been done to remove the existing calls to these functions and
392 we do not want any new callers of these functions.
393
394 Instead use g_snprintf() since that function will if used correctly prevent
395 buffer overflows for large strings.
396
397 When using a buffer to create a string, do not use a buffer stored on the stack.
398 I.e. do not use a buffer declared as
399    char buffer[1024];
400 instead allocate a buffer dynamically using the emem routines (see
401 README.malloc) such as
402    char *buffer=NULL;
403    ...
404    #define MAX_BUFFER 1024
405    buffer=ep_alloc(MAX_BUFFER);
406    buffer[0]='\0';
407    ...
408    g_snprintf(buffer, MAX_BUFFER, ...
409
410 This avoids the stack from being corrupted in case there is a bug in your code
411 that accidentally writes beyond the end of the buffer.
412
413
414 If you write a routine that will create and return a pointer to a filled in
415 string and if that buffer will not be further processed or appended to after
416 the routine returns (except being added to the proto tree),
417 do not preallocate the buffer to fill in and pass as a parameter instead
418 pass a pointer to a pointer to the function and return a pointer to an
419 emem allocated buffer that will be automatically freed. (see README.malloc)
420
421 I.e. do not write code such as
422   static void
423   foo_to_str(char *string, ... ){
424      <fill in string>
425   }
426   ...
427      char buffer[1024];
428      ...
429      foo_to_str(buffer, ...
430      proto_tree_add_text(... buffer ...
431
432 instead write the code as
433   static void
434   foo_to_str(char **buffer, ...
435     #define MAX_BUFFER x
436     *buffer=ep_alloc(MAX_BUFFER);
437     <fill in *buffer>
438   }
439   ...
440     char *buffer;
441     ...
442     foo_to_str(&buffer, ...
443     proto_tree_add_text(... *buffer ...
444
445 Use ep_ allocated buffers. They are very fast and nice. These buffers are all
446 automatically free()d when the dissection of the current packet ends so you
447 don't have to worry about free()ing them explicitly in order to not leak memory.
448 Please read README.malloc.
449
450 1.1.3 Robustness.
451
452 Wireshark is not guaranteed to read only network traces that contain correctly-
453 formed packets. Wireshark is commonly used to track down networking
454 problems, and the problems might be due to a buggy protocol implementation
455 sending out bad packets.
456
457 Therefore, protocol dissectors not only have to be able to handle
458 correctly-formed packets without, for example, crashing or looping
459 infinitely, they also have to be able to handle *incorrectly*-formed
460 packets without crashing or looping infinitely.
461
462 Here are some suggestions for making dissectors more robust in the face
463 of incorrectly-formed packets:
464
465 Do *NOT* use "g_assert()" or "g_assert_not_reached()" in dissectors.
466 *NO* value in a packet's data should be considered "wrong" in the sense
467 that it's a problem with the dissector if found; if it cannot do
468 anything else with a particular value from a packet's data, the
469 dissector should put into the protocol tree an indication that the
470 value is invalid, and should return. You can use the DISSECTOR_ASSERT
471 macro for that purpose.
472
473 If you are allocating a chunk of memory to contain data from a packet,
474 or to contain information derived from data in a packet, and the size of
475 the chunk of memory is derived from a size field in the packet, make
476 sure all the data is present in the packet before allocating the buffer.
477 Doing so means that
478
479         1) Wireshark won't leak that chunk of memory if an attempt to
480            fetch data not present in the packet throws an exception
481
482 and
483
484         2) it won't crash trying to allocate an absurdly-large chunk of
485            memory if the size field has a bogus large value.
486
487 If you're fetching into such a chunk of memory a string from the buffer,
488 and the string has a specified size, you can use "tvb_get_*_string()",
489 which will check whether the entire string is present before allocating
490 a buffer for the string, and will also put a trailing '\0' at the end of
491 the buffer.
492
493 If you're fetching into such a chunk of memory a 2-byte Unicode string
494 from the buffer, and the string has a specified size, you can use
495 "tvb_get_ephemeral_faked_unicode()", which will check whether the entire
496 string is present before allocating a buffer for the string, and will also
497 put a trailing '\0' at the end of the buffer.  The resulting string will be
498 a sequence of single-byte characters; the only Unicode characters that
499 will be handled correctly are those in the ASCII range.  (Wireshark's
500 ability to handle non-ASCII strings is limited; it needs to be
501 improved.)
502
503 If you're fetching into such a chunk of memory a sequence of bytes from
504 the buffer, and the sequence has a specified size, you can use
505 "tvb_memdup()", which will check whether the entire sequence is present
506 before allocating a buffer for it.
507
508 Otherwise, you can check whether the data is present by using
509 "tvb_ensure_bytes_exist()" or by getting a pointer to the data by using
510 "tvb_get_ptr()", although note that there might be problems with using
511 the pointer from "tvb_get_ptr()" (see the item on this in the
512 Portability section above, and the next item below).
513
514 Note also that you should only fetch string data into a fixed-length
515 buffer if the code ensures that no more bytes than will fit into the
516 buffer are fetched ("the protocol ensures" isn't good enough, as
517 protocol specifications can't ensure only packets that conform to the
518 specification will be transmitted or that only packets for the protocol
519 in question will be interpreted as packets for that protocol by
520 Wireshark).  If there's no maximum length of string data to be fetched,
521 routines such as "tvb_get_*_string()" are safer, as they allocate a buffer
522 large enough to hold the string.  (Note that some variants of this call
523 require you to free the string once you're finished with it.)
524
525 If you have gotten a pointer using "tvb_get_ptr()", you must make sure
526 that you do not refer to any data past the length passed as the last
527 argument to "tvb_get_ptr()"; while the various "tvb_get" routines
528 perform bounds checking and throw an exception if you refer to data not
529 available in the tvbuff, direct references through a pointer gotten from
530 "tvb_get_ptr()" do not do any bounds checking.
531
532 If you have a loop that dissects a sequence of items, each of which has
533 a length field, with the offset in the tvbuff advanced by the length of
534 the item, then, if the length field is the total length of the item, and
535 thus can be zero, you *MUST* check for a zero-length item and abort the
536 loop if you see one.  Otherwise, a zero-length item could cause the
537 dissector to loop infinitely.  You should also check that the offset,
538 after having the length added to it, is greater than the offset before
539 the length was added to it, if the length field is greater than 24 bits
540 long, so that, if the length value is *very* large and adding it to the
541 offset causes an overflow, that overflow is detected.
542
543 If you are fetching a length field from the buffer, corresponding to the
544 length of a portion of the packet, and subtracting from that length a
545 value corresponding to the length of, for example, a header in the
546 packet portion in question, *ALWAYS* check that the value of the length
547 field is greater than or equal to the length you're subtracting from it,
548 and report an error in the packet and stop dissecting the packet if it's
549 less than the length you're subtracting from it.  Otherwise, the
550 resulting length value will be negative, which will either cause errors
551 in the dissector or routines called by the dissector, or, if the value
552 is interpreted as an unsigned integer, will cause the value to be
553 interpreted as a very large positive value.
554
555 Any tvbuff offset that is added to as processing is done on a packet
556 should be stored in a 32-bit variable, such as an "int"; if you store it
557 in an 8-bit or 16-bit variable, you run the risk of the variable
558 overflowing.
559
560 sprintf() -> g_snprintf()
561 Prevent yourself from using the sprintf() function, as it does not test the
562 length of the given output buffer and might be writing into unintended memory
563 areas. This function is one of the main causes of security problems like buffer
564 exploits and many other bugs that are very hard to find. It's much better to
565 use the g_snprintf() function declared by <glib.h> instead.
566
567 You should test your dissector against incorrectly-formed packets.  This
568 can be done using the randpkt and editcap utilities that come with the
569 Wireshark distribution.  Testing using randpkt can be done by generating
570 output at the same layer as your protocol, and forcing Wireshark/TShark
571 to decode it as your protocol, e.g. if your protocol sits on top of UDP:
572
573     randpkt -c 50000 -t dns randpkt.pcap
574     tshark -nVr randpkt.pcap -d udp.port==53,<myproto>
575
576 Testing using editcap can be done using preexisting capture files and the
577 "-E" flag, which introduces errors in a capture file.  E.g.:
578
579     editcap -E 0.03 infile.pcap outfile.pcap
580     tshark -nVr outfile.pcap
581
582 The script fuzz-test.sh is available to help automate these tests.
583
584 1.1.4 Name convention.
585
586 Wireshark uses the underscore_convention rather than the InterCapConvention for
587 function names, so new code should probably use underscores rather than
588 intercaps for functions and variable names. This is especially important if you
589 are writing code that will be called from outside your code.  We are just
590 trying to keep things consistent for other developers.
591
592 1.1.5 White space convention.
593
594 Avoid using tab expansions different from 8 column widths, as not all
595 text editors in use by the developers support this. For a detailed
596 discussion of tabs, spaces, and indentation, see
597
598     http://www.jwz.org/doc/tabs-vs-spaces.html
599
600 When creating a new file, you are free to choose an indentation logic.
601 Most of the files in Wireshark tend to use 2-space or 4-space
602 indentation. You are encouraged to write a short comment on the
603 indentation logic at the beginning of this new file, especially if
604 you're using non-mod-8 tabs.  The tabs-vs-spaces document above provides
605 examples of Emacs and vi modelines for this purpose.
606
607 When editing an existing file, try following the existing indentation
608 logic and even if it very tempting, never ever use a restyler/reindenter
609 utility on an existing file.  If you run across wildly varying
610 indentation styles within the same file, it might be helpful to send a
611 note to wireshark-dev for guidance.
612
613 1.1.6 Compiler warnings
614
615 You should write code that is free of compiler warnings. Such warnings will
616 often indicate questionable code and sometimes even real bugs, so it's best
617 to avoid warnings at all.
618
619 The compiler flags in the Makefiles are set to "treat warnings as errors",
620 so your code won't even compile when warnings occur.
621
622 1.2 Skeleton code.
623
624 Wireshark requires certain things when setting up a protocol dissector.
625 Below is skeleton code for a dissector that you can copy to a file and
626 fill in.  Your dissector should follow the naming convention of packet-
627 followed by the abbreviated name for the protocol.  It is recommended
628 that where possible you keep to the IANA abbreviated name for the
629 protocol, if there is one, or a commonly-used abbreviation for the
630 protocol, if any.
631
632 Usually, you will put your newly created dissector file into the directory
633 epan/dissectors, just like all the other packet-....c files already in there.
634
635 Also, please add your dissector file to the corresponding makefile,
636 described in section "1.9 Editing Makefile.common to add your dissector" below.
637
638 Dissectors that use the dissector registration to register with a lower level
639 dissector don't need to define a prototype in the .h file. For other
640 dissectors the main dissector routine should have a prototype in a header
641 file whose name is "packet-", followed by the abbreviated name for the
642 protocol, followed by ".h"; any dissector file that calls your dissector
643 should be changed to include that file.
644
645 You may not need to include all the headers listed in the skeleton
646 below, and you may need to include additional headers.  For example, the
647 code inside
648
649         #ifdef HAVE_LIBPCRE
650
651                 ...
652
653         #endif
654
655 is needed only if you are using a function from libpcre, e.g. the
656 "pcre_compile()" function.
657
658 The "$Id$" in the comment will be updated by Subversion when the file is
659 checked in.
660
661 When creating a new file, it is fine to just write "$Id$" as Subversion will
662 automatically fill in the identifier at the time the file will be added to the
663 SVN repository (committed).
664
665 ------------------------------------Cut here------------------------------------
666 /* packet-PROTOABBREV.c
667  * Routines for PROTONAME dissection
668  * Copyright 200x, YOUR_NAME <YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS>
669  *
670  * $Id$
671  *
672  * Wireshark - Network traffic analyzer
673  * By Gerald Combs <gerald@wireshark.org>
674  * Copyright 1998 Gerald Combs
675  *
676  * Copied from WHATEVER_FILE_YOU_USED (where "WHATEVER_FILE_YOU_USED"
677  * is a dissector file; if you just copied this from README.developer,
678  * don't bother with the "Copied from" - you don't even need to put
679  * in a "Copied from" if you copied an existing dissector, especially
680  * if the bulk of the code in the new dissector is your code)
681  *
682  * This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
683  * modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License
684  * as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2
685  * of the License, or (at your option) any later version.
686  *
687  * This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
688  * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
689  * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
690  * GNU General Public License for more details.
691  *
692  * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
693  * along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
694  * Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA  02110-1301, USA.
695  */
696
697 #ifdef HAVE_CONFIG_H
698 # include "config.h"
699 #endif
700
701 #include <stdio.h>
702 #include <stdlib.h>
703 #include <string.h>
704
705 #include <glib.h>
706
707 #include <epan/packet.h>
708 #include <epan/prefs.h>
709
710 /* IF PROTO exposes code to other dissectors, then it must be exported
711    in a header file. If not, a header file is not needed at all. */
712 #include "packet-PROTOABBREV.h"
713
714 /* Forward declaration we need below */
715 void proto_reg_handoff_PROTOABBREV(void);
716
717 /* Initialize the protocol and registered fields */
718 static int proto_PROTOABBREV = -1;
719 static int hf_PROTOABBREV_FIELDABBREV = -1;
720
721 /* Global sample preference ("controls" display of numbers) */
722 static gboolean gPREF_HEX = FALSE;
723
724 /* Initialize the subtree pointers */
725 static gint ett_PROTOABBREV = -1;
726
727 /* Code to actually dissect the packets */
728 static int
729 dissect_PROTOABBREV(tvbuff_t *tvb, packet_info *pinfo, proto_tree *tree)
730 {
731
732 /* Set up structures needed to add the protocol subtree and manage it */
733         proto_item *ti;
734         proto_tree *PROTOABBREV_tree;
735
736 /*  First, if at all possible, do some heuristics to check if the packet cannot
737  *  possibly belong to your protocol.  This is especially important for
738  *  protocols directly on top of TCP or UDP where port collisions are
739  *  common place (e.g., even though your protocol uses a well known port,
740  *  someone else may set up, for example, a web server on that port which,
741  *  if someone analyzed that web server's traffic in Wireshark, would result
742  *  in Wireshark handing an HTTP packet to your dissector).  For example:
743  */
744         /* Check that there's enough data */
745         if (tvb_length(tvb) < /* your protocol's smallest packet size */)
746                 return 0;
747
748         /* Get some values from the packet header, probably using tvb_get_*() */
749         if ( /* these values are not possible in PROTONAME */ )
750                 /*  This packet does not appear to belong to PROTONAME.
751                  *  Return 0 to give another dissector a chance to dissect it.
752                  */
753                 return 0;
754
755 /* Make entries in Protocol column and Info column on summary display */
756         if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_PROTOCOL))
757                 col_set_str(pinfo->cinfo, COL_PROTOCOL, "PROTOABBREV");
758
759 /* This field shows up as the "Info" column in the display; you should use
760    it, if possible, to summarize what's in the packet, so that a user looking
761    at the list of packets can tell what type of packet it is. See section 1.5
762    for more information.
763
764    Before changing the contents of a column you should make sure the column is
765    active by calling "check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_*)". If it is not active
766    don't bother setting it.
767
768    If you are setting the column to a constant string, use "col_set_str()",
769    as it's more efficient than the other "col_set_XXX()" calls.
770
771    If you're setting it to a string you've constructed, or will be
772    appending to the column later, use "col_add_str()".
773
774    "col_add_fstr()" can be used instead of "col_add_str()"; it takes
775    "printf()"-like arguments.  Don't use "col_add_fstr()" with a format
776    string of "%s" - just use "col_add_str()" or "col_set_str()", as it's
777    more efficient than "col_add_fstr()".
778
779    If you will be fetching any data from the packet before filling in
780    the Info column, clear that column first, in case the calls to fetch
781    data from the packet throw an exception because they're fetching data
782    past the end of the packet, so that the Info column doesn't have data
783    left over from the previous dissector; do
784
785         if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO))
786                 col_clear(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO);
787
788    */
789
790         if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO))
791                 col_set_str(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO, "XXX Request");
792
793 /* A protocol dissector can be called in 2 different ways:
794
795         (a) Operational dissection
796
797                 In this mode, Wireshark is only interested in the way protocols
798                 interact, protocol conversations are created, packets are
799                 reassembled and handed over to higher-level protocol dissectors.
800                 In this mode Wireshark does not build a so-called "protocol
801                 tree".
802
803         (b) Detailed dissection
804
805                 In this mode, Wireshark is also interested in all details of
806                 a given protocol, so a "protocol tree" is created.
807
808    Wireshark distinguishes between the 2 modes with the proto_tree pointer:
809         (a) <=> tree == NULL
810         (b) <=> tree != NULL
811
812    In the interest of speed, if "tree" is NULL, avoid building a
813    protocol tree and adding stuff to it, or even looking at any packet
814    data needed only if you're building the protocol tree, if possible.
815
816    Note, however, that you must fill in column information, create
817    conversations, reassemble packets, build any other persistent state
818    needed for dissection, and call subdissectors regardless of whether
819    "tree" is NULL or not.  This might be inconvenient to do without
820    doing most of the dissection work; the routines for adding items to
821    the protocol tree can be passed a null protocol tree pointer, in
822    which case they'll return a null item pointer, and
823    "proto_item_add_subtree()" returns a null tree pointer if passed a
824    null item pointer, so, if you're careful not to dereference any null
825    tree or item pointers, you can accomplish this by doing all the
826    dissection work.  This might not be as efficient as skipping that
827    work if you're not building a protocol tree, but if the code would
828    have a lot of tests whether "tree" is null if you skipped that work,
829    you might still be better off just doing all that work regardless of
830    whether "tree" is null or not. */
831         if (tree) {
832
833 /* NOTE: The offset and length values in the call to
834    "proto_tree_add_item()" define what data bytes to highlight in the hex
835    display window when the line in the protocol tree display
836    corresponding to that item is selected.
837
838    Supplying a length of -1 is the way to highlight all data from the
839    offset to the end of the packet. */
840
841 /* create display subtree for the protocol */
842                 ti = proto_tree_add_item(tree, proto_PROTOABBREV, tvb, 0, -1, FALSE);
843
844                 PROTOABBREV_tree = proto_item_add_subtree(ti, ett_PROTOABBREV);
845
846 /* add an item to the subtree, see section 1.6 for more information */
847                 proto_tree_add_item(PROTOABBREV_tree,
848                     hf_PROTOABBREV_FIELDABBREV, tvb, offset, len, FALSE);
849
850
851 /* Continue adding tree items to process the packet here */
852
853
854         }
855
856 /* If this protocol has a sub-dissector call it here, see section 1.8 */
857
858 /* Return the amount of data this dissector was able to dissect */
859         return tvb_length(tvb);
860 }
861
862
863 /* Register the protocol with Wireshark */
864
865 /* this format is require because a script is used to build the C function
866    that calls all the protocol registration.
867 */
868
869 void
870 proto_register_PROTOABBREV(void)
871 {
872         module_t *PROTOABBREV_module;
873
874 /* Setup list of header fields  See Section 1.6.1 for details*/
875         static hf_register_info hf[] = {
876                 { &hf_PROTOABBREV_FIELDABBREV,
877                         { "FIELDNAME",           "PROTOABBREV.FIELDABBREV",
878                         FIELDTYPE, FIELDBASE, FIELDCONVERT, BITMASK,
879                         "FIELDDESCR", HFILL }
880                 }
881         };
882
883 /* Setup protocol subtree array */
884         static gint *ett[] = {
885                 &ett_PROTOABBREV
886         };
887
888 /* Register the protocol name and description */
889         proto_PROTOABBREV = proto_register_protocol("PROTONAME",
890             "PROTOSHORTNAME", "PROTOABBREV");
891
892 /* Required function calls to register the header fields and subtrees used */
893         proto_register_field_array(proto_PROTOABBREV, hf, array_length(hf));
894         proto_register_subtree_array(ett, array_length(ett));
895
896 /* Register preferences module (See Section 2.6 for more on preferences) */
897         PROTOABBREV_module = prefs_register_protocol(proto_PROTOABBREV,
898             proto_reg_handoff_PROTOABBREV);
899
900 /* Register a sample preference */
901         prefs_register_bool_preference(PROTOABBREV_module, "show_hex",
902              "Display numbers in Hex",
903              "Enable to display numerical values in hexadecimal.",
904              &gPREF_HEX);
905 }
906
907
908 /* If this dissector uses sub-dissector registration add a registration routine.
909    This exact format is required because a script is used to find these
910    routines and create the code that calls these routines.
911
912    This function is also called by preferences whenever "Apply" is pressed
913    (see prefs_register_protocol above) so it should accommodate being called
914    more than once.
915 */
916 void
917 proto_reg_handoff_PROTOABBREV(void)
918 {
919         static gboolean inited = FALSE;
920
921         if (!inited) {
922
923             dissector_handle_t PROTOABBREV_handle;
924
925 /*  Use new_create_dissector_handle() to indicate that dissect_PROTOABBREV()
926  *  returns the number of bytes it dissected (or 0 if it thinks the packet
927  *  does not belong to PROTONAME).
928  */
929             PROTOABBREV_handle = new_create_dissector_handle(dissect_PROTOABBREV,
930                 proto_PROTOABBREV);
931             dissector_add("PARENT_SUBFIELD", ID_VALUE, PROTOABBREV_handle);
932
933             inited = TRUE;
934         }
935
936         /*
937           If you perform registration functions which are dependent upon
938           prefs the you should de-register everything which was associated
939           with the previous settings and re-register using the new prefs
940           settings here. In general this means you need to keep track of 
941           the PROTOABBREV_handle and the value the preference had at the time 
942           you registered.  The PROTOABBREV_handle value and the value of the preference 
943           can be saved using local statics in this function (proto_reg_handoff). ie.
944
945           static PROTOABBREV_handle;
946           static int currentPort = -1;
947
948           ...
949
950           if (currentPort != -1) {
951               dissector_delete("tcp.port", currentPort, PROTOABBREV_handle);
952           }
953
954           currentPort = gPortPref;
955
956           dissector_add("tcp.port", currentPort, PROTOABBREV_handle);
957
958         */
959 }
960
961 ------------------------------------Cut here------------------------------------
962
963 1.3 Explanation of needed substitutions in code skeleton.
964
965 In the above code block the following strings should be substituted with
966 your information.
967
968 YOUR_NAME       Your name, of course.  You do want credit, don't you?
969                 It's the only payment you will receive....
970 YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS      Keep those cards and letters coming.
971 WHATEVER_FILE_YOU_USED  Add this line if you are using another file as a
972                 starting point.
973 PROTONAME       The name of the protocol; this is displayed in the
974                 top-level protocol tree item for that protocol.
975 PROTOSHORTNAME  An abbreviated name for the protocol; this is displayed
976                 in the "Preferences" dialog box if your dissector has
977                 any preferences, in the dialog box of enabled protocols,
978                 and in the dialog box for filter fields when constructing
979                 a filter expression.
980 PROTOABBREV     A name for the protocol for use in filter expressions;
981                 it shall contain only lower-case letters, digits, and
982                 hyphens.
983 FIELDNAME       The displayed name for the header field.
984 FIELDABBREV     The abbreviated name for the header field. (NO SPACES)
985 FIELDTYPE       FT_NONE, FT_BOOLEAN, FT_UINT8, FT_UINT16, FT_UINT24,
986                 FT_UINT32, FT_UINT64, FT_INT8, FT_INT16, FT_INT24, FT_INT32,
987                 FT_INT64, FT_FLOAT, FT_DOUBLE, FT_ABSOLUTE_TIME,
988                 FT_RELATIVE_TIME, FT_STRING, FT_STRINGZ, FT_EBCDIC,
989                 FT_UINT_STRING, FT_ETHER, FT_BYTES, FT_IPv4, FT_IPv6, FT_IPXNET,
990                 FT_FRAMENUM, FT_PROTOCOL, FT_GUID, FT_OID
991 FIELDBASE       BASE_NONE, BASE_DEC, BASE_HEX, BASE_OCT, BASE_DEC_HEX,
992                 BASE_HEX_DEC, BASE_RANGE_STRING, BASE_CUSTOM
993 FIELDCONVERT    VALS(x), RVALS(x), TFS(x), NULL
994 BITMASK         Usually 0x0 unless using the TFS(x) field conversion.
995 FIELDDESCR      A brief description of the field, or NULL.
996 PARENT_SUBFIELD Lower level protocol field used for lookup, i.e. "tcp.port"
997 ID_VALUE        Lower level protocol field value that identifies this protocol
998                 For example the TCP or UDP port number
999
1000 If, for example, PROTONAME is "Internet Bogosity Discovery Protocol",
1001 PROTOSHORTNAME would be "IBDP", and PROTOABBREV would be "ibdp".  Try to
1002 conform with IANA names.
1003
1004 1.4 The dissector and the data it receives.
1005
1006
1007 1.4.1 Header file.
1008
1009 This is only needed if the dissector doesn't use self-registration to
1010 register itself with the lower level dissector, or if the protocol dissector
1011 wants/needs to expose code to other subdissectors.
1012
1013 The dissector must be declared exactly as follows in the file
1014 packet-PROTOABBREV.h:
1015
1016 int
1017 dissect_PROTOABBREV(tvbuff_t *tvb, packet_info *pinfo, proto_tree *tree);
1018
1019
1020 1.4.2 Extracting data from packets.
1021
1022 NOTE: See the file /epan/tvbuff.h for more details.
1023
1024 The "tvb" argument to a dissector points to a buffer containing the raw
1025 data to be analyzed by the dissector; for example, for a protocol
1026 running atop UDP, it contains the UDP payload (but not the UDP header,
1027 or any protocol headers above it).  A tvbuffer is an opaque data
1028 structure, the internal data structures are hidden and the data must be
1029 accessed via the tvbuffer accessors.
1030
1031 The accessors are:
1032
1033 Bit accessors for a maximum of 8-bits, 16-bits 32-bits and 64-bits:
1034
1035 guint8 tvb_get_bits8(tvbuff_t *tvb, gint bit_offset, gint no_of_bits);
1036 guint16 tvb_get_bits16(tvbuff_t *tvb, gint bit_offset, gint no_of_bits,gboolean little_endian);
1037 guint32 tvb_get_bits32(tvbuff_t *tvb, gint bit_offset, gint no_of_bits,gboolean little_endian);
1038 guint64 tvb_get_bits64(tvbuff_t *tvb, gint bit_offset, gint no_of_bits,gboolean little_endian);
1039
1040 Single-byte accessor:
1041
1042 guint8  tvb_get_guint8(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1043
1044 Network-to-host-order accessors for 16-bit integers (guint16), 24-bit
1045 integers, 32-bit integers (guint32), and 64-bit integers (guint64):
1046
1047 guint16 tvb_get_ntohs(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1048 guint32 tvb_get_ntoh24(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1049 guint32 tvb_get_ntohl(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1050 guint64 tvb_get_ntoh64(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1051
1052 Network-to-host-order accessors for single-precision and
1053 double-precision IEEE floating-point numbers:
1054
1055 gfloat tvb_get_ntohieee_float(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1056 gdouble tvb_get_ntohieee_double(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1057
1058 Little-Endian-to-host-order accessors for 16-bit integers (guint16),
1059 24-bit integers, 32-bit integers (guint32), and 64-bit integers
1060 (guint64):
1061
1062 guint16 tvb_get_letohs(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1063 guint32 tvb_get_letoh24(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1064 guint32 tvb_get_letohl(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1065 guint64 tvb_get_letoh64(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1066
1067 Little-Endian-to-host-order accessors for single-precision and
1068 double-precision IEEE floating-point numbers:
1069
1070 gfloat tvb_get_letohieee_float(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1071 gdouble tvb_get_letohieee_double(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1072
1073 Accessors for IPv4 and IPv6 addresses:
1074
1075 guint32 tvb_get_ipv4(tvbuff_t*, gint offset);
1076 void tvb_get_ipv6(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, struct e_in6_addr *addr);
1077
1078 NOTE: IPv4 addresses are not to be converted to host byte order before
1079 being passed to "proto_tree_add_ipv4()".  You should use "tvb_get_ipv4()"
1080 to fetch them, not "tvb_get_ntohl()" *OR* "tvb_get_letohl()" - don't,
1081 for example, try to use "tvb_get_ntohl()", find that it gives you the
1082 wrong answer on the PC on which you're doing development, and try
1083 "tvb_get_letohl()" instead, as "tvb_get_letohl()" will give the wrong
1084 answer on big-endian machines.
1085
1086 Accessors for GUID:
1087
1088 void tvb_get_ntohguid(tvbuff_t *, gint offset, e_guid_t *guid);
1089 void tvb_get_letohguid(tvbuff_t *, gint offset, e_guid_t *guid);
1090
1091 String accessors:
1092
1093 guint8 *tvb_get_string(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length);
1094 guint8 *tvb_get_ephemeral_string(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length);
1095
1096 Returns a null-terminated buffer containing data from the specified
1097 tvbuff, starting at the specified offset, and containing the specified
1098 length worth of characters (the length of the buffer will be length+1,
1099 as it includes a null character to terminate the string).
1100
1101 tvb_get_string() returns a buffer allocated by g_malloc() so you must
1102 g_free() it when you are finished with the string. Failure to g_free() this
1103 buffer will lead to memory leaks.
1104 tvb_get_ephemeral_string() returns a buffer allocated from a special heap
1105 with a lifetime until the next packet is dissected. You do not need to
1106 free() this buffer, it will happen automatically once the next packet is
1107 dissected.
1108
1109
1110 guint8 *tvb_get_stringz(tvbuff_t *tvb, gint offset, gint *lengthp);
1111 guint8 *tvb_get_ephemeral_stringz(tvbuff_t *tvb, gint offset, gint *lengthp);
1112
1113 Returns a null-terminated buffer, allocated with "g_malloc()",
1114 containing data from the specified tvbuff, starting at the
1115 specified offset, and containing all characters from the tvbuff up to
1116 and including a terminating null character in the tvbuff.  "*lengthp"
1117 will be set to the length of the string, including the terminating null.
1118
1119 tvb_get_stringz() returns a buffer allocated by g_malloc() so you must
1120 g_free() it when you are finished with the string. Failure to g_free() this
1121 buffer will lead to memory leaks.
1122 tvb_get_ephemeral_stringz() returns a buffer allocated from a special heap
1123 with a lifetime until the next packet is dissected. You do not need to
1124 free() this buffer, it will happen automatically once the next packet is
1125 dissected.
1126
1127
1128 guint8 *tvb_fake_unicode(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length, gboolean little_endian);
1129 guint8 *tvb_get_ephemeral_faked_unicode(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length, gboolean little_endian);
1130
1131 Converts a 2-byte unicode string to an ASCII string.
1132 Returns a null-terminated buffer containing data from the specified
1133 tvbuff, starting at the specified offset, and containing the specified
1134 length worth of characters (the length of the buffer will be length+1,
1135 as it includes a null character to terminate the string).
1136
1137 tvb_fake_unicode() returns a buffer allocated by g_malloc() so you must
1138 g_free() it when you are finished with the string. Failure to g_free() this
1139 buffer will lead to memory leaks.
1140 tvb_get_ephemeral_faked_unicode() returns a buffer allocated from a special
1141 heap with a lifetime until the next packet is dissected. You do not need to
1142 free() this buffer, it will happen automatically once the next packet is
1143 dissected.
1144
1145
1146 Copying memory:
1147 guint8* tvb_memcpy(tvbuff_t*, guint8* target, gint offset, gint length);
1148
1149 Copies into the specified target the specified length's worth of data
1150 from the specified tvbuff, starting at the specified offset.
1151
1152 guint8* tvb_memdup(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length);
1153 guint8* ep_tvb_memdup(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length);
1154
1155 Returns a buffer, allocated with "g_malloc()", containing the specified
1156 length's worth of data from the specified tvbuff, starting at the
1157 specified offset. The ephemeral variant is freed automatically after the
1158 packet is dissected.
1159
1160 Pointer-retrieval:
1161 /* WARNING! This function is possibly expensive, temporarily allocating
1162  * another copy of the packet data. Furthermore, it's dangerous because once
1163  * this pointer is given to the user, there's no guarantee that the user will
1164  * honor the 'length' and not overstep the boundaries of the buffer.
1165  */
1166 guint8* tvb_get_ptr(tvbuff_t*, gint offset, gint length);
1167
1168 The reason that tvb_get_ptr() might have to allocate a copy of its data
1169 only occurs with TVBUFF_COMPOSITES, data that spans multiple tvbuffers.
1170 If the user requests a pointer to a range of bytes that span the member
1171 tvbuffs that make up the TVBUFF_COMPOSITE, the data will have to be
1172 copied to another memory region to assure that all the bytes are
1173 contiguous.
1174
1175
1176
1177 1.5 Functions to handle columns in the traffic summary window.
1178
1179 The topmost pane of the main window is a list of the packets in the
1180 capture, possibly filtered by a display filter.
1181
1182 Each line corresponds to a packet, and has one or more columns, as
1183 configured by the user.
1184
1185 Many of the columns are handled by code outside individual dissectors;
1186 most dissectors need only specify the value to put in the "Protocol" and
1187 "Info" columns.
1188
1189 Columns are specified by COL_ values; the COL_ value for the "Protocol"
1190 field, typically giving an abbreviated name for the protocol (but not
1191 the all-lower-case abbreviation used elsewhere) is COL_PROTOCOL, and the
1192 COL_ value for the "Info" field, giving a summary of the contents of the
1193 packet for that protocol, is COL_INFO.
1194
1195 A value for a column should only be added if the user specified that it
1196 be displayed; to check whether a given column is to be displayed, call
1197 'check_col' with the COL_ value for that field as an argument - it will
1198 return TRUE if the column is to be displayed and FALSE if it is not to
1199 be displayed.
1200
1201 The value for a column can be specified with one of several functions,
1202 all of which take the 'fd' argument to the dissector as their first
1203 argument, and the COL_ value for the column as their second argument.
1204
1205 1.5.1 The col_set_str function.
1206
1207 'col_set_str' takes a string as its third argument, and sets the value
1208 for the column to that value.  It assumes that the pointer passed to it
1209 points to a string constant or a static "const" array, not to a
1210 variable, as it doesn't copy the string, it merely saves the pointer
1211 value; the argument can itself be a variable, as long as it always
1212 points to a string constant or a static "const" array.
1213
1214 It is more efficient than 'col_add_str' or 'col_add_fstr'; however, if
1215 the dissector will be using 'col_append_str' or 'col_append_fstr" to
1216 append more information to the column, the string will have to be copied
1217 anyway, so it's best to use 'col_add_str' rather than 'col_set_str' in
1218 that case.
1219
1220 For example, to set the "Protocol" column
1221 to "PROTOABBREV":
1222
1223         if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_PROTOCOL))
1224                 col_set_str(pinfo->cinfo, COL_PROTOCOL, "PROTOABBREV");
1225
1226
1227 1.5.2 The col_add_str function.
1228
1229 'col_add_str' takes a string as its third argument, and sets the value
1230 for the column to that value.  It takes the same arguments as
1231 'col_set_str', but copies the string, so that if the string is, for
1232 example, an automatic variable that won't remain in scope when the
1233 dissector returns, it's safe to use.
1234
1235
1236 1.5.3 The col_add_fstr function.
1237
1238 'col_add_fstr' takes a 'printf'-style format string as its third
1239 argument, and 'printf'-style arguments corresponding to '%' format
1240 items in that string as its subsequent arguments.  For example, to set
1241 the "Info" field to "<XXX> request, <N> bytes", where "reqtype" is a
1242 string containing the type of the request in the packet and "n" is an
1243 unsigned integer containing the number of bytes in the request:
1244
1245         if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO))
1246                 col_add_fstr(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO, "%s request, %u bytes",
1247                     reqtype, n);
1248
1249 Don't use 'col_add_fstr' with a format argument of just "%s" -
1250 'col_add_str', or possibly even 'col_set_str' if the string that matches
1251 the "%s" is a static constant string, will do the same job more
1252 efficiently.
1253
1254
1255 1.5.4 The col_clear function.
1256
1257 If the Info column will be filled with information from the packet, that
1258 means that some data will be fetched from the packet before the Info
1259 column is filled in.  If the packet is so small that the data in
1260 question cannot be fetched, the routines to fetch the data will throw an
1261 exception (see the comment at the beginning about tvbuffers improving
1262 the handling of short packets - the tvbuffers keep track of how much
1263 data is in the packet, and throw an exception on an attempt to fetch
1264 data past the end of the packet, so that the dissector won't process
1265 bogus data), causing the Info column not to be filled in.
1266
1267 This means that the Info column will have data for the previous
1268 protocol, which would be confusing if, for example, the Protocol column
1269 had data for this protocol.
1270
1271 Therefore, before a dissector fetches any data whatsoever from the
1272 packet (unless it's a heuristic dissector fetching data to determine
1273 whether the packet is one that it should dissect, in which case it
1274 should check, before fetching the data, whether there's any data to
1275 fetch; if there isn't, it should return FALSE), it should set the
1276 Protocol column and the Info column.
1277
1278 If the Protocol column will ultimately be set to, for example, a value
1279 containing a protocol version number, with the version number being a
1280 field in the packet, the dissector should, before fetching the version
1281 number field or any other field from the packet, set it to a value
1282 without a version number, using 'col_set_str', and should later set it
1283 to a value with the version number after it's fetched the version
1284 number.
1285
1286 If the Info column will ultimately be set to a value containing
1287 information from the packet, the dissector should, before fetching any
1288 fields from the packet, clear the column using 'col_clear' (which is
1289 more efficient than clearing it by calling 'col_set_str' or
1290 'col_add_str' with a null string), and should later set it to the real
1291 string after it's fetched the data to use when doing that.
1292
1293
1294 1.5.5 The col_append_str function.
1295
1296 Sometimes the value of a column, especially the "Info" column, can't be
1297 conveniently constructed at a single point in the dissection process;
1298 for example, it might contain small bits of information from many of the
1299 fields in the packet.  'col_append_str' takes, as arguments, the same
1300 arguments as 'col_add_str', but the string is appended to the end of the
1301 current value for the column, rather than replacing the value for that
1302 column.  (Note that no blank separates the appended string from the
1303 string to which it is appended; if you want a blank there, you must add
1304 it yourself as part of the string being appended.)
1305
1306
1307 1.5.6 The col_append_fstr function.
1308
1309 'col_append_fstr' is to 'col_add_fstr' as 'col_append_str' is to
1310 'col_add_str' - it takes, as arguments, the same arguments as
1311 'col_add_fstr', but the formatted string is appended to the end of the
1312 current value for the column, rather than replacing the value for that
1313 column.
1314
1315 1.5.7 The col_append_sep_str and col_append_sep_fstr functions.
1316
1317 In specific situations the developer knows that a column's value will be
1318 created in a stepwise manner, where the appended values are listed. Both
1319 'col_append_sep_str' and 'col_append_sep_fstr' functions will add an item
1320 separator between two consecutive items, and will not add the separator at the
1321 beginning of the column. The remainder of the work both functions do is
1322 identical to what 'col_append_str' and 'col_append_fstr' do.
1323
1324 1.5.8 The col_set_fence and col_prepend_fence_fstr functions.
1325
1326 Sometimes a dissector may be called multiple times for different PDUs in the
1327 same frame (for example in the case of SCTP chunk bundling: several upper
1328 layer data packets may be contained in one SCTP packet).  If the upper layer
1329 dissector calls 'col_set_str()' or 'col_clear()' on the Info column when it
1330 begins dissecting each of those PDUs then when the frame is fully dissected
1331 the Info column would contain only the string from the last PDU in the frame.
1332 The 'col_set_fence' function erects a "fence" in the column that prevents
1333 subsequent 'col_...' calls from clearing the data currently in that column.
1334 For example, the SCTP dissector calls 'col_set_fence' on the Info column
1335 after it has called any subdissectors for that chunk so that subdissectors
1336 of any subsequent chunks may only append to the Info column.
1337 'col_prepend_fence_fstr' prepends data before a fence (moving it if
1338 necessary).  It will create a fence at the end of the prended data if the
1339 fence does not already exist.
1340
1341
1342 1.5.9 The col_set_time function.
1343
1344 The 'col_set_time' function takes an nstime value as its third argument.
1345 This nstime value is a relative value and will be added as such to the
1346 column. The fourth argument is the filtername holding this value. This
1347 way, rightclicking on the column makes it possible to build a filter
1348 based on the time-value.
1349
1350 For example:
1351
1352 if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_REL_CONV_TIME)) {
1353   nstime_delta(&ts, &pinfo->fd->abs_ts, &tcpd->ts_first);
1354   col_set_time(pinfo->cinfo, COL_REL_CONV_TIME, &ts, "tcp.time_relative");
1355 }
1356
1357
1358 1.6 Constructing the protocol tree.
1359
1360 The middle pane of the main window, and the topmost pane of a packet
1361 popup window, are constructed from the "protocol tree" for a packet.
1362
1363 The protocol tree, or proto_tree, is a GNode, the N-way tree structure
1364 available within GLIB. Of course the protocol dissectors don't care
1365 what a proto_tree really is; they just pass the proto_tree pointer as an
1366 argument to the routines which allow them to add items and new branches
1367 to the tree.
1368
1369 When a packet is selected in the packet-list pane, or a packet popup
1370 window is created, a new logical protocol tree (proto_tree) is created.
1371 The pointer to the proto_tree (in this case, 'protocol tree'), is passed
1372 to the top-level protocol dissector, and then to all subsequent protocol
1373 dissectors for that packet, and then the GUI tree is drawn via
1374 proto_tree_draw().
1375
1376 The logical proto_tree needs to know detailed information about the protocols
1377 and fields about which information will be collected from the dissection
1378 routines. By strictly defining (or "typing") the data that can be attached to a
1379 proto tree, searching and filtering becomes possible.  This means that for
1380 every protocol and field (which I also call "header fields", since they are
1381 fields in the protocol headers) which might be attached to a tree, some
1382 information is needed.
1383
1384 Every dissector routine will need to register its protocols and fields
1385 with the central protocol routines (in proto.c). At first I thought I
1386 might keep all the protocol and field information about all the
1387 dissectors in one file, but decentralization seemed like a better idea.
1388 That one file would have gotten very large; one small change would have
1389 required a re-compilation of the entire file. Also, by allowing
1390 registration of protocols and fields at run-time, loadable modules of
1391 protocol dissectors (perhaps even user-supplied) is feasible.
1392
1393 To do this, each protocol should have a register routine, which will be
1394 called when Wireshark starts.  The code to call the register routines is
1395 generated automatically; to arrange that a protocol's register routine
1396 be called at startup:
1397
1398         the file containing a dissector's "register" routine must be
1399         added to "DISSECTOR_SRC" in "epan/dissectors/Makefile.common";
1400
1401         the "register" routine must have a name of the form
1402         "proto_register_XXX";
1403
1404         the "register" routine must take no argument, and return no
1405         value;
1406
1407         the "register" routine's name must appear in the source file
1408         either at the beginning of the line, or preceded only by "void "
1409         at the beginning of the line (that would typically be the
1410         definition) - other white space shouldn't cause a problem, e.g.:
1411
1412 void proto_register_XXX(void) {
1413
1414         ...
1415
1416 }
1417
1418 and
1419
1420 void
1421 proto_register_XXX( void )
1422 {
1423
1424         ...
1425
1426 }
1427
1428         and so on should work.
1429
1430 For every protocol or field that a dissector wants to register, a variable of
1431 type int needs to be used to keep track of the protocol. The IDs are
1432 needed for establishing parent/child relationships between protocols and
1433 fields, as well as associating data with a particular field so that it
1434 can be stored in the logical tree and displayed in the GUI protocol
1435 tree.
1436
1437 Some dissectors will need to create branches within their tree to help
1438 organize header fields. These branches should be registered as header
1439 fields. Only true protocols should be registered as protocols. This is
1440 so that a display filter user interface knows how to distinguish
1441 protocols from fields.
1442
1443 A protocol is registered with the name of the protocol and its
1444 abbreviation.
1445
1446 Here is how the frame "protocol" is registered.
1447
1448         int proto_frame;
1449
1450         proto_frame = proto_register_protocol (
1451                 /* name */            "Frame",
1452                 /* short name */      "Frame",
1453                 /* abbrev */          "frame" );
1454
1455 A header field is also registered with its name and abbreviation, but
1456 information about its data type is needed. It helps to look at
1457 the header_field_info struct to see what information is expected:
1458
1459 struct header_field_info {
1460         const char                      *name;
1461         const char                      *abbrev;
1462         enum ftenum                     type;
1463         int                             display;
1464         const void                      *strings;
1465         guint32                         bitmask;
1466         const char                      *blurb;
1467         .....
1468 };
1469
1470 name
1471 ----
1472 A string representing the name of the field. This is the name
1473 that will appear in the graphical protocol tree.  It must be a non-empty
1474 string.
1475
1476 abbrev
1477 ------
1478 A string with an abbreviation of the field. We concatenate the
1479 abbreviation of the parent protocol with an abbreviation for the field,
1480 using a period as a separator. For example, the "src" field in an IP packet
1481 would have "ip.src" as an abbreviation. It is acceptable to have
1482 multiple levels of periods if, for example, you have fields in your
1483 protocol that are then subdivided into subfields. For example, TRMAC
1484 has multiple error fields, so the abbreviations follow this pattern:
1485 "trmac.errors.iso", "trmac.errors.noniso", etc.
1486
1487 The abbreviation is the identifier used in a display filter.  If it is
1488 an empty string then the field will not be filterable.
1489
1490 type
1491 ----
1492 The type of value this field holds. The current field types are:
1493
1494         FT_NONE                 No field type. Used for fields that
1495                                 aren't given a value, and that can only
1496                                 be tested for presence or absence; a
1497                                 field that represents a data structure,
1498                                 with a subtree below it containing
1499                                 fields for the members of the structure,
1500                                 or that represents an array with a
1501                                 subtree below it containing fields for
1502                                 the members of the array, might be an
1503                                 FT_NONE field.
1504         FT_PROTOCOL             Used for protocols which will be placing
1505                                 themselves as top-level items in the
1506                                 "Packet Details" pane of the UI.
1507         FT_BOOLEAN              0 means "false", any other value means
1508                                 "true".
1509         FT_FRAMENUM             A frame number; if this is used, the "Go
1510                                 To Corresponding Frame" menu item can
1511                                 work on that field.
1512         FT_UINT8                An 8-bit unsigned integer.
1513         FT_UINT16               A 16-bit unsigned integer.
1514         FT_UINT24               A 24-bit unsigned integer.
1515         FT_UINT32               A 32-bit unsigned integer.
1516         FT_UINT64               A 64-bit unsigned integer.
1517         FT_INT8                 An 8-bit signed integer.
1518         FT_INT16                A 16-bit signed integer.
1519         FT_INT24                A 24-bit signed integer.
1520         FT_INT32                A 32-bit signed integer.
1521         FT_INT64                A 64-bit signed integer.
1522         FT_FLOAT                A single-precision floating point number.
1523         FT_DOUBLE               A double-precision floating point number.
1524         FT_ABSOLUTE_TIME        Seconds (4 bytes) and nanoseconds (4 bytes)
1525                                 of time displayed as month name, month day,
1526                                 year, hours, minutes, and seconds with 9
1527                                 digits after the decimal point.
1528         FT_RELATIVE_TIME        Seconds (4 bytes) and nanoseconds (4 bytes)
1529                                 of time displayed as seconds and 9 digits
1530                                 after the decimal point.
1531         FT_STRING               A string of characters, not necessarily
1532                                 NUL-terminated, but possibly NUL-padded.
1533                                 This, and the other string-of-characters
1534                                 types, are to be used for text strings,
1535                                 not raw binary data.
1536         FT_STRINGZ              A NUL-terminated string of characters.
1537         FT_EBCDIC               A string of characters, not necessarily
1538                                 NUL-terminated, but possibly NUL-padded.
1539                                 The data from the packet is converted from
1540                                 EBCDIC to ASCII before displaying to the user.
1541         FT_UINT_STRING          A counted string of characters, consisting
1542                                 of a count (represented as an integral value,
1543                                 of width given in the proto_tree_add_item()
1544                                 call) followed immediately by that number of
1545                                 characters.
1546         FT_ETHER                A six octet string displayed in
1547                                 Ethernet-address format.
1548         FT_BYTES                A string of bytes with arbitrary values;
1549                                 used for raw binary data.
1550         FT_IPv4                 A version 4 IP address (4 bytes) displayed
1551                                 in dotted-quad IP address format (4
1552                                 decimal numbers separated by dots).
1553         FT_IPv6                 A version 6 IP address (16 bytes) displayed
1554                                 in standard IPv6 address format.
1555         FT_IPXNET               An IPX address displayed in hex as a 6-byte
1556                                 network number followed by a 6-byte station
1557                                 address.
1558         FT_GUID                 A Globally Unique Identifier
1559         FT_OID                  An ASN.1 Object Identifier
1560
1561 Some of these field types are still not handled in the display filter
1562 routines, but the most common ones are. The FT_UINT* variables all
1563 represent unsigned integers, and the FT_INT* variables all represent
1564 signed integers; the number on the end represent how many bits are used
1565 to represent the number.
1566
1567 display
1568 -------
1569 The display field has a couple of overloaded uses. This is unfortunate,
1570 but since we're using C as an application programming language, this sometimes
1571 makes for cleaner programs. Right now I still think that overloading
1572 this variable was okay.
1573
1574 For integer fields (FT_UINT* and FT_INT*), this variable represents the
1575 base in which you would like the value displayed.  The acceptable bases
1576 are:
1577
1578         BASE_DEC,
1579         BASE_HEX,
1580         BASE_OCT,
1581         BASE_DEC_HEX,
1582         BASE_HEX_DEC,
1583         BASE_CUSTOM
1584
1585 BASE_DEC, BASE_HEX, and BASE_OCT are decimal, hexadecimal, and octal,
1586 respectively. BASE_DEC_HEX and BASE_HEX_DEC display value in two bases
1587 (the 1st representation followed by the 2nd in parenthesis).
1588
1589 BASE_CUSTOM allows one to specify a callback function pointer that will
1590 format the value. The function pointer of the same type as defined by
1591 custom_fmt_func_t in epan/proto.h, specifically:
1592
1593   void func(gchar *, guint32);
1594
1595 The first argument is a pointer to a buffer of the ITEM_LABEL_LENGTH size
1596 and the second argument is the value to be formatted.
1597
1598 For FT_BOOLEAN fields that are also bitfields, 'display' is used to tell
1599 the proto_tree how wide the parent bitfield is.  With integers this is
1600 not needed since the type of integer itself (FT_UINT8, FT_UINT16,
1601 FT_UINT24, FT_UINT32, etc.) tells the proto_tree how wide the parent
1602 bitfield is.
1603
1604 Additionally, BASE_NONE is used for 'display' as a NULL-value. That is,
1605 for non-integers and non-bitfield FT_BOOLEANs, you'll want to use BASE_NONE
1606 in the 'display' field.  You may not use BASE_NONE for integers.
1607
1608 It is possible that in the future we will record the endianness of
1609 integers. If so, it is likely that we'll use a bitmask on the display field
1610 so that integers would be represented as BEND|BASE_DEC or LEND|BASE_HEX.
1611 But that has not happened yet.
1612
1613 strings
1614 -------
1615 Some integer fields, of type FT_UINT*, need labels to represent the true
1616 value of a field.  You could think of those fields as having an
1617 enumerated data type, rather than an integral data type.
1618
1619 A 'value_string' structure is a way to map values to strings.
1620
1621         typedef struct _value_string {
1622                 guint32  value;
1623                 gchar   *strptr;
1624         } value_string;
1625
1626 For fields of that type, you would declare an array of "value_string"s:
1627
1628         static const value_string valstringname[] = {
1629                 { INTVAL1, "Descriptive String 1" },
1630                 { INTVAL2, "Descriptive String 2" },
1631                 { 0,       NULL }
1632         };
1633
1634 (the last entry in the array must have a NULL 'strptr' value, to
1635 indicate the end of the array).  The 'strings' field would be set to
1636 'VALS(valstringname)'.
1637
1638 If the field has a numeric rather than an enumerated type, the 'strings'
1639 field would be set to NULL.
1640
1641 If the field has a numeric type that might logically fit in ranges of values
1642 one can use a range_string struct.
1643
1644 Thus a 'range_string' structure is a way to map ranges to strings.
1645
1646         typedef struct _range_string {
1647                 guint32        value_min;
1648                 guint32        value_max;
1649                 const gchar   *strptr;
1650         } range_string;
1651
1652 For fields of that type, you would declare an array of "range_string"s:
1653
1654         static const range_string rvalstringname[] = {
1655                 { INTVAL_MIN1, INTVALMAX1, "Descriptive String 1" },
1656                 { INTVAL_MIN2, INTVALMAX2, "Descriptive String 2" },
1657                 { 0,           0,          NULL                   }
1658         };
1659
1660 If INTVAL_MIN equals INTVAL_MAX for a given entry the range_string
1661 behavior collapses to the one of value_string.
1662 For FT_(U)INT* fields that need a 'range_string' struct, the 'strings' field
1663 would be set to 'RVALS(rvalstringname)'. Furthermore, 'display' field must be
1664 ORed with 'BASE_RANGE_STRING' (e.g. BASE_DEC|BASE_RANGE_STRING).
1665
1666 FT_BOOLEANs have a default map of 0 = "False", 1 (or anything else) = "True".
1667 Sometimes it is useful to change the labels for boolean values (e.g.,
1668 to "Yes"/"No", "Fast"/"Slow", etc.).  For these mappings, a struct called
1669 true_false_string is used.
1670
1671         typedef struct true_false_string {
1672                 char    *true_string;
1673                 char    *false_string;
1674         } true_false_string;
1675
1676 For Boolean fields for which "False" and "True" aren't the desired
1677 labels, you would declare a "true_false_string"s:
1678
1679         static const true_false_string boolstringname = {
1680                 "String for True",
1681                 "String for False"
1682         };
1683
1684 Its two fields are pointers to the string representing truth, and the
1685 string representing falsehood.  For FT_BOOLEAN fields that need a
1686 'true_false_string' struct, the 'strings' field would be set to
1687 'TFS(&boolstringname)'.
1688
1689 If the Boolean field is to be displayed as "False" or "True", the
1690 'strings' field would be set to NULL.
1691
1692 Wireshark predefines a whole range of ready made "true_false_string"s
1693 in tfs.h, included via packet.h.
1694
1695 bitmask
1696 -------
1697 If the field is a bitfield, then the bitmask is the mask which will
1698 leave only the bits needed to make the field when ANDed with a value.
1699 The proto_tree routines will calculate 'bitshift' automatically
1700 from 'bitmask', by finding the rightmost set bit in the bitmask.
1701 This shift is applied before applying string mapping functions or 
1702 filtering.
1703 If the field is not a bitfield, then bitmask should be set to 0.
1704
1705 blurb
1706 -----
1707 This is a string giving a proper description of the field.  It should be
1708 at least one grammatically complete sentence, or NULL in which case the
1709 name field is used.
1710 It is meant to provide a more detailed description of the field than the
1711 name alone provides. This information will be used in the man page, and
1712 in a future GUI display-filter creation tool. We might also add tooltips
1713 to the labels in the GUI protocol tree, in which case the blurb would
1714 be used as the tooltip text.
1715
1716
1717 1.6.1 Field Registration.
1718
1719 Protocol registration is handled by creating an instance of the
1720 header_field_info struct (or an array of such structs), and
1721 calling the registration function along with the registration ID of
1722 the protocol that is the parent of the fields. Here is a complete example:
1723
1724         static int proto_eg = -1;
1725         static int hf_field_a = -1;
1726         static int hf_field_b = -1;
1727
1728         static hf_register_info hf[] = {
1729
1730                 { &hf_field_a,
1731                 { "Field A",    "proto.field_a", FT_UINT8, BASE_HEX, NULL,
1732                         0xf0, "Field A represents Apples", HFILL }},
1733
1734                 { &hf_field_b,
1735                 { "Field B",    "proto.field_b", FT_UINT16, BASE_DEC, VALS(vs),
1736                         0x0, "Field B represents Bananas", HFILL }}
1737         };
1738
1739         proto_eg = proto_register_protocol("Example Protocol",
1740             "PROTO", "proto");
1741         proto_register_field_array(proto_eg, hf, array_length(hf));
1742
1743 Be sure that your array of hf_register_info structs is declared 'static',
1744 since the proto_register_field_array() function does not create a copy
1745 of the information in the array... it uses that static copy of the
1746 information that the compiler created inside your array. Here's the
1747 layout of the hf_register_info struct:
1748
1749 typedef struct hf_register_info {
1750         int                     *p_id;  /* pointer to parent variable */
1751         header_field_info       hfinfo;
1752 } hf_register_info;
1753
1754 Also be sure to use the handy array_length() macro found in packet.h
1755 to have the compiler compute the array length for you at compile time.
1756
1757 If you don't have any fields to register, do *NOT* create a zero-length
1758 "hf" array; not all compilers used to compile Wireshark support them.
1759 Just omit the "hf" array, and the "proto_register_field_array()" call,
1760 entirely.
1761
1762 It is OK to have header fields with a different format be registered with
1763 the same abbreviation. For instance, the following is valid:
1764
1765         static hf_register_info hf[] = {
1766
1767                 { &hf_field_8bit, /* 8-bit version of proto.field */
1768                 { "Field (8 bit)", "proto.field", FT_UINT8, BASE_DEC, NULL,
1769                         0x00, "Field represents FOO", HFILL }},
1770
1771                 { &hf_field_32bit, /* 32-bit version of proto.field */
1772                 { "Field (32 bit)", "proto.field", FT_UINT32, BASE_DEC, NULL,
1773                         0x00, "Field represents FOO", HFILL }}
1774         };
1775
1776 This way a filter expression can match a header field, irrespective of the
1777 representation of it in the specific protocol context. This is interesting
1778 for protocols with variable-width header fields.
1779
1780 The HFILL macro at the end of the struct will set reasonable default values
1781 for internally used fields.
1782
1783 1.6.2 Adding Items and Values to the Protocol Tree.
1784
1785 A protocol item is added to an existing protocol tree with one of a
1786 handful of proto_XXX_DO_YYY() functions.
1787
1788 Remember that it only makes sense to add items to a protocol tree if its
1789 proto_tree pointer is not null. Should you add an item to a NULL tree, then
1790 the proto_XXX_DO_YYY() function will immediately return. The cost of this
1791 function call can be avoided by checking for the tree pointer.
1792
1793 Subtrees can be made with the proto_item_add_subtree() function:
1794
1795         item = proto_tree_add_item(....);
1796         new_tree = proto_item_add_subtree(item, tree_type);
1797
1798 This will add a subtree under the item in question; a subtree can be
1799 created under an item made by any of the "proto_tree_add_XXX" functions,
1800 so that the tree can be given an arbitrary depth.
1801
1802 Subtree types are integers, assigned by
1803 "proto_register_subtree_array()".  To register subtree types, pass an
1804 array of pointers to "gint" variables to hold the subtree type values to
1805 "proto_register_subtree_array()":
1806
1807         static gint ett_eg = -1;
1808         static gint ett_field_a = -1;
1809
1810         static gint *ett[] = {
1811                 &ett_eg,
1812                 &ett_field_a
1813         };
1814
1815         proto_register_subtree_array(ett, array_length(ett));
1816
1817 in your "register" routine, just as you register the protocol and the
1818 fields for that protocol.
1819
1820 There are several functions that the programmer can use to add either
1821 protocol or field labels to the proto_tree:
1822
1823         proto_item*
1824         proto_tree_add_item(tree, id, tvb, start, length, little_endian);
1825
1826         proto_item*
1827         proto_tree_add_bits_item(tree, id, tvb, bit_offset, no_of_bits, little_endian);
1828
1829         proto_item *
1830         proto_tree_add_bits_ret_val(tree, id, tvb, bit_offset, no_of_bits, return_value, little_endian);
1831
1832         proto_item*
1833         proto_tree_add_none_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, format, ...);
1834
1835         proto_item*
1836         proto_tree_add_protocol_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1837             format, ...);
1838
1839         proto_item *
1840         proto_tree_add_bytes(tree, id, tvb, start, length, start_ptr);
1841
1842         proto_item *
1843         proto_tree_add_bytes_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, start_ptr,
1844             format, ...);
1845
1846         proto_item *
1847         proto_tree_add_bytes_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1848             start_ptr, format, ...);
1849
1850         proto_item *
1851         proto_tree_add_time(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr);
1852
1853         proto_item *
1854         proto_tree_add_time_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr,
1855             format, ...);
1856
1857         proto_item *
1858         proto_tree_add_time_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1859             value_ptr, format, ...);
1860
1861         proto_item *
1862         proto_tree_add_ipxnet(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1863
1864         proto_item *
1865         proto_tree_add_ipxnet_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1866             format, ...);
1867
1868         proto_item *
1869         proto_tree_add_ipxnet_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1870             value, format, ...);
1871
1872         proto_item *
1873         proto_tree_add_ipv4(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1874
1875         proto_item *
1876         proto_tree_add_ipv4_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1877             format, ...);
1878
1879         proto_item *
1880         proto_tree_add_ipv4_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1881             value, format, ...);
1882
1883         proto_item *
1884         proto_tree_add_ipv6(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr);
1885
1886         proto_item *
1887         proto_tree_add_ipv6_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr,
1888             format, ...);
1889
1890         proto_item *
1891         proto_tree_add_ipv6_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1892             value_ptr, format, ...);
1893
1894         proto_item *
1895         proto_tree_add_ether(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr);
1896
1897         proto_item *
1898         proto_tree_add_ether_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr,
1899             format, ...);
1900
1901         proto_item *
1902         proto_tree_add_ether_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1903             value_ptr, format, ...);
1904
1905         proto_item *
1906         proto_tree_add_string(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr);
1907
1908         proto_item *
1909         proto_tree_add_string_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr,
1910             format, ...);
1911
1912         proto_item *
1913         proto_tree_add_string_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1914             value_ptr, format, ...);
1915
1916         proto_item *
1917         proto_tree_add_boolean(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1918
1919         proto_item *
1920         proto_tree_add_boolean_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1921             format, ...);
1922
1923         proto_item *
1924         proto_tree_add_boolean_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1925             value, format, ...);
1926
1927         proto_item *
1928         proto_tree_add_float(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1929
1930         proto_item *
1931         proto_tree_add_float_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1932             format, ...);
1933
1934         proto_item *
1935         proto_tree_add_float_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1936             value, format, ...);
1937
1938         proto_item *
1939         proto_tree_add_double(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1940
1941         proto_item *
1942         proto_tree_add_double_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1943             format, ...);
1944
1945         proto_item *
1946         proto_tree_add_double_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1947             value, format, ...);
1948
1949         proto_item *
1950         proto_tree_add_uint(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1951
1952         proto_item *
1953         proto_tree_add_uint_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1954             format, ...);
1955
1956         proto_item *
1957         proto_tree_add_uint_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1958             value, format, ...);
1959
1960         proto_item *
1961         proto_tree_add_uint64(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1962
1963         proto_item *
1964         proto_tree_add_uint64_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1965             format, ...);
1966
1967         proto_item *
1968         proto_tree_add_uint64_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1969             value, format, ...);
1970
1971         proto_item *
1972         proto_tree_add_int(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1973
1974         proto_item *
1975         proto_tree_add_int_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1976             format, ...);
1977
1978         proto_item *
1979         proto_tree_add_int_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1980             value, format, ...);
1981
1982         proto_item *
1983         proto_tree_add_int64(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value);
1984
1985         proto_item *
1986         proto_tree_add_int64_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value,
1987             format, ...);
1988
1989         proto_item *
1990         proto_tree_add_int64_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
1991             value, format, ...);
1992
1993         proto_item*
1994         proto_tree_add_text(tree, tvb, start, length, format, ...);
1995
1996         proto_item*
1997         proto_tree_add_text_valist(tree, tvb, start, length, format, ap);
1998
1999         proto_item *
2000         proto_tree_add_guid(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr);
2001
2002         proto_item *
2003         proto_tree_add_guid_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr,
2004             format, ...);
2005
2006         proto_item *
2007         proto_tree_add_guid_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
2008             value_ptr, format, ...);
2009
2010         proto_item *
2011         proto_tree_add_oid(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr);
2012
2013         proto_item *
2014         proto_tree_add_oid_format(tree, id, tvb, start, length, value_ptr,
2015             format, ...);
2016
2017         proto_item *
2018         proto_tree_add_oid_format_value(tree, id, tvb, start, length,
2019             value_ptr, format, ...);
2020
2021         proto_item *
2022         proto_tree_add_bitmask(tree, tvb, start, header, ett, **fields,
2023             little_endian);
2024
2025         proto_item *
2026         proto_tree_add_bitmask_text(proto_tree *tree, tvbuff_t *tvb,
2027             guint offset, guint len, const char *name, const char *fallback,
2028             gint ett, const int **fields, gboolean little_endian, int flags);
2029
2030 The 'tree' argument is the tree to which the item is to be added.  The
2031 'tvb' argument is the tvbuff from which the item's value is being
2032 extracted; the 'start' argument is the offset from the beginning of that
2033 tvbuff of the item being added, and the 'length' argument is the length,
2034 in bytes, of the item, bit_offset is the offset in bits and no_of_bits
2035 is the lenght in bits.
2036
2037 The length of some items cannot be determined until the item has been
2038 dissected; to add such an item, add it with a length of -1, and, when the
2039 dissection is complete, set the length with 'proto_item_set_len()':
2040
2041         void
2042         proto_item_set_len(ti, length);
2043
2044 The "ti" argument is the value returned by the call that added the item
2045 to the tree, and the "length" argument is the length of the item.
2046
2047 proto_tree_add_item()
2048 ---------------------
2049 proto_tree_add_item is used when you wish to do no special formatting.
2050 The item added to the GUI tree will contain the name (as passed in the
2051 proto_register_*() function) and a value.  The value will be fetched
2052 from the tvbuff by proto_tree_add_item(), based on the type of the field
2053 and, for integral and Boolean fields, the byte order of the value; the
2054 byte order is specified by the 'little_endian' argument, which is TRUE
2055 if the value is little-endian and FALSE if it is big-endian.
2056
2057 Now that definitions of fields have detailed information about bitfield
2058 fields, you can use proto_tree_add_item() with no extra processing to
2059 add bitfield values to your tree.  Here's an example.  Take the Format
2060 Identifier (FID) field in the Transmission Header (TH) portion of the SNA
2061 protocol.  The FID is the high nibble of the first byte of the TH.  The
2062 FID would be registered like this:
2063
2064         name            = "Format Identifier"
2065         abbrev          = "sna.th.fid"
2066         type            = FT_UINT8
2067         display         = BASE_HEX
2068         strings         = sna_th_fid_vals
2069         bitmask         = 0xf0
2070
2071 The bitmask contains the value which would leave only the FID if bitwise-ANDed
2072 against the parent field, the first byte of the TH.
2073
2074 The code to add the FID to the tree would be;
2075
2076         proto_tree_add_item(bf_tree, hf_sna_th_fid, tvb, offset, 1, TRUE);
2077
2078 The definition of the field already has the information about bitmasking
2079 and bitshifting, so it does the work of masking and shifting for us!
2080 This also means that you no longer have to create value_string structs
2081 with the values bitshifted.  The value_string for FID looks like this,
2082 even though the FID value is actually contained in the high nibble.
2083 (You'd expect the values to be 0x0, 0x10, 0x20, etc.)
2084
2085 /* Format Identifier */
2086 static const value_string sna_th_fid_vals[] = {
2087         { 0x0,  "SNA device <--> Non-SNA Device" },
2088         { 0x1,  "Subarea Node <--> Subarea Node" },
2089         { 0x2,  "Subarea Node <--> PU2" },
2090         { 0x3,  "Subarea Node or SNA host <--> Subarea Node" },
2091         { 0x4,  "?" },
2092         { 0x5,  "?" },
2093         { 0xf,  "Adjaced Subarea Nodes" },
2094         { 0,    NULL }
2095 };
2096
2097 The final implication of this is that display filters work the way you'd
2098 naturally expect them to. You'd type "sna.th.fid == 0xf" to find Adjacent
2099 Subarea Nodes. The user does not have to shift the value of the FID to
2100 the high nibble of the byte ("sna.th.fid == 0xf0") as was necessary
2101 in the past.
2102
2103 proto_tree_add_bits_item()
2104 --------------------------
2105 Adds a number of bits to the protocol tree which does not have to be byte aligned.
2106 The offset and length is in bits.
2107 Output format:
2108
2109 ..10 1010 10.. .... "value" (formated as FT_ indicates).
2110
2111 proto_tree_add_bits_ret_val()
2112 -----------------------------
2113 Works in the same way but alo returns the value of the read bits.
2114
2115 proto_tree_add_protocol_format()
2116 --------------------------------
2117 proto_tree_add_protocol_format is used to add the top-level item for the
2118 protocol when the dissector routine wants complete control over how the
2119 field and value will be represented on the GUI tree.  The ID value for
2120 the protocol is passed in as the "id" argument; the rest of the
2121 arguments are a "printf"-style format and any arguments for that format.
2122 The caller must include the name of the protocol in the format; it is
2123 not added automatically as in proto_tree_add_item().
2124
2125 proto_tree_add_none_format()
2126 ----------------------------
2127 proto_tree_add_none_format is used to add an item of type FT_NONE.
2128 The caller must include the name of the field in the format; it is
2129 not added automatically as in proto_tree_add_item().
2130
2131 proto_tree_add_bytes()
2132 proto_tree_add_time()
2133 proto_tree_add_ipxnet()
2134 proto_tree_add_ipv4()
2135 proto_tree_add_ipv6()
2136 proto_tree_add_ether()
2137 proto_tree_add_string()
2138 proto_tree_add_boolean()
2139 proto_tree_add_float()
2140 proto_tree_add_double()
2141 proto_tree_add_uint()
2142 proto_tree_add_uint64()
2143 proto_tree_add_int()
2144 proto_tree_add_int64()
2145 proto_tree_add_guid()
2146 proto_tree_add_oid()
2147 ------------------------
2148 These routines are used to add items to the protocol tree if either:
2149
2150         the value of the item to be added isn't just extracted from the
2151         packet data, but is computed from data in the packet;
2152
2153         the value was fetched into a variable.
2154
2155 The 'value' argument has the value to be added to the tree.
2156
2157 NOTE: in all cases where the 'value' argument is a pointer, a copy is
2158 made of the object pointed to; if you have dynamically allocated a
2159 buffer for the object, that buffer will not be freed when the protocol
2160 tree is freed - you must free the buffer yourself when you don't need it
2161 any more.
2162
2163 For proto_tree_add_bytes(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to a
2164 sequence of bytes.
2165
2166 For proto_tree_add_time(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to an
2167 "nstime_t", which is a structure containing the time to be added; it has
2168 'secs' and 'nsecs' members, giving the integral part and the fractional
2169 part of a time in units of seconds, with 'nsecs' being the number of
2170 nanoseconds.  For absolute times, "secs" is a UNIX-style seconds since
2171 January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT value.
2172
2173 For proto_tree_add_ipxnet(), the 'value' argument is a 32-bit IPX
2174 network address.
2175
2176 For proto_tree_add_ipv4(), the 'value' argument is a 32-bit IPv4
2177 address, in network byte order.
2178
2179 For proto_tree_add_ipv6(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to a
2180 128-bit IPv6 address.
2181
2182 For proto_tree_add_ether(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to a
2183 48-bit MAC address.
2184
2185 For proto_tree_add_string(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to a
2186 text string.
2187
2188 For proto_tree_add_boolean(), the 'value' argument is a 32-bit integer.
2189 It is masked and shifted as defined by the field info after which zero
2190 means "false", and non-zero means "true".
2191
2192 For proto_tree_add_float(), the 'value' argument is a 'float' in the
2193 host's floating-point format.
2194
2195 For proto_tree_add_double(), the 'value' argument is a 'double' in the
2196 host's floating-point format.
2197
2198 For proto_tree_add_uint(), the 'value' argument is a 32-bit unsigned
2199 integer value, in host byte order.  (This routine cannot be used to add
2200 64-bit integers.)
2201
2202 For proto_tree_add_uint64(), the 'value' argument is a 64-bit unsigned
2203 integer value, in host byte order.
2204
2205 For proto_tree_add_int(), the 'value' argument is a 32-bit signed
2206 integer value, in host byte order.  (This routine cannot be used to add
2207 64-bit integers.)
2208
2209 For proto_tree_add_int64(), the 'value' argument is a 64-bit signed
2210 integer value, in host byte order.
2211
2212 For proto_tree_add_guid(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to an
2213 e_guid_t structure.
2214
2215 For proto_tree_add_oid(), the 'value_ptr' argument is a pointer to an
2216 ASN.1 Object Identifier.
2217
2218 proto_tree_add_bytes_format()
2219 proto_tree_add_time_format()
2220 proto_tree_add_ipxnet_format()
2221 proto_tree_add_ipv4_format()
2222 proto_tree_add_ipv6_format()
2223 proto_tree_add_ether_format()
2224 proto_tree_add_string_format()
2225 proto_tree_add_boolean_format()
2226 proto_tree_add_float_format()
2227 proto_tree_add_double_format()
2228 proto_tree_add_uint_format()
2229 proto_tree_add_uint64_format()
2230 proto_tree_add_int_format()
2231 proto_tree_add_int64_format()
2232 proto_tree_add_guid_format()
2233 proto_tree_add_oid_format()
2234 ----------------------------
2235 These routines are used to add items to the protocol tree when the
2236 dissector routine wants complete control over how the field and value
2237 will be represented on the GUI tree.  The argument giving the value is
2238 the same as the corresponding proto_tree_add_XXX() function; the rest of
2239 the arguments are a "printf"-style format and any arguments for that
2240 format.  The caller must include the name of the field in the format; it
2241 is not added automatically as in the proto_tree_add_XXX() functions.
2242
2243 proto_tree_add_bytes_format_value()
2244 proto_tree_add_time_format_value()
2245 proto_tree_add_ipxnet_format_value()
2246 proto_tree_add_ipv4_format_value()
2247 proto_tree_add_ipv6_format_value()
2248 proto_tree_add_ether_format_value()
2249 proto_tree_add_string_format_value()
2250 proto_tree_add_boolean_format_value()
2251 proto_tree_add_float_format_value()
2252 proto_tree_add_double_format_value()
2253 proto_tree_add_uint_format_value()
2254 proto_tree_add_uint64_format_value()
2255 proto_tree_add_int_format_value()
2256 proto_tree_add_int64_format_value()
2257 proto_tree_add_guid_format_value()
2258 proto_tree_add_oid_format_value()
2259 ------------------------------------
2260
2261 These routines are used to add items to the protocol tree when the
2262 dissector routine wants complete control over how the value will be
2263 represented on the GUI tree.  The argument giving the value is the same
2264 as the corresponding proto_tree_add_XXX() function; the rest of the
2265 arguments are a "printf"-style format and any arguments for that format.
2266 With these routines, unlike the proto_tree_add_XXX_format() routines,
2267 the name of the field is added automatically as in the
2268 proto_tree_add_XXX() functions; only the value is added with the format.
2269
2270 proto_tree_add_text()
2271 ---------------------
2272 proto_tree_add_text() is used to add a label to the GUI tree.  It will
2273 contain no value, so it is not searchable in the display filter process.
2274 This function was needed in the transition from the old-style proto_tree
2275 to this new-style proto_tree so that Wireshark would still decode all
2276 protocols w/o being able to filter on all protocols and fields.
2277 Otherwise we would have had to cripple Wireshark's functionality while we
2278 converted all the old-style proto_tree calls to the new-style proto_tree
2279 calls.  In other words, you should not use this in new code unless you've got
2280 a specific reason (see below).
2281
2282 This can also be used for items with subtrees, which may not have values
2283 themselves - the items in the subtree are the ones with values.
2284
2285 For a subtree, the label on the subtree might reflect some of the items
2286 in the subtree.  This means the label can't be set until at least some
2287 of the items in the subtree have been dissected.  To do this, use
2288 'proto_item_set_text()' or 'proto_item_append_text()':
2289
2290         void
2291         proto_item_set_text(proto_item *ti, ...);
2292
2293         void
2294         proto_item_append_text(proto_item *ti, ...);
2295
2296 'proto_item_set_text()' takes as an argument the value returned by
2297 'proto_tree_add_text()', a 'printf'-style format string, and a set of
2298 arguments corresponding to '%' format items in that string, and replaces
2299 the text for the item created by 'proto_tree_add_text()' with the result
2300 of applying the arguments to the format string.
2301
2302 'proto_item_append_text()' is similar, but it appends to the text for
2303 the item the result of applying the arguments to the format string.
2304
2305 For example, early in the dissection, one might do:
2306
2307         ti = proto_tree_add_text(tree, tvb, offset, length, <label>);
2308
2309 and later do
2310
2311         proto_item_set_text(ti, "%s: %s", type, value);
2312
2313 after the "type" and "value" fields have been extracted and dissected.
2314 <label> would be a label giving what information about the subtree is
2315 available without dissecting any of the data in the subtree.
2316
2317 Note that an exception might be thrown when trying to extract the values of
2318 the items used to set the label, if not all the bytes of the item are
2319 available.  Thus, one should create the item with text that is as
2320 meaningful as possible, and set it or append additional information to
2321 it as the values needed to supply that information are extracted.
2322
2323 proto_tree_add_text_valist()
2324 ----------------------------
2325 This is like proto_tree_add_text(), but takes, as the last argument, a
2326 'va_list'; it is used to allow routines that take a printf-like
2327 variable-length list of arguments to add a text item to the protocol
2328 tree.
2329
2330 proto_tree_add_bitmask() and proto_tree_add_bitmask_text()
2331 ----------------------------------------------------------
2332 This function provides an easy to use and convenient helper function
2333 to manage many types of common bitmasks that occur in protocols.
2334
2335 This function will dissect a 1/2/3/4 byte large bitmask into its individual
2336 fields.
2337 header is an integer type and must be of type FT_[U]INT{8|16|24|32} and
2338 represents the entire width of the bitmask.
2339
2340 'header' and 'ett' are the hf fields and ett field respectively to create an
2341 expansion that covers the 1-4 bytes of the bitmask.
2342
2343 '**fields' is a NULL terminated a array of pointers to hf fields representing
2344 the individual subfields of the bitmask. These fields must either be integers
2345 of the same byte width as 'header' or of the type FT_BOOLEAN.
2346 Each of the entries in '**fields' will be dissected as an item under the
2347 'header' expansion and also IF the field is a boolean and IF it is set to 1,
2348 then the name of that boolean field will be printed on the 'header' expansion
2349 line.  For integer type subfields that have a value_string defined, the
2350 matched string from that value_string will be printed on the expansion line as well.
2351
2352 Example: (from the scsi dissector)
2353         static int hf_scsi_inq_peripheral        = -1;
2354         static int hf_scsi_inq_qualifier         = -1;
2355         static gint ett_scsi_inq_peripheral = -1;
2356         ...
2357         static const int *peripheal_fields[] = {
2358                 &hf_scsi_inq_qualifier,
2359                 &hf_scsi_inq_devtype,
2360                 NULL
2361         };
2362         ...
2363         /* Qualifier and DeviceType */
2364         proto_tree_add_bitmask(tree, tvb, offset, hf_scsi_inq_peripheral, ett_scsi_inq_peripheral, peripheal_fields, FALSE);
2365         offset+=1;
2366         ...
2367         { &hf_scsi_inq_peripheral,
2368           {"Peripheral", "scsi.inquiry.preipheral", FT_UINT8, BASE_HEX,
2369            NULL, 0, NULL, HFILL}},
2370         { &hf_scsi_inq_qualifier,
2371           {"Qualifier", "scsi.inquiry.qualifier", FT_UINT8, BASE_HEX,
2372            VALS (scsi_qualifier_val), 0xE0, NULL, HFILL}},
2373         ...
2374
2375 Which provides very pretty dissection of this one byte bitmask.
2376
2377 PROTO_ITEM_SET_HIDDEN()
2378 -----------------------
2379 PROTO_ITEM_SET_HIDDEN is used to hide fields, which have already been added
2380 to the tree, from being visible in the displayed tree.
2381
2382 NOTE that creating hidden fields is actually quite a bad idea from a UI design
2383 perspective because the user (someone who did not write nor has ever seen the
2384 code) has no way of knowing that hidden fields are there to be filtered on
2385 thus defeating the whole purpose of putting them there.  A Better Way might
2386 be to add the fields (that might otherwise be hidden) to a subtree where they
2387 won't be seen unless the user opens the subtree--but they can be found if the
2388 user wants.
2389
2390 One use for hidden fields (which would be better implemented using visible
2391 fields in a subtree) follows: The caller may want a value to be
2392 included in a tree so that the packet can be filtered on this field, but
2393 the representation of that field in the tree is not appropriate.  An
2394 example is the token-ring routing information field (RIF).  The best way
2395 to show the RIF in a GUI is by a sequence of ring and bridge numbers.
2396 Rings are 3-digit hex numbers, and bridges are single hex digits:
2397
2398         RIF: 001-A-013-9-C0F-B-555
2399
2400 In the case of RIF, the programmer should use a field with no value and
2401 use proto_tree_add_none_format() to build the above representation. The
2402 programmer can then add the ring and bridge values, one-by-one, with
2403 proto_tree_add_item() and hide them with PROTO_ITEM_SET_HIDDEN() so that the
2404 user can then filter on or search for a particular ring or bridge. Here's a
2405 skeleton of how the programmer might code this.
2406
2407         char *rif;
2408         rif = create_rif_string(...);
2409
2410         proto_tree_add_none_format(tree, hf_tr_rif_label, ..., "RIF: %s", rif);
2411
2412         for(i = 0; i < num_rings; i++) {
2413                 proto_item *pi;
2414
2415                 pi = proto_tree_add_item(tree, hf_tr_rif_ring, ..., FALSE);
2416                 PROTO_ITEM_SET_HIDDEN(pi);
2417         }
2418         for(i = 0; i < num_rings - 1; i++) {
2419                 proto_item *pi;
2420
2421                 pi = proto_tree_add_item(tree, hf_tr_rif_bridge, ..., FALSE);
2422                 PROTO_ITEM_SET_HIDDEN(pi);
2423         }
2424
2425 The logical tree has these items:
2426
2427         hf_tr_rif_label, text="RIF: 001-A-013-9-C0F-B-555", value = NONE
2428         hf_tr_rif_ring,  hidden, value=0x001
2429         hf_tr_rif_bridge, hidden, value=0xA
2430         hf_tr_rif_ring,  hidden, value=0x013
2431         hf_tr_rif_bridge, hidden, value=0x9
2432         hf_tr_rif_ring,  hidden, value=0xC0F
2433         hf_tr_rif_bridge, hidden, value=0xB
2434         hf_tr_rif_ring,  hidden, value=0x555
2435
2436 GUI or print code will not display the hidden fields, but a display
2437 filter or "packet grep" routine will still see the values. The possible
2438 filter is then possible:
2439
2440         tr.rif_ring eq 0x013
2441
2442 The proto_tree_add_bitmask_text() function is an extended version of
2443 the proto_tree_add_bitmask() function. In addition, it allows to:
2444 - Provide a leading text (e.g. "Flags: ") that will appear before
2445   the comma-separated list of field values
2446 - Provide a fallback text (e.g. "None") that will be appended if
2447   no fields warranted a change to the top-level title.
2448 - Using flags, specify which fields will affect the top-level title.
2449
2450 There are the following flags defined:
2451
2452   BMT_NO_APPEND - the title is taken "as-is" from the 'name' argument.
2453   BMT_NO_INT - only boolean flags are added to the title.
2454   BMT_NO_FALSE - boolean flags are only added to the title if they are set.
2455   BMT_NO_TFS - only add flag name to the title, do not use true_false_string
2456
2457 The proto_tree_add_bitmask() behavior can be obtained by providing
2458 both 'name' and 'fallback' arguments as NULL, and a flags of
2459 (BMT_NO_FALSE|BMT_NO_TFS).
2460
2461 1.7 Utility routines.
2462
2463 1.7.1 match_strval and val_to_str.
2464
2465 A dissector may need to convert a value to a string, using a
2466 'value_string' structure, by hand, rather than by declaring a field with
2467 an associated 'value_string' structure; this might be used, for example,
2468 to generate a COL_INFO line for a frame.
2469
2470 'match_strval()' will do that:
2471
2472         gchar*
2473         match_strval(guint32 val, const value_string *vs)
2474
2475 It will look up the value 'val' in the 'value_string' table pointed to
2476 by 'vs', and return either the corresponding string, or NULL if the
2477 value could not be found in the table.  Note that, unless 'val' is
2478 guaranteed to be a value in the 'value_string' table ("guaranteed" as in
2479 "the code has already checked that it's one of those values" or "the
2480 table handles all possible values of the size of 'val'", not "the
2481 protocol spec says it has to be" - protocol specs do not prevent invalid
2482 packets from being put onto a network or into a purported packet capture
2483 file), you must check whether 'match_strval()' returns NULL, and arrange
2484 that its return value not be dereferenced if it's NULL. 'val_to_str()'
2485 can be used to generate a string for values not found in the table:
2486
2487         gchar*
2488         val_to_str(guint32 val, const value_string *vs, const char *fmt)
2489
2490 If the value 'val' is found in the 'value_string' table pointed to by
2491 'vs', 'val_to_str' will return the corresponding string; otherwise, it
2492 will use 'fmt' as an 'sprintf'-style format, with 'val' as an argument,
2493 to generate a string, and will return a pointer to that string.
2494 You can use it in a call to generate a COL_INFO line for a frame such as
2495
2496         col_add_fstr(COL_INFO, ", %s", val_to_str(val, table, "Unknown %d"));
2497
2498 1.7.2 match_strrval and rval_to_str.
2499
2500 A dissector may need to convert a range of values to a string, using a
2501 'range_string' structure.
2502
2503 'match_strrval()' will do that:
2504
2505         gchar*
2506         match_strrval(guint32 val, const range_string *rs)
2507
2508 It will look up the value 'val' in the 'range_string' table pointed to
2509 by 'rs', and return either the corresponding string, or NULL if the
2510 value could not be found in the table. Please note that its base
2511 behavior is inherited from match_strval().
2512
2513 'rval_to_str()' can be used to generate a string for values not found in
2514 the table:
2515
2516         gchar*
2517         rval_to_str(guint32 val, const range_string *rs, const char *fmt)
2518
2519 If the value 'val' is found in the 'range_string' table pointed to by
2520 'rs', 'rval_to_str' will return the corresponding string; otherwise, it
2521 will use 'fmt' as an 'sprintf'-style format, with 'val' as an argument,
2522 to generate a string, and will return a pointer to that string. Please
2523 note that its base behavior is inherited from match_strval().
2524
2525 1.8 Calling Other Dissectors.
2526
2527 As each dissector completes its portion of the protocol analysis, it
2528 is expected to create a new tvbuff of type TVBUFF_SUBSET which
2529 contains the payload portion of the protocol (that is, the bytes
2530 that are relevant to the next dissector).
2531
2532 The syntax for creating a new TVBUFF_SUBSET is:
2533
2534 next_tvb = tvb_new_subset(tvb, offset, length, reported_length)
2535
2536 Where:
2537         tvb is the tvbuff that the dissector has been working on. It
2538         can be a tvbuff of any type.
2539
2540         next_tvb is the new TVBUFF_SUBSET.
2541
2542         offset is the byte offset of 'tvb' at which the new tvbuff
2543         should start.  The first byte is the 0th byte.
2544
2545         length is the number of bytes in the new TVBUFF_SUBSET. A length
2546         argument of -1 says to use as many bytes as are available in
2547         'tvb'.
2548
2549         reported_length is the number of bytes that the current protocol
2550         says should be in the payload. A reported_length of -1 says that
2551         the protocol doesn't say anything about the size of its payload.
2552
2553
2554 An example from packet-ipx.c -
2555
2556 void
2557 dissect_ipx(tvbuff_t *tvb, packet_info *pinfo, proto_tree *tree)
2558 {
2559         tvbuff_t        *next_tvb;
2560         int             reported_length, available_length;
2561
2562
2563         /* Make the next tvbuff */
2564
2565 /* IPX does have a length value in the header, so calculate report_length */
2566    Set this to -1 if there isn't any length information in the protocol
2567 */
2568         reported_length = ipx_length - IPX_HEADER_LEN;
2569
2570 /* Calculate the available data in the packet,
2571    set this to -1 to use all the data in the tv_buffer
2572 */
2573         available_length = tvb_length(tvb) - IPX_HEADER_LEN;
2574
2575 /* Create the tvbuffer for the next dissector */
2576         next_tvb = tvb_new_subset(tvb, IPX_HEADER_LEN,
2577                         MIN(available_length, reported_length),
2578                         reported_length);
2579
2580 /* call the next dissector */
2581         dissector_next( next_tvb, pinfo, tree);
2582
2583
2584 1.9 Editing Makefile.common to add your dissector.
2585
2586 To arrange that your dissector will be built as part of Wireshark, you
2587 must add the name of the source file for your dissector to the
2588 'DISSECTOR_SRC' macro in the 'Makefile.common' file in the 'epan/dissectors'
2589 directory.  (Note that this is for modern versions of UNIX, so there
2590 is no 14-character limitation on file names, and for modern versions of
2591 Windows, so there is no 8.3-character limitation on file names.)
2592
2593 If your dissector also has its own header file or files, you must add
2594 them to the 'DISSECTOR_INCLUDES' macro in the 'Makefile.common' file in
2595 the 'epan/dissectors' directory, so that it's included when release source
2596 tarballs are built (otherwise, the source in the release tarballs won't
2597 compile).
2598
2599 1.10 Using the SVN source code tree.
2600
2601   See <http://www.wireshark.org/develop.html>
2602
2603 1.11 Submitting code for your new dissector.
2604
2605   - VERIFY that your dissector code does not use prohibited or deprecated APIs
2606     as follows:
2607     perl <wireshark_root>/tools/checkAPIs.pl <source-filename(s)>
2608
2609   - TEST YOUR DISSECTOR BEFORE SUBMITTING IT.
2610     Use fuzz-test.sh and/or randpkt against your dissector.  These are
2611     described at <http://wiki.wireshark.org/FuzzTesting>.
2612
2613   - Subscribe to <mailto:wireshark-dev[AT]wireshark.org> by sending an email to
2614     <mailto:wireshark-dev-request[AT]wireshark.org?body="help"> or visiting
2615     <http://www.wireshark.org/lists/>.
2616
2617   - 'svn add' all the files of your new dissector.
2618
2619   - 'svn diff' the workspace and save the result to a file.
2620
2621   - Edit the diff file - remove any changes unrelated to your new dissector,
2622     e.g. changes in config.nmake
2623
2624   - Submit a bug report to the Wireshark bug database, found at
2625     <http://bugs.wireshark.org>, qualified as an enhancement and attach your
2626     diff file there. Set the review request flag to '?' so it will pop up in
2627     the patch review list.
2628
2629   - Create a Wiki page on the protocol at <http://wiki.wireshark.org>.
2630     A template is provided so it is easy to setup in a consistent style.
2631
2632   - If possible, add sample capture files to the sample captures page at
2633     <http://wiki.wireshark.org/SampleCaptures>.  These files are used by
2634     the automated build system for fuzz testing.
2635
2636   - If you find that you are contributing a lot to wireshark on an ongoing
2637     basis you can request to become a committer which will allow you to
2638     commit files to subversion directly.
2639
2640 2. Advanced dissector topics.
2641
2642 2.1 Introduction.
2643
2644 Some of the advanced features are being worked on constantly. When using them
2645 it is wise to check the relevant header and source files for additional details.
2646
2647 2.2 Following "conversations".
2648
2649 In wireshark a conversation is defined as a series of data packets between two
2650 address:port combinations.  A conversation is not sensitive to the direction of
2651 the packet.  The same conversation will be returned for a packet bound from
2652 ServerA:1000 to ClientA:2000 and the packet from ClientA:2000 to ServerA:1000.
2653
2654 There are five routines that you will use to work with a conversation:
2655 conversation_new, find_conversation, conversation_add_proto_data,
2656 conversation_get_proto_data, and conversation_delete_proto_data.
2657
2658
2659 2.2.1 The conversation_init function.
2660
2661 This is an internal routine for the conversation code.  As such you
2662 will not have to call this routine.  Just be aware that this routine is
2663 called at the start of each capture and before the packets are filtered
2664 with a display filter.  The routine will destroy all stored
2665 conversations.  This routine does NOT clean up any data pointers that are
2666 passed in the conversation_new 'data' variable.  You are responsible for
2667 this clean up if you pass a malloc'ed pointer in this variable.
2668
2669 See item 2.2.8 for more information about the 'data' pointer.
2670
2671
2672 2.2.2 The conversation_new function.
2673
2674 This routine will create a new conversation based upon two address/port
2675 pairs.  If you want to associate with the conversation a pointer to a
2676 private data structure you must use the conversation_add_proto_data
2677 function.  The ptype variable is used to differentiate between
2678 conversations over different protocols, i.e. TCP and UDP.  The options
2679 variable is used to define a conversation that will accept any destination
2680 address and/or port.  Set options = 0 if the destination port and address
2681 are know when conversation_new is called.  See section 2.4 for more
2682 information on usage of the options parameter.
2683
2684 The conversation_new prototype:
2685         conversation_t *conversation_new(guint32 setup_frame, address *addr1,
2686             address *addr2, port_type ptype, guint32 port1, guint32 port2,
2687             guint options);
2688
2689 Where:
2690         guint32 setup_frame = The lowest numbered frame for this conversation
2691         address* addr1      = first data packet address
2692         address* addr2      = second data packet address
2693         port_type ptype     = port type, this is defined in packet.h
2694         guint32 port1       = first data packet port
2695         guint32 port2       = second data packet port
2696         guint options       = conversation options, NO_ADDR2 and/or NO_PORT2
2697
2698 setup_frame indicates the first frame for this conversation, and is used to
2699 distinguish multiple conversations with the same addr1/port1 and addr2/port2
2700 pair that occur within the same capture session.
2701
2702 "addr1" and "port1" are the first address/port pair; "addr2" and "port2"
2703 are the second address/port pair.  A conversation doesn't have source
2704 and destination address/port pairs - packets in a conversation go in
2705 both directions - so "addr1"/"port1" may be the source or destination
2706 address/port pair; "addr2"/"port2" would be the other pair.
2707
2708 If NO_ADDR2 is specified, the conversation is set up so that a
2709 conversation lookup will match only the "addr1" address; if NO_PORT2 is
2710 specified, the conversation is set up so that a conversation lookup will
2711 match only the "port1" port; if both are specified, i.e.
2712 NO_ADDR2|NO_PORT2, the conversation is set up so that the lookup will
2713 match only the "addr1"/"port1" address/port pair.  This can be used if a
2714 packet indicates that, later in the capture, a conversation will be
2715 created using certain addresses and ports, in the case where the packet
2716 doesn't specify the addresses and ports of both sides.
2717
2718 2.2.3 The find_conversation function.
2719
2720 Call this routine to look up a conversation.  If no conversation is found,
2721 the routine will return a NULL value.
2722
2723 The find_conversation prototype:
2724
2725         conversation_t *find_conversation(guint32 frame_num, address *addr_a,
2726             address *addr_b, port_type ptype, guint32 port_a, guint32 port_b,
2727             guint options);
2728
2729 Where:
2730         guint32 frame_num = a frame number to match
2731         address* addr_a = first address
2732         address* addr_b = second address
2733         port_type ptype = port type
2734         guint32 port_a  = first data packet port
2735         guint32 port_b  = second data packet port
2736         guint options   = conversation options, NO_ADDR_B and/or NO_PORT_B
2737
2738 frame_num is a frame number to match. The conversation returned is where
2739         (frame_num >= conversation->setup_frame
2740         && frame_num < conversation->next->setup_frame)
2741 Suppose there are a total of 3 conversations (A, B, and C) that match
2742 addr_a/port_a and addr_b/port_b, where the setup_frame used in
2743 conversation_new() for A, B and C are 10, 50, and 100 respectively. The
2744 frame_num passed in find_conversation is compared to the setup_frame of each
2745 conversation. So if (frame_num >= 10 && frame_num < 50), conversation A is
2746 returned. If (frame_num >= 50 && frame_num < 100), conversation B is returned.
2747 If (frame_num >= 100) conversation C is returned.
2748
2749 "addr_a" and "port_a" are the first address/port pair; "addr_b" and
2750 "port_b" are the second address/port pair.  Again, as a conversation
2751 doesn't have source and destination address/port pairs, so
2752 "addr_a"/"port_a" may be the source or destination address/port pair;
2753 "addr_b"/"port_b" would be the other pair.  The search will match the
2754 "a" address/port pair against both the "1" and "2" address/port pairs,
2755 and match the "b" address/port pair against both the "2" and "1"
2756 address/port pairs; you don't have to worry about which side the "a" or
2757 "b" pairs correspond to.
2758
2759 If the NO_ADDR_B flag was specified to "find_conversation()", the
2760 "addr_b" address will be treated as matching any "wildcarded" address;
2761 if the NO_PORT_B flag was specified, the "port_b" port will be treated
2762 as matching any "wildcarded" port.  If both flags are specified, i.e.
2763 NO_ADDR_B|NO_PORT_B, the "addr_b" address will be treated as matching
2764 any "wildcarded" address and the "port_b" port will be treated as
2765 matching any "wildcarded" port.
2766
2767
2768 2.2.4 The conversation_add_proto_data function.
2769
2770 Once you have created a conversation with conversation_new, you can
2771 associate data with it using this function.
2772
2773 The conversation_add_proto_data prototype:
2774
2775         void conversation_add_proto_data(conversation_t *conv, int proto,
2776             void *proto_data);
2777
2778 Where:
2779         conversation_t *conv = the conversation in question
2780         int proto            = registered protocol number
2781         void *data           = dissector data structure
2782
2783 "conversation" is the value returned by conversation_new.  "proto" is a
2784 unique protocol number created with proto_register_protocol.  Protocols
2785 are typically registered in the proto_register_XXXX section of your
2786 dissector.  "data" is a pointer to the data you wish to associate with the
2787 conversation.  Using the protocol number allows several dissectors to
2788 associate data with a given conversation.
2789
2790
2791 2.2.5 The conversation_get_proto_data function.
2792
2793 After you have located a conversation with find_conversation, you can use
2794 this function to retrieve any data associated with it.
2795
2796 The conversation_get_proto_data prototype:
2797
2798         void *conversation_get_proto_data(conversation_t *conv, int proto);
2799
2800 Where:
2801         conversation_t *conv = the conversation in question
2802         int proto            = registered protocol number
2803
2804 "conversation" is the conversation created with conversation_new.  "proto"
2805 is a unique protocol number created with proto_register_protocol,
2806 typically in the proto_register_XXXX portion of a dissector.  The function
2807 returns a pointer to the data requested, or NULL if no data was found.
2808
2809
2810 2.2.6 The conversation_delete_proto_data function.
2811
2812 After you are finished with a conversation, you can remove your association
2813 with this function.  Please note that ONLY the conversation entry is
2814 removed.  If you have allocated any memory for your data, you must free it
2815 as well.
2816
2817 The conversation_delete_proto_data prototype:
2818
2819         void conversation_delete_proto_data(conversation_t *conv, int proto);
2820
2821 Where:
2822         conversation_t *conv = the conversation in question
2823         int proto            = registered protocol number
2824
2825 "conversation" is the conversation created with conversation_new.  "proto"
2826 is a unique protocol number created with proto_register_protocol,
2827 typically in the proto_register_XXXX portion of a dissector.
2828
2829
2830 2.2.7 Using timestamps relative to the conversation
2831
2832 There is a framework to calculate timestamps relative to the start of the
2833 conversation. First of all the timestamp of the first packet that has been
2834 seen in the conversation must be kept in the protocol data to be able
2835 to calculate the timestamp of the current packet relative to the start
2836 of the conversation. The timestamp of the last packet that was seen in the
2837 conversation should also be kept in the protocol data. This way the
2838 delta time between the current packet and the previous packet in the
2839 conversation can be calculated.
2840
2841 So add the following items to the struct that is used for the protocol data:
2842
2843   nstime_t      ts_first;
2844   nstime_t      ts_prev;
2845
2846 The ts_prev value should only be set during the first run through the
2847 packets (ie pinfo->fd->flags.visited is false).
2848
2849 Next step is to use the per-packet information (described in section 2.5)
2850 to keep the calculated delta timestamp, as it can only be calculated
2851 on the first run through the packets. This is because a packet can be
2852 selected in random order once the whole file has been read.
2853
2854 After calculating the conversation timestamps, it is time to put them in
2855 the appropriate columns with the function 'col_set_time' (described in
2856 section 1.5.9). There are two columns for conversation timestamps:
2857
2858 COL_REL_CONV_TIME,  /* Relative time to beginning of conversation */
2859 COL_DELTA_CONV_TIME,/* Delta time to last frame in conversation */
2860
2861 Last but not least, there MUST be a preference in each dissector that
2862 uses conversation timestamps that makes it possible to enable and
2863 disable the calculation of conversation timestamps. The main argument
2864 for this is that a higher level conversation is able to overwrite
2865 the values of lowel level conversations in these two columns. Being
2866 able to actively select which protocols may overwrite the conversation
2867 timestamp columns gives the user the power to control these columns.
2868 (A second reason is that conversation timestamps use the per-packet
2869 data structure which uses additional memory, which should be avoided
2870 if these timestamps are not needed)
2871
2872 Have a look at the differences to packet-tcp.[ch] in SVN 22966 and
2873 SVN 23058 to see the implementation of conversation timestamps for
2874 the tcp-dissector.
2875
2876
2877 2.2.8 The example conversation code with GMemChunk's.
2878
2879 For a conversation between two IP addresses and ports you can use this as an
2880 example.  This example uses the GMemChunk to allocate memory and stores the data
2881 pointer in the conversation 'data' variable.
2882
2883 NOTE: Remember to register the init routine (my_dissector_init) in the
2884 protocol_register routine.
2885
2886
2887 /************************ Global values ************************/
2888
2889 /* the number of entries in the memory chunk array */
2890 #define my_init_count 10
2891
2892 /* define your structure here */
2893 typedef struct {
2894
2895 } my_entry_t;
2896
2897 /* the GMemChunk base structure */
2898 static GMemChunk *my_vals = NULL;
2899
2900 /* Registered protocol number */
2901 static int my_proto = -1;
2902
2903
2904 /********************* in the dissector routine *********************/
2905
2906 /* the local variables in the dissector */
2907
2908 conversation_t *conversation;
2909 my_entry_t *data_ptr;
2910
2911
2912 /* look up the conversation */
2913
2914 conversation = find_conversation(pinfo->fd->num, &pinfo->src, &pinfo->dst,
2915         pinfo->ptype, pinfo->srcport, pinfo->destport, 0);
2916
2917 /* if conversation found get the data pointer that you stored */
2918 if (conversation)
2919     data_ptr = (my_entry_t*)conversation_get_proto_data(conversation, my_proto);
2920 else {
2921
2922     /* new conversation create local data structure */
2923
2924     data_ptr = g_mem_chunk_alloc(my_vals);
2925
2926     /*** add your code here to setup the new data structure ***/
2927
2928     /* create the conversation with your data pointer  */
2929
2930     conversation = conversation_new(pinfo->fd->num,  &pinfo->src, &pinfo->dst, pinfo->ptype,
2931             pinfo->srcport, pinfo->destport, 0);
2932     conversation_add_proto_data(conversation, my_proto, (void *)data_ptr);
2933 }
2934
2935 /* at this point the conversation data is ready */
2936
2937
2938 /******************* in the dissector init routine *******************/
2939
2940 #define my_init_count 20
2941
2942 static void
2943 my_dissector_init(void)
2944 {
2945
2946     /* destroy memory chunks if needed */
2947
2948     if (my_vals)
2949         g_mem_chunk_destroy(my_vals);
2950
2951     /* now create memory chunks */
2952
2953     my_vals = g_mem_chunk_new("my_proto_vals",
2954             sizeof(my_entry_t),
2955             my_init_count * sizeof(my_entry_t),
2956             G_ALLOC_AND_FREE);
2957 }
2958
2959 /***************** in the protocol register routine *****************/
2960
2961 /* register re-init routine */
2962
2963 register_init_routine(&my_dissector_init);
2964
2965 my_proto = proto_register_protocol("My Protocol", "My Protocol", "my_proto");
2966
2967
2968 2.2.9 An example conversation code that starts at a specific frame number.
2969
2970 Sometimes a dissector has determined that a new conversation is needed that
2971 starts at a specific frame number, when a capture session encompasses multiple
2972 conversation that reuse the same src/dest ip/port pairs. You can use the
2973 conversation->setup_frame returned by find_conversation with
2974 pinfo->fd->num to determine whether or not there already exists a conversation
2975 that starts at the specific frame number.
2976
2977 /* in the dissector routine */
2978
2979         conversation = find_conversation(pinfo->fd->num, &pinfo->src, &pinfo->dst,
2980             pinfo->ptype, pinfo->srcport, pinfo->destport, 0);
2981         if (conversation == NULL || (conversation->setup_frame != pinfo->fd->num)) {
2982                 /* It's not part of any conversation or the returned
2983                  * conversation->setup_frame doesn't match the current frame
2984                  * create a new one.
2985                  */
2986                 conversation = conversation_new(pinfo->fd->num, &pinfo->src,
2987                     &pinfo->dst, pinfo->ptype, pinfo->srcport, pinfo->destport,
2988                     NULL, 0);
2989         }
2990
2991
2992 2.2.10 The example conversation code using conversation index field.
2993
2994 Sometimes the conversation isn't enough to define a unique data storage
2995 value for the network traffic.  For example if you are storing information
2996 about requests carried in a conversation, the request may have an
2997 identifier that is used to  define the request. In this case the
2998 conversation and the identifier are required to find the data storage
2999 pointer.  You can use the conversation data structure index value to
3000 uniquely define the conversation.
3001
3002 See packet-afs.c for an example of how to use the conversation index.  In
3003 this dissector multiple requests are sent in the same conversation.  To store
3004 information for each request the dissector has an internal hash table based
3005 upon the conversation index and values inside the request packets.
3006
3007
3008         /* in the dissector routine */
3009
3010         /* to find a request value, first lookup conversation to get index */
3011         /* then used the conversation index, and request data to find data */
3012         /* in the local hash table */
3013
3014         conversation = find_conversation(pinfo->fd->num, &pinfo->src, &pinfo->dst,
3015             pinfo->ptype, pinfo->srcport, pinfo->destport, 0);
3016         if (conversation == NULL) {
3017                 /* It's not part of any conversation - create a new one. */
3018                 conversation = conversation_new(pinfo->fd->num, &pinfo->src,
3019                     &pinfo->dst, pinfo->ptype, pinfo->srcport, pinfo->destport,
3020                     NULL, 0);
3021         }
3022
3023         request_key.conversation = conversation->index;
3024         request_key.service = pntohs(&rxh->serviceId);
3025         request_key.callnumber = pntohl(&rxh->callNumber);
3026
3027         request_val = (struct afs_request_val *)g_hash_table_lookup(
3028                 afs_request_hash, &request_key);
3029
3030         /* only allocate a new hash element when it's a request */
3031         opcode = 0;
3032         if (!request_val && !reply)
3033         {
3034                 new_request_key = g_mem_chunk_alloc(afs_request_keys);
3035                 *new_request_key = request_key;
3036
3037                 request_val = g_mem_chunk_alloc(afs_request_vals);
3038                 request_val -> opcode = pntohl(&afsh->opcode);
3039                 opcode = request_val->opcode;
3040
3041                 g_hash_table_insert(afs_request_hash, new_request_key,
3042                         request_val);
3043         }
3044
3045
3046
3047 2.3 Dynamic conversation dissector registration.
3048
3049
3050 NOTE:   This sections assumes that all information is available to
3051         create a complete conversation, source port/address and
3052         destination port/address.  If either the destination port or
3053         address is know, see section 2.4 Dynamic server port dissector
3054         registration.
3055
3056 For protocols that negotiate a secondary port connection, for example
3057 packet-msproxy.c, a conversation can install a dissector to handle
3058 the secondary protocol dissection.  After the conversation is created
3059 for the negotiated ports use the conversation_set_dissector to define
3060 the dissection routine.
3061 Before we create these conversations or assign a dissector to them we should
3062 first check that the conversation does not already exist and if it exists
3063 whether it is registered to our protocol or not.
3064 We should do this because it is uncommon but it does happen that multiple
3065 different protocols can use the same socketpair during different stages of
3066 an application cycle. By keeping track of the frame number a conversation
3067 was started in wireshark can still tell these different protocols apart.
3068
3069 The second argument to conversation_set_dissector is a dissector handle,
3070 which is created with a call to create_dissector_handle or
3071 register_dissector.
3072
3073 create_dissector_handle takes as arguments a pointer to the dissector
3074 function and a protocol ID as returned by proto_register_protocol;
3075 register_dissector takes as arguments a string giving a name for the
3076 dissector, a pointer to the dissector function, and a protocol ID.
3077
3078 The protocol ID is the ID for the protocol dissected by the function.
3079 The function will not be called if the protocol has been disabled by the
3080 user; instead, the data for the protocol will be dissected as raw data.
3081
3082 An example -
3083
3084 /* the handle for the dynamic dissector *
3085 static dissector_handle_t sub_dissector_handle;
3086
3087 /* prototype for the dynamic dissector */
3088 static void sub_dissector(tvbuff_t *tvb, packet_info *pinfo,
3089                 proto_tree *tree);
3090
3091 /* in the main protocol dissector, where the next dissector is setup */
3092
3093 /* if conversation has a data field, create it and load structure */
3094
3095 /* First check if a conversation already exists for this
3096         socketpair
3097 */
3098         conversation = find_conversation(pinfo->fd->num,
3099                                 &pinfo->src, &pinfo->dst, protocol,
3100                                 src_port, dst_port, new_conv_info, 0);
3101
3102 /* If there is no such conversation, or if there is one but for
3103    someone else's protocol then we just create a new conversation
3104    and assign our protocol to it.
3105 */
3106         if ( (conversation == NULL) ||
3107              (conversation->dissector_handle != sub_dissector_handle) ) {
3108             new_conv_info = g_mem_chunk_alloc(new_conv_vals);
3109             new_conv_info->data1 = value1;
3110
3111 /* create the conversation for the dynamic port */
3112             conversation = conversation_new(pinfo->fd->num,
3113                 &pinfo->src, &pinfo->dst, protocol,
3114                 src_port, dst_port, new_conv_info, 0);
3115
3116 /* set the dissector for the new conversation */
3117             conversation_set_dissector(conversation, sub_dissector_handle);
3118         }
3119                 ...
3120
3121 void
3122 proto_register_PROTOABBREV(void)
3123 {
3124         ...
3125
3126         sub_dissector_handle = create_dissector_handle(sub_dissector,
3127             proto);
3128
3129         ...
3130 }
3131
3132 2.4 Dynamic server port dissector registration.
3133
3134 NOTE: While this example used both NO_ADDR2 and NO_PORT2 to create a
3135 conversation with only one port and address set, this isn't a
3136 requirement.  Either the second port or the second address can be set
3137 when the conversation is created.
3138
3139 For protocols that define a server address and port for a secondary
3140 protocol, a conversation can be used to link a protocol dissector to
3141 the server port and address.  The key is to create the new
3142 conversation with the second address and port set to the "accept
3143 any" values.
3144
3145 Some server applications can use the same port for different protocols during
3146 different stages of a transaction. For example it might initially use SNMP
3147 to perform some discovery and later switch to use TFTP using the same port.
3148 In order to handle this properly we must first check whether such a
3149 conversation already exists or not and if it exists we also check whether the
3150 registered dissector_handle for that conversation is "our" dissector or not.
3151 If not we create a new conversation on top of the previous one and set this new
3152 conversation to use our protocol.
3153 Since wireshark keeps track of the frame number where a conversation started
3154 wireshark will still be able to keep the packets apart even though they do use
3155 the same socketpair.
3156                 (See packet-tftp.c and packet-snmp.c for examples of this)
3157
3158 There are two support routines that will allow the second port and/or
3159 address to be set later.
3160
3161 conversation_set_port2( conversation_t *conv, guint32 port);
3162 conversation_set_addr2( conversation_t *conv, address addr);
3163
3164 These routines will change the second address or port for the
3165 conversation.  So, the server port conversation will be converted into a
3166 more complete conversation definition.  Don't use these routines if you
3167 want to create a conversation between the server and client and retain the
3168 server port definition, you must create a new conversation.
3169
3170
3171 An example -
3172
3173 /* the handle for the dynamic dissector *
3174 static dissector_handle_t sub_dissector_handle;
3175
3176         ...
3177
3178 /* in the main protocol dissector, where the next dissector is setup */
3179
3180 /* if conversation has a data field, create it and load structure */
3181
3182         new_conv_info = g_mem_chunk_alloc(new_conv_vals);
3183         new_conv_info->data1 = value1;
3184
3185 /* create the conversation for the dynamic server address and port      */
3186 /* NOTE: The second address and port values don't matter because the    */
3187 /* NO_ADDR2 and NO_PORT2 options are set.                               */
3188
3189 /* First check if a conversation already exists for this
3190         IP/protocol/port
3191 */
3192         conversation = find_conversation(pinfo->fd->num,
3193                                 &server_src_addr, 0, protocol,
3194                                 server_src_port, 0, NO_ADDR2 | NO_PORT_B);
3195 /* If there is no such conversation, or if there is one but for
3196    someone else's protocol then we just create a new conversation
3197    and assign our protocol to it.
3198 */
3199         if ( (conversation == NULL) ||
3200              (conversation->dissector_handle != sub_dissector_handle) ) {
3201             conversation = conversation_new(pinfo->fd->num,
3202             &server_src_addr, 0, protocol,
3203             server_src_port, 0, new_conv_info, NO_ADDR2 | NO_PORT2);
3204
3205 /* set the dissector for the new conversation */
3206             conversation_set_dissector(conversation, sub_dissector_handle);
3207         }
3208
3209 2.5 Per-packet information.
3210
3211 Information can be stored for each data packet that is processed by the
3212 dissector.  The information is added with the p_add_proto_data function and
3213 retrieved with the p_get_proto_data function.  The data pointers passed into
3214 the p_add_proto_data are not managed by the proto_data routines. If you use
3215 malloc or any other dynamic memory allocation scheme, you must release the
3216 data when it isn't required.
3217
3218 void
3219 p_add_proto_data(frame_data *fd, int proto, void *proto_data)
3220 void *
3221 p_get_proto_data(frame_data *fd, int proto)
3222
3223 Where:
3224         fd         - The fd pointer in the pinfo structure, pinfo->fd
3225         proto      - Protocol id returned by the proto_register_protocol call
3226                      during initialization
3227         proto_data - pointer to the dissector data.
3228
3229
3230 2.6 User Preferences.
3231
3232 If the dissector has user options, there is support for adding these preferences
3233 to a configuration dialog.
3234
3235 You must register the module with the preferences routine with -
3236
3237 module_t *prefs_register_protocol(proto_id, void (*apply_cb)(void))
3238
3239 Where: proto_id   - the value returned by "proto_register_protocol()" when
3240                     the protocol was registered
3241        apply_cb   - Callback routine that is called when preferences are applied
3242
3243
3244 Then you can register the fields that can be configured by the user with these
3245 routines -
3246
3247         /* Register a preference with an unsigned integral value. */
3248         void prefs_register_uint_preference(module_t *module, const char *name,
3249             const char *title, const char *description, guint base, guint *var);
3250
3251         /* Register a preference with an Boolean value. */
3252         void prefs_register_bool_preference(module_t *module, const char *name,
3253             const char *title, const char *description, gboolean *var);
3254
3255         /* Register a preference with an enumerated value. */
3256         void prefs_register_enum_preference(module_t *module, const char *name,
3257             const char *title, const char *description, gint *var,
3258             const enum_val_t *enumvals, gboolean radio_buttons)
3259
3260         /* Register a preference with a character-string value. */
3261         void prefs_register_string_preference(module_t *module, const char *name,
3262             const char *title, const char *description, char **var)
3263
3264         /* Register a preference with a range of unsigned integers (e.g.,
3265          * "1-20,30-40").
3266          */
3267         void prefs_register_range_preference(module_t *module, const char *name,
3268             const char *title, const char *description, range_t *var,
3269             guint32 max_value)
3270
3271 Where: module - Returned by the prefs_register_protocol routine
3272          name     - This is appended to the name of the protocol, with a
3273                     "." between them, to construct a name that identifies
3274                     the field in the preference file; the name itself
3275                     should not include the protocol name, as the name in
3276                     the preference file will already have it
3277          title    - Field title in the preferences dialog
3278          description - Comments added to the preference file above the
3279                        preference value
3280          var      - pointer to the storage location that is updated when the
3281                     field is changed in the preference dialog box
3282          base     - Base that the unsigned integer is expected to be in,
3283                     see strtoul(3).
3284          enumvals - an array of enum_val_t structures.  This must be
3285                     NULL-terminated; the members of that structure are:
3286
3287                         a short name, to be used with the "-o" flag - it
3288                         should not contain spaces or upper-case letters,
3289                         so that it's easier to put in a command line;
3290
3291                         a description, which is used in the GUI (and
3292                         which, for compatibility reasons, is currently
3293                         what's written to the preferences file) - it can
3294                         contain spaces, capital letters, punctuation,
3295                         etc.;
3296
3297                         the numerical value corresponding to that name
3298                         and description
3299          radio_buttons - TRUE if the field is to be displayed in the
3300                          preferences dialog as a set of radio buttons,
3301                          FALSE if it is to be displayed as an option
3302                          menu
3303          max_value - The maximum allowed value for a range (0 is the minimum).
3304
3305 An example from packet-beep.c -
3306
3307   proto_beep = proto_register_protocol("Blocks Extensible Exchange Protocol",
3308                                        "BEEP", "beep");
3309
3310         ...
3311
3312   /* Register our configuration options for BEEP, particularly our port */
3313
3314   beep_module = prefs_register_protocol(proto_beep, proto_reg_handoff_beep);
3315
3316   prefs_register_uint_preference(beep_module, "tcp.port", "BEEP TCP Port",
3317                                  "Set the port for BEEP messages (if other"
3318                                  " than the default of 10288)",
3319                                  10, &global_beep_tcp_port);
3320
3321   prefs_register_bool_preference(beep_module, "strict_header_terminator",
3322                                  "BEEP Header Requires CRLF",
3323                                  "Specifies that BEEP requires CRLF as a "
3324                                  "terminator, and not just CR or LF",
3325                                  &global_beep_strict_term);
3326
3327 This will create preferences "beep.tcp.port" and
3328 "beep.strict_header_terminator", the first of which is an unsigned
3329 integer and the second of which is a Boolean.
3330
3331 Note that a warning will pop up if you've saved such preference to the
3332 preference file and you subsequently take the code out. The way to make
3333 a preference obsolete is to register it as such:
3334
3335 /* Register a preference that used to be supported but no longer is. */
3336         void prefs_register_obsolete_preference(module_t *module,
3337             const char *name);
3338
3339 2.7 Reassembly/desegmentation for protocols running atop TCP.
3340
3341 There are two main ways of reassembling a Protocol Data Unit (PDU) which
3342 spans across multiple TCP segments.  The first approach is simpler, but
3343 assumes you are running atop of TCP when this occurs (but your dissector
3344 might run atop of UDP, too, for example), and that your PDUs consist of a
3345 fixed amount of data that includes enough information to determine the PDU
3346 length, possibly followed by additional data.  The second method is more
3347 generic but requires more code and is less efficient.
3348
3349 2.7.1 Using tcp_dissect_pdus().
3350
3351 For the first method, you register two different dissection methods, one
3352 for the TCP case, and one for the other cases.  It is a good idea to
3353 also have a dissect_PROTO_common function which will parse the generic
3354 content that you can find in all PDUs which is called from
3355 dissect_PROTO_tcp when the reassembly is complete and from
3356 dissect_PROTO_udp (or dissect_PROTO_other).
3357
3358 To register the distinct dissector functions, consider the following
3359 example, stolen from packet-dns.c:
3360
3361         dissector_handle_t dns_udp_handle;
3362         dissector_handle_t dns_tcp_handle;
3363         dissector_handle_t mdns_udp_handle;
3364
3365         dns_udp_handle = create_dissector_handle(dissect_dns_udp,
3366             proto_dns);
3367         dns_tcp_handle = create_dissector_handle(dissect_dns_tcp,
3368             proto_dns);
3369         mdns_udp_handle = create_dissector_handle(dissect_mdns_udp,
3370             proto_dns);
3371
3372         dissector_add("udp.port", UDP_PORT_DNS, dns_udp_handle);
3373         dissector_add("tcp.port", TCP_PORT_DNS, dns_tcp_handle);
3374         dissector_add("udp.port", UDP_PORT_MDNS, mdns_udp_handle);
3375         dissector_add("tcp.port", TCP_PORT_MDNS, dns_tcp_handle);
3376
3377 The dissect_dns_udp function does very little work and calls
3378 dissect_dns_common, while dissect_dns_tcp calls tcp_dissect_pdus with a
3379 reference to a callback which will be called with reassembled data:
3380
3381         static void
3382         dissect_dns_tcp(tvbuff_t *tvb, packet_info *pinfo, proto_tree *tree)
3383         {
3384                 tcp_dissect_pdus(tvb, pinfo, tree, dns_desegment, 2,
3385                     get_dns_pdu_len, dissect_dns_tcp_pdu);
3386         }
3387
3388 (The dissect_dns_tcp_pdu function acts similarly to dissect_dns_udp.)
3389 The arguments to tcp_dissect_pdus are:
3390
3391         the tvbuff pointer, packet_info pointer, and proto_tree pointer
3392         passed to the dissector;
3393
3394         a gboolean flag indicating whether desegmentation is enabled for
3395         your protocol;
3396
3397         the number of bytes of PDU data required to determine the length
3398         of the PDU;
3399
3400         a routine that takes as arguments a packet_info pointer, a tvbuff
3401         pointer and an offset value representing the offset into the tvbuff
3402         at which a PDU begins and should return - *without* throwing an
3403         exception (it is guaranteed that the number of bytes specified by the
3404         previous argument to tcp_dissect_pdus is available, but more data
3405         might not be available, so don't refer to any data past that) - the
3406         total length of the PDU, in bytes;
3407
3408         a routine that's passed a tvbuff pointer, packet_info pointer,
3409         and proto_tree pointer, with the tvbuff containing a
3410         possibly-reassembled PDU, and that should dissect that PDU.
3411
3412 2.7.2 Modifying the pinfo struct.
3413
3414 The second reassembly mode is preferred when the dissector cannot determine
3415 how many bytes it will need to read in order to determine the size of a PDU.
3416 It may also be useful if your dissector needs to support reassembly from
3417 protocols other than TCP.
3418
3419 Your dissect_PROTO will initially be passed a tvbuff containing the payload of
3420 the first packet. It should dissect as much data as it can, noting that it may
3421 contain more than one complete PDU. If the end of the provided tvbuff coincides
3422 with the end of a PDU then all is well and your dissector can just return as
3423 normal. (If it is a new-style dissector, it should return the number of bytes
3424 successfully processed.)
3425
3426 If the dissector discovers that the end of the tvbuff does /not/ coincide with
3427 the end of a PDU, (ie, there is half of a PDU at the end of the tvbuff), it can
3428 indicate this to the parent dissector, by updating the pinfo struct. The
3429 desegment_offset field is the offset in the tvbuff at which the dissector will
3430 continue processing when next called.  The desegment_len field should contain
3431 the estimated number of additional bytes required for completing the PDU.  Next
3432 time your dissect_PROTO is called, it will be passed a tvbuff composed of the
3433 end of the data from the previous tvbuff together with desegment_len more bytes.
3434
3435 If the dissector cannot tell how many more bytes it will need, it should set
3436 desegment_len=DESEGMENT_ONE_MORE_SEGMENT; it will then be called again as soon
3437 as any more data becomes available. Dissectors should set the desegment_len to a
3438 reasonable value when possible rather than always setting
3439 DESEGMENT_ONE_MORE_SEGMENT as it will generally be more efficient. Also, you
3440 *must not* set desegment_len=1 in this case, in the hope that you can change
3441 your mind later: once you return a positive value from desegment_len, your PDU
3442 boundary is set in stone.
3443
3444 static hf_register_info hf[] = {
3445     {&hf_cstring,
3446      {"C String", "c.string", FT_STRING, BASE_NONE, NULL, 0x0,
3447       "C String", HFILL}
3448      }
3449    };
3450
3451 /**
3452 *   Dissect a buffer containing C strings.
3453 *
3454 *   @param  tvb     The buffer to dissect.
3455 *   @param  pinfo   Packet Info.
3456 *   @param  tree    The protocol tree.
3457 **/
3458 static void dissect_cstr(tvbuff_t * tvb, packet_info * pinfo, proto_tree * tree)
3459 {
3460     guint offset = 0;
3461     while(offset < tvb_reported_length(tvb)) {
3462         gint available = tvb_reported_length_remaining(tvb, offset);
3463         gint len = tvb_strnlen(tvb, offset, available);
3464
3465         if( -1 == len ) {
3466             /* we ran out of data: ask for more */
3467             pinfo->desegment_offset = offset;
3468             pinfo->desegment_len = DESEGMENT_ONE_MORE_SEGMENT;
3469             return;
3470         }
3471
3472         if (check_col(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO)) {
3473             col_set_str(pinfo->cinfo, COL_INFO, "C String");
3474         }
3475
3476         len += 1; /* Add one for the '\0' */
3477
3478         if (tree) {
3479             proto_tree_add_item(tree, hf_cstring, tvb, offset, len, FALSE);
3480         }
3481         offset += (guint)len;
3482     }
3483
3484     /* if we get here, then the end of the tvb coincided with the end of a
3485        string. Happy days. */
3486 }
3487
3488 This simple dissector will repeatedly return DESEGMENT_ONE_MORE_SEGMENT
3489 requesting more data until the tvbuff contains a complete C string. The C string
3490 will then be added to the protocol tree. Note that there may be more
3491 than one complete C string in the tvbuff, so the dissection is done in a
3492 loop.
3493
3494 2.8 ptvcursors.
3495
3496 The ptvcursor API allows a simpler approach to writing dissectors for
3497 simple protocols. The ptvcursor API works best for protocols whose fields
3498 are static and whose format does not depend on the value of other fields.
3499 However, even if only a portion of your protocol is statically defined,
3500 then that portion could make use of ptvcursors.
3501
3502 The ptvcursor API lets you extract data from a tvbuff, and add it to a
3503 protocol tree in one step. It also keeps track of the position in the
3504 tvbuff so that you can extract data again without having to compute any
3505 offsets --- hence the "cursor" name of the API.
3506
3507 The three steps for a simple protocol are:
3508     1. Create a new ptvcursor with ptvcursor_new()
3509     2. Add fields with multiple calls of ptvcursor_add()
3510     3. Delete the ptvcursor with ptvcursor_free()
3511
3512 ptvcursor offers the possibility to add subtrees in the tree as well. It can be
3513 done in very simple steps :
3514     1. Create a new subtree with ptvcursor_push_subtree(). The old subtree is
3515        pushed in a stack and the new subtree will be used by ptvcursor.
3516     2. Add fields with multiple calls of ptvcursor_add(). The fields will be
3517        added in the new subtree created at the previous step.
3518     3. Pop the previous subtree with ptvcursor_pop_subtree(). The previous
3519        subtree is again used by ptvcursor.
3520 Note that at the end of the parsing of a packet you must have popped each
3521 subtree you pushed. If it's not the case, the dissector will generate an error.
3522
3523 To use the ptvcursor API, include the "ptvcursor.h" file. The PGM dissector
3524 is an example of how to use it. You don't need to look at it as a guide;
3525 instead, the API description here should be good enough.
3526
3527 2.8.1 ptvcursor API.
3528
3529 ptvcursor_t*
3530 ptvcursor_new(proto_tree* tree, tvbuff_t* tvb, gint offset)
3531     This creates a new ptvcursor_t object for iterating over a tvbuff.
3532 You must call this and use this ptvcursor_t object so you can use the
3533 ptvcursor API.
3534
3535 proto_item*
3536 ptvcursor_add(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, int hf, gint length, gboolean endianness)
3537     This will extract 'length' bytes from the tvbuff and place it in
3538 the proto_tree as field 'hf', which is a registered header_field. The
3539 pointer to the proto_item that is created is passed back to you. Internally,
3540 the ptvcursor advances its cursor so the next call to ptvcursor_add
3541 starts where this call finished. The 'endianness' parameter matters for
3542 FT_UINT* and FT_INT* fields.
3543
3544 proto_item*
3545 ptvcursor_add_no_advance(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, int hf, gint length, gboolean endianness)
3546     Like ptvcursor_add, but does not advance the internal cursor.
3547
3548 void
3549 ptvcursor_advance(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, gint length)
3550     Advances the internal cursor without adding anything to the proto_tree.
3551
3552 void
3553 ptvcursor_free(ptvcursor_t* ptvc)
3554     Frees the memory associated with the ptvcursor. You must call this
3555 after your dissection with the ptvcursor API is completed.
3556
3557
3558 proto_tree*
3559 ptvcursor_push_subtree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, proto_item* it, gint ett_subtree)
3560     Pushes the current subtree in the tree stack of the cursor, creates a new
3561 one and sets this one as the working tree.
3562
3563 void
3564 ptvcursor_pop_subtree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc);
3565     Pops a subtree in the tree stack of the cursor
3566
3567 proto_tree*
3568 ptvcursor_add_with_subtree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, int hfindex, gint length,
3569                             gboolean little_endian, gint ett_subtree);
3570     Adds an item to the tree and creates a subtree.
3571 If the length is unknown, length may be defined as SUBTREE_UNDEFINED_LENGTH.
3572 In this case, at the next pop, the item length will be equal to the advancement
3573 of the cursor since the creation of the subtree.
3574
3575 proto_tree*
3576 ptvcursor_add_text_with_subtree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, gint length,
3577                                 gint ett_subtree, const char* format, ...);
3578     Add a text node to the tree and create a subtree.
3579 If the length is unknown, length may be defined as SUBTREE_UNDEFINED_LENGTH.
3580 In this case, at the next pop, the item length will be equal to the advancement
3581 of the cursor since the creation of the subtree.
3582
3583 2.8.2 Miscellaneous functions.
3584
3585 tvbuff_t*
3586 ptvcursor_tvbuff(ptvcursor_t* ptvc)
3587     Returns the tvbuff associated with the ptvcursor.
3588
3589 gint
3590 ptvcursor_current_offset(ptvcursor_t* ptvc)
3591     Returns the current offset.
3592
3593 proto_tree*
3594 ptvcursor_tree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc)
3595     Returns the proto_tree associated with the ptvcursor.
3596
3597 void
3598 ptvcursor_set_tree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, proto_tree *tree)
3599     Sets a new proto_tree for the ptvcursor.
3600
3601 proto_tree*
3602 ptvcursor_set_subtree(ptvcursor_t* ptvc, proto_item* it, gint ett_subtree);
3603     Creates a subtree and adds it to the cursor as the working tree but does
3604 not save the old working tree.