4e5993f3bc43ef11c8a335eb7ae2089fe0435c1a
[nivanova/samba-autobuild/.git] / docs / htmldocs / nmbd.8.html
1 <HTML
2 ><HEAD
3 ><TITLE
4 >nmbd</TITLE
5 ><META
6 NAME="GENERATOR"
7 CONTENT="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.57"></HEAD
8 ><BODY
9 CLASS="REFENTRY"
10 BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF"
11 TEXT="#000000"
12 LINK="#0000FF"
13 VLINK="#840084"
14 ALINK="#0000FF"
15 ><H1
16 ><A
17 NAME="NMBD"
18 >nmbd</A
19 ></H1
20 ><DIV
21 CLASS="REFNAMEDIV"
22 ><A
23 NAME="AEN5"
24 ></A
25 ><H2
26 >Name</H2
27 >nmbd&nbsp;--&nbsp;NetBIOS name server to provide NetBIOS 
28         over IP naming services to clients</DIV
29 ><DIV
30 CLASS="REFSYNOPSISDIV"
31 ><A
32 NAME="AEN8"
33 ></A
34 ><H2
35 >Synopsis</H2
36 ><P
37 ><B
38 CLASS="COMMAND"
39 >nmbd</B
40 >  [-D] [-a] [-i] [-o] [-P] [-h] [-V] [-d &#60;debug level&#62;] [-H &#60;lmhosts file&#62;] [-l &#60;log directory&#62;] [-n &#60;primary netbios name&#62;] [-p &#60;port number&#62;] [-s &#60;configuration file&#62;]</P
41 ></DIV
42 ><DIV
43 CLASS="REFSECT1"
44 ><A
45 NAME="AEN24"
46 ></A
47 ><H2
48 >DESCRIPTION</H2
49 ><P
50 >This program is part of the Samba suite.</P
51 ><P
52 ><B
53 CLASS="COMMAND"
54 >nmbd</B
55 > is a server that understands 
56         and can reply to NetBIOS over IP name service requests, like 
57         those produced by SMB/CIFS clients such as Windows 95/98/ME, 
58         Windows NT, Windows 2000, and LanManager clients. It also
59         participates in the browsing protocols which make up the 
60         Windows "Network Neighborhood" view.</P
61 ><P
62 >SMB/CIFS clients, when they start up, may wish to 
63         locate an SMB/CIFS server. That is, they wish to know what 
64         IP number a specified host is using.</P
65 ><P
66 >Amongst other services, <B
67 CLASS="COMMAND"
68 >nmbd</B
69 > will 
70         listen for such requests, and if its own NetBIOS name is 
71         specified it will respond with the IP number of the host it 
72         is running on.  Its "own NetBIOS name" is by
73         default the primary DNS name of the host it is running on, 
74         but this can be overridden with the <EM
75 >-n</EM
76
77         option (see OPTIONS below). Thus <B
78 CLASS="COMMAND"
79 >nmbd</B
80 > will 
81         reply to broadcast queries for its own name(s). Additional
82         names for <B
83 CLASS="COMMAND"
84 >nmbd</B
85 > to respond on can be set 
86         via parameters in the <A
87 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
88 TARGET="_top"
89 ><TT
90 CLASS="FILENAME"
91 >       smb.conf(5)</TT
92 ></A
93 > configuration file.</P
94 ><P
95 ><B
96 CLASS="COMMAND"
97 >nmbd</B
98 > can also be used as a WINS 
99         (Windows Internet Name Server) server. What this basically means 
100         is that it will act as a WINS database server, creating a 
101         database from name registration requests that it receives and 
102         replying to queries from clients for these names.</P
103 ><P
104 >In addition, <B
105 CLASS="COMMAND"
106 >nmbd</B
107 > can act as a WINS 
108         proxy, relaying broadcast queries from clients that do 
109         not understand how to talk the WINS protocol to a WIN 
110         server.</P
111 ></DIV
112 ><DIV
113 CLASS="REFSECT1"
114 ><A
115 NAME="AEN41"
116 ></A
117 ><H2
118 >OPTIONS</H2
119 ><P
120 ></P
121 ><DIV
122 CLASS="VARIABLELIST"
123 ><DL
124 ><DT
125 >-D</DT
126 ><DD
127 ><P
128 >If specified, this parameter causes 
129                 <B
130 CLASS="COMMAND"
131 >nmbd</B
132 > to operate as a daemon. That is, 
133                 it detaches itself and runs in the background, fielding 
134                 requests on the appropriate port. By default, <B
135 CLASS="COMMAND"
136 >nmbd</B
137
138                 will operate as a daemon if launched from a command shell. 
139                 nmbd can also be operated from the <B
140 CLASS="COMMAND"
141 >inetd</B
142
143                 meta-daemon, although this is not recommended.
144                 </P
145 ></DD
146 ><DT
147 >-a</DT
148 ><DD
149 ><P
150 >If this parameter is specified, each new 
151                 connection will append log messages to the log file.  
152                 This is the default.</P
153 ></DD
154 ><DT
155 >-i</DT
156 ><DD
157 ><P
158 >If this parameter is specified it causes the
159                 server to run "interactively", not as a daemon, even if the
160                 server is executed on the command line of a shell. Setting this
161                 parameter negates the implicit deamon mode when run from the
162                 command line.
163                 </P
164 ></DD
165 ><DT
166 >-o</DT
167 ><DD
168 ><P
169 >If this parameter is specified, the 
170                 log files will be overwritten when opened.  By default, 
171                 <B
172 CLASS="COMMAND"
173 >smbd</B
174 > will append entries to the log 
175                 files.</P
176 ></DD
177 ><DT
178 >-h</DT
179 ><DD
180 ><P
181 >Prints the help information (usage) 
182                 for <B
183 CLASS="COMMAND"
184 >nmbd</B
185 >.</P
186 ></DD
187 ><DT
188 >-H &#60;filename&#62;</DT
189 ><DD
190 ><P
191 >NetBIOS lmhosts file.  The lmhosts 
192                 file is a list of NetBIOS names to IP addresses that 
193                 is loaded by the nmbd server and used via the name 
194                 resolution mechanism <A
195 HREF="smb.conf.5.html#nameresolveorder"
196 TARGET="_top"
197 >               name resolve order</A
198 > described in <A
199 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
200 TARGET="_top"
201 > <TT
202 CLASS="FILENAME"
203 >smb.conf(5)</TT
204 ></A
205 >
206                 to resolve any NetBIOS name queries needed by the server. Note 
207                 that the contents of this file are <EM
208 >NOT</EM
209
210                 used by <B
211 CLASS="COMMAND"
212 >nmbd</B
213 > to answer any name queries. 
214                 Adding a line to this file affects name NetBIOS resolution 
215                 from this host <EM
216 >ONLY</EM
217 >.</P
218 ><P
219 >The default path to this file is compiled into 
220                 Samba as part of the build process. Common defaults 
221                 are <TT
222 CLASS="FILENAME"
223 >/usr/local/samba/lib/lmhosts</TT
224 >,
225                 <TT
226 CLASS="FILENAME"
227 >/usr/samba/lib/lmhosts</TT
228 > or
229                 <TT
230 CLASS="FILENAME"
231 >/etc/lmhosts</TT
232 >. See the <A
233 HREF="lmhosts.5.html"
234 TARGET="_top"
235 >               <TT
236 CLASS="FILENAME"
237 >lmhosts(5)</TT
238 ></A
239 > man page for details on the 
240                 contents of this file.</P
241 ></DD
242 ><DT
243 >-V</DT
244 ><DD
245 ><P
246 >Prints the version number for 
247                 <B
248 CLASS="COMMAND"
249 >nmbd</B
250 >.</P
251 ></DD
252 ><DT
253 >-d &#60;debug level&#62;</DT
254 ><DD
255 ><P
256 >debuglevel is an integer 
257                 from 0 to 10.  The default value if this parameter is 
258                 not specified is zero.</P
259 ><P
260 >The higher this value, the more detail will 
261                 be logged to the log files about the activities of the 
262                 server. At level 0, only critical errors and serious 
263                 warnings will be logged. Level 1 is a reasonable level for
264                 day to day running - it generates a small amount of 
265                 information about operations carried out.</P
266 ><P
267 >Levels above 1 will generate considerable amounts 
268                 of log data, and should only be used when investigating 
269                 a problem. Levels above 3 are designed for use only by developers 
270                 and generate HUGE amounts of log data, most of which is extremely 
271                 cryptic.</P
272 ><P
273 >Note that specifying this parameter here will override 
274                 the <A
275 HREF="smb.conf.5.html#loglevel"
276 TARGET="_top"
277 >log level</A
278
279                 parameter in the <A
280 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
281 TARGET="_top"
282 ><TT
283 CLASS="FILENAME"
284 >               smb.conf</TT
285 ></A
286 > file.</P
287 ></DD
288 ><DT
289 >-l &#60;log directory&#62;</DT
290 ><DD
291 ><P
292 >The -l parameter specifies a directory 
293                 into which the "log.nmbd" log file will be created
294                 for operational data from the running
295                 <B
296 CLASS="COMMAND"
297 >nmbd</B
298 > server.</P
299 ><P
300 >The default log directory is compiled into Samba
301                 as part of the build process. Common defaults are <TT
302 CLASS="FILENAME"
303 >               /usr/local/samba/var/log.nmb</TT
304 >, <TT
305 CLASS="FILENAME"
306 >               /usr/samba/var/log.nmb</TT
307 > or
308                 <TT
309 CLASS="FILENAME"
310 >/var/log/log.nmb</TT
311 >.</P
312 ></DD
313 ><DT
314 >-n &#60;primary NetBIOS name&#62;</DT
315 ><DD
316 ><P
317 >This option allows you to override
318                 the NetBIOS name that Samba uses for itself. This is identical 
319                 to setting the <A
320 HREF="smb.conf.5.html#netbiosname"
321 TARGET="_top"
322 >               NetBIOS name</A
323 > parameter in the <A
324 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
325 TARGET="_top"
326 >       
327                 <TT
328 CLASS="FILENAME"
329 >smb.conf</TT
330 ></A
331 > file.  However, a command
332                 line setting will take precedence over settings in 
333                 <TT
334 CLASS="FILENAME"
335 >smb.conf</TT
336 >.</P
337 ></DD
338 ><DT
339 >-p &#60;UDP port number&#62;</DT
340 ><DD
341 ><P
342 >UDP port number is a positive integer value.
343                 This option changes the default UDP port number (normally 137) 
344                 that <B
345 CLASS="COMMAND"
346 >nmbd</B
347 > responds to name queries on. Don't 
348                 use this option unless you are an expert, in which case you 
349                 won't need help!</P
350 ></DD
351 ><DT
352 >-s &#60;configuration file&#62;</DT
353 ><DD
354 ><P
355 >The default configuration file name 
356                 is set at build time, typically as <TT
357 CLASS="FILENAME"
358 >               /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</TT
359 >, but
360                 this may be changed when Samba is autoconfigured.</P
361 ><P
362 >The file specified contains the configuration details 
363                 required by the server. See <A
364 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
365 TARGET="_top"
366
367                 <TT
368 CLASS="FILENAME"
369 >smb.conf(5)</TT
370 ></A
371 > for more information.
372                 </P
373 ></DD
374 ></DL
375 ></DIV
376 ></DIV
377 ><DIV
378 CLASS="REFSECT1"
379 ><A
380 NAME="AEN130"
381 ></A
382 ><H2
383 >FILES</H2
384 ><P
385 ></P
386 ><DIV
387 CLASS="VARIABLELIST"
388 ><DL
389 ><DT
390 ><TT
391 CLASS="FILENAME"
392 >/etc/inetd.conf</TT
393 ></DT
394 ><DD
395 ><P
396 >If the server is to be run by the 
397                 <B
398 CLASS="COMMAND"
399 >inetd</B
400 > meta-daemon, this file 
401                 must contain suitable startup information for the 
402                 meta-daemon. See the <A
403 HREF="UNIX_INSTALL.html"
404 TARGET="_top"
405 >UNIX_INSTALL.html</A
406 > document
407                 for details.
408                 </P
409 ></DD
410 ><DT
411 ><TT
412 CLASS="FILENAME"
413 >/etc/rc</TT
414 ></DT
415 ><DD
416 ><P
417 >or whatever initialization script your 
418                 system uses).</P
419 ><P
420 >If running the server as a daemon at startup, 
421                 this file will need to contain an appropriate startup 
422                 sequence for the server. See the <A
423 HREF="UNIX_INSTALL.html"
424 TARGET="_top"
425 >UNIX_INSTALL.html</A
426 > document
427                 for details.</P
428 ></DD
429 ><DT
430 ><TT
431 CLASS="FILENAME"
432 >/etc/services</TT
433 ></DT
434 ><DD
435 ><P
436 >If running the server via the 
437                 meta-daemon <B
438 CLASS="COMMAND"
439 >inetd</B
440 >, this file 
441                 must contain a mapping of service name (e.g., netbios-ssn) 
442                 to service port (e.g., 139) and protocol type (e.g., tcp). 
443                 See the <A
444 HREF="UNIX_INSTALL.html"
445 TARGET="_top"
446 >UNIX_INSTALL.html</A
447 >
448                 document for details.</P
449 ></DD
450 ><DT
451 ><TT
452 CLASS="FILENAME"
453 >/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</TT
454 ></DT
455 ><DD
456 ><P
457 >This is the default location of the 
458                 <A
459 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
460 TARGET="_top"
461 ><TT
462 CLASS="FILENAME"
463 >smb.conf</TT
464 ></A
465 >
466                 server configuration file. Other common places that systems 
467                 install this file are <TT
468 CLASS="FILENAME"
469 >/usr/samba/lib/smb.conf</TT
470
471                 and <TT
472 CLASS="FILENAME"
473 >/etc/smb.conf</TT
474 >.</P
475 ><P
476 >When run as a WINS server (see the 
477                 <A
478 HREF="smb.conf.5.html#WINSSUPPORT"
479 TARGET="_top"
480 >wins support</A
481 >
482                 parameter in the <TT
483 CLASS="FILENAME"
484 >smb.conf(5)</TT
485 > man page),
486                 <B
487 CLASS="COMMAND"
488 >nmbd</B
489 >
490                 will store the WINS database in the file <TT
491 CLASS="FILENAME"
492 >wins.dat</TT
493
494                 in the <TT
495 CLASS="FILENAME"
496 >var/locks</TT
497 > directory configured under 
498                 wherever Samba was configured to install itself.</P
499 ><P
500 >If <B
501 CLASS="COMMAND"
502 >nmbd</B
503 > is acting as a <EM
504 >               browse master</EM
505 > (see the <A
506 HREF="smb.conf.5.html#LOCALMASTER"
507 TARGET="_top"
508 >local master</A
509 >
510                 parameter in the <TT
511 CLASS="FILENAME"
512 >smb.conf(5)</TT
513 > man page,
514                 <B
515 CLASS="COMMAND"
516 >nmbd</B
517 >
518                 will store the browsing database in the file <TT
519 CLASS="FILENAME"
520 >browse.dat
521                 </TT
522 > in the <TT
523 CLASS="FILENAME"
524 >var/locks</TT
525 > directory
526                 configured under wherever Samba was configured to install itself.
527                 </P
528 ></DD
529 ></DL
530 ></DIV
531 ></DIV
532 ><DIV
533 CLASS="REFSECT1"
534 ><A
535 NAME="AEN177"
536 ></A
537 ><H2
538 >SIGNALS</H2
539 ><P
540 >To shut down an <B
541 CLASS="COMMAND"
542 >nmbd</B
543 > process it is recommended 
544         that SIGKILL (-9) <EM
545 >NOT</EM
546 > be used, except as a last 
547         resort, as this may leave the name database in an inconsistent state. 
548         The correct way to terminate <B
549 CLASS="COMMAND"
550 >nmbd</B
551 > is to send it 
552         a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on its own.</P
553 ><P
554 ><B
555 CLASS="COMMAND"
556 >nmbd</B
557 > will accept SIGHUP, which will cause 
558         it to dump out its namelists into the file <TT
559 CLASS="FILENAME"
560 >namelist.debug
561         </TT
562 > in the <TT
563 CLASS="FILENAME"
564 >/usr/local/samba/var/locks</TT
565
566         directory (or the <TT
567 CLASS="FILENAME"
568 >var/locks</TT
569 > directory configured 
570         under wherever Samba was configured to install itself). This will also 
571         cause <B
572 CLASS="COMMAND"
573 >nmbd</B
574 > to dump out its server database in
575         the <TT
576 CLASS="FILENAME"
577 >log.nmb</TT
578 > file.</P
579 ><P
580 >The debug log level of nmbd may be raised or lowered using
581         <A
582 HREF="smbcontrol.1.html"
583 TARGET="_top"
584 ><B
585 CLASS="COMMAND"
586 >smbcontrol(1)</B
587 >
588         </A
589 > (SIGUSR[1|2] signals are no longer used in Samba 2.2). This is
590         to allow transient problems to be diagnosed, whilst still running
591         at a normally low log level.</P
592 ></DIV
593 ><DIV
594 CLASS="REFSECT1"
595 ><A
596 NAME="AEN193"
597 ></A
598 ><H2
599 >VERSION</H2
600 ><P
601 >This man page is correct for version 2.2 of 
602         the Samba suite.</P
603 ></DIV
604 ><DIV
605 CLASS="REFSECT1"
606 ><A
607 NAME="AEN196"
608 ></A
609 ><H2
610 >SEE ALSO</H2
611 ><P
612 ><B
613 CLASS="COMMAND"
614 >inetd(8)</B
615 >, <A
616 HREF="smbd.8.html"
617 TARGET="_top"
618 ><B
619 CLASS="COMMAND"
620 >smbd(8)</B
621 ></A
622 >, 
623         <A
624 HREF="smb.conf.5.html"
625 TARGET="_top"
626 ><TT
627 CLASS="FILENAME"
628 >smb.conf(5)</TT
629 >
630         </A
631 >, <A
632 HREF="smbclient.1.html"
633 TARGET="_top"
634 ><B
635 CLASS="COMMAND"
636 >smbclient(1)
637         </B
638 ></A
639 >, <A
640 HREF="testparm.1.html"
641 TARGET="_top"
642 ><B
643 CLASS="COMMAND"
644 >       testparm(1)</B
645 ></A
646 >, <A
647 HREF="testprns.1.html"
648 TARGET="_top"
649 >       <B
650 CLASS="COMMAND"
651 >testprns(1)</B
652 ></A
653 >, and the Internet RFC's
654         <TT
655 CLASS="FILENAME"
656 >rfc1001.txt</TT
657 >, <TT
658 CLASS="FILENAME"
659 >rfc1002.txt</TT
660 >. 
661         In addition the CIFS (formerly SMB) specification is available 
662         as a link from the Web page <A
663 HREF="http://samba.org/cifs/"
664 TARGET="_top"
665
666         http://samba.org/cifs/</A
667 >.</P
668 ></DIV
669 ><DIV
670 CLASS="REFSECT1"
671 ><A
672 NAME="AEN213"
673 ></A
674 ><H2
675 >AUTHOR</H2
676 ><P
677 >The original Samba software and related utilities 
678         were created by Andrew Tridgell. Samba is now developed
679         by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar 
680         to the way the Linux kernel is developed.</P
681 ><P
682 >The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. 
683         The man page sources were converted to YODL format (another 
684         excellent piece of Open Source software, available at
685         <A
686 HREF="ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/"
687 TARGET="_top"
688 >       ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/</A
689 >) and updated for the Samba 2.0 
690         release by Jeremy Allison.  The conversion to DocBook for 
691         Samba 2.2 was done by Gerald Carter</P
692 ></DIV
693 ></BODY
694 ></HTML
695 >