c8b124d537b6fadfc7bba7c3d667e4a20a619e52
[nivanova/samba-autobuild/.git] / ctdb / doc / ctdb.7.xml
1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE refentry
3         PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.5//EN"
4         "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.5/docbookx.dtd">
5 <refentry id="ctdb.7">
6
7 <refmeta>
8         <refentrytitle>ctdb</refentrytitle>
9         <manvolnum>7</manvolnum>
10         <refmiscinfo class="source">ctdb</refmiscinfo>
11         <refmiscinfo class="manual">CTDB - clustered TDB database</refmiscinfo>
12 </refmeta>
13
14
15 <refnamediv>
16         <refname>ctdb</refname>
17         <refpurpose>Clustered TDB</refpurpose>
18 </refnamediv>
19
20 <refsect1>
21   <title>DESCRIPTION</title>
22
23   <para>
24     CTDB is a clustered database component in clustered Samba that
25     provides a high-availability load-sharing CIFS server cluster.
26   </para>
27
28   <para>
29     The main functions of CTDB are:
30   </para>
31
32   <itemizedlist>
33     <listitem>
34       <para>
35         Provide a clustered version of the TDB database with automatic
36         rebuild/recovery of the databases upon node failures.
37       </para>
38     </listitem>
39
40     <listitem>
41       <para>
42       Monitor nodes in the cluster and services running on each node.
43       </para>
44     </listitem>
45
46     <listitem>
47       <para>
48         Manage a pool of public IP addresses that are used to provide
49         services to clients.  Alternatively, CTDB can be used with
50         LVS.
51       </para>
52     </listitem>
53   </itemizedlist>
54
55   <para>
56     Combined with a cluster filesystem CTDB provides a full
57     high-availablity (HA) environment for services such as clustered
58     Samba, NFS and other services.
59   </para>
60 </refsect1>
61
62 <refsect1>
63   <title>ANATOMY OF A CTDB CLUSTER</title>
64
65   <para>
66     A CTDB cluster is a collection of nodes with 2 or more network
67     interfaces.  All nodes provide network (usually file/NAS) services
68     to clients.  Data served by file services is stored on shared
69     storage (usually a cluster filesystem) that is accessible by all
70     nodes.
71   </para>
72   <para>
73     CTDB provides an "all active" cluster, where services are load
74     balanced across all nodes.
75   </para>
76 </refsect1>
77
78   <refsect1>
79     <title>Recovery Lock</title>
80
81     <para>
82       CTDB uses a <emphasis>recovery lock</emphasis> to avoid a
83       <emphasis>split brain</emphasis>, where a cluster becomes
84       partitioned and each partition attempts to operate
85       independently.  Issues that can result from a split brain
86       include file data corruption, because file locking metadata may
87       not be tracked correctly.
88     </para>
89
90     <para>
91       CTDB uses a <emphasis>cluster leader and follower</emphasis>
92       model of cluster management.  All nodes in a cluster elect one
93       node to be the leader.  The leader node coordinates privileged
94       operations such as database recovery and IP address failover.
95       CTDB refers to the leader node as the <emphasis>recovery
96       master</emphasis>.  This node takes and holds the recovery lock
97       to assert its privileged role in the cluster.
98     </para>
99
100     <para>
101       By default, the recovery lock is implemented using a file
102       (specified by <parameter>CTDB_RECOVERY_LOCK</parameter>)
103       residing in shared storage (usually) on a cluster filesystem.
104       To support a recovery lock the cluster filesystem must support
105       lock coherence.  See
106       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ping_pong</refentrytitle>
107       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry> for more details.
108     </para>
109
110     <para>
111       The recovery lock can also be implemented using an arbitrary
112       cluster mutex call-out by using an exclamation point ('!') as
113       the first character of
114       <parameter>CTDB_RECOVERY_LOCK</parameter>.  For example, a value
115       of <command>!/usr/local/bin/myhelper recovery</command> would
116       run the given helper with the specified arguments.  See the
117       source code relating to cluster mutexes for clues about writing
118       call-outs.
119     </para>
120
121     <para>
122       If a cluster becomes partitioned (for example, due to a
123       communication failure) and a different recovery master is
124       elected by the nodes in each partition, then only one of these
125       recovery masters will be able to take the recovery lock.  The
126       recovery master in the "losing" partition will not be able to
127       take the recovery lock and will be excluded from the cluster.
128       The nodes in the "losing" partition will elect each node in turn
129       as their recovery master so eventually all the nodes in that
130       partition will be excluded.
131     </para>
132
133     <para>
134       CTDB does sanity checks to ensure that the recovery lock is held
135       as expected.
136     </para>
137
138     <para>
139       CTDB can run without a recovery lock but this is not recommended
140       as there will be no protection from split brains.
141     </para>
142   </refsect1>
143
144   <refsect1>
145     <title>Private vs Public addresses</title>
146
147     <para>
148       Each node in a CTDB cluster has multiple IP addresses assigned
149       to it:
150
151       <itemizedlist>
152         <listitem>
153           <para>
154             A single private IP address that is used for communication
155             between nodes.
156           </para>
157         </listitem>
158         <listitem>
159           <para>
160             One or more public IP addresses that are used to provide
161             NAS or other services.
162           </para>
163         </listitem>
164       </itemizedlist>
165     </para>
166
167     <refsect2>
168       <title>Private address</title>
169
170       <para>
171         Each node is configured with a unique, permanently assigned
172         private address.  This address is configured by the operating
173         system.  This address uniquely identifies a physical node in
174         the cluster and is the address that CTDB daemons will use to
175         communicate with the CTDB daemons on other nodes.
176       </para>
177       <para>
178         Private addresses are listed in the file specified by the
179         <varname>CTDB_NODES</varname> configuration variable (see
180         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd.conf</refentrytitle>
181         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>, default
182         <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/nodes</filename>).  This file contains the
183         list of private addresses for all nodes in the cluster, one
184         per line. This file must be the same on all nodes in the
185         cluster.
186       </para>
187       <para>
188         Private addresses should not be used by clients to connect to
189         services provided by the cluster.
190       </para>
191       <para>
192         It is strongly recommended that the private addresses are
193         configured on a private network that is separate from client
194         networks.  This is because the CTDB protocol is both
195         unauthenticated and unencrypted.  If clients share the private
196         network then steps need to be taken to stop injection of
197         packets to relevant ports on the private addresses.  It is
198         also likely that CTDB protocol traffic between nodes could
199         leak sensitive information if it can be intercepted.
200       </para>
201
202       <para>
203         Example <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/nodes</filename> for a four node
204         cluster:
205       </para>
206       <screen format="linespecific">
207 192.168.1.1
208 192.168.1.2
209 192.168.1.3
210 192.168.1.4
211       </screen>
212     </refsect2>
213
214     <refsect2>
215       <title>Public addresses</title>
216
217       <para>
218         Public addresses are used to provide services to clients.
219         Public addresses are not configured at the operating system
220         level and are not permanently associated with a particular
221         node.  Instead, they are managed by CTDB and are assigned to
222         interfaces on physical nodes at runtime.
223       </para>
224       <para>
225         The CTDB cluster will assign/reassign these public addresses
226         across the available healthy nodes in the cluster. When one
227         node fails, its public addresses will be taken over by one or
228         more other nodes in the cluster.  This ensures that services
229         provided by all public addresses are always available to
230         clients, as long as there are nodes available capable of
231         hosting this address.
232       </para>
233       <para>
234         The public address configuration is stored in a file on each
235         node specified by the <varname>CTDB_PUBLIC_ADDRESSES</varname>
236         configuration variable (see
237         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd.conf</refentrytitle>
238         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>, recommended
239         <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses</filename>).  This file
240         contains a list of the public addresses that the node is
241         capable of hosting, one per line.  Each entry also contains
242         the netmask and the interface to which the address should be
243         assigned.
244       </para>
245
246       <para>
247         Example <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses</filename> for a
248         node that can host 4 public addresses, on 2 different
249         interfaces:
250       </para>
251       <screen format="linespecific">
252 10.1.1.1/24 eth1
253 10.1.1.2/24 eth1
254 10.1.2.1/24 eth2
255 10.1.2.2/24 eth2
256       </screen>
257
258       <para>
259         In many cases the public addresses file will be the same on
260         all nodes.  However, it is possible to use different public
261         address configurations on different nodes.
262       </para>
263
264       <para>
265         Example: 4 nodes partitioned into two subgroups:
266       </para>
267       <screen format="linespecific">
268 Node 0:/usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses
269         10.1.1.1/24 eth1
270         10.1.1.2/24 eth1
271
272 Node 1:/usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses
273         10.1.1.1/24 eth1
274         10.1.1.2/24 eth1
275
276 Node 2:/usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses
277         10.1.2.1/24 eth2
278         10.1.2.2/24 eth2
279
280 Node 3:/usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses
281         10.1.2.1/24 eth2
282         10.1.2.2/24 eth2
283       </screen>
284       <para>
285         In this example nodes 0 and 1 host two public addresses on the
286         10.1.1.x network while nodes 2 and 3 host two public addresses
287         for the 10.1.2.x network.
288       </para>
289       <para>
290         Public address 10.1.1.1 can be hosted by either of nodes 0 or
291         1 and will be available to clients as long as at least one of
292         these two nodes are available.
293       </para>
294       <para>
295         If both nodes 0 and 1 become unavailable then public address
296         10.1.1.1 also becomes unavailable. 10.1.1.1 can not be failed
297         over to nodes 2 or 3 since these nodes do not have this public
298         address configured.
299       </para>
300       <para>
301         The <command>ctdb ip</command> command can be used to view the
302         current assignment of public addresses to physical nodes.
303       </para>
304     </refsect2>
305   </refsect1>
306
307
308   <refsect1>
309     <title>Node status</title>
310
311     <para>
312       The current status of each node in the cluster can be viewed by the 
313       <command>ctdb status</command> command.
314     </para>
315
316     <para>
317       A node can be in one of the following states:
318     </para>
319
320     <variablelist>
321       <varlistentry>
322         <term>OK</term>
323         <listitem>
324           <para>
325             This node is healthy and fully functional.  It hosts public
326             addresses to provide services.
327           </para>
328         </listitem>
329       </varlistentry>
330
331       <varlistentry>
332         <term>DISCONNECTED</term>
333         <listitem>
334           <para>
335             This node is not reachable by other nodes via the private
336             network.  It is not currently participating in the cluster.
337             It <emphasis>does not</emphasis> host public addresses to
338             provide services.  It might be shut down.
339           </para>
340         </listitem>
341       </varlistentry>
342
343       <varlistentry>
344         <term>DISABLED</term>
345         <listitem>
346           <para>
347             This node has been administratively disabled. This node is
348             partially functional and participates in the cluster.
349             However, it <emphasis>does not</emphasis> host public
350             addresses to provide services.
351           </para>
352         </listitem>
353       </varlistentry>
354
355       <varlistentry>
356         <term>UNHEALTHY</term>
357         <listitem>
358           <para>
359             A service provided by this node has failed a health check
360             and should be investigated.  This node is partially
361             functional and participates in the cluster.  However, it
362             <emphasis>does not</emphasis> host public addresses to
363             provide services.  Unhealthy nodes should be investigated
364             and may require an administrative action to rectify.
365           </para>
366         </listitem>
367       </varlistentry>
368
369       <varlistentry>
370         <term>BANNED</term>
371         <listitem>
372           <para>
373             CTDB is not behaving as designed on this node.  For example,
374             it may have failed too many recovery attempts.  Such nodes
375             are banned from participating in the cluster for a
376             configurable time period before they attempt to rejoin the
377             cluster.  A banned node <emphasis>does not</emphasis> host
378             public addresses to provide services.  All banned nodes
379             should be investigated and may require an administrative
380             action to rectify.
381           </para>
382         </listitem>
383       </varlistentry>
384
385       <varlistentry>
386         <term>STOPPED</term>
387         <listitem>
388           <para>
389             This node has been administratively exclude from the
390             cluster.  A stopped node does no participate in the cluster
391             and <emphasis>does not</emphasis> host public addresses to
392             provide services.  This state can be used while performing
393             maintenance on a node.
394           </para>
395         </listitem>
396       </varlistentry>
397
398       <varlistentry>
399         <term>PARTIALLYONLINE</term>
400         <listitem>
401           <para>
402             A node that is partially online participates in a cluster
403             like a healthy (OK) node.  Some interfaces to serve public
404             addresses are down, but at least one interface is up.  See
405             also <command>ctdb ifaces</command>.
406           </para>
407         </listitem>
408       </varlistentry>
409
410     </variablelist>
411   </refsect1>
412
413   <refsect1>
414     <title>CAPABILITIES</title>
415
416     <para>
417       Cluster nodes can have several different capabilities enabled.
418       These are listed below.
419     </para>
420
421     <variablelist>
422
423       <varlistentry>
424         <term>RECMASTER</term>
425         <listitem>
426           <para>
427             Indicates that a node can become the CTDB cluster recovery
428             master.  The current recovery master is decided via an
429             election held by all active nodes with this capability.
430           </para>
431           <para>
432             Default is YES.
433           </para>
434         </listitem>
435       </varlistentry>
436
437       <varlistentry>
438         <term>LMASTER</term>
439         <listitem>
440           <para>
441             Indicates that a node can be the location master (LMASTER)
442             for database records.  The LMASTER always knows which node
443             has the latest copy of a record in a volatile database.
444           </para>
445           <para>
446             Default is YES.
447           </para>
448         </listitem>
449       </varlistentry>
450
451     </variablelist>
452
453     <para>
454       The RECMASTER and LMASTER capabilities can be disabled when CTDB
455       is used to create a cluster spanning across WAN links. In this
456       case CTDB acts as a WAN accelerator.
457     </para>
458
459   </refsect1>
460
461   <refsect1>
462     <title>LVS</title>
463
464     <para>
465       LVS is a mode where CTDB presents one single IP address for the
466       entire cluster. This is an alternative to using public IP
467       addresses and round-robin DNS to loadbalance clients across the
468       cluster.
469     </para>
470
471     <para>
472       This is similar to using a layer-4 loadbalancing switch but with
473       some restrictions.
474     </para>
475
476     <para>
477       One extra LVS public address is assigned on the public network
478       to each LVS group.  Each LVS group is a set of nodes in the
479       cluster that presents the same LVS address public address to the
480       outside world.  Normally there would only be one LVS group
481       spanning an entire cluster, but in situations where one CTDB
482       cluster spans multiple physical sites it might be useful to have
483       one LVS group for each site.  There can be multiple LVS groups
484       in a cluster but each node can only be member of one LVS group.
485     </para>
486
487     <para>
488       Client access to the cluster is load-balanced across the HEALTHY
489       nodes in an LVS group.  If no HEALTHY nodes exists then all
490       nodes in the group are used, regardless of health status.  CTDB
491       will, however never load-balance LVS traffic to nodes that are
492       BANNED, STOPPED, DISABLED or DISCONNECTED.  The <command>ctdb
493       lvs</command> command is used to show which nodes are currently
494       load-balanced across.
495     </para>
496
497     <para>
498       In each LVS group, one of the nodes is selected by CTDB to be
499       the LVS master.  This node receives all traffic from clients
500       coming in to the LVS public address and multiplexes it across
501       the internal network to one of the nodes that LVS is using.
502       When responding to the client, that node will send the data back
503       directly to the client, bypassing the LVS master node.  The
504       command <command>ctdb lvsmaster</command> will show which node
505       is the current LVS master.
506     </para>
507
508     <para>
509       The path used for a client I/O is:
510       <orderedlist>
511         <listitem>
512           <para>
513             Client sends request packet to LVSMASTER.
514           </para>
515         </listitem>
516         <listitem>
517           <para>
518             LVSMASTER passes the request on to one node across the
519             internal network.
520           </para>
521         </listitem>
522         <listitem>
523           <para>
524             Selected node processes the request.
525           </para>
526         </listitem>
527         <listitem>
528           <para>
529             Node responds back to client.
530           </para>
531         </listitem>
532       </orderedlist>
533     </para>
534
535     <para>
536       This means that all incoming traffic to the cluster will pass
537       through one physical node, which limits scalability. You can
538       send more data to the LVS address that one physical node can
539       multiplex. This means that you should not use LVS if your I/O
540       pattern is write-intensive since you will be limited in the
541       available network bandwidth that node can handle.  LVS does work
542       wery well for read-intensive workloads where only smallish READ
543       requests are going through the LVSMASTER bottleneck and the
544       majority of the traffic volume (the data in the read replies)
545       goes straight from the processing node back to the clients. For
546       read-intensive i/o patterns you can acheive very high throughput
547       rates in this mode.
548     </para>
549
550     <para>
551       Note: you can use LVS and public addresses at the same time.
552     </para>
553
554     <para>
555       If you use LVS, you must have a permanent address configured for
556       the public interface on each node. This address must be routable
557       and the cluster nodes must be configured so that all traffic
558       back to client hosts are routed through this interface. This is
559       also required in order to allow samba/winbind on the node to
560       talk to the domain controller.  This LVS IP address can not be
561       used to initiate outgoing traffic.
562     </para>
563     <para>
564       Make sure that the domain controller and the clients are
565       reachable from a node <emphasis>before</emphasis> you enable
566       LVS.  Also ensure that outgoing traffic to these hosts is routed
567       out through the configured public interface.
568     </para>
569
570     <refsect2>
571       <title>Configuration</title>
572
573       <para>
574         To activate LVS on a CTDB node you must specify the
575         <varname>CTDB_LVS_PUBLIC_IFACE</varname>,
576         <varname>CTDB_LVS_PUBLIC_IP</varname> and
577         <varname>CTDB_LVS_NODES</varname> configuration variables.
578         <varname>CTDB_LVS_NODES</varname> specifies a file containing
579         the private address of all nodes in the current node's LVS
580         group.
581       </para>
582
583       <para>
584         Example:
585         <screen format="linespecific">
586 CTDB_LVS_PUBLIC_IFACE=eth1
587 CTDB_LVS_PUBLIC_IP=10.1.1.237
588 CTDB_LVS_NODES=/usr/local/etc/ctdb/lvs_nodes
589         </screen>
590       </para>
591
592       <para>
593         Example <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/lvs_nodes</filename>:
594       </para>
595       <screen format="linespecific">
596 192.168.1.2
597 192.168.1.3
598 192.168.1.4
599       </screen>
600
601       <para>
602         Normally any node in an LVS group can act as the LVS master.
603         Nodes that are highly loaded due to other demands maybe
604         flagged with the "slave-only" option in the
605         <varname>CTDB_LVS_NODES</varname> file to limit the LVS
606         functionality of those nodes.
607       </para>
608
609       <para>
610         LVS nodes file that excludes 192.168.1.4 from being
611         the LVS master node:
612       </para>
613       <screen format="linespecific">
614 192.168.1.2
615 192.168.1.3
616 192.168.1.4 slave-only
617       </screen>
618
619     </refsect2>
620   </refsect1>
621
622   <refsect1>
623     <title>TRACKING AND RESETTING TCP CONNECTIONS</title>
624
625     <para>
626       CTDB tracks TCP connections from clients to public IP addresses,
627       on known ports.  When an IP address moves from one node to
628       another, all existing TCP connections to that IP address are
629       reset.  The node taking over this IP address will also send
630       gratuitous ARPs (for IPv4, or neighbour advertisement, for
631       IPv6).  This allows clients to reconnect quickly, rather than
632       waiting for TCP timeouts, which can be very long.
633     </para>
634
635     <para>
636       It is important that established TCP connections do not survive
637       a release and take of a public IP address on the same node.
638       Such connections can get out of sync with sequence and ACK
639       numbers, potentially causing a disruptive ACK storm.
640     </para>
641
642   </refsect1>
643
644   <refsect1>
645     <title>NAT GATEWAY</title>
646
647     <para>
648       NAT gateway (NATGW) is an optional feature that is used to
649       configure fallback routing for nodes.  This allows cluster nodes
650       to connect to external services (e.g. DNS, AD, NIS and LDAP)
651       when they do not host any public addresses (e.g. when they are
652       unhealthy).
653     </para>
654     <para>
655       This also applies to node startup because CTDB marks nodes as
656       UNHEALTHY until they have passed a "monitor" event.  In this
657       context, NAT gateway helps to avoid a "chicken and egg"
658       situation where a node needs to access an external service to
659       become healthy.
660     </para>
661     <para>
662       Another way of solving this type of problem is to assign an
663       extra static IP address to a public interface on every node.
664       This is simpler but it uses an extra IP address per node, while
665       NAT gateway generally uses only one extra IP address.
666     </para>
667
668     <refsect2>
669       <title>Operation</title>
670
671       <para>
672         One extra NATGW public address is assigned on the public
673         network to each NATGW group.  Each NATGW group is a set of
674         nodes in the cluster that shares the same NATGW address to
675         talk to the outside world.  Normally there would only be one
676         NATGW group spanning an entire cluster, but in situations
677         where one CTDB cluster spans multiple physical sites it might
678         be useful to have one NATGW group for each site.
679       </para>
680       <para>
681         There can be multiple NATGW groups in a cluster but each node
682         can only be member of one NATGW group.
683       </para>
684       <para>
685         In each NATGW group, one of the nodes is selected by CTDB to
686         be the NATGW master and the other nodes are consider to be
687         NATGW slaves.  NATGW slaves establish a fallback default route
688         to the NATGW master via the private network.  When a NATGW
689         slave hosts no public IP addresses then it will use this route
690         for outbound connections.  The NATGW master hosts the NATGW
691         public IP address and routes outgoing connections from
692         slave nodes via this IP address.  It also establishes a
693         fallback default route.
694       </para>
695     </refsect2>
696
697     <refsect2>
698       <title>Configuration</title>
699
700       <para>
701         NATGW is usually configured similar to the following example configuration:
702       </para>
703       <screen format="linespecific">
704 CTDB_NATGW_NODES=/usr/local/etc/ctdb/natgw_nodes
705 CTDB_NATGW_PRIVATE_NETWORK=192.168.1.0/24
706 CTDB_NATGW_PUBLIC_IP=10.0.0.227/24
707 CTDB_NATGW_PUBLIC_IFACE=eth0
708 CTDB_NATGW_DEFAULT_GATEWAY=10.0.0.1
709       </screen>
710
711       <para>
712         Normally any node in a NATGW group can act as the NATGW
713         master.  Some configurations may have special nodes that lack
714         connectivity to a public network.  In such cases, those nodes
715         can be flagged with the "slave-only" option in the
716         <varname>CTDB_NATGW_NODES</varname> file to limit the NATGW
717         functionality of those nodes.
718       </para>
719
720       <para>
721         See the <citetitle>NAT GATEWAY</citetitle> section in
722         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd.conf</refentrytitle>
723         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> for more details of
724         NATGW configuration.
725       </para>
726     </refsect2>
727
728
729     <refsect2>
730       <title>Implementation details</title>
731
732       <para>
733         When the NATGW functionality is used, one of the nodes is
734         selected to act as a NAT gateway for all the other nodes in
735         the group when they need to communicate with the external
736         services.  The NATGW master is selected to be a node that is
737         most likely to have usable networks.
738       </para>
739
740       <para>
741         The NATGW master hosts the NATGW public IP address
742         <varname>CTDB_NATGW_PUBLIC_IP</varname> on the configured public
743         interfaces <varname>CTDB_NATGW_PUBLIC_IFACE</varname> and acts as
744         a router, masquerading outgoing connections from slave nodes
745         via this IP address.  If
746         <varname>CTDB_NATGW_DEFAULT_GATEWAY</varname> is set then it
747         also establishes a fallback default route to the configured
748         this gateway with a metric of 10.  A metric 10 route is used
749         so it can co-exist with other default routes that may be
750         available.
751       </para>
752
753       <para>
754         A NATGW slave establishes its fallback default route to the
755         NATGW master via the private network
756         <varname>CTDB_NATGW_PRIVATE_NETWORK</varname>with a metric of 10.
757         This route is used for outbound connections when no other
758         default route is available because the node hosts no public
759         addresses.  A metric 10 routes is used so that it can co-exist
760         with other default routes that may be available when the node
761         is hosting public addresses.
762       </para>
763
764       <para>
765         <varname>CTDB_NATGW_STATIC_ROUTES</varname> can be used to
766         have NATGW create more specific routes instead of just default
767         routes.
768       </para>
769
770       <para>
771         This is implemented in the <filename>11.natgw</filename>
772         eventscript.  Please see the eventscript file and the
773         <citetitle>NAT GATEWAY</citetitle> section in
774         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd.conf</refentrytitle>
775         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> for more details.
776       </para>
777
778     </refsect2>
779   </refsect1>
780
781   <refsect1>
782     <title>POLICY ROUTING</title>
783
784     <para>
785       Policy routing is an optional CTDB feature to support complex
786       network topologies.  Public addresses may be spread across
787       several different networks (or VLANs) and it may not be possible
788       to route packets from these public addresses via the system's
789       default route.  Therefore, CTDB has support for policy routing
790       via the <filename>13.per_ip_routing</filename> eventscript.
791       This allows routing to be specified for packets sourced from
792       each public address.  The routes are added and removed as CTDB
793       moves public addresses between nodes.
794     </para>
795
796     <refsect2>
797       <title>Configuration variables</title>
798
799       <para>
800         There are 4 configuration variables related to policy routing:
801         <varname>CTDB_PER_IP_ROUTING_CONF</varname>,
802         <varname>CTDB_PER_IP_ROUTING_RULE_PREF</varname>,
803         <varname>CTDB_PER_IP_ROUTING_TABLE_ID_LOW</varname>,
804         <varname>CTDB_PER_IP_ROUTING_TABLE_ID_HIGH</varname>.  See the
805         <citetitle>POLICY ROUTING</citetitle> section in
806         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd.conf</refentrytitle>
807         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> for more details.
808       </para>
809     </refsect2>
810
811     <refsect2>
812       <title>Configuration</title>
813
814       <para>
815         The format of each line of
816         <varname>CTDB_PER_IP_ROUTING_CONF</varname> is:
817       </para>
818       
819       <screen>
820 &lt;public_address&gt; &lt;network&gt; [ &lt;gateway&gt; ]
821       </screen>
822
823       <para>
824         Leading whitespace is ignored and arbitrary whitespace may be
825         used as a separator.  Lines that have a "public address" item
826         that doesn't match an actual public address are ignored.  This
827         means that comment lines can be added using a leading
828         character such as '#', since this will never match an IP
829         address.
830       </para>
831
832       <para>
833         A line without a gateway indicates a link local route.
834       </para>
835
836       <para>
837         For example, consider the configuration line:
838       </para>
839
840       <screen>
841   192.168.1.99  192.168.1.1/24
842       </screen>
843
844       <para>
845         If the corresponding public_addresses line is:
846       </para>
847
848       <screen>
849   192.168.1.99/24     eth2,eth3
850       </screen>
851
852       <para>
853         <varname>CTDB_PER_IP_ROUTING_RULE_PREF</varname> is 100, and
854         CTDB adds the address to eth2 then the following routing
855         information is added:
856       </para>
857
858       <screen>
859   ip rule add from 192.168.1.99 pref 100 table ctdb.192.168.1.99
860   ip route add 192.168.1.0/24 dev eth2 table ctdb.192.168.1.99
861       </screen>
862
863       <para>  
864         This causes traffic from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.0/24 go via
865         eth2.
866       </para>
867
868       <para>
869         The <command>ip rule</command> command will show (something
870         like - depending on other public addresses and other routes on
871         the system):
872       </para>
873
874       <screen>
875   0:            from all lookup local 
876   100:          from 192.168.1.99 lookup ctdb.192.168.1.99
877   32766:        from all lookup main 
878   32767:        from all lookup default 
879       </screen>
880
881       <para>
882         <command>ip route show table ctdb.192.168.1.99</command> will show:
883       </para>
884
885       <screen>
886   192.168.1.0/24 dev eth2 scope link
887       </screen>
888
889       <para>
890         The usual use for a line containing a gateway is to add a
891         default route corresponding to a particular source address.
892         Consider this line of configuration:
893       </para>
894
895       <screen>
896   192.168.1.99  0.0.0.0/0       192.168.1.1
897       </screen>
898
899       <para>
900         In the situation described above this will cause an extra
901         routing command to be executed:
902       </para>
903
904       <screen>
905   ip route add 0.0.0.0/0 via 192.168.1.1 dev eth2 table ctdb.192.168.1.99
906       </screen>
907
908       <para>
909         With both configuration lines, <command>ip route show table
910         ctdb.192.168.1.99</command> will show:
911       </para>
912
913       <screen>
914   192.168.1.0/24 dev eth2 scope link 
915   default via 192.168.1.1 dev eth2 
916       </screen>
917     </refsect2>
918
919     <refsect2>
920       <title>Sample configuration</title>
921
922       <para>
923         Here is a more complete example configuration.
924       </para>
925
926       <screen>
927 /usr/local/etc/ctdb/public_addresses:
928
929   192.168.1.98  eth2,eth3
930   192.168.1.99  eth2,eth3
931
932 /usr/local/etc/ctdb/policy_routing:
933
934   192.168.1.98 192.168.1.0/24
935   192.168.1.98 192.168.200.0/24 192.168.1.254
936   192.168.1.98 0.0.0.0/0        192.168.1.1
937   192.168.1.99 192.168.1.0/24
938   192.168.1.99 192.168.200.0/24 192.168.1.254
939   192.168.1.99 0.0.0.0/0        192.168.1.1
940       </screen>
941
942       <para>
943         The routes local packets as expected, the default route is as
944         previously discussed, but packets to 192.168.200.0/24 are
945         routed via the alternate gateway 192.168.1.254.
946       </para>
947
948     </refsect2>
949   </refsect1>
950
951   <refsect1>
952     <title>NOTIFICATION SCRIPT</title>
953
954     <para>
955       When certain state changes occur in CTDB, it can be configured
956       to perform arbitrary actions via a notification script.  For
957       example, sending SNMP traps or emails when a node becomes
958       unhealthy or similar.
959     </para>
960     <para>
961       This is activated by setting the
962       <varname>CTDB_NOTIFY_SCRIPT</varname> configuration variable.
963       The specified script must be executable.  
964     </para>
965     <para>
966       Use of the provided <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/notify.sh</filename>
967       script is recommended.  It executes files in
968       <filename>/usr/local/etc/ctdb/notify.d/</filename>.
969     </para>
970     <para>
971       CTDB currently generates notifications after CTDB changes to
972       these states:
973     </para>
974
975     <simplelist>
976       <member>init</member>
977       <member>setup</member>
978       <member>startup</member>
979       <member>healthy</member>
980       <member>unhealthy</member>
981     </simplelist>
982
983   </refsect1>
984
985   <refsect1>
986     <title>DEBUG LEVELS</title>
987
988     <para>
989       Valid values for DEBUGLEVEL are:
990     </para>
991
992     <simplelist>
993       <member>ERR</member>
994       <member>WARNING</member>
995       <member>NOTICE</member>
996       <member>INFO</member>
997       <member>DEBUG</member>
998     </simplelist>
999   </refsect1>
1000
1001
1002   <refsect1>
1003     <title>REMOTE CLUSTER NODES</title>
1004     <para>
1005 It is possible to have a CTDB cluster that spans across a WAN link. 
1006 For example where you have a CTDB cluster in your datacentre but you also
1007 want to have one additional CTDB node located at a remote branch site.
1008 This is similar to how a WAN accelerator works but with the difference 
1009 that while a WAN-accelerator often acts as a Proxy or a MitM, in 
1010 the ctdb remote cluster node configuration the Samba instance at the remote site
1011 IS the genuine server, not a proxy and not a MitM, and thus provides 100%
1012 correct CIFS semantics to clients.
1013     </para>
1014
1015     <para>
1016         See the cluster as one single multihomed samba server where one of
1017         the NICs (the remote node) is very far away.
1018     </para>
1019
1020     <para>
1021         NOTE: This does require that the cluster filesystem you use can cope
1022         with WAN-link latencies. Not all cluster filesystems can handle
1023         WAN-link latencies! Whether this will provide very good WAN-accelerator
1024         performance or it will perform very poorly depends entirely
1025         on how optimized your cluster filesystem is in handling high latency
1026         for data and metadata operations.
1027     </para>
1028
1029     <para>
1030         To activate a node as being a remote cluster node you need to set
1031         the following two parameters in /etc/sysconfig/ctdb  for the remote node:
1032         <screen format="linespecific">
1033 CTDB_CAPABILITY_LMASTER=no
1034 CTDB_CAPABILITY_RECMASTER=no
1035         </screen>
1036     </para>
1037
1038     <para>
1039         Verify with the command "ctdb getcapabilities" that that node no longer
1040         has the recmaster or the lmaster capabilities.
1041     </para>
1042
1043   </refsect1>
1044
1045
1046   <refsect1>
1047     <title>SEE ALSO</title>
1048
1049     <para>
1050       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdb</refentrytitle>
1051       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1052
1053       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd</refentrytitle>
1054       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1055
1056       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd_wrapper</refentrytitle>
1057       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1058
1059       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdb_diagnostics</refentrytitle>
1060       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1061
1062       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ltdbtool</refentrytitle>
1063       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1064
1065       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>onnode</refentrytitle>
1066       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1067
1068       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ping_pong</refentrytitle>
1069       <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1070
1071       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdbd.conf</refentrytitle>
1072       <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1073
1074       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdb-statistics</refentrytitle>
1075       <manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1076
1077       <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ctdb-tunables</refentrytitle>
1078       <manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>,
1079
1080       <ulink url="http://ctdb.samba.org/"/>
1081     </para>
1082   </refsect1>
1083
1084   <refentryinfo>
1085     <author>
1086       <contrib>
1087         This documentation was written by
1088         Ronnie Sahlberg,
1089         Amitay Isaacs,
1090         Martin Schwenke
1091       </contrib>
1092     </author>
1093
1094     <copyright>
1095       <year>2007</year>
1096       <holder>Andrew Tridgell</holder>
1097       <holder>Ronnie Sahlberg</holder>
1098     </copyright>
1099     <legalnotice>
1100       <para>
1101         This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
1102         modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
1103         published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of
1104         the License, or (at your option) any later version.
1105       </para>
1106       <para>
1107         This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
1108         useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied
1109         warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
1110         PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public License for more details.
1111       </para>
1112       <para>
1113         You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
1114         License along with this program; if not, see
1115         <ulink url="http://www.gnu.org/licenses"/>.
1116       </para>
1117     </legalnotice>
1118   </refentryinfo>
1119
1120 </refentry>