docs: Remove Win9X/WinMe mentions from TOSHARG-PDC
authorAndrew Bartlett <abartlet@samba.org>
Sat, 22 Sep 2012 18:55:20 +0000 (04:55 +1000)
committerAndrew Bartlett <abartlet@samba.org>
Tue, 25 Sep 2012 04:43:15 +0000 (14:43 +1000)
docs-xml/Samba3-HOWTO/TOSHARG-PDC.xml

index 5c4428376cc1acd3ed44348300fd01d9a6999725..0698ced8210152f518e193ccf7a8e6a24d1d1610 100644 (file)
@@ -907,172 +907,6 @@ Microsoft, and we recommend that you do not do that.
 
 </sect3>
 
 
 </sect3>
 
-<sect3>
-<title>The Special Case of Windows 9x/Me</title>
-
-<para>
-<indexterm><primary>domain</primary></indexterm>
-<indexterm><primary>workgroup</primary></indexterm>
-<indexterm><primary>authentication</primary></indexterm>
-<indexterm><primary>browsing</primary></indexterm>
-<indexterm><primary>rights</primary></indexterm>
-A domain and a workgroup are exactly the same in terms of network
-browsing. The difference is that a distributable authentication
-database is associated with a domain, for secure login access to a
-network. Also, different access rights can be granted to users if they
-successfully authenticate against a domain logon server. Samba-3 does this
-now in the same way as MS Windows NT/200x.
-</para>
-
-<para>
-<indexterm><primary>browsing</primary></indexterm>
-The SMB client logging on to a domain has an expectation that every other
-server in the domain should accept the same authentication information.
-Network browsing functionality of domains and workgroups is identical and
-is explained in this documentation under the browsing discussions.
-It should be noted that browsing is totally orthogonal to logon support.
-</para>
-
-<para>
-<indexterm><primary>single-logon</primary></indexterm>
-<indexterm><primary>domain logons</primary></indexterm>
-<indexterm><primary>network logon</primary></indexterm>
-Issues related to the single-logon network model are discussed in this
-section. Samba supports domain logons, network logon scripts, and user
-profiles for MS Windows for Workgroups and MS Windows 9x/Me clients,
-which are the focus of this section.
-</para>
-
-<para>
-<indexterm><primary>broadcast request</primary></indexterm>
-When an SMB client in a domain wishes to log on, it broadcasts requests for a logon server. The first one to
-reply gets the job and validates its password using whatever mechanism the Samba administrator has installed.
-It is possible (but ill advised) to create a domain where the user database is not shared between servers;
-that is, they are effectively workgroup servers advertising themselves as participating in a domain. This
-demonstrates how authentication is quite different from but closely involved with domains.
-</para>
-
-<para>
-Using these features, you can make your clients verify their logon via
-the Samba server, make clients run a batch file when they log on to
-the network and download their preferences, desktop, and start menu.
-</para>
-
-<para><emphasis>
-MS Windows XP Home edition is not able to join a domain and does not permit the use of domain logons.
-</emphasis></para>
-
-<para>
-Before launching into the configuration instructions, it is worthwhile to look at how a Windows 9x/Me client
-performs a logon:
-</para>
-
-<orderedlist>
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       <indexterm><primary>DOMAIN&lt;1C&gt;</primary></indexterm>
-       <indexterm><primary>logon server</primary></indexterm>
-       The client broadcasts (to the IP broadcast address of the subnet it is in)
-       a NetLogon request. This is sent to the NetBIOS name DOMAIN&lt;1C&gt; at the
-       NetBIOS layer. The client chooses the first response it receives, which
-       contains the NetBIOS name of the logon server to use in the format of 
-       <filename>\\SERVER</filename>. The <literal>1C</literal> name is the name
-       type that is registered by domain controllers (SMB/CIFS servers that provide
-       the netlogon service).
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       <indexterm><primary>IPC$</primary></indexterm>
-       <indexterm><primary>SMBsessetupX</primary></indexterm>
-       <indexterm><primary>SMBtconX</primary></indexterm>
-       The client connects to that server, logs on (does an SMBsessetupX) and
-       then connects to the IPC$ share (using an SMBtconX).
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       <indexterm><primary>NetWkstaUserLogon</primary></indexterm>
-       The client does a NetWkstaUserLogon request, which retrieves the name
-       of the user's logon script. 
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       The client then connects to the NetLogon share and searches for said script.    
-       If it is found and can be read, it is retrieved and executed by the client.
-       After this, the client disconnects from the NetLogon share.
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       <indexterm><primary>NetUserGetInfo</primary></indexterm>
-       <indexterm><primary>profile</primary></indexterm>
-       The client sends a NetUserGetInfo request to the server to retrieve
-       the user's home share, which is used to search for profiles. Since the
-       response to the NetUserGetInfo request does not contain much more than  
-       the user's home share, profiles for Windows 9x clients must reside in the user
-       home directory.
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       <indexterm><primary>profiles</primary></indexterm>
-       The client connects to the user's home share and searches for the 
-       user's profile. As it turns out, you can specify the user's home share as
-       a share name and path. For example, <filename>\\server\fred\.winprofile</filename>.
-       If the profiles are found, they are implemented.
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-
-<listitem>
-       <para>
-       <indexterm><primary>CONFIG.POL</primary></indexterm>
-       The client then disconnects from the user's home share and reconnects to
-       the NetLogon share and looks for <filename>CONFIG.POL</filename>, the policies file. If this is
-       found, it is read and implemented.
-       </para>
-</listitem>
-</orderedlist>
-
-<para>
-The main difference between a PDC and a Windows 9x/Me logon server configuration is:
-</para>
-
-<itemizedlist>
-<listitem><para>
-       <indexterm><primary>password</primary><secondary>plaintext</secondary></indexterm>
-       <indexterm><primary>plaintext password</primary></indexterm>
-       Password encryption is not required for a Windows 9x/Me logon server. But note
-       that beginning with MS Windows 98 the default setting is that plaintext
-       password support is disabled. It can be re-enabled with the registry
-       changes that are documented in <link linkend="PolicyMgmt">System and Account Policies</link>.
-       </para></listitem>
-
-       <listitem><para>
-       <indexterm><primary>machine trust account</primary></indexterm>
-       Windows 9x/Me clients do not require and do not use Machine Trust Accounts.
-       </para></listitem>
-</itemizedlist>
-
-<para>
-<indexterm><primary>network logon services</primary></indexterm>
-A Samba PDC will act as a Windows 9x/Me logon server; after all, it does provide the
-network logon services that MS Windows 9x/Me expect to find.
-</para>
-
-<note><para>
-<indexterm><primary>sniffer</primary></indexterm>
-Use of plaintext passwords is strongly discouraged. Where used they are easily detected
-using a sniffer tool to examine network traffic.
-</para></note>
-
-</sect3>
 </sect2>
 
 <sect2>
 </sect2>
 
 <sect2>