a bunch of man page cleanups from a kind contributor
authorAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Mon, 19 Aug 1996 10:54:06 +0000 (10:54 +0000)
committerAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Mon, 19 Aug 1996 10:54:06 +0000 (10:54 +0000)
(This used to be commit 6d82a8751221539ab7f56dd6dae862d985a6e0ed)

docs/manpages/nmbd.8
docs/manpages/samba.7
docs/manpages/smb.conf.5
docs/manpages/smbclient.1
docs/manpages/smbd.8
docs/manpages/smbrun.1
docs/manpages/smbstatus.1
docs/manpages/smbtar.1
docs/manpages/testparm.1
docs/manpages/testprns.1

index d74baebbb306527e52d5b92963fce6e72b652cbe..78212ebef6551ac73d0b7b637debf2cd23ddf494 100644 (file)
@@ -4,24 +4,26 @@ nmbd \- provide netbios nameserver support to clients
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .B nmbd
 [
-.B -D
+.B \-D
 ] [
-.B -H
+.B \-H
 .I netbios hosts file
 ] [
-.B -d
+.B \-d
 .I debuglevel
 ] [
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 .I log basename
 ] [
-.B -p
+.B \-n
+.I netbios name
+] [
+.B \-p
 .I port number
 ] [
-.B -s
-.I config file name
+.B \-s
+.I configuration file
 ]
-
 .SH DESCRIPTION
 This program is part of the Samba suite.
 
@@ -37,7 +39,7 @@ This program simply listens for such requests, and if its own name is specified
 it will respond with the IP number of the host it is running on. "Its own name"
 is by default the name of the host it is running on, but this can be overriden
 with the
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 option (see "OPTIONS" below). Using the
 
 Nmbd can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server)
@@ -45,18 +47,18 @@ server. It will do this automatically by default. What this basically
 means is that it will respond to all name requests that it receives
 that are not broadcasts, as long as it can resolve the name.
 .SH OPTIONS
-.B -B
+.B \-B
 
 .RS 3
 This option is obsolete. Please use the interfaces option in smb.conf
 .RE
-.B -I
+.B \-I
 
 .RS 3
 This option is obsolete. Please use the interfaces option in smb.conf
 .RE
 
-.B -D
+.B \-D
 
 .RS 3
 If specified, this parameter causes the server to operate as a daemon. That is,
@@ -66,19 +68,20 @@ appropriate port.
 By default, the server will NOT operate as a daemon.
 .RE
 
-.B -C comment string
+.B \-C comment string
 
 .RS 3
 This option is obsolete. Please use the "server string" option in smb.conf
 .RE
 
-.B -G
+.B \-G
 
 .RS 3
 This option is obsolete. Please use the "workgroup" option in smb.conf
 .RE
 
-.B -H
+.B \-H
+.I netbios hosts file
 
 .RS 3
 It may be useful in some situations to be able to specify a list of
@@ -90,7 +93,7 @@ The file contains three columns. Lines beginning with a # are ignored
 as comments. The first column is an IP address, or a hostname. If it
 is a hostname then it is interpreted as the IP address returned by
 gethostbyname() when read. Any IP address of 0.0.0.0 will be
-interpreted as the servers own IP address.
+interpreted as the server's own IP address.
 
 The second column is a netbios name. This is the name that the server
 will respond to. It must be less than 20 characters long.
@@ -98,17 +101,22 @@ will respond to. It must be less than 20 characters long.
 The third column is optional, and is intended for flags. Currently the
 only flag supported is M. 
 
-A M means that this name is the default netbios name for this
-machine. This has the same affect as specifying the -n option to nmbd.
+An M means that this name is the default netbios name for this
+machine. This has the same affect as specifying the
+.B \-n
+option to
+.BR nmbd .
 
 NOTE: The G and S flags are now obsolete and are replaced by the
 "interfaces" and "remote announce" options in smb.conf.
 
 After startup the server waits for queries, and will answer queries to
 any name known to it. This includes all names in the netbios hosts
-file (if any) and it's own name.
+file (if any) and its own name.
 
-The primary intention of the -H option is to allow a mapping from
+The primary intention of the
+.B \-H
+option is to allow a mapping from
 netbios names to internet domain names.
 
 .B Example:
@@ -127,25 +135,26 @@ netbios names to internet domain names.
         130.45.3.213 FREDDY
 
 .RE
-.B -N
+.B \-N
 
 .RS 3
 This option is obsolete. Please use the "interfaces" option in
 smb.conf instead.
 .RE
 
-.B -d
+.B \-d
 .I debuglevel
 .RS 3
-This option set the debug level. See smb.conf(5)
+This option sets the debug level. See
+.BR smb.conf (5).
 .RE
 
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 .I log file
 
 .RS 3
 If specified,
-.I logfile
+.I log file
 specifies a base filename into which operational data from the running server
 will be logged.
 
@@ -156,7 +165,7 @@ name specified was "log" then the file log.nmb would contain debug
 info.
 .RE
 
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 .I netbios name
 
 .RS 3
@@ -164,7 +173,7 @@ This option allows you to override the Netbios name that Samba uses
 for itself. 
 .RE
 
-.B -p
+.B \-p
 .I port number
 .RS 3
 
@@ -173,6 +182,17 @@ port number is a positive integer value.
 Don't use this option unless you are an expert, in which case you
 won't need help!
 
+.B \-s
+.I configuration file
+
+.RS 3
+The default configuration file name is determined at compile time.
+
+The file specified contains the configuration details required by the server.
+See
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for more information.
+.RE
 .SH VERSION
 
 This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.16 of the Samba
@@ -182,22 +202,15 @@ that your version of the server has extensions or parameter semantics
 that differ from or are not covered by this man page. Please notify
 these to the address below for rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B inetd(8),
-.B smbd(8), 
-.B smb.conf(5),
-.B smbclient(1),
-.B testparm(1), 
-.B testprns(1)
-
+.BR inetd (8),
+.BR smbd (8), 
+.BR smb.conf (5),
+.BR smbclient (1),
+.BR testparm (1), 
+.BR testprns (1)
 .SH CREDITS
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by 
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-This man page originally written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
-
-
-
-
-
-
+This man page was originally written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au).
index d325e3a0855dfc170d0a87df6e927cdc5b3ebed9..d393f0602d8494924384b6935c487da949ff34e1 100644 (file)
@@ -1,15 +1,14 @@
 .TH SAMBA 7 29/3/95 Samba Samba
 .SH NAME
-Samba \- a LanManager like fileserver for Unix
+Samba \- a LanManager like fileserver for UNIX
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .B Samba
 .SH DESCRIPTION
 The
 .B Samba
 software suite is a collection of programs that implements the SMB
-protocol for unix systems. This protocol is sometimes also referred to
+protocol for UNIX systems. This protocol is sometimes also referred to
 as the LanManager or Netbios protocol.
-
 .SH COMPONENTS
 
 The Samba suite is made up of several components. Each component is
@@ -18,25 +17,37 @@ you read the documentation that comes with Samba and the manual pages
 of those components that you use. If the manual pages aren't clear
 enough then please send me a patch!
 
-The smbd(8) daemon provides the file and print services to SMB clients,
+The
+.BR smbd (8)
+daemon provides the file and print services to SMB clients,
 such as Windows for Workgroups, Windows NT or LanManager. The
-configuration file for this daemon is described in smb.conf(5).
+configuration file for this daemon is described in
+.BR smb.conf (5).
 
-The nmbd(8) daemon provides Netbios nameserving and browsing
+The
+.BR nmbd (8)
+daemon provides Netbios nameserving and browsing
 support. It can also be run interactively to query other name service
 daemons.
 
-The smbclient(1) program implements a simple ftp-like client. This is
+The
+.BR smbclient (1)
+program implements a simple ftp-like client. This is
 useful for accessing SMB shares on other compatible servers (such as
-WfWg), and can also be used to allow a unix box to print to a printer
+WfWg), and can also be used to allow a UNIX box to print to a printer
 attached to any SMB server (such as a PC running WfWg).
 
-The testparm(1) utility allows you to test your smb.conf(5)
+The
+.BR testparm (1)
+utility allows you to test your
+.BR smb.conf (5)
 configuration file.
 
-The smbstatus(1) utility allows you to tell who is currently using the
-smbd(8) server.
-
+The
+.BR smbstatus (1)
+utility allows you to tell who is currently using the
+.BR smbd (8)
+server.
 .SH AVAILABILITY
 
 The Samba software suite is licensed under the Gnu Public License. A
@@ -55,7 +66,6 @@ the mailing list are given in the README file that comes with Samba.
 If you have access to a WWW viewer (such as Netscape or Mosaic) then
 you will also find lots of useful information, including back issues
 of the Samba mailing list, at http://samba.canberra.edu.au/pub/samba/
-
 .SH AUTHOR
 
 The main author of the Samba suite is Andrew Tridgell. He may be
@@ -66,7 +76,6 @@ all over the world. A partial list of these contributors is included
 in the CREDITS section below. The list is, however, badly out of
 date. More up to date info may be obtained from the change-log that
 comes with the Samba source code.
-
 .SH CONTRIBUTIONS
 
 If you wish to contribute to the Samba project, then I suggest you
@@ -75,8 +84,7 @@ join the Samba mailing list.
 If you have patches to submit or bugs to report then you may mail them
 directly to samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au. Note, however, that due to the
 enormous popularity of this package I may take some time to repond to
-mail. I prefer patches in "diff -u" format.
-
+mail. I prefer patches in "diff \-u" format.
 .SH CREDITS
 
 Contributors to the project are (in alphabetical order by email address):
index 1437777c65a7ee7bea4390c6c98a2f121677273f..e04e5bc95cdd2234ea7ea2c1efead6c7147fc2f0 100644 (file)
@@ -15,7 +15,6 @@ program. The
 .B smbd
 program provides LanManager-like services to clients
 using the SMB protocol.
-
 .SH FILE FORMAT
 The file consists of sections and parameters. A section begins with the 
 name of the section in square brackets and continues until the next
@@ -36,7 +35,7 @@ Any line beginning with a semicolon is ignored, as are lines containing
 only whitespace.
 
 Any line ending in a \e is "continued" on the next line in the
-customary unix fashion.
+customary UNIX fashion.
 
 The values following the equals sign in parameters are all either a string
 (no quotes needed) or a boolean, which may be given as yes/no, 0/1 or
@@ -91,7 +90,6 @@ means access will be permitted as the default guest user (specified elsewhere):
                read only = true
                printable = true
                public = true
-
 .SH SPECIAL SECTIONS
 
 .SS The [global] section
@@ -124,7 +122,7 @@ If no path was given, the path is set to the user's home directory.
 If you decide to use a path= line in your [homes] section then you may
 find it useful to use the %S macro. For example path=/data/pchome/%S
 would be useful if you have different home directories for your PCs
-than for unix access.
+than for UNIX access.
 
 This is a fast and simple way to give a large number of clients access to
 their home directories with a minimum of fuss.
@@ -284,7 +282,7 @@ substitutions and other smb.conf options.
 
 .SS NAME MANGLING
 
-Samba supports "name mangling" so that Dos and Windows clients can use
+Samba supports "name mangling" so that DOS and Windows clients can use
 files that don't conform to the 8.3 format. It can also be set to adjust
 the case of 8.3 format filenames.
 
@@ -318,7 +316,7 @@ upper case, or if they are forced to be the "default" case. This option can
 be use with "preserve case = yes" to permit long filenames to retain their
 case, while short names are lowered. Default no.
 
-.SS COMPLETE LIST OF GLOBAL PARAMETER
+.SS COMPLETE LIST OF GLOBAL PARAMETERS
 
 Here is a list of all global parameters. See the section of each
 parameter for details.  Note that some are synonyms.
@@ -415,6 +413,8 @@ server string
 
 smbrun
 
+socket address
+
 socket options
 
 status
@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ workgroup
 
 write raw
 
-.SS COMPLETE LIST OF SERVICE PARAMETER
+.SS COMPLETE LIST OF SERVICE PARAMETERS
 
 Here is a list of all service parameters. See the section of each
 parameter for details. Note that some are synonyms.
@@ -619,7 +619,6 @@ then the "load printers" option is easier.
 .B Example:
        auto services = fred lp colorlp
 
-
 .SS allow hosts (S)
 A synonym for this parameter is 'hosts allow'.
 
@@ -633,7 +632,7 @@ You can specify the hosts by name or IP number. For example, you could
 restrict access to only the hosts on a Class C subnet with something like
 "allow hosts = 150.203.5.". The full syntax of the list is described in
 the man page
-.B hosts_access(5).
+.BR hosts_access (5).
 
 You can also specify hosts by network/netmask pairs and by netgroup
 names if your system supports netgroups. The EXCEPT keyword can also
@@ -660,7 +659,9 @@ deny access from one particular host
 
 Note that access still requires suitable user-level passwords.
 
-See testparm(1) for a way of testing your host access to see if it
+See
+.BR testparm (1)
+for a way of testing your host access to see if it
 does what you expect.
 
 .B Default:
@@ -672,12 +673,12 @@ does what you expect.
 .SS alternate permissions (S)
 
 This option affects the way the "read only" DOS attribute is produced
-for unix files. If this is false then the read only bit is set for
+for UNIX files. If this is false then the read only bit is set for
 files on writeable shares which the user cannot write to.
 
 If this is true then it is set for files whos user write bit is not set.
 
-The latter behaviour of useful for when users copy files from each
+The latter behaviour is useful for when users copy files from each
 others directories, and use a file manager that preserves
 permissions. Without this option they may get annoyed as all copied
 files will have the "read only" bit set.
@@ -733,11 +734,11 @@ file.
 
 This option takes the usual substitutions, which can be very useful.
 
-If thew config file doesn't exist then it won't be loaded (allowing
+If the config file doesn't exist then it won't be loaded (allowing
 you to special case the config files of just a few clients).
 
 .B Example:
-       config file = /usr/local/samba/smb.conf.%m
+       config file = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf.%m
 
 .SS copy (S)
 This parameter allows you to 'clone' service entries. The specified
@@ -758,7 +759,7 @@ in the configuration file than the service doing the copying.
 A synonym for this parameter is 'create mode'.
 
 This parameter is the octal modes which are used when converting DOS modes 
-to Unix modes.
+to UNIX modes.
 
 Note that Samba will or this value with 0700 as you must have at least
 user read, write and execute for Samba to work properly.
@@ -795,7 +796,9 @@ A deadtime of zero indicates that no auto-disconnection should be performed.
        dead time = 15
 .SS debug level (G)
 The value of the parameter (an integer) allows the debug level
-(logging level) to be specified in the smb.conf file. This is to give
+(logging level) to be specified in the
+.B smb.conf
+file. This is to give
 greater flexibility in the configuration of the system.
 
 The default will be the debug level specified on the command line.
@@ -822,7 +825,7 @@ attempting to connect to a nonexistent service results in an error.
 
 Typically the default service would be a public, read-only service.
 
-Also not that s of 1.9.14 the apparent service name will be changed to
+Also note that as of 1.9.14 the apparent service name will be changed to
 equal that of the requested service, this is very useful as it allows
 you to use macros like %S to make a wildcard service.
 
@@ -840,10 +843,10 @@ things.
 
 .SS delete readonly (S)
 This parameter allows readonly files to be deleted.  This is not normal DOS
-semantics, but is allowed by Unix.
+semantics, but is allowed by UNIX.
 
-This option may be useful for running applications such as rcs, where unix
-file ownership prevents changing file permissions, and dos semantics prevent
+This option may be useful for running applications such as rcs, where UNIX
+file ownership prevents changing file permissions, and DOS semantics prevent
 deletion of a read only file.
 
 .B Default:
@@ -890,18 +893,21 @@ Note: Your script should NOT be setuid or setgid and should be owned by
 and remaining space will be used.
 
 .B Example:
-       dfree command = /usr/local/smb/dfree
+       dfree command = /usr/local/samba/bin/dfree
 
        Where the script dfree (which must be made executable) could be
 
-       #!/bin/sh
-       df $1 | tail -1 | awk '{print $2" "$4}'
+.nf
+       #!/bin/sh
+       df $1 | tail -1 | awk '{print $2" "$4}'
+.fi
 
        or perhaps (on Sys V)
 
+.nf
        #!/bin/sh
        /usr/bin/df -k $1 | tail -1 | awk '{print $3" "$5}'
-
+.fi
 
        Note that you may have to replace the command names with full
 path names on some systems.
@@ -973,8 +979,9 @@ the specified username overrides this one.
 
 One some systems the account "nobody" may not be able to print. Use
 another account in this case. You should test this by trying to log in
-as your guest user (perhaps by using the "su -" command) and trying to
-print using lpr.
+as your guest user (perhaps by using the "su \-" command) and trying to
+print using
+.BR lpr .
 
 Note that as of version 1.9 of Samba this option may be set
 differently for each service.
@@ -1083,7 +1090,7 @@ This is a list of users that should not be allowed to login to this
 service. This is really a "paranoid" check to absolutely ensure an
 improper setting does not breach your security.
 
-A name starting with @ is interpreted as a unix group.
+A name starting with @ is interpreted as a UNIX group.
 
 The current servicename is substituted for %S. This is useful in the
 [homes] section.
@@ -1098,7 +1105,7 @@ See also "valid users"
 
 .SS include (G)
 
-This allows you to inlcude one config file inside another. the file is
+This allows you to include one config file inside another. the file is
 included literally, as though typed in place.
 
 It takes the standard substitutions, except %u, %P and %S
@@ -1137,7 +1144,7 @@ The lock files are used to implement the "max connections" option.
        lock directory = /tmp/samba
 
 .B Example: 
-       lock directory = /usr/local/samba/locks
+       lock directory = /usr/local/samba/var/locks
 .SS locking (S)
 This controls whether or not locking will be performed by the server in 
 response to lock requests from the client.
@@ -1168,7 +1175,7 @@ This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
 separate log files for each user or machine.
 
 .B Example:
-       log file = /usr/local/samba/log.%m
+       log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
 
 .SS log level (G)
 see "debug level"
@@ -1182,9 +1189,11 @@ job number to pause the print job. Currently I don't know of any print
 spooler system that can do this with a simple option, except for the PPR
 system from Trinity College (ppr\-dist.trincoll.edu/pub/ppr). One way
 of implementing this is by using job priorities, where jobs having a too
-low priority wont be sent to the printer. See also the lppause command.
+low priority won't be sent to the printer. See also the
+.B lppause
+command.
 
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in it's place. A %j is
+If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. A %j is
 replaced with the job number (an integer).
 On HPUX (see printing=hpux), if the -p%p option is added to the lpq
 command, the job will show up with the correct status, i.e. if the job
@@ -1233,7 +1242,7 @@ This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
 as its only parameter and outputs printer status information. 
 
 Currently six styles of printer status information are supported; BSD,
-SYSV, AIX, HPUX, QNX and PLP. This covers most unix systems. You
+SYSV, AIX, HPUX, QNX, LPRNG and PLP. This covers most UNIX systems. You
 control which type is expected using the "printing =" option.
 
 Some clients (notably Windows for Workgroups) may not correctly send the
@@ -1242,7 +1251,7 @@ about. To get around this, the server reports on the first printer service
 connected to by the client. This only happens if the connection number sent
 is invalid.
 
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in it's place. Otherwise
+If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. Otherwise
 it is placed at the end of the command.
 
 Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lpq
@@ -1261,7 +1270,7 @@ order to restart or continue printing or spooling a specific print job.
 This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name and
 job number to resume the print job. See also the lppause command.
 
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in it's place. A %j is
+If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. A %j is
 replaced with the job number (an integer).
 
 Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lpresume
@@ -1280,11 +1289,11 @@ order to delete a print job.
 This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
 and job number, and deletes the print job.
 
-Currently six styles of printer control are supported; BSD, SYSV, AIX
-HPUX, QNX and PLP. This covers most unix systems. You control which type is
-expected using the "printing =" option.
+Currently seven styles of printer control are supported; BSD, SYSV, AIX
+HPUX, QNX, LPRNG and PLP. This covers most UNIX systems. You control
+which type is expected using the "printing =" option.
 
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in it's place. A %j is
+If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. A %j is
 replaced with the job number (an integer).
 
 Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lprm
@@ -1314,7 +1323,7 @@ output file content is undefined.
        magic output = myfile.txt
 .SS magic script (S)
 This parameter specifies the name of a file which, if opened, will be
-executed by the server when the file is closed. This allows a Unix script
+executed by the server when the file is closed. This allows a UNIX script
 to be sent to the Samba host and executed on behalf of the connected user.
 
 Scripts executed in this way will be deleted upon completion, permissions
@@ -1331,6 +1340,7 @@ marker. Magic scripts must be executable "as is" on the host, which
 for some hosts and some shells will require filtering at the DOS end.
 
 Magic scripts are EXPERIMENTAL and should NOT be relied upon.
+
 .B Default:
        None. Magic scripts disabled.
 
@@ -1340,8 +1350,8 @@ Magic scripts are EXPERIMENTAL and should NOT be relied upon.
 This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which are
 not representable on DOS.  The mangling of names is not always what is
 needed.  In particular you may have documents with file extensiosn
-that differ between dos and unix. For example, under unix it is common
-to use .html for HTML files, whereas under dos .htm is more commonly
+that differ between DOS and UNIX. For example, under UNIX it is common
+to use .html for HTML files, whereas under DOS .htm is more commonly
 used.
 
 So to map 'html' to 'htm' you put:
@@ -1349,7 +1359,7 @@ So to map 'html' to 'htm' you put:
   mangled map = (*.html *.htm)
 
 One very useful case is to remove the annoying ;1 off the ends of
-filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some unixes). To do this
+filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXes). To do this
 use a map of (*;1 *)
 
 .B default:
@@ -1363,7 +1373,7 @@ use a map of (*;1 *)
 See the section on "NAME MANGLING"
 
 .SS mangled names (S)
-This controls whether non-DOS names under Unix should be mapped to
+This controls whether non-DOS names under UNIX should be mapped to
 DOS-compatible names ("mangled") and made visible, or whether non-DOS names
 should simply be ignored.
 
@@ -1391,7 +1401,7 @@ final extension is defined as that part of the original filename after the
 rightmost dot. If there are no dots in the filename, the mangled name will
 have no extension (except in the case of hidden files - see below).
 
-- files whose Unix name begins with a dot will be presented as DOS hidden
+- files whose UNIX name begins with a dot will be presented as DOS hidden
 files. The mangled name will be created as for other filenames, but with the
 leading dot removed and "___" as its extension regardless of actual original
 extension (that's three underscores).
@@ -1403,8 +1413,8 @@ This algorithm can cause name collisions only if files in a directory share
 the same first five alphanumeric characters. The probability of such a clash 
 is 1/1300.
 
-The name mangling (if enabled) allows a file to be copied between Unix
-directories from DOS while retaining the long Unix filename. Unix files can
+The name mangling (if enabled) allows a file to be copied between UNIX
+directories from DOS while retaining the long UNIX filename. UNIX files can
 be renamed to a new extension from DOS and will retain the same basename. 
 Mangled names do not change between sessions.
 
@@ -1482,7 +1492,7 @@ maintained if they are longer than 3 characters or contains upper case
 characters).
 
 The larger this value, the more likely it is that mangled names can be
-successfully converted to correct long Unix names. However, large stack
+successfully converted to correct long UNIX names. However, large stack
 sizes will slow most directory access. Smaller stacks save memory in the
 server (each stack element costs 256 bytes).
 
@@ -1496,7 +1506,7 @@ be prepared for some surprises!
        mangled stack = 100
 
 .SS map archive (S)
-This controls whether the DOS archive attribute should be mapped to Unix
+This controls whether the DOS archive attribute should be mapped to UNIX
 execute bits.  The DOS archive bit is set when a file has been modified
 since its last backup.  One motivation for this option it to keep Samba/your
 PC from making any file it touches from becoming executable under UNIX.
@@ -1509,7 +1519,7 @@ This can be quite annoying for shared source code, documents,  etc...
       map archive = no
 
 .SS map hidden (S)
-This controls whether DOS style hidden files should be mapped to Unix
+This controls whether DOS style hidden files should be mapped to UNIX
 execute bits.
 
 .B Default:
@@ -1518,7 +1528,7 @@ execute bits.
 .B Example:
        map hidden = yes
 .SS map system (S)
-This controls whether DOS style system files should be mapped to Unix
+This controls whether DOS style system files should be mapped to UNIX
 execute bits.
 
 .B Default:
@@ -1607,7 +1617,7 @@ If you want to silently delete it then try "message command = rm %s".
 
 For the really adventurous, try something like this:
 
-message command = csh -c 'csh < %s |& /usr/local/samba/smbclient \\
+message command = csh -c 'csh < %s |& /usr/local/samba/bin/smbclient \e
                   -M %m; rm %s' &
 
 this would execute the command as a script on the server, then give
@@ -1652,14 +1662,14 @@ longer implemented as of version 1.7.00, and is kept only so old
 configuration files do not become invalid.
 
 .SS passwd chat (G)
-This string coontrols the "chat" conversation that takes places
+This string controls the "chat" conversation that takes places
 between smbd and the local password changing program to change the
 users password. The string describes a sequence of response-receive
 pairs that smbd uses to determine what to send to the passwd program
 and what to expect back. If the expected output is not received then
 the password is not changed.
 
-This chat sequence is often quite site specific, deppending on what
+This chat sequence is often quite site specific, depending on what
 local methods are used for password control (such as NIS+ etc).
 
 The string can contain the macros %o and %n which are substituted for
@@ -1732,7 +1742,7 @@ you probably have a slow crypt() routine. Samba now comes with a fast
 sure the PASSWORD_LENGTH option is correct for your system in local.h
 and includes.h. On most systems only the first 8 chars of a password
 are significant so PASSWORD_LENGTH should be 8, but on some longer
-passwords are significant. The inlcudes.h file tries to select the
+passwords are significant. The includes.h file tries to select the
 right length for your system.
 
 .B Default:
@@ -1745,18 +1755,18 @@ right length for your system.
 
 By specifying the name of another SMB server (such as a WinNT box)
 with this option, and using "security = server" you can get Samba to
-do all it's username/password validation via a remote server.
+do all its username/password validation via a remote server.
 
 This options sets the name of the password server to use. It must be a
-netbios name, so if the machines netbios name is different from it's
-internet name then you may have to add it's netbios name to
+netbios name, so if the machine's netbios name is different from its
+internet name then you may have to add its netbios name to
 /etc/hosts.
 
 The password server much be a machine capable of using the "LM1.2X002"
 or the "LM NT 0.12" protocol, and it must be in user level security
 mode. 
 
-NOTE: Using a password server means your unix box (running Samba) is
+NOTE: Using a password server means your UNIX box (running Samba) is
 only as secure as your password server. DO NOT CHOOSE A PASSWORD
 SERVER THAT YOU DON'T COMPLETELY TRUST.
 
@@ -1839,7 +1849,7 @@ An interesting example is to send the users a welcome message every
 time they log in. Maybe a message of the day? Here is an example:
 
 preexec = csh -c 'echo \"Welcome to %S!\" | \
-       /usr/local/samba/smbclient -M %m -I %I' &
+       /usr/local/samba/bin/smbclient -M %m -I %I' &
 
 Of course, this could get annoying after a while :-)
 
@@ -1905,7 +1915,7 @@ If there is neither a specified print command for a printable service nor a
 global print command, spool files will be created but not processed and (most
 importantly) not removed.
 
-Note that printing may fail on some unixes from the "nobody"
+Note that printing may fail on some UNIXes from the "nobody"
 account. If this happens then create an alternative guest account that
 can print and set the "guest account" in the [global] section.
 
@@ -1920,10 +1930,10 @@ You may have to vary this command considerably depending on how you
 normally print files on your system.
 
 .B Default:
-        print command = lpr -r -P %p %s
+       print command = lpr -r -P %p %s
 
 .B Example:
-       print command = /usr/local/samba/myprintscript %p %s
+       print command = /usr/local/samba/bin/myprintscript %p %s
 .SS print ok (S)
 See
 .B printable.
@@ -2016,6 +2026,7 @@ If you don't know the exact string to use then you should first try
 with no "printer driver" option set and the client will give you a
 list of printer drivers. The appropriate strings are shown in a
 scrollbox after you have chosen the printer manufacturer.
+
 .B Example:
        printer driver = HP LaserJet 4L
 
@@ -2202,7 +2213,7 @@ The set of files that must be mirrored is operating system dependent.
 .B Example:
        root directory = /homes/smb
 .SS security (G)
-This option does affects how clients respond to Samba.
+This option affects how clients respond to Samba.
 
 The option sets the "security mode bit" in replies to protocol negotiations
 to turn share level security on or off. Clients decide based on this bit 
@@ -2214,8 +2225,8 @@ option at one stage.
 The alternatives are "security = user" or "security = server". 
 
 If your PCs use usernames that are the same as their usernames on the
-unix machine then you will want to use "security = user". If you
-mostly use usernames that don't exist on the unix box then use
+UNIX machine then you will want to use "security = user". If you
+mostly use usernames that don't exist on the UNIX box then use
 "security = share".
 
 There is a bug in WfWg that may affect your decision. When in user
@@ -2259,7 +2270,8 @@ value in the Makefile.
 
 You must get this path right for many services to work correctly.
 
-.B Default: taken from Makefile
+.B Default:
+taken from Makefile
 
 .B Example:
        smbrun = /usr/local/samba/bin/smbrun
@@ -2292,6 +2304,7 @@ command to change directory.
 
 The setdir comand is only implemented in the Digital Pathworks client. See the
 Pathworks documentation for details.
+
 .B Default:
        set directory = no
 
@@ -2304,7 +2317,7 @@ This enables or disables the honouring of the "share modes" during a
 file open. These modes are used by clients to gain exclusive read or
 write access to a file. 
 
-These open modes are not directly supported by unix, so they are
+These open modes are not directly supported by UNIX, so they are
 simulated using lock files in the "lock directory". The "lock
 directory" specified in smb.conf must be readable by all users.
 
@@ -2312,7 +2325,7 @@ The share modes that are enabled by this option are DENY_DOS,
 DENY_ALL, DENY_READ, DENY_WRITE, DENY_NONE and DENY_FCB.
 
 Enabling this option gives full share compatability but may cost a bit
-of processing time on the unix server. They are enabled by default.
+of processing time on the UNIX server. They are enabled by default.
 
 .B Default:
        share modes = yes
@@ -2320,6 +2333,17 @@ of processing time on the unix server. They are enabled by default.
 .B Example:
        share modes = no
 
+.SS socket address (G)
+
+This option allows you to control what address Samba will listen for
+connections on. This is used to support multiple virtual interfaces on
+the one server, each with a different configuration.
+
+By default samba will accept connections on any address.
+
+.B Example:
+       socket address = 192.168.2.20
+
 .SS socket options (G)
 This option (which can also be invoked with the -O command line
 option) allows you to set socket options to be used when talking with
@@ -2401,9 +2425,12 @@ completely. Use these options with caution!
 
 .SS status (G)
 This enables or disables logging of connections to a status file that
-smbstatus can read.
+.B smbstatus
+can read.
 
-With this disabled smbstatus won't be able to tell you what
+With this disabled
+.B smbstatus
+won't be able to tell you what
 connections are active.
 
 .B Default:
@@ -2413,7 +2440,7 @@ connections are active.
        status = no
 
 .SS strip dot (G)
-This is a boolean that controls whether to strup trailing dots off
+This is a boolean that controls whether to strip trailing dots off
 filenames. This helps with some CDROMs that have filenames ending in a
 single dot.
 
@@ -2443,7 +2470,7 @@ so in the vast majority of cases "strict locking = no" is preferable.
 
 This is a boolean parameter that controls whether writes will always
 be written to stable storage before the write call returns. If this is
-false then the server will be guided by the clients request in each
+false then the server will be guided by the client's request in each
 write call (clients can set a bit indicating that a particular write
 should be synchronous). If this is true then every write will be
 followed by a fsync() call to ensure the data is written to disk.
@@ -2474,9 +2501,9 @@ A synonym for this parameter is 'user'.
 Multiple users may be specified in a comma-delimited list, in which case the
 supplied password will be tested against each username in turn (left to right).
 
-The username= line is needed only when the PC is unable to supply it's own
+The username= line is needed only when the PC is unable to supply its own
 username. This is the case for the coreplus protocol or where your
-users have different WfWg usernames to unix usernames. In both these
+users have different WfWg usernames to UNIX usernames. In both these
 cases you may also be better using the \\\\server\\share%user syntax
 instead. 
 
@@ -2486,7 +2513,7 @@ usernames in the username= line in turn. This is slow and a bad idea for
 lots of users in case of duplicate passwords. You may get timeouts or
 security breaches using this parameter unwisely.
 
-Samba relies on the underlying unix security. This parameter does not
+Samba relies on the underlying UNIX security. This parameter does not
 restrict who can login, it just offers hints to the Samba server as to
 what usernames might correspond to the supplied password. Users can
 login as whoever they please and they will be able to do no more
@@ -2516,32 +2543,32 @@ on how this parameter determines access to the services.
 
 This option allows you to to specify a file containing a mapping of
 usernames from the clients to the server. This can be used for several
-purposes. The most common is to map usernames that users use on dos or
-windows machines to those that the unix box uses. The other is to map
+purposes. The most common is to map usernames that users use on DOS or
+Windows machines to those that the UNIX box uses. The other is to map
 multiple users to a single username so that they can more easily share
 files.
 
 The map file is parsed line by line. Each line should contain a single
-unix username on the left then a '=' followed by a list of usernames
+UNIX username on the left then a '=' followed by a list of usernames
 on the right. The list of usernames on the right may contain names of
-the form @group in which case they will match any unix username in
+the form @group in which case they will match any UNIX username in
 that group. The special client name '*' is a wildcard and matches any
 name.
 
 The file is processed on each line by taking the supplied username and
 comparing it with each username on the right hand side of the '='
-signs. If the supplied name matrches any of the names on the right
+signs. If the supplied name matches any of the names on the right
 hand side then it is replaced with the name on the left. Processing
 then continues with the next line.
 
 If any line begins with a '#' or a ';' then it is ignored
 
-For example to map from he name "admin" or "administrator" to the unix
+For example to map from the name "admin" or "administrator" to the UNIX
 name "root" you would use
 
        root = admin administrator
 
-Or to map anyone in the unix group "system" to the unix name "sys" you
+Or to map anyone in the UNIX group "system" to the UNIX name "sys" you
 would use
 
        sys = @system
@@ -2552,7 +2579,7 @@ Note that the remapping is applied to all occurances of
 usernames. Thus if you connect to "\\\\server\\fred" and "fred" is
 remapped to "mary" then you will actually be connecting to
 "\\\\server\\mary" and will need to supply a password suitable for
-"mary" not "fred". The only exception to this is the username passwed
+"mary" not "fred". The only exception to this is the username passed
 to the "password server" (if you have one). The password server will
 receive whatever username the client supplies without modification.
 
@@ -2590,11 +2617,13 @@ valid chars = Z
 valid chars = z:Z
 valid chars = 0132:0172
 
-The last two examples above actually add two characters, and alters
+The last two examples above actually add two characters, and alter
 the uppercase and lowercase mappings appropriately.
 
 .B Default
+.br
        Samba defaults to using a reasonable set of valid characters
+.br
        for english systems
 
 .B Example
@@ -2609,10 +2638,9 @@ tino@augsburg.net has written a package called "validchars" which will
 automatically produce a complete "valid chars" line for a given client
 system. Look in the examples subdirectory for this package.
 
-
 .SS valid users (S)
 This is a list of users that should be allowed to login to this
-service. A name starting with @ is interpreted as a unix group.
+service. A name starting with @ is interpreted as a UNIX group.
 
 If this is empty (the default) then any user can login. If a username
 is in both this list and the "invalid users" list then access is
@@ -2631,13 +2659,13 @@ See also "invalid users"
 
 .SS volume (S)
 This allows you to override the volume label returned for a
-share. Useful for CDROMs whos installation programs insist on a
+share. Useful for CDROMs with installation programs that insist on a
 particular volume label.
 
 The default is the name of the share
 
 .SS wide links (S)
-This parameter controls whether or not links in the Unix file system may be
+This parameter controls whether or not links in the UNIX file system may be
 followed by the server. Links that point to areas within the directory tree
 exported by the server are always allowed; this parameter controls access 
 only to areas that are outside the directory tree being exported.
@@ -2680,7 +2708,7 @@ itself.
 This controls what workgroup your server will appear to be in when
 queried by clients. This can be different to the workgroup specified
 in the nmbd configuration, but it is probably best if you set them to
-the same value.
+                          the same value.
 
 .B Default:
        set in the Makefile
@@ -2746,7 +2774,7 @@ the following steps are not checked.
 If the service is marked "guest only = yes" then steps 1 to 5 are skipped
 
 Step 1: If the client has passed a username/password pair and that
-username/password pair is validated by the unix systems password
+username/password pair is validated by the UNIX system's password
 programs then the connection is made as that username. Note that this
 includes the \\\\server\\service%username method of passing a username.
 
@@ -2754,7 +2782,7 @@ Step 2: If the client has previously registered a username with the
 system and now supplies a correct password for that username then the
 connection is allowed.
 
-Step 3: The clients netbios name and any previously used user names
+Step 3: The client's netbios name and any previously used user names
 are checked against the supplied password, if they match then the
 connection is allowed as the corresponding user.
 
@@ -2765,7 +2793,7 @@ for this service.
 
 Step 5: If a "user = " field is given in the smb.conf file for the
 service and the client has supplied a password, and that password
-matches (according to the unix systems password checking) with one of
+matches (according to the UNIX system's password checking) with one of
 the usernames from the user= field then the connection is made as the
 username in the "user=" line. If one of the username in the user= list
 begins with a @ then that name expands to a list of names in the group
@@ -2774,8 +2802,6 @@ of the same name.
 Step 6: If the service is a guest service then a connection is made as
 the username given in the "guest account =" for the service,
 irrespective of the supplied password.
-
-
 .SH WARNINGS
 Although the configuration file permits service names to contain spaces, 
 your client software may not. Spaces will be ignored in comparisons anyway,
@@ -2804,27 +2830,25 @@ radically different (more primitive). If you are using a version earlier than
 1.8.05, it is STRONGLY recommended that you upgrade.
 .SH OPTIONS
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH FILES
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B smbd(8),
-.B smbclient(1),
-.B nmbd(8),
-.B testparm(1), 
-.B testprns(1),
-.B lpq(1),
-.B hosts_access(5)
+.BR smbd (8),
+.BR smbclient (1),
+.BR nmbd (8),
+.BR testparm (1), 
+.BR testprns (1),
+.BR lpq (1),
+.BR hosts_access (5)
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
 [This section under construction]
 
 Most diagnostics issued by the server are logged in a specified log file. The
 log file name is specified at compile time, but may be overridden on the
-smbd (see smbd(8)) command line.
+smbd command line (see
+.BR smbd (8)).
 
 The number and nature of diagnostics available depends on the debug level used
 by the server. If you have problems, set the debug level to 3 and peruse the
@@ -2835,7 +2859,6 @@ creation of this man page the source code is still too fluid to warrant
 describing each and every diagnostic. At this stage your best bet is still
 to grep the source code and inspect the conditions that gave rise to the 
 diagnostics you are seeing.
-
 .SH BUGS
 None known.
 
@@ -2845,16 +2868,16 @@ Please send bug reports, comments and so on to:
 .B samba-bugs@anu.edu.au (Andrew Tridgell)
 
 .RS 3
-or to the mailing list
+or to the mailing list:
 .RE
 
 .B samba@listproc.anu.edu.au
 
 .RE
-You may also like to subscribe to the announcement channel
+You may also like to subscribe to the announcement channel:
 
 .RS 3
-samba-announce@listproc.anu.edu.au
+.B samba-announce@listproc.anu.edu.au
 .RE
 
 To subscribe to these lists send a message to
index e0af67ca1a4a5c85f67983bd8c256423fa4d8118..22daaf4105d9fbcdaee115a1780b38ca23cd2ece 100644 (file)
@@ -7,51 +7,51 @@ smbclient \- ftp-like Lan Manager client program
 [
 .B password
 ] [
-.B -A
+.B \-A
 ] [
-.B -E
+.B \-E
 ] [
-.B -L
+.B \-L
 .I host
 ] [
-.B -M
+.B \-M
 .I host
 ] [
-.B -I
+.B \-I
 .I IP number
 ] [
-.B -N
+.B \-N
 ] [
-.B -P
+.B \-P
 ] [
-.B -U
+.B \-U
 .I username
 ] [
-.B -d
+.B \-d
 .I debuglevel
 ] [
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 .I log basename
 ] [
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 .I netbios name
 ] [
-.B -W
+.B \-W
 .I workgroup
 ] [
-.B -O
+.B \-O
 .I socket options
 ] [
-.B -p
+.B \-p
 .I port number
 ] [
-.B -c
+.B \-c
 .I command string
 ] [
-.B -T
+.B \-T
 .I tar options
 ] [
-.B -D
+.B \-D
 .I initial directory
 ]
 .SH DESCRIPTION
@@ -62,10 +62,10 @@ is a client that can 'talk' to a Lan Manager server. It offers
 an interface similar to that of the 
 .B ftp
 program (see
-.B ftp(1)). Operations include things like getting files from the
+.BR ftp (1)).
+Operations include things like getting files from the
 server to the local machine, putting files from the local machine to
 the server, retrieving directory information from the server and so on.
-
 .SH OPTIONS
 .B servicename
 .RS 3
@@ -95,16 +95,16 @@ be the same as the hostname of the machine running the server.
 password
 is the password required to access the specified service on the
 specified server. If supplied, the
-.B -N
+.B \-N
 option (suppress password prompt) is assumed.
 
 There is no default password. If no password is supplied on the command line
 (either here or using the 
-.B -U
+.B \-U
 option (see below)) and 
-.B -N
+.B \-N
 is not specified, the client will prompt for a password, even if the desired 
-service does not require one. (If prompted for a password and none is 
+service does not require one. (If no password is 
 required, simply press ENTER to provide a null password.)
 
 Note: Some servers (including OS/2 and Windows for Workgroups) insist
@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ rejected by these servers.
 Be cautious about including passwords in scripts.
 .RE
 
-.B -A
+.B \-A
 
 .RS 3
 This parameter, if specified, causes the maximum debug level to be selected.
@@ -123,21 +123,23 @@ a security issue involved, as at the maximum debug level cleartext passwords
 may be written to some log files.
 .RE
 
-.B -L
+.B \-L
 
 .RS 3
 This option allows you to look at what services are available on a
 server. You use it as "smbclient -L host" and a list should appear.
-The -I option may be useful if your netbios names don't match your 
+The
+.B \-I
+option may be useful if your netbios names don't match your 
 tcp/ip host names or if you are trying to reach a host on another
 network. For example:
 
 smbclient -L ftp -I ftp.microsoft.com
 
-will list the shares available on microsofts public server.
+will list the shares available on Microsoft's public server.
 .RE
 
-.B -M
+.B \-M
 
 .RS 3
 This options allows you to send messages, using the "WinPopup"
@@ -151,22 +153,30 @@ message will be lost, and no error message will occur.
 The message is also automatically truncated if the message is over
 1600 bytes, as this is the limit of the protocol.
 
-One useful trick is to cat the message through smbclient. For example:
+One useful trick is to cat the message through
+.BR smbclient .
+For example:
 
 cat mymessage.txt | smbclient -M FRED
 
 will send the message in the file "mymessage.txt" to the machine FRED.
 
-You may also find the -U and -I options useful, as they allow you to
+You may also find the
+.B \-U
+and
+.B \-I
+options useful, as they allow you to
 control the FROM and TO parts of the message. 
 
-Samba currently has no way of receiving WinPopup messages.
+See the message command section of
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for a description of how to handle incoming WinPopup messages in Samba.
 
 Note: Copy WinPopup into the startup group on your WfWg PCs if you
 want them to always be able to receive messages.
 .RE
 
-.B -E
+.B \-E
 
 .RS 3
 This parameter, if specified, causes the client to write messages to the
@@ -176,7 +186,7 @@ By default, the client writes messages to standard output - typically the
 user's tty.
 .RE
 
-.B -I
+.B \-I
 .I IP number
 
 .RS 3
@@ -193,7 +203,7 @@ There is no default for this parameter. If not supplied, it will be determined
 automatically by the client as described above.
 .RE
 
-.B -N
+.B \-N
 
 .RS 3
 If specified, this parameter suppresses the normal password prompt from the
@@ -204,14 +214,16 @@ Unless a password is specified on the command line or this parameter is
 specified, the client will request a password.
 .RE
 
-.B -O
+.B \-O
 .I socket options
-.RS 3
-
-See the socket options section of smb.conf(5) for details
 
+.RS 3
+See the socket options section of
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for details.
 .RE
-.B -P
+
+.B \-P
 
 .RS 3
 If specified, the service requested will be connected to as a printer service
@@ -221,7 +233,7 @@ will not be applicable for such a connection.
 By default, services will be connected to as NON-printer services.
 .RE
 
-.B -U
+.B \-U
 .I username
 
 .RS 3
@@ -247,19 +259,19 @@ be empty.
 
 If the service you are connecting to requires a password, it can be supplied
 using the
-.B -U
+.B \-U
 option, by appending a percent symbol ("%") then the password to 
 .I username.
 For example, to attach to a service as user "fred" with password "secret", you
 would specify
-.B -U
+.B \-U
 .I fred%secret
 on the command line. Note that there are no spaces around the percent symbol.
 
 If you specify the password as part of
 .I username
 then the 
-.B -N
+.B \-N
 option (suppress password prompt) is assumed.
 
 If you specify the password as a parameter AND as part of
@@ -277,10 +289,10 @@ rejected by these servers.
 Be cautious about including passwords in scripts.
 .RE
 
-.B -d
+.B \-d
 .I debuglevel
-.RS 3
 
+.RS 3
 debuglevel is an integer from 0 to 5.
 
 The default value if this parameter is not specified is zero.
@@ -296,7 +308,7 @@ use only by developers and generate HUGE amounts of log data, most of which
 is extremely cryptic.
 .RE
 
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 .I log basename
 
 .RS 3
@@ -320,9 +332,8 @@ log.client.out (containing outbound transaction data)
 
 The log files generated are never removed by the client.
 .RE
-.RE
 
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 .I netbios name
 
 .RS 3
@@ -331,7 +342,7 @@ uppercase) as its netbios name. This parameter allows you to override
 the host name and use whatever netbios name you wish.
 .RE
 
-.B -W
+.B \-W
 .I workgroup
 
 .RS 3
@@ -339,10 +350,10 @@ Override what workgroup is used for the connection. This may be needed
 to connect to some servers.
 .RE
 
-.B -p
+.B \-p
 .I port number
-.RS 3
 
+.RS 3
 port number is a positive integer value.
 
 The default value if this parameter is not specified is 139.
@@ -352,12 +363,25 @@ the server. The standard (well-known) port number for the server is 139,
 hence the default.
 
 This parameter is not normally specified.
+.RE
 
-.B -T
+.B \-T
 .I tar options
-.RS3 
 
-where tar options are one or more of c,x,I,X,b,g,N or a; used as:
+.RS 3 
+where
+.I tar options
+consists of one or more of
+.BR c ,
+.BR x ,
+.BR I ,
+.BR X ,
+.BR b ,
+.BR g ,
+.BR N
+or
+.BR a ;
+used as:
 .LP
 smbclient 
 .B "\\\\\\\\server\\\\share"
@@ -373,18 +397,25 @@ smbclient
 .IR filenames....
 ]
 
-.RS3
+.RS 3
 .B c
 Create a tar file on UNIX. Must be followed by the name of a tar file,
-tape device or "-" for standard output. (May be useful to set debugging
-low (-d0)) to avoid corrupting your tar file if using "-"). Mutually
-exclusive with the x flag.
+tape device or "\-" for standard output. (May be useful to set debugging
+low
+.RB ( -d0 ))
+to avoid corrupting your tar file if using "\-"). Mutually
+exclusive with the
+.B x
+flag.
 
 .B x
-Extract (restore) a local tar file back to a share. Unless the -D
+Extract (restore) a local tar file back to a share. Unless the
+.B \-D
 option is given, the tar files will be restored from the top level of
-the share. Must be followed by the name of the tar file, device or "-"
-for standard input. Mutually exclusive with the c flag.
+the share. Must be followed by the name of the tar file, device or "\-"
+for standard input. Mutually exclusive with the
+.B c
+flag.
 
 .B I
 Include files and directories. Is the default behaviour when
@@ -405,17 +436,25 @@ blocks.
 
 .B g
 Incremental. Only back up files that have the archive bit set. Useful
-only with the c flag.
+only with the
+.B c
+flag.
 
 .B N
 Newer than. Must be followed by the name of a file whose date is
 compared against files found on the share during a create. Only files
 newer than the file specified are backed up to the tar file. Useful
-only with the c flag.
+only with the
+.B c
+flag.
 
 .B a
 Set archive bit. Causes the archive bit to be reset when a file is backed
-up. Useful with the g (and c) flags.
+up. Useful with the
+.B g
+(and
+.BR c )
+flags.
 .LP
 
 .B Examples
@@ -431,33 +470,32 @@ Restore everything except users/docs
 smbclient \\\\mypc\\myshare "" -N -Tc backup.tar users/docs
 
 Create a tar file of the files beneath users/docs.
-
+.RE
 .RE
 
-.B -D
+.B \-D
 .I initial directory
 
-.RS3 
-
+.RS 3 
 Change to initial directory before starting. Probably only of any use
-with the tar (\-T) option.
-
-
+with the tar
+.RB ( \-T )
+option.
 .RE
 
-.B -c
+.B \-c
 .I command string
 
 .RS 3
-
 command string is a semicolon separated list of commands to be
-executed instead of prompting from stdin. -N is implied by -c.
+executed instead of prompting from stdin.
+.B \-N
+is implied by
+.BR \-c .
 
 This is particularly useful in scripts and for printing stdin to
-the server, e.g. -c 'print -'.
-
+the server, e.g. \-c 'print \-'.
 .RE
-
 .SH OPERATIONS
 Once the client is running, the user is presented with a prompt, "smb: \\>".
 The backslash ("\\") indicates the current working directory on the server,
@@ -602,7 +640,9 @@ Copy the file called
 from the server to the machine running the client. If specified, name the
 local copy
 .I local file name.
-Note that all transfers in smbclient are binary. See also the
+Note that all transfers in
+.B smbclient
+are binary. See also the
 .B lowercase
 command.
 .RE
@@ -666,7 +706,7 @@ when using the
 and
 .B mget
 commands. This is often useful when copying (say) MSDOS files from a server,
-because lowercase filenames are the norm on Unix systems.
+because lowercase filenames are the norm on UNIX systems.
 .RE
 .RE
 
@@ -776,8 +816,9 @@ operation - refer to the
 .B recurse
 and
 .B mask
-commands for more information. Note that all transfers in smbclient are 
-binary. See also the
+commands for more information. Note that all transfers in
+.B smbclient
+are binary. See also the
 .B lowercase
 command.
 .RE
@@ -820,8 +861,9 @@ operation - refer to the
 .B recurse
 and
 .B mask
-commands for more information. Note that all transfers in smbclient are 
-binary.
+commands for more information. Note that all transfers in
+.B smbclient
+are binary.
 .RE
 .RE
 
@@ -895,7 +937,9 @@ Copy the file called
 from the machine running the client to the server. If specified, name the
 remote copy
 .I remote file name.
-Note that all transfers in smbclient are binary. See also the
+Note that all transfers in
+.B smbclient
+are binary. See also the
 .B lowercase
 command.
 .RE
@@ -966,7 +1010,7 @@ directory (ie., the directory they are copying
 files that match the mask specified using the
 .B mask
 command will be retrieved. See also the
-.mask
+.mask
 command.
 
 When recursion is toggled OFF, only files from the current working
@@ -1019,11 +1063,13 @@ Remove the specified directory (user access privileges permitting)
 .RE
 .B Description:
 .RS 3
-Performs a tar operation - see -T command line option above. Behaviour
+Performs a tar operation - see the
+.B \-T
+command line option above. Behaviour
 may be affected by the
 .B tarmode
-command (see below). Using the g (incremental) and N (newer) will affect
-tarmode settings. Note that using the "-" option with tar x may not
+command (see below). Using g (incremental) and N (newer) will affect
+tarmode settings. Note that using the "\-" option with tar x may not
 work - use the command line option instead.
 .RE
 .RE
@@ -1064,7 +1110,7 @@ on all files it backs up (implies read/write share).
 .RS 3
 .B Parameters
 .RS 3
-.I <filename> <perm=[+|-]rsha>
+.I <filename> <perm=[+|\-]rsha>
 
 .RE
 .B Description
@@ -1076,14 +1122,13 @@ setmode myfile +r
 would make myfile read only.
 .RE
 .RE
-
 .SH NOTES
 Some servers are fussy about the case of supplied usernames, passwords, share
 names (aka service names) and machine names. If you fail to connect try
 giving all parameters in uppercase.
 
 It is often necessary to use the
-.B -n
+.B \-n
 option when connecting to some types
 of servers. For example OS/2 LanManager insists on a valid netbios name
 being used, so you need to supply a valid name that would be known to
@@ -1092,10 +1137,8 @@ the server.
 .B smbclient
 supports long file names where the server supports the LANMAN2
 protocol.
-
 .SH FILES
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 .B USER
 .RS 3
@@ -1103,12 +1146,12 @@ The variable USER may contain the username of the person using the client.
 This information is used only if the protocol level is high enough to support
 session-level passwords.
 .RE
-
 .SH INSTALLATION
 The location of the client program is a matter for individual system 
 administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
 
-It is recommended that the client software be installed under the /usr/local
+It is recommended that the client software be installed under the
+/usr/local/samba
 hierarchy, in a directory readable by all, writeable only by root. The client
 program itself should be executable by all. The client should NOT be setuid 
 or setgid!
@@ -1117,8 +1160,11 @@ The client log files should be put in a directory readable and writable only
 by the user.
 
 To test the client, you will need to know the name of a running Lan manager
-server. It is possible to run the smbd (see
-.B smbd(8)) as an ordinary user - running that server as a daemon on a
+server. It is possible to run
+.B smbd
+(see
+.BR smbd (8))
+as an ordinary user - running that server as a daemon on a
 user-accessible port (typically any port number over 1024) would
 provide a suitable test server.
 .SH VERSION
@@ -1129,8 +1175,7 @@ the client has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not
 covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
 rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B smbd(8)
-
+.BR smbd (8)
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
 [This section under construction]
 
@@ -1147,7 +1192,6 @@ creation of this man page the source code is still too fluid to warrant
 describing each and every diagnostic. At this stage your best bet is still
 to grep the source code and inspect the conditions that gave rise to the 
 diagnostics you are seeing.
-
 .SH BUGS
 None known.
 .SH CREDITS
@@ -1155,8 +1199,9 @@ The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-This man page written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
+This man page was written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au).
 
 See
-.B smb.conf(5) for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
 submit bug reports, comments etc.
index bae41b2c479525b4de43085dbdf0ee76940e96ad..4faa06799c6fb6c1deb13caab56ef5ad8a1580d3 100644 (file)
@@ -4,23 +4,23 @@ smbd \- provide SMB (aka LanManager) services to clients
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .B smbd
 [
-.B -D
+.B \-D
 ] [
-.B -a
+.B \-a
 ] [
-.B -d
+.B \-d
 .I debuglevel
 ] [
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 .I log file
 ] [
-.B -p
+.B \-p
 .I port number
 ] [
-.B -O
+.B \-O
 .I socket options
 ] [
-.B -s
+.B \-s
 .I configuration file
 ]
 .SH DESCRIPTION
@@ -35,12 +35,14 @@ service LanManager clients.
 An extensive description of the services that the server can provide is given
 in the man page for the configuration file controlling the attributes of those
 services (see
-.B smb.conf(5)). This man page will not describe the services, but
+.BR smb.conf (5)).
+This man page will not describe the services, but
 will concentrate on the administrative aspects of running the server.
 
 Please note that there are significant security implications to running this
 server, and
-.B smb.conf(5) should be regarded as mandatory reading before proceeding with 
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+should be regarded as mandatory reading before proceeding with 
 installation.
 
 A session is created whenever a client requests one. Each client gets a copy
@@ -50,9 +52,8 @@ are closed, the copy of the server for that client terminates.
 
 The configuration file is automatically reloaded if it changes. You
 can force a reload by sending a SIGHUP to the server.
-
 .SH OPTIONS
-.B -D
+.B \-D
 
 .RS 3
 If specified, this parameter causes the server to operate as a daemon. That is,
@@ -62,14 +63,14 @@ appropriate port.
 By default, the server will NOT operate as a daemon.
 .RE
 
-.B -a
+.B \-a
 
 .RS 3
 If this parameter is specified, the log files will be overwritten with each 
 new connection. By default, the log files will be appended to.
 .RE
 
-.B -d
+.B \-d
 .I debuglevel
 .RS 3
 
@@ -88,7 +89,7 @@ use only by developers and generate HUGE amounts of log data, most of which
 is extremely cryptic.
 .RE
 
-.B -l
+.B \-l
 .I log file
 
 .RS 3
@@ -113,14 +114,16 @@ log.out (containing outbound transaction data)
 The log files generated are never removed by the server.
 .RE
 
-.B -O
+.B \-O
 .I socket options
 .RS 3
 
-See the socket options section of smb.conf(5) for details
+See the socket options section of
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for details
 
 .RE
-.B -p
+.B \-p
 .I port number
 .RS 3
 
@@ -138,7 +141,7 @@ situation.
 This parameter is not normally specified except in the above situation.
 .RE
 
-.B -s
+.B \-s
 .I configuration file
 
 .RS 3
@@ -148,9 +151,9 @@ The file specified contains the configuration details required by the server.
 The information in this file includes server-specific information such as
 what printcap file to use, as well as descriptions of all the services that the
 server is to provide. See
-.B smb.conf(5) for more information.
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for more information.
 .RE
-
 .SH FILES
 
 .B /etc/inetd.conf
@@ -179,23 +182,24 @@ mapping of service name (eg., netbios-ssn)  to service port (eg., 139) and
 protocol type (eg., tcp). See the section "INSTALLATION" below.
 .RE
 
-.B /usr/local/smb/smb.conf
+.B /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf
 
 .RS 3
 This file describes all the services the server is to make available to
 clients. See
-.B smb.conf(5) for more information.
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for more information.
 .RE
 .RE
-
 .SH LIMITATIONS
 
-On some systems smbd cannot change uid back to root after a setuid() call.
+On some systems
+.B smbd
+cannot change uid back to root after a setuid() call.
 Such systems are called "trapdoor" uid systems. If you have such a system,
 you will be unable to connect from a client (such as a PC) as two different
 users at once. Attempts to connect the second user will result in "access
 denied" or similar.
-
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 
 .B PRINTER
@@ -206,13 +210,12 @@ use the value of this variable (or "lp" if this variable is not defined)
 as the name of the printer to use. This is not specific to the server,
 however.
 .RE
-
 .SH INSTALLATION
 The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
 system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
 
 It is recommended that the server software be installed under the
-/usr/local hierarchy, in a directory readable by all, writeable only
+/usr/local/samba hierarchy, in a directory readable by all, writeable only
 by root. The server program itself should be executable by all, as
 users may wish to run the server themselves (in which case it will of
 course run with their privileges).  The server should NOT be
@@ -239,9 +242,10 @@ modified to suit your needs.
 The remaining notes will assume the following:
 
 .RS 3
-smbd (the server program) installed in /usr/local/smb
+.B smbd
+(the server program) installed in /usr/local/samba/bin
 
-smb.conf (the configuration file) installed in /usr/local/smb
+smb.conf (the configuration file) installed in /usr/local/samba/lib
 
 log files stored in /var/adm/smblogs
 .RE
@@ -255,9 +259,13 @@ TCP-wrapper may be used for extra security.
 When you've decided, continue with either "RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON" or
 "RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST".
 .SH RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON
-To run the server as a daemon from the command line, simply put the "-D" option
+To run the server as a daemon from the command line, simply put the
+.B \-D
+option
 on the command line. There is no need to place an ampersand at the end of the
-command line - the "-D" option causes the server to detach itself from the
+command line - the
+.B \-D
+option causes the server to detach itself from the
 tty anyway.
 
 Any user can run the server as a daemon (execute permissions permitting, of 
@@ -273,7 +281,7 @@ port number, log file location, configuration file location and debug level as
 desired:
 
 .RS 3
-/usr/local/smb/smbd -D -l /var/adm/smblogs/log -s /usr/local/smb/smb.conf
+/usr/local/samba/bin/smbd -D -l /var/adm/smblogs/log -s /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf
 .RE
 
 (The above should appear in your initialisation script as a single line. 
@@ -282,7 +290,9 @@ this man page. If the above appears as more than one line, please treat any
 newlines or indentation as a single space or TAB character.)
 
 If the options used at compile time are appropriate for your system, all
-parameters except the desired debug level and "-D" may be omitted. See the
+parameters except the desired debug level and
+.B \-D
+may be omitted. See the
 section "OPTIONS" above.
 .SH RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST
 If your system uses a meta-daemon such as inetd, you can arrange to have the
@@ -294,8 +304,9 @@ assistance of your system administrator to modify the system files.
 You will probably want to set up the name server
 .B nmbd
 at the same time as
-the smbd - refer to the man page 
-.B nmbd(8).
+.B smbd
+- refer to the man page 
+.BR nmbd (8).
 
 First, ensure that a port is configured in the file /etc/services. The 
 well-known port 139 should be used if possible, though any port may be used.
@@ -313,11 +324,14 @@ Next, put a suitable line in the file /etc/inetd.conf (in the unlikely event
 that you are using a meta-daemon other than inetd, you are on your own). Note
 that the first item in this line matches the service name in /etc/services.
 Substitute appropriate values for your system in this line (see
-.B inetd(8)):
+.BR inetd (8)):
 
 .RS 3
-netbios-ssn stream tcp nowait root /usr/local/smb/smbd -d1 
--l/var/adm/smblogs/log -s/usr/local/smb/smb.conf
+.\" turn off right adjustment
+.ad l
+netbios-ssn stream tcp nowait root /usr/local/samba/bin/smbd -d1 
+-l/var/adm/smblogs/log -s/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf
+.ad
 .RE
 
 (The above should appear in /etc/inetd.conf as a single line. Depending on 
@@ -359,7 +373,7 @@ able to connect to the service "\\\\fred\\mary".
 
 To properly test and experiment with the server, we recommend using the
 smbclient program (see
-.B smbclient(1)).
+.BR smbclient (1)).
 .SH VERSION
 This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.00 of the Samba suite, plus some
 of the recent patches to it. These notes will necessarily lag behind 
@@ -368,14 +382,13 @@ the server has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not
 covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
 rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B hosts_access(5),
-.B inetd(8),
-.B nmbd(8), 
-.B smb.conf(5),
-.B smbclient(1),
-.B testparm(1), 
-.B testprns(1)
-
+.BR hosts_access (5),
+.BR inetd (8),
+.BR nmbd (8), 
+.BR smb.conf (5),
+.BR smbclient (1),
+.BR testparm (1), 
+.BR testprns (1)
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
 [This section under construction]
 
@@ -392,7 +405,6 @@ creation of this man page the source code is still too fluid to warrant
 describing each and every diagnostic. At this stage your best bet is still
 to grep the source code and inspect the conditions that gave rise to the 
 diagnostics you are seeing.
-
 .SH BUGS
 None known.
 .SH CREDITS
@@ -400,8 +412,9 @@ The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-This man page written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
+This man page was written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au).
 
 See
-.B smb.conf(5) for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
 submit bug reports, comments etc.
index 1608d3bb345dc260432c743d1e78db0d5afa0b50..f72f93607f7250d93440abef535b6a67eabc093b 100644 (file)
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ is a very small 'glue' program, which runs shell commands for
 the
 .B smbd
 daemon (see
-.B smbd(8)).
+.BR smbd (8)).
 
 It first changes to the highest effective user and group ID that it can, 
 then runs the command line provided using the system() call. This program is
@@ -30,14 +30,13 @@ The PATH variable set for the environment in which
 .B smbrun
 is executed will affect what executables are located and executed if a
 fully-qualified path is not given in the command.
-
 .SH INSTALLATION
 The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
 system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
 
 It is recommended that the
 .B smbrun
-program be installed under the /usr/local hierarchy, in a directory readable
+program be installed under the /usr/local/samba hierarchy, in a directory readable
 by all, writeable only by root. The program should be executable by all.
 The program should NOT be setuid or setgid!
 .SH VERSION
@@ -48,12 +47,16 @@ the program has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not
 covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
 rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B smbd(8), 
-.B smb.conf(8) 
+.BR smbd (8), 
+.BR smb.conf (8) 
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
-If smbrun cannot be located or cannot be executed by
+If
+.B smbrun
+cannot be located or cannot be executed by
+.B smbd
+then appropriate messages will be found in the
 .B smbd
-then appropriate messages will be found in the smbd logs. Other diagnostics are
+logs. Other diagnostics are
 dependent on the shell-command being run. It is advisable for your shell
 commands to issue suitable diagnostics to aid trouble-shooting.
 .SH BUGS
@@ -63,8 +66,9 @@ The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-This man page was written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
+This man page was written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au).
 
 See
-.B smb.conf(5) for a full list of contributors and details of how to 
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for a full list of contributors and details of how to 
 submit bug reports, comments etc.
index 76dc50cbb538e8fe46a2a96fb239d997bf20539c..e3b01046b76157331bfe869502e0c8ec7b35712b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,39 +3,51 @@
 smbstatus \- report on current Samba connections
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .B smbstatus
-[-d]
-[-s
+[
+.B \-d
+] [
+.B \-p
+] [
+.B \-s
 .I configuration file
 ]
 .SH DESCRIPTION
 This program is part of the Samba suite.
 
 .B smbstatus
-is a very simple program to list the current Samba connections
+is a very simple program to list the current Samba connections.
 
-Just run the program and the output is self explanatory. You can offer
-a configuration filename to override the default. The default is
-CONFIGFILE from the Makefile.
-
-Option
-.I -d
+Just run the program and the output is self explanatory.
+.SH OPTIONS
+.B \-d
 gives verbose output.
 
-.I -p
-print a list of smbd processes and exit. Useful for scripting.
+.B \-p
+print a list of
+.B smbd
+processes and exit. Useful for scripting.
+
+.B \-s
+.I configuration file
+
+.RS 3
+The default configuration file name is determined at compile time.
 
+The file specified contains the configuration details required by the server.
+See
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for more information.
+.RE
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH INSTALLATION
 The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
 system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
 
 It is recommended that the
 .B smbstatus
-program be installed under the /usr/local hierarchy, in a directory readable
+program be installed under the /usr/local/samba hierarchy, in a directory readable
 by all, writeable only by root. The program itself should be executable by all.
-
 .SH VERSION
 This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.00 of the Samba suite, plus some
 of the recent patches to it. These notes will necessarily lag behind 
@@ -44,9 +56,10 @@ the program has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not
 covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
 rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B smb.conf(5),
-.B smbd(8)
+.BR smb.conf (5),
+.BR smbd (8)
 
 See
-.B smb.conf(5) for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
 submit bug reports, comments etc.
index 0f1c38c271ffc2c5bc14ee8527014ad240a43b9f..7906e9b1ac4cc4976ed58b4e77c39e3170aaeffa 100644 (file)
@@ -5,41 +5,47 @@ smbtar \- shell script for backing up SMB shares directly to UNIX tape drive
 .B smbtar
 .B \-s
 .I server
-.B [ \-p
+[
+.B \-p
 .I password
-.B ]
-.B \-x
+] [
+.B \-x
 .I service
-.B ]
-.B [ \-X ]
-.B [ \-d
+] [
+.B \-X
+] [
+.B \-d
 .I directory
-.B ]
-.B \-u
+] [
+.B \-u
 .I user
-.B ]
-.B \-t
+] [
+.B \-t
 .I tape
-.B ]
-.B \-b
+] [
+.B \-b
 .I blocksize
-.B ]
-.B \-N
+] [
+.B \-N
 .I filename
-.B ]
-.B [ \-i ]
-.B [ \-r ]
-.B [ \-l ]
-.B [ \-v ]
+] [
+.B \-i
+] [
+.B \-r
+] [
+.B \-l
+.I log level
+] [
+.B \-v
+]
 .I filenames...
-
 .SH DESCRIPTION
 This program is an extension to the Samba suite.
 
 .B smbtar
-is a very small shell script on top of smbclient, which dumps SMB
-shares directly to tape.
-
+is a very small shell script on top of
+.BR smbclient ,
+which dumps SMB shares directly to tape.
 .SH OPTIONS
 .B \-s
 .I server
@@ -92,13 +98,15 @@ The user id to connect as. Default: UNIX login name.
 .RS 3
 Tape device. May be regular file or tape device. Default: Tape environmental
 variable; if not set, a file called
-.I tar.out.
+.IR tar.out .
 .RE
 
 .B \-b
 .I blocksize
 .RS 3
-Blocking factor. Defaults to 20. See tar(1) for a fuller explanation.
+Blocking factor. Defaults to 20. See
+.BR tar (1)
+for a fuller explanation.
 .RE
 
 .B \-N
@@ -120,48 +128,51 @@ Restore. Files are restored to the share from the tar file.
 .RE
 
 .B \-l
+.I log level
 .RS 3
-Debug level. Corresponds to -d flag on smbclient(1).
+Log (debug) level. Corresponds to
+.B \-d
+flag of
+.BR smbclient (1).
 .RE
-
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 The TAPE variable specifies the default tape device to write to. May
-be overidden with the -t option.
-
+be overidden with the
+.B \-t
+option.
 .SH BUGS
-The smbtar script has different options from ordinary tar and tar
-called from smbclient.
-
+The
+.B smbtar
+script has different options from ordinary tar and tar
+called from
+.BR smbclient .
 .SH CAVEATS
 Sites that are more careful about security may not like the way
 the script handles PC passwords. Backup and restore work on entire shares,
 should work on file lists.
-
 .SH VERSION
 This man page is correct for version 1.9.15p8 of the Samba suite.
-
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B smbclient
-(8), 
-.B smb.conf
-(8) 
+.BR smbclient (8), 
+.BR smb.conf (8) 
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
 See diagnostics for 
 .B smbclient
 command.
-
 .SH CREDITS
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by 
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
 Ricky Poulten (poultenr@logica.co.uk) wrote the tar extension and this
-man page. The smbtar script was heavily rewritten and improved by
+man page. The
+.B smbtar
+script was heavily rewritten and improved by
 Martin Kraemer <Martin.Kraemer@mch.sni.de>. Many thanks to everyone
 who suggested extensions, improvements, bug fixes, etc.
 
 See
-.B smb.conf
-(5) for a full list of contributors and details of how to submit bug reports,
+.BR smb.conf (5)
+for a full list of contributors and details of how to submit bug reports,
 comments etc.
 
index 4a0ffcbc489889f2e5566a76115be220e74bc72e..b563708c184341bc8e64539d8f89a3327b24b00c 100644 (file)
@@ -18,7 +18,9 @@ is a very simple test program to check an
 .B smbd
 configuration
 file for internal correctness. If this program reports no problems, you can use
-the configuration file with confidence that smbd will successfully
+the configuration file with confidence that
+.B smbd
+will successfully
 load the configuration file.
 
 Note that this is NOT a guarantee that the services specified in the
@@ -56,18 +58,18 @@ parameter is supplied, or strange things may happen.
 .SH FILES
 .B smb.conf
 .RS 3
-This is usually the name of the configuration file used by smbd.
+This is usually the name of the configuration file used by
+.BR smbd .
 .RE
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH INSTALLATION
 The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
 system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
 
 It is recommended that the
 .B testparm
-program be installed under the /usr/local hierarchy, in a directory readable
+program be installed under the /usr/local/samba hierarchy, in a directory readable
 by all, writeable only by root. The program itself should be executable by all.
 The program should NOT be setuid or setgid!
 .SH VERSION
@@ -78,8 +80,8 @@ the program has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not
 covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
 rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B smb.conf(5),
-.B smbd(8)
+.BR smb.conf (5),
+.BR smbd (8)
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
 The program will issue a message saying whether the configuration file loaded
 OK or not. This message may be preceded by errors and warnings if the file
@@ -96,9 +98,12 @@ The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-The testparm program and this man page were written by Karl Auer
-(Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
+The
+.B testparm
+program and this man page were written by Karl Auer
+(Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au).
 
 See
-.B samba(7) for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
+.BR samba (7)
+for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
 submit bug reports, comments etc.
index f1c3d3ef020ee71bdb8d2f110c4ad84d3f51eea4..08a9bc413e3315e847993234fb2e0c111cb35b3e 100644 (file)
@@ -30,11 +30,12 @@ file, single printer names and sets of aliases separated by vertical bars
 syntax is done beyond that required to extract the printer name. It may
 be that the print spooling system is more forgiving or less forgiving
 than 
+.BR testprns .
+However, if
 .B testprns
-however if
-.B testprns
-finds the printer then smbd should do as well.
-
+finds the printer then
+.B smbd
+should do so as well.
 .RE
 
 .I printcapname
@@ -52,18 +53,17 @@ will attempt to scan the printcap file specified at compile time
 .B /etc/printcap
 .RS 3
 This is usually the default printcap file to scan. See
-.B printcap(5)).
+.BR printcap (5)).
 .RE
 .SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
 Not applicable.
-
 .SH INSTALLATION
 The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
 system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
 
 It is recommended that the
 .B testprns
-program be installed under the /usr/local hierarchy, in a directory readable
+program be installed under the /usr/local/samba hierarchy, in a directory readable
 by all, writeable only by root. The program should be executable by all.
 The program should NOT be setuid or setgid!
 .SH VERSION
@@ -74,9 +74,9 @@ the program has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not
 covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
 rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
-.B printcap(5),
-.B smbd(8), 
-.B smbclient(1)
+.BR printcap (5),
+.BR smbd (8), 
+.BR smbclient (1)
 .SH DIAGNOSTICS
 If a printer is found to be valid, the message "Printer name <printername> is 
 valid" will be displayed.
@@ -84,7 +84,9 @@ valid" will be displayed.
 If a printer is found to be invalid, the message "Printer name <printername> 
 is not valid" will be displayed.
 
-All messages that would normally be logged during operation of smbd are
+All messages that would normally be logged during operation of
+.B smbd
+are
 logged by this program to the file
 .I test.log
 in the current directory. The program runs at debuglevel 3, so quite extensive
@@ -99,9 +101,12 @@ The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-The testprns program and this man page were written by Karl Auer
-(Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
+The
+.B testprns
+program and this man page were written by Karl Auer
+(Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au).
 
 See
-.B samba(7) for a full list of contributors and details of how to 
+.BR samba (7)
+for a full list of contributors and details of how to 
 submit bug reports, comments etc.