- document the "remote announce" option
authorAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Fri, 16 Aug 1996 12:49:33 +0000 (12:49 +0000)
committerAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Fri, 16 Aug 1996 12:49:33 +0000 (12:49 +0000)
- cleanup nmbd.8 quite a bit
(This used to be commit 525235135bdd6461b50ac2723f95f5a38686ecc2)

docs/manpages/nmbd.8
docs/manpages/samba.7
docs/manpages/smb.conf.5

index d3f397563df1922d4e886d5ba08808ba483de8e9..ab3c0c67d1709c1f438c136ca8abbb36ad3ef24b 100644 (file)
@@ -4,34 +4,17 @@ nmbd \- provide netbios nameserver support to clients
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .B nmbd
 [
-.B -B
-.I broadcast address
-] [
-.B -I
-.I IP address
-] [
 .B -D
 ] [
-.B -C comment string
-] [
-.B -G
-.I group name
-] [
 .B -H
 .I netbios hosts file
 ] [
-.B -N
-.I netmask
-] [
 .B -d
 .I debuglevel
 ] [
 .B -l
 .I log basename
 ] [
-.B -n
-.I netbios name
-] [
 .B -p
 .I port number
 ] [
@@ -65,23 +48,12 @@ that are not broadcasts, as long as it can resolve the name.
 .B -B
 
 .RS 3
-On some systems, the server is unable to determine the broadcast address to
-use for name registration requests. If your system has this difficulty, this 
-parameter may be used to specify an appropriate broadcast address. The 
-address should be given in standard "a.b.c.d" notation.
-
-Only use this parameter if you are sure that the server cannot properly 
-determine the proper broadcast address.
-
-The default broadcast address is determined by the server at run time. If it
-encounters difficulty doing so, it makes a guess based on the local IP
-number.
+This option is obsolete. Please use the interfaces option in smb.conf
 .RE
 .B -I
 
 .RS 3
-On some systems, the server is unable to determine the correct IP
-address to use. This allows you to override the default choice.
+This option is obsolete. Please use the interfaces option in smb.conf
 .RE
 
 .B -D
@@ -97,29 +69,13 @@ By default, the server will NOT operate as a daemon.
 .B -C comment string
 
 .RS 3
-This allows you to set the "comment string" that is shown next to the
-machine name in browse listings. 
-
-A %v will be replaced with the Samba version number.
-
-A %h will be replaced with the hostname.
-
-It defaults to "Samba %v".
+This option is obsolete. Please use the "server string" option in smb.conf
 .RE
 
 .B -G
 
 .RS 3
-This option allows you to specify a netbios group (also known as
-lanmanager domain) that the server should be part of. You may include
-several of these on the command line if you like. Alternatively you
-can use the -H option to load a netbios hosts file containing domain names.
-
-At startup, unless the -R switch has been used, the server will
-attempt to register all group names in the hosts file and on the
-command line (from the -G option).
-
-The server will also respond to queries on this name.
+This option is obsolete. Please use the "workgroup" option in smb.conf
 .RE
 
 .B -H
@@ -140,29 +96,17 @@ The second column is a netbios name. This is the name that the server
 will respond to. It must be less than 20 characters long.
 
 The third column is optional, and is intended for flags. Currently the
-only flags supported are G, S and M. A G indicates that the name is a
-group (also known as domain) name.
-
-At startup all groups known to the server (either from this file or
-from the -G option) are registered on the network (unless the -R
-option has been selected).
-
-A S or G means that the specified address is a broadcast address of a
-network that you want people to be able to browse you from. Nmbd will
-search for a master browser in that domain and will send host
-announcements to that machine, informing it that the specified domain
-is available.
+only flag supported is M. 
 
 A M means that this name is the default netbios name for this
 machine. This has the same affect as specifying the -n option to nmbd.
 
 After startup the server waits for queries, and will answer queries to
 any name known to it. This includes all names in the netbios hosts
-file (if any), it's own name, and any names given with the -G option.
+file (if any) and it's own name.
 
 The primary intention of the -H option is to allow a mapping from
-netbios names to internet domain names, and to allow the specification
-of groups that the server should be part of.
+netbios names to internet domain names.
 
 .B Example:
 
@@ -173,70 +117,24 @@ of groups that the server should be part of.
         # if you want to include a name with a space in it then 
         # use double quotes.
 
-        # first put ourselves in the group LANGROUP
-        0.0.0.0 LANGROUP G
-
         # next add a netbios alias for a faraway host
         arvidsjaur.anu.edu.au ARVIDSJAUR
 
         # finally put in an IP for a hard to find host
         130.45.3.213 FREDDY
 
-        # now we want another subnet to be able to browse
-        # us in the workgroup UNIXSERV
-        192.0.2.255  UNIXSERV G
-
-.RE
-
-.B -M
-.I workgroup name
-
-.RS 3
-If this parameter is given, the server will look for a master browser
-for the specified workgroup name, report success or failure, then
-exit. If successful, the IP address of the name located will be
-reported. 
-
-If you use the workgroup name "-" then nmbd will search for a master
-browser for any workgroup by using the name __MSBROWSE__.
-
-This option is meant to be used interactively on the command line, not
-as a daemon or in inetd.
-
 .RE
 .B -N
 
 .RS 3
-On some systems, the server is unable to determine the netmask. If
-your system has this difficulty, this parameter may be used to specify
-an appropriate netmask. The mask should be given in standard
-"a.b.c.d" notation.
-
-Only use this parameter if you are sure that the server cannot properly 
-determine the proper netmask.
-
-The default netmask is determined by the server at run time. If it
-encounters difficulty doing so, it makes a guess based on the local IP
-number.
+This option is obsolete. Please use the "interfaces" option in
+smb.conf instead.
 .RE
 
 .B -d
 .I debuglevel
 .RS 3
-
-debuglevel is an integer from 0 to 5.
-
-The default value if this parameter is not specified is zero.
-
-The higher this value, the more detail will be logged to the log files about
-the activities of the server. At level 0, only critical errors and serious 
-warnings will be logged. Level 1 is a reasonable level for day to day running
-- it generates a small amount of information about operations carried out.
-
-Levels above 1 will generate considerable amounts of log data, and should 
-only be used when investigating a problem. Levels above 3 are designed for 
-use only by developers and generate HUGE amounts of log data, most of which 
-is extremely cryptic.
+This option set the debug level. See smb.conf(5)
 .RE
 
 .B -l
@@ -251,29 +149,16 @@ will be logged.
 The default base name is specified at compile time.
 
 The base name is used to generate actual log file names. For example, if the
-name specified was "log", the following files would be used for log data:
-
-.RS 3
-log.nmb (containing debugging information)
-
-log.nmb.in (containing inbound transaction data)
-
-log.nmb.out (containing outbound transaction data)
-.RE
-
-The log files generated are never removed by the server.
+name specified was "log" then the file log.nmb would contain debug
+info.
 .RE
 
 .B -n
 .I netbios name
 
 .RS 3
-This parameter tells the server what netbios name to respond with when 
-queried. The same name is also registered on startup unless the -R 
-parameter was specified.
-
-The default netbios name used if this parameter is not specified is the 
-name of the host on which the server is running.
+This option allows you to override the Netbios name that Samba uses
+for itself. 
 .RE
 
 .B -p
@@ -282,165 +167,17 @@ name of the host on which the server is running.
 
 port number is a positive integer value.
 
-The default value if this parameter is not specified is 137.
-
-This number is the port number that will be used when making connections to
-the server from client software. The standard (well-known) port number for the
-server is 137, hence the default. If you wish to run the server as an ordinary
-user rather than as root, most systems will require you to use a port number
-greater than 1024 - ask your system administrator for help if you are in this
-situation.
-
-Note that the name server uses UDP, not TCP!
-
-This parameter is not normally specified except in the above situation.
-.RE
-.SH FILES
-
-.B /etc/inetd.conf
-
-.RS 3
-If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must contain
-suitable startup information for the meta-daemon. See the section 
-"INSTALLATION" below.
-.RE
-
-.B /etc/rc.d/rc.inet2
-
-.RS 3
-(or whatever initialisation script your system uses)
-
-If running the server as a daemon at startup, this file will need to contain
-an appropriate startup sequence for the server. See the section "Installation"
-below.
-.RE
-
-.B /etc/services
-
-.RS 3
-If running the server via the meta-daemon inetd, this file must contain a
-mapping of service name (eg., netbios-ns)  to service port (eg., 137) and
-protocol type (eg., udp). See the section "INSTALLATION" below.
-.RE
-
-.SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
-Not applicable.
-
-.SH INSTALLATION
-The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
-system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
-
-It is recommended that the server software be installed under the /usr/local
-hierarchy, in a directory readable by all, writeable only by root. The server
-program itself should be executable by all, as users may wish to run the 
-server themselves (in which case it will of course run with their privileges).
-The server should NOT be setuid or setgid!
-
-The server log files should be put in a directory readable and writable only
-by root, as the log files may contain sensitive information.
-
-The remaining notes will assume the following:
-
-.RS 3
-nmbd (the server program) installed in /usr/local/smb
-
-log files stored in /var/adm/smblogs
-.RE
-
-The server may be run either as a daemon by users or at startup, or it may
-be run from a meta-daemon such as inetd upon request. If run as a daemon, the
-server will always be ready, so starting sessions will be faster. If run from 
-a meta-daemon some memory will be saved and utilities such as the tcpd 
-TCP-wrapper may be used for extra security.
-
-When you've decided, continue with either "Running the server as a daemon" or
-"Running the server on request".
-.SH RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON
-To run the server as a daemon from the command line, simply put the "-D" option
-on the command line. There is no need to place an ampersand at the end of the
-command line - the "-D" option causes the server to detach itself from the
-tty anyway.
-
-Any user can run the server as a daemon (execute permissions permitting, of 
-course). This is useful for testing purposes.
-
-To ensure that the server is run as a daemon whenever the machine is started,
-you will need to modify the system startup files. Wherever appropriate (for
-example, in /etc/rc.d/rc.inet2), insert the following line, substituting 
-values appropriate to your system:
-
-.RS 3
-/usr/local/smb/nmbd -D -l/var/adm/smblogs/log
-.RE
-
-(The above should appear in your initialisation script as a single line. 
-Depending on your terminal characteristics, it may not appear that way in
-this man page. If the above appears as more than one line, please treat any 
-newlines or indentation as a single space or TAB character.)
-
-If the options used at compile time are appropriate for your system, all
-parameters except the desired debug level and "-D" may be omitted. See the
-section on "Options" above.
-.SH RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST
-If your system uses a meta-daemon such as inetd, you can arrange to have the
-SMB name server started whenever a process attempts to connect to it. This 
-requires several changes to the startup files on the host machine. If you are
-experimenting as an ordinary user rather than as root, you will need the 
-assistance of your system administrator to modify the system files.
-
-First, ensure that a port is configured in the file /etc/services. The 
-well-known port 137 should be used if possible, though any port may be used.
-
-Ensure that a line similar to the following is in /etc/services:
-
-.RS 3
-netbios-ns     137/udp
-.RE
-
-Note for NIS/YP users: You may need to rebuild the NIS service maps rather
-than alter your local /etc/services file.
-
-Next, put a suitable line in the file /etc/inetd.conf (in the unlikely event
-that you are using a meta-daemon other than inetd, you are on your own). Note
-that the first item in this line matches the service name in /etc/services.
-Substitute appropriate values for your system in this line (see
-.B inetd(8)):
-
-.RS 3
-netbios-ns dgram udp wait root /usr/local/smb/nmbd -l/var/adm/smblogs/log
-.RE
-
-(The above should appear in /etc/inetd.conf as a single line. Depending on 
-your terminal characteristics, it may not appear that way in this man page.
-If the above appears as more than one line, please treat any newlines or 
-indentation as a single space or TAB character.)
-
-Note that there is no need to specify a port number here, even if you are 
-using a non-standard port number.
-.SH TESTING THE INSTALLATION
-If running the server as a daemon, execute it before proceeding. If
-using a meta-daemon, either restart the system or kill and restart the 
-meta-daemon. Some versions of inetd will reread their configuration tables if
-they receive a HUP signal.
-
-To test whether the name server is running, start up a client
-.I on a different machine
-and see whether the desired name is now present. Alternatively, run 
-the nameserver
-.I on a different machine
-specifying "-L netbiosname", where "netbiosname" is the name you have 
-configured the test server to respond with. The command should respond 
-with success, and the IP number of the machine using the specified netbios 
-name. You may need the -B parameter on some systems. See the README
-file for more information on testing nmbd.
+Don't use this option unless you are an expert, in which case you
+won't need help!
 
 .SH VERSION
-This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.00 of the Samba suite, plus some
-of the recent patches to it. These notes will necessarily lag behind 
-development of the software, so it is possible that your version of 
-the server has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not 
-covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
-rectification.
+
+This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.16 of the Samba
+suite, plus some of the recent patches to it. These notes will
+necessarily lag behind development of the software, so it is possible
+that your version of the server has extensions or parameter semantics
+that differ from or are not covered by this man page. Please notify
+these to the address below for rectification.
 .SH SEE ALSO
 .B inetd(8),
 .B smbd(8), 
@@ -449,35 +186,13 @@ rectification.
 .B testparm(1), 
 .B testprns(1)
 
-.SH DIAGNOSTICS
-[This section under construction]
-
-Most diagnostics issued by the server are logged in the specified log file. The
-log file name is specified at compile time, but may be overridden on the
-command line.
-
-The number and nature of diagnostics available depends on the debug level used
-by the server. If you have problems, set the debug level to 3 and peruse the
-log files.
-
-Most messages are reasonably self-explanatory. Unfortunately, at time of
-creation of this man page the source code is still too fluid to warrant
-describing each and every diagnostic. At this stage your best bet is still
-to grep the source code and inspect the conditions that gave rise to the 
-diagnostics you are seeing.
-
-.SH BUGS
-None known.
 .SH CREDITS
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by 
 Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
 of the Source for this project.
 
-This man page written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
+This man page originally written by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
 
-See
-.B smb.conf(5) for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
-submit bug reports, comments etc.
 
 
 
index ac106e002249ed9753dbec430bbf24c9bcf10afe..d325e3a0855dfc170d0a87df6e927cdc5b3ebed9 100644 (file)
@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ If you wish to contribute to the Samba project, then I suggest you
 join the Samba mailing list.
 
 If you have patches to submit or bugs to report then you may mail them
-directly to samba-bugs@anu.edu.au. Note, however, that due to the
+directly to samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au. Note, however, that due to the
 enormous popularity of this package I may take some time to repond to
 mail. I prefer patches in "diff -u" format.
 
index 7f67ae4e123f1a6b008c685b2416d51f7172d7ef..1437777c65a7ee7bea4390c6c98a2f121677273f 100644 (file)
@@ -401,6 +401,8 @@ read raw
 
 read size
 
+remote announce
+
 root
 
 root dir
@@ -532,6 +534,8 @@ preserve case
 
 print command
 
+printer driver
+
 print ok
 
 printable
@@ -2125,6 +2129,31 @@ pointless and will cause you to allocate memory unnecessarily.
 .B Example:
        read size = 8192
 
+.SS remote announce (G)
+
+This option allows you to setup nmbd to periodically announce itself
+to arbitrary IP addresses with an arbitrary workgroup name. 
+
+This is useful if you want your Samba server to appear in a remote
+workgroup for which the normal browse propogation rules don't
+work. The remote workgroup can be anywhere that you can send IP
+packets to.
+
+For example:
+
+       remote announce = 192.168.2.255/SERVERS 192.168.4.255/STAFF
+
+the above line would cause nmbd to announce itself to the two given IP
+addresses using the given workgroup names. If you leave out the
+workgroup name then the one given in the "workgroup" option is used
+instead. 
+
+The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
+of the remote networks, but can also be the IP addresses of known
+browse masters if your network config is that stable.
+
+This option replaces similar functionality from the nmbd lmhosts file.
+
 .SS revalidate (S)
 
 This options controls whether Samba will allow a previously validated