fad3f075066d8d1ad7aa93c6126d607f4e61bbc0
[kai/samba.git] / docs / textdocs / DOMAIN.txt
1 Contributor:    Samba Team
2 Updated:        June 27, 1997
3
4 Subject:        Network Logons and Roving Profiles
5 ===========================================================================
6
7 Samba supports domain logons, network logon scripts and user profiles.
8 The support is still experimental, but it seems to work.
9
10 The support is also not complete. Samba does not yet support the
11 sharing of the SAM database with other systems, or remote administration.
12 Support for these kind of things should be added sometime in the future.
13
14 The domain support works for WfWg and Win95 clients. Support for Windows
15 NT and OS/2 clients is still being worked on and  is still experimental.
16
17 Using these features you can make your clients verify their logon via
18 the Samba server, make clients run a batch file when they logon to
19 the network and download their preferences, desktop and start menu.
20
21
22 Configuration Instructions:     Network Logons
23 ==============================================
24
25 To use domain logons and profiles you need to do the following:
26
27
28 1) Setup nmbd and smbd by configuring smb.conf so that Samba is
29    acting as the master browser. See INSTALL.txt and BROWSING.txt
30    for details.
31
32 2) Setup a WINS server (see NetBIOS.txt) and configure all your clients
33    to use that WINS service.  [lkcl 12jul97 - problems occur where
34    clients do not pick up the profiles properly unless they are using a
35    WINS server.  this is still under investigation].
36
37 3) create a share called [netlogon] in your smb.conf. This share should
38    be readable by all users, and probably should not be writeable. This
39    share will hold your network logon scripts, and the CONFIG.POL file
40    (Note: for details on the CONFIG.POL file, refer to the Microsoft
41    Windows NT Administration documentation.  The format of these files
42    is not known, so you will need to use Microsoft tools.)
43
44 For example I have used:
45
46    [netlogon]
47     path = /data/dos/netlogon
48     writeable = no
49     guest ok = yes
50
51 Note that it is important that this share is not writeable by ordinary
52 users, in a secure environment: ordinary users should not be allowed
53 to modify or add files that another user's computer would then download
54 when they log in.
55
56 4) in the [global] section of smb.conf set the following:
57
58    domain logons = yes
59    logon script = %U.bat
60
61 the choice of batch file is, of course, up to you. The above would
62 give each user a separate batch file as the %U will be changed to
63 their username automatically. The other standard % macros may also be
64 used. You can make the batch files come from a subdirectory by using
65 something like:
66
67    logon script = scripts\%U.bat
68
69 5) create the batch files to be run when the user logs in. If the batch
70    file doesn't exist then no batch file will be run. 
71
72 In the batch files you need to be careful to use DOS style cr/lf line
73 endings. If you don't then DOS may get confused. I suggest you use a
74 DOS editor to remotely edit the files if you don't know how to produce
75 DOS style files under unix.
76
77 6) Use smbclient with the -U option for some users to make sure that
78    the \\server\NETLOGON share is available, the batch files are
79    visible and they are readable by the users.
80
81 7) you will probabaly find that your clients automatically mount the
82    \\SERVER\NETLOGON share as drive z: while logging in. You can put
83    some useful programs there to execute from the batch files.
84
85 NOTE: You must be using "security = user" or "security = server" for
86 domain logons to work correctly. Share level security won't work
87 correctly.
88
89
90
91 Configuration Instructions:     Setting up Roaming User Profiles
92 ================================================================
93
94 1) in the [global] section of smb.conf set the following:
95
96   logon path = \\profileserver\profileshare\profilepath\%U
97
98 The default for this option is \\%L\%U, namely \\sambaserver\username,
99 The \\L%\%U services is created automatically by the [homes] service.
100
101 If you are using a samba server for the profiles, you _must_ make the
102 share specified in the logon path browseable.  Windows 95 appears to
103 check that it can see the share and any subdirectories within that share
104 specified by the logon path option, rather than just connecting straight
105 away.  
106
107 When a user first logs in on Windows 95, the file user.dat is created,
108 as are folders "start menu", "desktop", "programs" and "nethood".  
109 These directories and their contents will be merged with the local
110 versions stored in c:\windows\profiles\username on subsequent logins,
111 taking the most recent from each.  You will need to use the [global]
112 options "preserve case = yes", "short case preserve = yes" and
113 "case sensitive = no" in order to maintain capital letters in shortcuts
114 in any of the profile folders.
115
116 The user.dat file contains all the user's preferences.  If you wish to
117 enforce a set of preferences, rename their user.dat file to user.man,
118 and deny them write access to the file.
119
120 2) On the Windows 95 machine, go to Control Panel | Passwords and
121    select the User Profiles tab.  Select the required level of
122    roaming preferences.  Press OK, but do _not_ allow the computer
123    to reboot.
124
125 3) On the Windows 95 machine, go to Control Panel | Network |
126    Client for Microsoft Networks | Preferences.  Select 'Log on to
127    NT Domain'.  Then, ensure that the Primary Logon is 'Client for
128    Microsoft Networks'.  Press OK, and this time allow the computer
129    to reboot.
130
131 [If you have the Primary Logon as 'Client for Novell Networks', then
132 the profiles and logon script will be downloaded from your Novell
133 Server.  If you have the Primary Logon as 'Windows Logon', then the
134 profiles will be loaded from the local machine - a bit against the
135 concept of roaming profiles, if you ask me].
136
137 You will now find that the Microsoft Networks Login box contains
138 [user, password, domain] instead of just [user, password].  Type in
139 the samba server's domain name (or any other domain known to exist),
140 user name and user's password.
141
142 Once the user has been successfully validated, the Windows 95 machine
143 will inform you that 'The user has not logged on before' and asks you
144 if you wish to save the user's preferences?  Select 'yes'.
145
146 Once the Windows 95 client comes up with the desktop, you should be able
147 to examine the contents of the directory specified in the "logon path"
148 (the default is \\samba_server\username) and verify that the "desktop",
149 "start menu", "programs" and "nethood" folders have been created.
150
151 These folders will be cached locally on the client, and updated when
152 the user logs off (if you haven't made them read-only by then :-).
153 If you make the folders read-only, then you will find that if the user
154 creates further folders or short-cuts, that the client will merge the
155 profile contents downloaded with the contents of the profile directory
156 already on the local client, taking the newest folders and short-cuts
157 from each set.
158
159
160 If you have problems creating user profiles, you can reset the user's
161 local desktop cache, as shown below.  When this user then next logs in,
162 they will be told that they are logging in "for the first time".
163
164
165 1) instead of logging in under the [user, password, domain] dialog],
166    press escape.
167
168 2) run the regedit.exe program, and look in:
169
170      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Windows\CurrentVersion\ProfileList
171
172    you will find an entry, for each user, of ProfilePath.  Note the
173    contents of this key (likely to be c:\windows\profiles\username),
174    then delete the key ProfilePath for the required user.
175
176    [Exit the registry editor].
177
178 3) WARNING - before deleting the contents of the directory listed in
179    the ProfilePath (this is likely to be c:\windows\profiles\username),
180    ask them if they have any important files stored on their desktop
181    or in their start menu.  delete the contents of the directory
182    ProfilePath (making a backup if any of the files are needed).
183
184    This will have the effect of removing the local (read-only hidden
185    system file) user.dat in their profile directory, as well as the
186    local "desktop", "nethood", "start menu" and "programs" folders.
187
188 4) search for the user's .PWL password-cacheing file in the c:\windows
189    directory, and delete it.
190
191 5) log off the windows 95 client.
192
193 6) check the contents of the profile path (see "logon path" described
194    above), and delete the user.dat or user.man file for the user,
195    making a backup if required.  
196
197
198 If all else fails, increase samba's debug log levels to between 3 and 10,
199 and / or run a packet trace program such as tcpdump or netmon.exe, and
200 look for any error reports.
201
202 If you have access to an NT server, then first set up roaming profiles
203 and / or netlogons on the NT server.  Make a packet trace, or examine
204 the example packet traces provided with NT server, and see what the
205 differences are with the equivalent samba trace.
206