Doc updates
[kai/samba.git] / docs / samba.faq
1
2                            Frequently Asked Questions
3
4                                     about the
5
6                                    SAMBA Suite
7
8                   (FAQ version 1.9.15a, Samba version 1.09.15)
9
10 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
11
12 This FAQ was originally prepared by Karl Auer (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au) and is
13 currently maintained by Paul Blackman (ictinus@lake.canberra.edu.au).
14
15 As Karl originally said, 'this FAQ was prepared with lots of help from numerous
16 net.helpers', and that's the way I'd like to keep it. So if you find anything
17 that you think should be in here don't hesitate to contact me.
18
19 Thanks to Karl for the work he's done, and continuing thanks to Andrew Tridgell
20 for developing Samba.
21
22 Note: This FAQ is (and probably always will be) under construction. Some
23 sections exist only as optimistic entries in the Contents page.
24
25 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
26
27 Contents
28
29      * SECTION ONE: General information
30           All about Samba - what it is, how to get it, related sources of
31           information.
32      * SECTION TWO: Compiling and installing Samba on a Unix host
33           Common problems that arise when building and installing Samba under
34           Unix.
35      * SECTION THREE: Common client problems
36           Common problems that arise when trying to communicate from a client
37           computer to a Samba server. All problems which have symptoms you see
38           at the client end will be in this section.
39      * SECTION FOUR: Specific client problems
40           This section covers problems that are specific to certain clients,
41           such as Windows for Workgroups or Windows NT. Please check Section
42           Three first!
43      * SECTION FIVE: Specific client application problems
44           This section covers problems that are specific to certain products,
45           such as Windows for Workgroups or Windows NT. Please check Sections
46           Three and Four first!
47      * SECTION SIX: Miscellaneous
48           All the questions that aren't classifiable into any other section.
49
50
51 ===============================================================================
52 SECTION ONE: General information
53 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
54 * 1: What is Samba?
55
56 Samba is a suite of programs which work together to allow clients to access
57 to a server's filespace and printers via the SMB (Session Message Block) 
58 protocol. Initially written for Unix, Samba now also runs on Netware, OS/2 and
59 AmigaDOS.
60
61 In practice, this means that you can redirect disks and printers to Unix disks
62 and printers from Lan Manager clients, Windows for Workgroups 3.11 clients,
63 Windows NT clients, Linux clients and OS/2 clients. There is also a generic 
64 Unix client program supplied as part of the suite which allows Unix users to 
65 use an ftp-like interface to access filespace and printers on any other SMB 
66 servers. This gives the capability for these operating systems to behave much
67 like a LAN Server or Windows NT Server machine, only with added functionality
68 and flexibility designed to make life easier for administrators.
69
70 The components of the suite are (in summary):
71
72      * smbd, the SMB server. This handles actual connections from clients,
73          doing all the file, permission and username work
74      * nmbd, the Netbios name server, which helps clients locate servers,
75          doing the browsing work and managing domains as this capability is
76          being built into Samba
77      * smbclient, the Unix-hosted client program
78      * smbrun, a little 'glue' program to help the server run external
79          programs
80      * testprns, a program to test server access to printers
81      * testparms, a program to test the Samba configuration file for
82          correctness
83      * smb.conf, the Samba configuration file
84      * smbprint, a sample script to allow a Unix host to use smbclient to
85          print to an SMB server
86      * documentation! DON'T neglect to read it - you will save a great deal
87          of time!
88
89 The suite is supplied with full source (of course!) and is GPLed.
90
91 The primary creator of the Samba suite is Andrew Tridgell. Later versions
92 incorporate much effort by many net.helpers. The man pages and this FAQ were
93 originally written by Karl Auer.
94
95 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
96 * 2: What is the current version of Samba?
97
98 At time of writing, the current version was 1.9.16. If you want to be sure
99 check the bottom of the change-log file. 
100 (ftp://samba.anu.edu.au/pub/samba/alpha/change-log)
101
102 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
103 * 3: Where can I get it?
104
105 The Samba suite is available via anonymous ftp from samba.anu.edu.au. The
106 latest and greatest versions of the suite are in the directory:
107
108 /pub/samba/
109
110 Development (read "alpha") versions, which are NOT necessarily stable and which
111 do NOT necessarily have accurate documentation, are available in the directory:
112
113 /pub/samba/alpha
114
115 Note that binaries are NOT included in any of the above. Samba is distributed
116 ONLY in source form, though binaries may be available from other sites. Recent
117 versions of some Linux distributions, for example, do contain Samba binaries
118 for that platform.
119
120 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
121 * 4: What platforms are supported?
122
123 Many different platforms have run Samba successfully. The platforms most widely
124 used and thus best tested are Linux and SunOS.
125
126 At time of writing, the Makefile claimed support for:
127
128      * SunOS
129      * Linux with shadow passwords
130      * Linux without shadow passwords
131      * SOLARIS
132      * SOLARIS 2.2 and above (aka SunOS 5)
133      * SVR4
134      * ULTRIX
135      * OSF1 (alpha only)
136      * OSF1 with NIS and Fast Crypt (alpha only)
137      * OSF1 V2.0 Enhanced Security (alpha only)
138      * AIX
139      * BSDI
140      * NetBSD
141      * NetBSD 1.0
142      * SEQUENT
143      * HP-UX
144      * SGI
145      * SGI IRIX 4.x.x
146      * SGI IRIX 5.x.x
147      * FreeBSD
148      * NeXT 3.2 and above
149      * NeXT OS 2.x
150      * NeXT OS 3.0
151      * ISC SVR3V4 (POSIX mode)
152      * ISC SVR3V4 (iBCS2 mode)
153      * A/UX 3.0
154      * SCO with shadow passwords.
155      * SCO with shadow passwords, without YP.
156      * SCO with TCB passwords
157      * SCO 3.2v2 (ODT 1.1) with TCP passwords
158      * intergraph
159      * DGUX
160      * Apollo Domain/OS sr10.3 (BSD4.3)
161
162 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
163 * 5: How can I find out more about Samba?
164
165 There are two mailing lists devoted to discussion of Samba-related matters.
166 There is also the newsgroup, comp.protocols.smb, which has a great deal of
167 discussion on Samba. There is also a WWW site 'SAMBA Web Pages' at
168 http://samba.canberra.edu.au/pub/samba/samba.html, under which there is a 
169 comprehensive survey of Samba users. Another useful resource is the hypertext
170 archive of the Samba mailing list.
171
172 Send email to listproc@anu.edu.au. Make sure the subject line is blank, and
173 include the following two lines in the body of the message:
174
175       subscribe samba Firstname Lastname
176       subscribe samba-announce Firstname Lastname
177
178 Obviously you should substitute YOUR first name for "Firstname" and YOUR last
179 name for "Lastname"! Try not to send any signature stuff, it sometimes confuses
180 the list processor.
181
182 The samba list is a digest list - every eight hours or so it regurgitates a
183 single message containing all the messages that have been received by the list
184 since the last time and sends a copy of this message to all subscribers.
185
186 If you stop being interested in Samba, please send another email to
187 listproc@anu.edu.au. Make sure the subject line is blank, and include the
188 following two lines in the body of the message:
189
190       unsubscribe samba
191       unsubscribe samba-announce
192
193 The From: line in your message MUST be the same address you used when you
194 subscribed.
195
196 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
197 * 6: Something's gone wrong - what should I do?
198
199 [#] *** IMPORTANT! *** [#]
200 DO NOT post messages on mailing lists or in newsgroups until you have carried
201 out the first three steps given here!
202
203 Firstly, see if there are any likely looking entries in this FAQ! If you have
204 just installed Samba, have you run through the checklist in DIAGNOSIS.txt? It
205 can save you a lot of time and effort.
206
207 Secondly, read the man pages for smbd, nmbd and smb.conf, looking for topics
208 that relate to what you are trying to do.
209
210 Thirdly, if there is no obvious solution to hand, try to get a look at the log
211 files for smbd and/or nmbd for the period during which you were having
212 problems. You may need to reconfigure the servers to provide more extensive
213 debugging information - usually level 2 or level 3 provide ample debugging
214 info. Inspect these logs closely, looking particularly for the string "Error:".
215
216 Fourthly, if you still haven't got anywhere, ask the mailing list or newsgroup.
217 In general nobody minds answering questions provided you have followed the
218 preceding steps. It might be a good idea to scan the archives of the mailing
219 list, which are available through the Samba web site described in the previous
220 section.
221
222 If you successfully solve a problem, please mail the FAQ maintainer a succinct 
223 description of the symptom, the problem and the solution, so I can incorporate 
224 it in the next version.
225
226 If you make changes to the source code, _please_ submit these patches so that
227 everyone else gets the benefit of your work. This is one of the most important
228 aspects to the maintainence of Samba. Send all patches to 
229 samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au, not Andrew Tridgell or any other individual. 
230
231 ===============================================================================
232 SECTION TWO: Compiling and installing Samba on a Unix host
233 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
234
235
236 ===============================================================================
237 SECTION THREE: Common client problems
238 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
239 * 1: I can't see the Samba server in any browse lists!
240
241 *** Until the FAQ can be updated, please check the file:
242 *** ftp://samba.anu.edu.au/pub/samba/BROWSING.txt
243 *** for more information on browsing. 
244
245 If your GUI client does not permit you to select non-browsable servers, you may
246 need to do so on the command line. For example, under Lan Manager you might
247 connect to the above service as disk drive M: thusly:
248
249    net use M: \\mary\fred
250
251 The details of how to do this and the specific syntax varies from client to
252 client - check your client's documentation.
253
254 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
255 * 2: Some files that I KNOW are on the server doesn't show up when I view the
256      directories from my client!
257
258 If you check what files are not showing up, you will note that they are files
259 which contain upper case letters or which are otherwise not DOS-compatible (ie,
260 they are not legal DOS filenames for some reason).
261
262 The Samba server can be configured either to ignore such files completely, or
263 to present them to the client in "mangled" form. If you are not seeing the
264 files at all, the Samba server has most likely been configured to ignore them.
265 Consult the man page smb.conf(5) for details of how to change this - the
266 parameter you need to set is "mangled names = yes".
267
268 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
269 * 3: Some files on the server show up with really wierd filenames when I view
270 the directories from my client!
271
272 If you check what files are showing up wierd, you will note that they are files
273 which contain upper case letters or which are otherwise not DOS-compatible (ie,
274 they are not legal DOS filenames for some reason).
275
276 The Samba server can be configured either to ignore such files completely, or
277 to present them to the client in "mangled" form. If you are seeing strange file
278 names, they are most likely "mangled". If you would prefer to have such files
279 ignored rather than presented in "mangled" form, consult the man page
280 smb.conf(5) for details of how to change the server configuration - the
281 parameter you need to set is "mangled names = no".
282
283 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
284 * 4: My client reports "cannot locate specified computer" or similar.
285
286 This indicates one of three things: You supplied an incorrect server name, the
287 underlying TCP/IP layer is not working correctly, or the name you specified
288 cannot be resolved.
289
290 After carefully checking that the name you typed is the name you should have
291 typed, try doing things like pinging a host or telnetting to somewhere on your
292 network to see if TCP/IP is functioning OK. If it is, the problem is most
293 likely name resolution.
294
295 If your client has a facility to do so, hardcode a mapping between the hosts IP
296 and the name you want to use. For example, with Man Manager or Windows for
297 Workgroups you would put a suitable entry in the file LMHOSTS. If this works,
298 the problem is in the communication between your client and the netbios name
299 server. If it does not work, then there is something fundamental wrong with
300 your naming and the solution is beyond the scope of this document.
301
302 If you do not have any server on your subnet supplying netbios name resolution,
303 hardcoded mappings are your only option. If you DO have a netbios name server
304 running (such as the Samba suite's nmbd program), the problem probably lies in
305 the way it is set up. Refer to Section Two of this FAQ for more ideas.
306
307 By the way, remember to REMOVE the hardcoded mapping before further tests :-)
308
309 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
310 * 5: My client reports "cannot locate specified share name" or similar.
311
312 This message indicates that your client CAN locate the specified server, which
313 is a good start, but that it cannot find a service of the name you gave.
314
315 The first step is to check the exact name of the service you are trying to
316 connect to (consult your system administrator). Assuming it exists and you
317 specified it correctly (read your client's doco on how to specify a service
318 name correctly), read on:
319
320      * Many clients cannot accept or use service names longer than eight
321          characters.
322      * Many clients cannot accept or use service names containing spaces.
323      * Some servers (not Samba though) are case sensitive with service names.
324      * Some clients force service names into upper case.
325
326 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
327 * 6: My client reports "cannot find domain controller", "cannot log on to the
328 network" or similar.
329
330 Nothing is wrong - Samba does not implement the primary domain name controller
331 stuff for several reasons, including the fact that the whole concept of a
332 primary domain controller and "logging in to a network" doesn't fit well with
333 clients possibly running on multiuser machines (such as users of smbclient
334 under Unix). Having said that, several developers are working hard on 
335 building it in to the next major version of Samba. If you can contribute, 
336 send a message to samba-bugs!
337
338 Seeing this message should not affect your ability to mount redirected disks
339 and printers, which is really what all this is about.
340
341 For many clients (including Windows for Workgroups and Lan Manager), setting
342 the domain to STANDALONE at least gets rid of the message.
343
344 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
345 * 7: Printing doesn't work :-(
346
347 Make sure that the specified print command for the service you are connecting
348 to is correct and that it has a fully-qualified path (eg., use "/usr/bin/lpr"
349 rather than just "lpr").
350
351 Make sure that the spool directory specified for the service is writable by the
352 user connected to the service. In particular the user "nobody" often has
353 problems with printing, even if it worked with an earlier version of Samba. Try
354 creating another guest user other than "nobody".
355
356 Make sure that the user specified in the service is permitted to use the
357 printer.
358
359 Check the debug log produced by smbd. Search for the printer name and see if
360 the log turns up any clues. Note that error messages to do with a service ipc$
361 are meaningless - they relate to the way the client attempts to retrieve status
362 information when using the LANMAN1 protocol.
363
364 If using WfWg then you need to set the default protocol to TCP/IP, not Netbeui.
365 This is a WfWg bug.
366
367 If using the Lanman1 protocol (the default) then try switching to coreplus.
368 Also not that print status error messages don't mean printing won't work. The
369 print status is received by a different mechanism.
370
371 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
372 * 8: My programs install on the server OK, but refuse to work properly.
373
374 There are numerous possible reasons for this, but one MAJOR possibility is that
375 your software uses locking. Make sure you are using Samba 1.6.11 or later. It
376 may also be possible to work around the problem by setting "locking=no" in the
377 Samba configuration file for the service the software is installed on. This
378 should be regarded as a strictly temporary solution.
379
380 In earlier Samba versions there were some difficulties with the very latest
381 Microsoft products, particularly Excel 5 and Word for Windows 6. These should
382 have all been solved. If not then please let Andrew Tridgell know.
383
384 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
385 * 9: My "server string" doesn't seem to be recognized, my client reports the
386      default setting, eg. "Samba 1.9.15p4", instead of what I have changed it
387      to in the smb.conf file.
388  
389 You need to use the -C option in nmbd. The "server string" affects
390 what smbd puts out and -C affects what nmbd puts out. In a future
391 version these will probably be combined and -C will be removed, but
392 for now use -C
393
394 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
395 * 10: When I attempt to get a listing of available resources from the Samba
396       server, my client reports
397       "This server is not configured to list shared resources".
398
399 Your guest account is probably invalid for some reason. Samba uses
400 the guest account for browsing in smbd.  Check that your guest account is
401 valid.
402
403 See also 'guest account' in smb.conf man page.
404
405
406 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
407 * 11: You get the message "you appear to have a trapdoor uid system"
408       in your logs
409
410 This can have several causes. It might be because you are using a uid
411 or gid of 65535 or -1. This is a VERY bad idea, and is a big security
412 hole. Check carefully in your /etc/passwd file and make sure that no
413 user has uid 65535 or -1. Especially check the "nobody" user, as many
414 broken systems are shipped with nobody setup with a uid of 65535.
415
416 It might also mean that your OS has a trapdoor uid/gid system :-)
417
418 This means that once a process changes effective uid from root to
419 another user it can't go back to root. Unfortunately Samba relies on
420 being able to change effective uid from root to non-root and back
421 again to implement its security policy. If your OS has a trapdoor uid
422 system this won't work, and several things in Samba may break. Less
423 things will break if you use user or server level security instead of
424 the default share level security, but you may still strike
425 problems. 
426
427 The problems don't give rise to any security holes, so don't panic,
428 but it does mean some of Samba's capabilities will be unavailable.
429 In particular you will not be able to connect to the Samba server as
430 two different uids at once. This may happen if you try to print as a
431 "guest" while accessing a share as a normal user. It may also affect
432 your ability to list the available shares as this is normally done as
433 the guest user.
434
435 Complain to your OS vendor and ask them to fix their system.
436
437 Note: the reason why 65535 is a VERY bad choice of uid and gid is that
438 it casts to -1 as a uid, and the setreuid() system call ignores (with
439 no error) uid changes to -1. This means any daemon attempting to run
440 as uid 65535 will actually run as root. This is not good!
441
442 ===============================================================================
443 SECTION FOUR: Specific client problems
444 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
445 * 1: Are any MacIntosh clients for Samba.
446
447 In Rob Newberry's words (rob@eats.com, Sun, 4 Dec 1994):
448
449 The answer is "No." Samba speaks SMB, the protocol used for Microsoft networks.
450 The Macintosh has ALWAYS spoken Appletalk. Even with Microsoft "services for
451 Macintosh", it has been a matter of making the server speak Appletalk. It is
452 the same for Novell Netware and the Macintosh, although I believe Novell has
453 (VERY LATE) released an extension for the Mac to let it speak IPX.
454
455 In future Apple System Software, you may see support for other protocols, such
456 as SMB -- Applet is working on a new networking architecture that will make it
457 easier to support additional protocols. But it's not here yet.
458
459 Now, the nice part is that if you want your Unix machine to speak Appletalk,
460 there are several options. "Netatalk" and "CAP" are free, and available on the
461 net. There are also several commercial options, such as "PacerShare" and
462 "Helios" (I think). In any case, you'll have to look around for a server, not
463 anything for the Mac.
464
465 Depending on you OS, some of these may not help you. I am currently
466 coordinating the effort to get CAP working with Native Ethertalk under Linux,
467 but we're not done yet.
468
469 Rob
470
471 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
472 * 2: I am getting a "Session request failed (131,130)" error when I try to
473      connect to my Win95 PC with smbclient. I am able to connect from the PC
474      to the Samba server without problems. What gives?
475
476 The following answer is provided by John E. Miller:
477
478 I'll assume that you're able to ping back and forth between the machines by
479 IP address and name, and that you're using some security model where you're
480 confident that you've got user IDs and passwords right.  The logging options
481 (-d3 or greater) can help a lot with that.  DNS and WINS configuration can
482 also impact connectivity as well.
483
484 Now, on to 'scope id's.  Somewhere in your Win95 TCP/IP network configuration
485 (I'm too much of an NT bigot to know where it's located in the Win95 setup,
486 but I'll have to learn someday since I teach for a Microsoft Solution Provider
487 Authorized Tech Education Center - what an acronym...) [Note: It's under
488 Control Panel | Network | TCP/IP | WINS Configuration] there's a little text
489 entry field called something like 'Scope ID'. 
490
491 This field essentially creates 'invisible' sub-workgroups on the same wire.
492 Boxes can only see other boxes whose Scope IDs are set to the exact same
493 value - it's sometimes used by OEMs to configure their boxes to browse only
494 other boxes from the same vendor and, in most environments, this field should
495 be left blank.  If you, in fact, have something in this box that EXACT value
496 (case-sensitive!) needs to be provided to smbclient and nmbd as the -i 
497 (lowercase) parameter. So, if your Scope ID is configured as the string
498 'SomeStr' in Win95 then you'd have to use smbclient -iSomeStr <otherparms>
499 in connecting to it.  
500
501 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
502 * 3: How do I synchronize my PC's clock with my Samba server? 
503
504 To syncronize your PC's clock with your Samba server:
505
506 * Copy timesync.pif to your windows directory
507   * timesync.pif can be found at:
508     http://samba.canberra.edu.au/pub/samba/binaries/miscellaneous/timesync.pif
509 * Add timesync.pif to your 'Start Up' group/folder
510 * Open the properties dialog box for the program/icon
511   * Make sure the 'Run Minimized' option is set in program 'Properties' 
512   * Change the command line section that reads \\sambahost to reflect the name
513     of your server.
514 * Close the properties dialog box by choosing 'OK'
515
516 Each time you start your computer (or login for Win95) your PC will
517 synchronize it's clock with your Samba server.
518
519
520 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
521 * 4: Problems with WinDD, NTrigue, WinCenterPro etc
522
523 All of the above programs are applications that sit on an NT box and
524 allow multiple users to access the NT GUI applications from remote
525 workstations (often over X).
526
527 What has this got to do with Samba? The problem comes when these users
528 use filemanager to mount shares from a Samba server. The most common
529 symptom is that the first user to connect get correct file permissions
530 and has a nice day, but subsequent connections get logged in as the
531 same user as the first person to login. They find that they cannot
532 access files in their own home directory, but that they can access
533 files in the first users home directory (maybe not such a nice day
534 after all?)
535
536 Why does this happen? The above products all share a common heritage
537 (and code base I believe). They all open just a single TCP based SMB
538 connection to the Samba server, and requests from all users are piped
539 over this connection. This is unfortunate, but not fatal.
540
541 It means that if you run your Samba server in share level security
542 (the default) then things will definately break as described above. The
543 share level SMB security model has no provision for multiple user IDs
544 on the one SMB connection. See security_level.txt in the docs for more
545 info on share/user/server level security.
546
547 If you run in user or server level security then you have a chance,
548 but only if you have a recent version of Samba (at least 1.9.15p6). In
549 older versions bugs in Samba meant you still would have had problems.
550
551 If you have a trapdoor uid system in your OS then it will never work
552 properly. Samba needs to be able to switch uids on the connection and
553 it can't if your OS has a trapdoor uid system. You'll know this
554 because Samba will note it in your logs.
555
556 Also note that you should not use the magic "homes" share name with
557 products like these, as otherwise all users will end up with the same
558 home directory. Use \\server\username instead.
559
560 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
561 * 5: Problem with printers under NT
562
563 This info from Stefan Hergeth may be useful:
564
565  A network-printer (with ethernetcard) is connected to the NT-Clients via
566  our UNIX-Fileserver (SAMBA-Server), like the configuration told by
567  Matthew Harrell <harrell@leech.nrl.navy.mil> (see WinNT.txt)
568
569  1.) If a user has choosen this printer as the default printer in his
570      NT-Session and this printer is not connected to the network
571      (e.g. switched off) than this user has a problem with the SAMBA-
572      connection of his filesystems. It's very slow.
573
574  2.) If the printer is connected to the network everything works fine.
575
576  3.) When the smbd ist started with debug level 3, you can see that the
577      NT spooling system try to connect to the printer many times. If the
578      printer ist not connected to the network this request fails and the
579      NT spooler is wasting a lot of time to connect to the printer service.
580      This seems to be the reason for the slow network connection.
581
582  4.) Maybe it's possible to change this behaviour by setting different printer
583      properties in the Print-Manager-Menu of NT, but i didn't try it
584      yet.
585
586  I hope this information will help in some way.
587
588  Stefan Hergeth <hergeth@f7axp1.informatik.fh-muenchen.de>
589
590 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
591 * 6: Why are my file's timestamps off by an hour, or by a few hours? 
592
593 This is from Paul Eggert <eggert@twinsun.com>.
594
595 Most likely it's a problem with your time zone settings.
596
597 Internally, Samba maintains time in traditional Unix format,
598 namely, the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 Universal Time
599 (or ``GMT''), not counting leap seconds.
600
601 On the server side, Samba uses the Unix TZ variable to convert internal
602 timestamps to and from local time.  So on the server side, there are two
603 things to get right.
604
605         1.  The Unix system clock must have the correct Universal time.
606         Use the shell command "sh -c 'TZ=UTC0 date'" to check this.
607
608         2.  The TZ environment variable must be set on the server
609         before Samba is invoked.  The details of this depend on the
610         server OS, but typically you must edit a file whose name is
611         /etc/TIMEZONE or /etc/default/init, or run the command `zic -l'.
612
613         3.  TZ must have the correct value.
614         
615                 3a.  If possible, use geographical time zone settings
616                 (e.g. TZ='America/Los_Angeles' or perhaps
617                 TZ=':US/Pacific').  These are supported by most
618                 popular Unix OSes, are easier to get right, and are
619                 more accurate for historical timestamps.  If your
620                 operating system has out-of-date tables, you should be
621                 able to update them from the public domain time zone
622                 tables at <URL:ftp://elsie.nci.nih.gov/pub/>.
623
624                 3b.  If your system does not support geographical time zone
625                 settings, you must use a Posix-style TZ strings, e.g.
626                 TZ='PST8PDT,M4.1.0/2,M10.5.0/2' for US Pacific time.
627                 Posix TZ strings can take the following form (with optional
628                 items in brackets):
629
630                         StdOffset[Dst[Offset],Date/Time,Date/Time]
631
632                 where:
633
634                         `Std' is the standard time designation (e.g. `PST').
635                 
636                         `Offset' is the number of hours behind UTC (e.g. `8').
637                         Prepend a `-' if you are ahead of UTC, and
638                         append `:30' if you are at a half-hour offset.
639                         Omit all the remaining items if you do not use
640                         daylight-saving time.
641                 
642                         `Dst' is the daylight-saving time designation
643                         (e.g. `PDT').
644
645                         The optional second `Offset' is the number of
646                         hours that daylight-saving time is behind UTC.
647                         The default is 1 hour ahead of standard time.
648
649                         `Date/Time,Date/Time' specify when daylight-saving
650                         time starts and ends.  The format for a date is
651                         `Mm.n.d', which specifies the dth day (0 is Sunday)
652                         of the nth week of the mth month, where week 5 means
653                         the last such day in the month.  The format for a
654                         time is [h]h[:mm[:ss]], using a 24-hour clock.
655
656                 Other Posix string formats are allowed but you don't want
657                 to know about them.
658
659 On the client side, you must make sure that your client's clock and
660 time zone is also set appropriately.  [[I don't know how to do this.]]
661
662 Samba traditionally has had many problems dealing with time zones, due
663 to the bizarre ways that Microsoft network protocols handle time
664 zones.  A common symptom is for file timestamps to be off by an hour.
665 To work around the problem, try disconnecting from your Samba server
666 and then reconnecting to it; or upgrade your Samba server to
667 1.9.16alpha10 or later.
668
669 ===============================================================================
670 SECTION FIVE: Specific client application problems
671 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
672 * 1: MS Office Setup reports "Cannot change properties of the file named:
673                                       X:\MSOFFICE\SETUP.INI"
674
675 When installing MS Office on a Samba drive for which you have admin user
676 permissions, ie. admin users = <username>, you will find the setup program
677 unable to complete the installation.
678
679 To get around this problem, do the installation without admin user permissions
680 The problem is that MS Office Setup checks that a file is rdonly by trying to
681 open it for writing.
682
683 Admin users can always open a file for writing, as they run as root. 
684 You just have to install as a non-admin user and then use "chown -R" to fix
685 the owner.
686
687 ===============================================================================
688 SECTION SIX: Miscellaneous
689 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
690
691
692 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
693 Maintained By Paul Blackman, Email:ictinus@lake.canberra.edu.au