Initial talk script.
authorKai Blin <kai.blin@biotech.uni-tuebingen.de>
Thu, 29 Dec 2011 12:50:48 +0000 (13:50 +0100)
committerKai Blin <kai.blin@biotech.uni-tuebingen.de>
Thu, 29 Dec 2011 12:50:48 +0000 (13:50 +0100)
script.txt [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/script.txt b/script.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1271320
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,45 @@
+Thank you xy for the kind introduction.
+Hi! Welcome to the biology section of LinuxConf.AU. If you want to learn about
+how new antibiotics are discovered, you've come to the right auditorium.
+
+I'm going to present antiSMASH, the software I'm developing as a Ph.D. project.
+It's open source software under the GNU GPLv3 (or later) and we're also running
+a public instance for the scientific community to use.
+
+But before I start talking about the software I'm working on, let me give you a
+short primer on the biology side of things. Without that background, the rest
+of the talk will be much harder to follow. Feel free to interrupt with
+questions at any time.
+
+As you might have seen on the first slide, I work in the Division for
+Microbiology/Biotechnology at the Microbiology Institute of the University of
+Tübingen, Germany. So, biotechnology, what is this all about?
+
+The United Nations "Convention on Biological Diversity" defines biotechnology
+as "Any technological application that uses biological systems, living
+organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for
+specific use". Quite a mouthful. But let me use a metaphor to build my
+explanations on.
+
+In biotechnology, we use biological systems such as bacteria or yeast, and then
+turn them into little factories to produce things we want. A popular example
+would be... beer. It's one of the oldest biotech applications on the planet. We
+use a certain kind of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to turn sugar into
+alcohol and carbon dioxide. Another widespread example is the use of a
+bacterium (Escherichia coli) to produce human insulin to treat people suffering
+from diabetes.
+
+Now, what's so nice about using those tiny organisms to produce these
+substances instead of going for an all-chemical full synthesis? Well, the first
+is that in some cases, like yeast producing ethanol, nature has already built
+that functionality into the organism. It's much easier to just let the yeast do
+it's thing that it would be to do the synthesis from scratch.
+
+Using bacteria to produce human insulin is a different story. The bacteria
+involved don't naturally produce insulin, they were engineered to do so.
+However, there's another reason we're using biological systems to produce
+stuff. Unlike a real factory, bacteria are self-reproducing. So if you provide
+enough food, a tiny amount of starter bacteria will multiply, and then you have
+a lot of little factories running your production line..
+
+