socket_wrapper: pass down sockaddr instead of sockaddr_in to prepare pcap support...
[jra/samba/.git] / README.Coding
index da6bb382078bfa4c49f13579797b60382102fb79..c1b6641a5aebf7de4d5e85d28cfd10403599e53c 100644 (file)
@@ -1,28 +1,27 @@
-##
-## Coding conventions in the Samba 3.0 tree
-##
+Coding conventions in the Samba tree
+------------------------------------
+
+.. contents::
 
 ===========
 Quick Start
 ===========
 
 Coding style guidelines are about reducing the number of unnecessary
-reformatting patches and making things easier developers to work together.
+reformatting patches and making things easier for developers to work together.
 You don't have to like them or even agree with them, but once put in place
 we all have to abide by them (or vote to change them).  However, coding
 style should never outweigh coding itself and so the the guidelines
-described here are hopefully easier enough to follow as they are very
+described here are hopefully easy enough to follow as they are very
 common and supported by tools and editors.
 
-The basic style, also mentioned in the SAMBA_4_0/prog_guide.txt is the
-Linux kernel coding style (See Documentation/CodingStyle in the kernel
-source tree).  The closely matches what most Samba developers use already
-anyways.
+The basic style, also mentioned in prog_guide4.txt, is the Linux kernel coding 
+style (See Documentation/CodingStyle in the kernel source tree). This closely 
+matches what most Samba developers use already anyways.
 
 But to save you the trouble of reading the Linux kernel style guide, here
 are the highlights.
 
-
 * Maximum Line Width is 80 Characters
   The reason is not for people with low-res screens but rather sticking
   to 80 columns prevents you from easily nesting more than one level of
@@ -59,14 +58,14 @@ Vi
 --
 (Thanks to SATOH Fumiyasu <fumiyas@osstech.jp> for these hints):
 
-For the basic vi editor including with all variants of *nix, add the 
+For the basic vi editor including with all variants of \*nix, add the 
 following to $HOME/.exrc:
 
   set tabstop=8
   set shiftwidth=8
 
 For Vim, the following settings in $HOME/.vimrc will also deal with 
-displaying trailing whitespace:
+displaying trailing whitespace::
 
   if has("syntax") && (&t_Co > 2 || has("gui_running"))
        syntax on
@@ -79,6 +78,11 @@ displaying trailing whitespace:
   " Show tabs, trailing whitespace, and continued lines visually
   set list listchars=tab:»·,trail:·,extends:…
 
+  " highlight overly long lines same as TODOs.
+  set textwidth=80
+  autocmd BufNewFile,BufRead *.c,*.h exec 'match Todo /\%>' . &textwidth . 'v.\+/'
+
+
 =========================
 FAQ & Statement Reference
 =========================
@@ -86,7 +90,7 @@ FAQ & Statement Reference
 Comments
 --------
 
-Comments should always use the standard C syntax.  I.e. /* ... */.  C++ 
+Comments should always use the standard C syntax.  C++ 
 style comments are not currently allowed.
 
 
@@ -140,7 +144,7 @@ The exception to the ending rule is when the closing brace is followed by
 another language keyword such as else or the closing while in a do..while 
 loop.
 
-Good examples:
+Good examples::
 
        if (x == 1) {
                printf("good\n");
@@ -157,7 +161,7 @@ Good examples:
                printf("also good\n");
        } while (1);
 
-Bad examples:
+Bad examples::
 
        while (1)
        {
@@ -168,33 +172,33 @@ Goto
 ----
 
 While many people have been academically taught that goto's are fundamentally
-evil, then can greatly enhance readability and reduce memory leaks when used
+evil, they can greatly enhance readability and reduce memory leaks when used
 as the single exit point from a function.  But in no Samba world what so ever 
 is a goto outside of a function or block of code a good idea.
 
-Good Examples:
+Good Examples::
 
-int function foo(int y)
-{
-       int *z = NULL;
-       int ret = 0;
-
-       if ( y < 10 ) {
-               z = malloc(sizeof(int)*y);
-               if (!z) {
-                       ret = 1;
-                       goto done;
+       int function foo(int y)
+       {
+               int *z = NULL;
+               int ret = 0;
+
+               if ( y < 10 ) {
+                       z = malloc(sizeof(int)*y);
+                       if (!z) {
+                               ret = 1;
+                               goto done;
+                       }
                }
-       }
 
-       print("Allocated %d elements.\n", y);
+               print("Allocated %d elements.\n", y);
 
- done: 
-       if (z)
-               free(z);
       done: 
+               if (z)
+                       free(z);
 
-       return ret;
-}
+               return ret;
+       }
 
 
 Checking Pointer Values
@@ -202,13 +206,13 @@ Checking Pointer Values
 
 When invoking functions that return pointer values, either of the following 
 are acceptable.  Use you best judgement and choose the more readable option.
-Remember that many other people will review it.
+Remember that many other people will review it.::
 
        if ((x = malloc(sizeof(short)*10)) == NULL ) {
                fprintf(stderr, "Unable to alloc memory!\n");
        }
 
-or
+or::
 
        x = malloc(sizeof(short)*10);
        if (!x) {