Move the talloc details to the mainpage.
authorAndreas Schneider <asn@redhat.com>
Sun, 7 Feb 2010 23:40:07 +0000 (00:40 +0100)
committerAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Mon, 8 Feb 2010 00:04:59 +0000 (11:04 +1100)
Signed-off-by: Andrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
lib/talloc/doc/mainpage.dox
lib/talloc/talloc.h

index 9629949124b1e2bc2b4e8ed265749cc4fd967398..3204e8a5c2622f58f512dd5baf070dbe6a1dece1 100644 (file)
  *
  * rsync -Pavz samba.org::ftp/unpacked/standalone_projects/lib/talloc .
  *
  *
  * rsync -Pavz samba.org::ftp/unpacked/standalone_projects/lib/talloc .
  *
+ * @section talloc_preample Preamble
+ *
+ * talloc is a hierarchical, reference counted memory pool system with
+ * destructors.
+ *
+ * Perhaps the biggest difference from other memory pool systems is that there
+ * is no distinction between a "talloc context" and a "talloc pointer". Any
+ * pointer returned from talloc() is itself a valid talloc context. This means
+ * you can do this:
+ *
+ * @code
+ *      struct foo *X = talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo);
+ *      X->name = talloc_strdup(X, "foo");
+ * @endcode
+ *
+ * The pointer X->name would be a "child" of the talloc context "X" which is
+ * itself a child of mem_ctx. So if you do talloc_free(mem_ctx) then it is all
+ * destroyed, whereas if you do talloc_free(X) then just X and X->name are
+ * destroyed, and if you do talloc_free(X->name) then just the name element of
+ * X is destroyed.
+ *
+ * If you think about this, then what this effectively gives you is an n-ary
+ * tree, where you can free any part of the tree with talloc_free().
+ *
+ * If you find this confusing, then run the testsuite to watch talloc in
+ * action. You may also like to add your own tests to testsuite.c to clarify
+ * how some particular situation is handled.
+ *
+ * @section talloc_performance Performance
+ *
+ * All the additional features of talloc() over malloc() do come at a price. We
+ * have a simple performance test in Samba4 that measures talloc() versus
+ * malloc() performance, and it seems that talloc() is about 4% slower than
+ * malloc() on my x86 Debian Linux box. For Samba, the great reduction in code
+ * complexity that we get by using talloc makes this worthwhile, especially as
+ * the total overhead of talloc/malloc in Samba is already quite small.
+ *
+ * @section talloc_named Named blocks
+ *
+ * Every talloc chunk has a name that can be used as a dynamic type-checking
+ * system. If for some reason like a callback function you had to cast a
+ * "struct foo *" to a "void *" variable, later you can safely reassign the
+ * "void *" pointer to a "struct foo *" by using the talloc_get_type() or
+ * talloc_get_type_abort() macros.
+ *
+ * @code
+ *      struct foo *X = talloc_get_type_abort(ptr, struct foo);
+ * @endcode
+ *
+ * This will abort if "ptr" does not contain a pointer that has been created
+ * with talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo).
+ *
+ * @section talloc_threading Multi-threading
+ *
+ * talloc itself does not deal with threads. It is thread-safe (assuming the
+ * underlying "malloc" is), as long as each thread uses different memory
+ * contexts.
+ *
+ * If two threads uses the same context then they need to synchronize in order
+ * to be safe. In particular:
+ *
+ *   - when using talloc_enable_leak_report(), giving directly NULL as a parent
+ *     context implicitly refers to a hidden "null context" global variable, so
+ *     this should not be used in a multi-threaded environment without proper
+ *     synchronization.
+ *   - the context returned by talloc_autofree_context() is also global so
+ *     shouldn't be used by several threads simultaneously without
+ *     synchronization.
+ *
  */
  */
index 17f7dc10600edb11e8340deb0ff30c4c8cac61e8..349209070a6c72eae02a71a0bd140a9aaeec6636 100644 (file)
  * talloc is a hierarchical, reference counted memory pool system with
  * destructors. It is the core memory allocator used in Samba.
  *
  * talloc is a hierarchical, reference counted memory pool system with
  * destructors. It is the core memory allocator used in Samba.
  *
- * Perhaps the biggest difference from other memory pool systems is that there
- * is no distinction between a "talloc context" and a "talloc pointer". Any
- * pointer returned from talloc() is itself a valid talloc context. This means
- * you can do this:
- *
- * @code
- *      struct foo *X = talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo);
- *      X->name = talloc_strdup(X, "foo");
- * @endcode
- *
- * The pointer X->name would be a "child" of the talloc context "X" which is
- * itself a child of mem_ctx. So if you do talloc_free(mem_ctx) then it is all
- * destroyed, whereas if you do talloc_free(X) then just X and X->name are
- * destroyed, and if you do talloc_free(X->name) then just the name element of
- * X is destroyed.
- *
- * If you think about this, then what this effectively gives you is an n-ary
- * tree, where you can free any part of the tree with talloc_free().
- *
- * If you find this confusing, then run the testsuite to watch talloc in
- * action. You may also like to add your own tests to testsuite.c to clarify
- * how some particular situation is handled.
- *
- * @section talloc_performance Performance
- *
- * All the additional features of talloc() over malloc() do come at a price. We
- * have a simple performance test in Samba4 that measures talloc() versus
- * malloc() performance, and it seems that talloc() is about 4% slower than
- * malloc() on my x86 Debian Linux box. For Samba, the great reduction in code
- * complexity that we get by using talloc makes this worthwhile, especially as
- * the total overhead of talloc/malloc in Samba is already quite small.
- *
- * @section talloc_named Named blocks
- *
- * Every talloc chunk has a name that can be used as a dynamic type-checking
- * system. If for some reason like a callback function you had to cast a
- * "struct foo *" to a "void *" variable, later you can safely reassign the
- * "void *" pointer to a "struct foo *" by using the talloc_get_type() or
- * talloc_get_type_abort() macros.
- *
- * @code
- *      struct foo *X = talloc_get_type_abort(ptr, struct foo);
- * @endcode
- *
- * This will abort if "ptr" does not contain a pointer that has been created
- * with talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo).
- *
- * @section talloc_threading Multi-threading
- *
- * talloc itself does not deal with threads. It is thread-safe (assuming the
- * underlying "malloc" is), as long as each thread uses different memory
- * contexts.
- *
- * If two threads uses the same context then they need to synchronize in order
- * to be safe. In particular:
- *
- *   - when using talloc_enable_leak_report(), giving directly NULL as a parent
- *     context implicitly refers to a hidden "null context" global variable, so
- *     this should not be used in a multi-threaded environment without proper
- *     synchronization.
- *   - the context returned by talloc_autofree_context() is also global so
- *     shouldn't be used by several threads simultaneously without
- *     synchronization.
- *
  * @{
  */
 
  * @{
  */