Move the talloc details to the mainpage.
[ira/wip.git] / lib / talloc / doc / mainpage.dox
1 /**
2  * @mainpage
3  *
4  * talloc is a hierarchical, reference counted memory pool system with
5  * destructors. It is the core memory allocator used in Samba.
6  *
7  * @section talloc_download Download
8  *
9  * You can download the latest releases of talloc from the
10  * <a href="http://samba.org/ftp/talloc" target="_blank">talloc directory</a>
11  * on the samba public source archive.
12  *
13  * @section talloc_bugs Discussion and bug reports
14  *
15  * talloc does not currently have its own mailing list or bug tracking system.
16  * For now, please use the
17  * <a href="https://lists.samba.org/mailman/listinfo/samba-technical" target="_blank">samba-technical</a>
18  * mailing list, and the
19  * <a href="http://bugzilla.samba.org/" target="_blank">Samba bugzilla</a>
20  * bug tracking system.
21  *
22  * @section talloc_devel Development
23  * You can download the latest code either via git or rsync.
24  *
25  * To fetch via git see the following guide:
26  *
27  * <a href="http://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Using_Git_for_Samba_Development" target="_blank">Using Git for Samba Development</a>
28  *
29  * Once you have cloned the tree switch to the master branch and cd into the
30  * lib/tevent directory.
31  *
32  * To fetch via rsync use this command:
33  *
34  * rsync -Pavz samba.org::ftp/unpacked/standalone_projects/lib/talloc .
35  *
36  * @section talloc_preample Preamble
37  *
38  * talloc is a hierarchical, reference counted memory pool system with
39  * destructors.
40  *
41  * Perhaps the biggest difference from other memory pool systems is that there
42  * is no distinction between a "talloc context" and a "talloc pointer". Any
43  * pointer returned from talloc() is itself a valid talloc context. This means
44  * you can do this:
45  *
46  * @code
47  *      struct foo *X = talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo);
48  *      X->name = talloc_strdup(X, "foo");
49  * @endcode
50  *
51  * The pointer X->name would be a "child" of the talloc context "X" which is
52  * itself a child of mem_ctx. So if you do talloc_free(mem_ctx) then it is all
53  * destroyed, whereas if you do talloc_free(X) then just X and X->name are
54  * destroyed, and if you do talloc_free(X->name) then just the name element of
55  * X is destroyed.
56  *
57  * If you think about this, then what this effectively gives you is an n-ary
58  * tree, where you can free any part of the tree with talloc_free().
59  *
60  * If you find this confusing, then run the testsuite to watch talloc in
61  * action. You may also like to add your own tests to testsuite.c to clarify
62  * how some particular situation is handled.
63  *
64  * @section talloc_performance Performance
65  *
66  * All the additional features of talloc() over malloc() do come at a price. We
67  * have a simple performance test in Samba4 that measures talloc() versus
68  * malloc() performance, and it seems that talloc() is about 4% slower than
69  * malloc() on my x86 Debian Linux box. For Samba, the great reduction in code
70  * complexity that we get by using talloc makes this worthwhile, especially as
71  * the total overhead of talloc/malloc in Samba is already quite small.
72  *
73  * @section talloc_named Named blocks
74  *
75  * Every talloc chunk has a name that can be used as a dynamic type-checking
76  * system. If for some reason like a callback function you had to cast a
77  * "struct foo *" to a "void *" variable, later you can safely reassign the
78  * "void *" pointer to a "struct foo *" by using the talloc_get_type() or
79  * talloc_get_type_abort() macros.
80  *
81  * @code
82  *      struct foo *X = talloc_get_type_abort(ptr, struct foo);
83  * @endcode
84  *
85  * This will abort if "ptr" does not contain a pointer that has been created
86  * with talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo).
87  *
88  * @section talloc_threading Multi-threading
89  *
90  * talloc itself does not deal with threads. It is thread-safe (assuming the
91  * underlying "malloc" is), as long as each thread uses different memory
92  * contexts.
93  *
94  * If two threads uses the same context then they need to synchronize in order
95  * to be safe. In particular:
96  *
97  *   - when using talloc_enable_leak_report(), giving directly NULL as a parent
98  *     context implicitly refers to a hidden "null context" global variable, so
99  *     this should not be used in a multi-threaded environment without proper
100  *     synchronization.
101  *   - the context returned by talloc_autofree_context() is also global so
102  *     shouldn't be used by several threads simultaneously without
103  *     synchronization.
104  *
105  */