7785d2c093c27b54ab137e900ab6788136bf64a1
[ira/wip.git] / docs-xml / manpages-3 / smbclient.1.xml
1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE refentry PUBLIC "-//Samba-Team//DTD DocBook V4.2-Based Variant V1.0//EN" "http://www.samba.org/samba/DTD/samba-doc">
3 <refentry id="smbclient.1">
4
5 <refmeta>
6         <refentrytitle>smbclient</refentrytitle>
7         <manvolnum>1</manvolnum>
8         <refmiscinfo class="source">Samba</refmiscinfo>
9         <refmiscinfo class="manual">User Commands</refmiscinfo>
10         <refmiscinfo class="version">3.5</refmiscinfo>
11 </refmeta>
12
13
14 <refnamediv>
15         <refname>smbclient</refname>
16         <refpurpose>ftp-like client to access SMB/CIFS resources
17         on servers</refpurpose>
18 </refnamediv>
19
20 <refsynopsisdiv>
21         <cmdsynopsis>
22                 <command>smbclient</command>
23                 <arg choice="opt">-b &lt;buffer size&gt;</arg>
24                 <arg choice="opt">-d debuglevel</arg>
25                 <arg choice="opt">-e</arg>
26                 <arg choice="opt">-L &lt;netbios name&gt;</arg>
27                 <arg choice="opt">-U username</arg>
28                 <arg choice="opt">-I destinationIP</arg>
29                 <arg choice="opt">-M &lt;netbios name&gt;</arg>
30                 <arg choice="opt">-m maxprotocol</arg>
31                 <arg choice="opt">-A authfile</arg>
32                 <arg choice="opt">-N</arg>
33                 <arg choice="opt">-g</arg>
34                 <arg choice="opt">-i scope</arg>
35                 <arg choice="opt">-O &lt;socket options&gt;</arg>
36                 <arg choice="opt">-p port</arg>
37                 <arg choice="opt">-R &lt;name resolve order&gt;</arg>
38                 <arg choice="opt">-s &lt;smb config file&gt;</arg>
39                 <arg choice="opt">-k</arg>
40                 <arg choice="opt">-P</arg>
41                 <arg choice="opt">-c &lt;command&gt;</arg>
42         </cmdsynopsis>
43
44         <cmdsynopsis>
45                 <command>smbclient</command>
46                 <arg choice="req">servicename</arg>
47                 <arg choice="opt">password</arg>
48                 <arg choice="opt">-b &lt;buffer size&gt;</arg>
49                 <arg choice="opt">-d debuglevel</arg>
50                 <arg choice="opt">-e</arg>
51                 <arg choice="opt">-D Directory</arg>
52                 <arg choice="opt">-U username</arg>
53                 <arg choice="opt">-W workgroup</arg>
54                 <arg choice="opt">-M &lt;netbios name&gt;</arg>
55                 <arg choice="opt">-m maxprotocol</arg>
56                 <arg choice="opt">-A authfile</arg>
57                 <arg choice="opt">-N</arg>
58                 <arg choice="opt">-g</arg>
59                 <arg choice="opt">-l log-basename</arg>
60                 <arg choice="opt">-I destinationIP</arg>
61                 <arg choice="opt">-E</arg>
62                 <arg choice="opt">-c &lt;command string&gt;</arg>
63                 <arg choice="opt">-i scope</arg>
64                 <arg choice="opt">-O &lt;socket options&gt;</arg>
65                 <arg choice="opt">-p port</arg>
66                 <arg choice="opt">-R &lt;name resolve order&gt;</arg>
67                 <arg choice="opt">-s &lt;smb config file&gt;</arg>
68                 <arg choice="opt">-T&lt;c|x&gt;IXFqgbNan</arg>
69                 <arg choice="opt">-k</arg>
70         </cmdsynopsis>
71 </refsynopsisdiv>
72
73 <refsect1>
74         <title>DESCRIPTION</title>
75
76         <para>This tool is part of the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>samba</refentrytitle>
77         <manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry> suite.</para>
78
79         <para><command>smbclient</command> is a client that can 
80         'talk' to an SMB/CIFS server. It offers an interface
81         similar to that of the ftp program (see <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ftp</refentrytitle>
82         <manvolnum>1</manvolnum></citerefentry>).  
83         Operations include things like getting files from the server 
84         to the local machine, putting files from the local machine to 
85         the server, retrieving directory information from the server 
86         and so on. </para>
87 </refsect1>
88
89
90 <refsect1>
91         <title>OPTIONS</title>
92         
93         <variablelist>
94                 <varlistentry>
95                 <term>servicename</term>
96                 <listitem><para>servicename is the name of the service 
97                 you want to use on the server. A service name takes the form
98                 <filename>//server/service</filename> where <parameter>server
99                 </parameter> is the NetBIOS name of the SMB/CIFS server 
100                 offering the desired service and <parameter>service</parameter> 
101                 is the name of the service offered.  Thus to connect to 
102                 the service "printer" on the SMB/CIFS server "smbserver",
103                 you would use the servicename <filename>//smbserver/printer
104                 </filename></para>
105
106                 <para>Note that the server name required is NOT necessarily 
107                 the IP (DNS) host name of the server !  The name required is 
108                 a NetBIOS server name, which may or may not be the
109                 same as the IP hostname of the machine running the server.
110                 </para>
111
112                 <para>The server name is looked up according to either 
113                 the <parameter>-R</parameter> parameter to <command>smbclient</command> or 
114                 using the name resolve order parameter in 
115                 the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smb.conf</refentrytitle>
116                 <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> file, 
117                 allowing an administrator to change the order and methods 
118                 by which server names are looked up. </para></listitem>
119                 </varlistentry>
120
121                 <varlistentry>
122                 <term>password</term>
123                 <listitem><para>The password required to access the specified 
124                 service on the specified server. If this parameter is 
125                 supplied, the <parameter>-N</parameter> option (suppress 
126                 password prompt) is assumed. </para>
127
128                 <para>There is no default password. If no password is supplied 
129                 on the command line (either by using this parameter or adding 
130                 a password to the <parameter>-U</parameter> option (see 
131                 below)) and the <parameter>-N</parameter> option is not 
132                 specified, the client will prompt for a password, even if 
133                 the desired service does not require one. (If no password is 
134                 required, simply press ENTER to provide a null password.)
135                 </para>
136
137                 <para>Note: Some servers (including OS/2 and Windows for 
138                 Workgroups) insist on an uppercase password. Lowercase 
139                 or mixed case passwords may be rejected by these servers.               
140                 </para>
141
142                 <para>Be cautious about including passwords in scripts.
143                 </para></listitem>
144                 </varlistentry>
145                 
146                 <varlistentry>
147                 <term>-R &lt;name resolve order&gt;</term> 
148                 <listitem><para>This option is used by the programs in the Samba 
149                 suite to determine what naming services and in what order to resolve 
150                 host names to IP addresses. The option takes a space-separated 
151                 string of different name resolution options.</para>
152
153                 <para>The options are :"lmhosts", "host", "wins" and "bcast". They 
154                 cause names to be resolved as follows:</para>
155
156                 <itemizedlist>
157                         <listitem><para><constant>lmhosts</constant>: Lookup an IP 
158                         address in the Samba lmhosts file. If the line in lmhosts has 
159                         no name type attached to the NetBIOS name (see 
160                         the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>lmhosts</refentrytitle>
161                         <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> for details) then
162                         any name type matches for lookup.</para>
163                         </listitem>
164                         
165                         <listitem><para><constant>host</constant>: Do a standard host 
166                         name to IP address resolution, using the system <filename>/etc/hosts
167                         </filename>, NIS, or DNS lookups. This method of name resolution 
168                         is operating system dependent, for instance on IRIX or Solaris this 
169                         may be controlled by the <filename>/etc/nsswitch.conf</filename> 
170                         file).  Note that this method is only used if the NetBIOS name 
171                         type being queried is the 0x20 (server) name type, otherwise 
172                         it is ignored.</para>
173                         </listitem>
174                         
175                         <listitem><para><constant>wins</constant>: Query a name with 
176                         the IP address listed in the <parameter>wins server</parameter>
177                         parameter.  If no WINS server has
178                         been specified this method will be ignored.</para>
179                         </listitem>
180                         
181                         <listitem><para><constant>bcast</constant>: Do a broadcast on 
182                         each of the known local interfaces listed in the 
183                         <parameter>interfaces</parameter>
184                         parameter. This is the least reliable of the name resolution 
185                         methods as it depends on the target host being on a locally 
186                         connected subnet.</para>
187                         </listitem>
188                 </itemizedlist>
189
190                 <para>If this parameter is not set then the name resolve order 
191                 defined in the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smb.conf</refentrytitle>
192                 <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> file parameter  
193                 (name resolve order) will be used. </para>
194
195                 <para>The default order is lmhosts, host, wins, bcast and without 
196                 this parameter or any entry in the <parameter>name resolve order
197                 </parameter> parameter of the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smb.conf</refentrytitle>
198                 <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> file the name resolution
199                 methods will be attempted in this order. </para></listitem>
200                 </varlistentry>
201                 
202                 
203                 <varlistentry>
204                 <term>-M NetBIOS name</term>
205                 <listitem><para>This options allows you to send messages, using 
206                 the "WinPopup" protocol, to another computer. Once a connection is 
207                 established you then type your message, pressing ^D (control-D) to 
208                 end. </para>
209
210                 <para>If the receiving computer is running WinPopup the user will 
211                 receive the message and probably a beep. If they are not running 
212                 WinPopup the message will be lost, and no error message will 
213                 occur. </para>
214
215                 <para>The message is also automatically truncated if the message 
216                 is over 1600 bytes, as this is the limit of the protocol. 
217                 </para>
218
219                 <para>
220                 One useful trick is to pipe the message through <command>smbclient</command>. 
221                 For example: smbclient -M FRED &lt; mymessage.txt will send the 
222                 message in the file <filename>mymessage.txt</filename> to the 
223                 machine FRED.
224                 </para>
225
226                 <para>You may also find the <parameter>-U</parameter> and 
227                 <parameter>-I</parameter> options useful, as they allow you to 
228                 control the FROM and TO parts of the message. </para>
229
230                 <para>See the <parameter>message command</parameter> parameter in the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smb.conf</refentrytitle>
231                 <manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> for a description of how to handle incoming 
232                 WinPopup messages in Samba. </para>
233
234                 <para><emphasis>Note</emphasis>: Copy WinPopup into the startup group 
235                 on your WfWg PCs if you want them to always be able to receive 
236                 messages. </para></listitem>
237                 </varlistentry>
238
239                 <varlistentry>
240                 <term>-p port</term>
241                 <listitem><para>This number is the TCP port number that will be used 
242                 when making connections to the server. The standard (well-known)
243                 TCP port number for an SMB/CIFS server is 139, which is the 
244                 default. </para></listitem>
245                 </varlistentry>
246
247                 <varlistentry>
248                 <term>-g</term>
249                 <listitem><para>This parameter provides combined with
250                 <parameter>-L</parameter> easy parseable output that allows processing
251                 with utilities such as grep and cut.
252                 </para></listitem>
253                 </varlistentry>
254
255                 <varlistentry>
256                 <term>-P</term>
257                 <listitem><para>
258                 Make queries to the external server using the machine account of the local server.
259                 </para></listitem>
260                 </varlistentry>
261
262                 &stdarg.help;
263
264                 <varlistentry>
265                 <term>-I IP-address</term>
266                 <listitem><para><replaceable>IP address</replaceable> is the address of the server to connect to.
267                 It should be specified in standard "a.b.c.d" notation. </para>
268
269                 <para>Normally the client would attempt to locate a named 
270                 SMB/CIFS server by looking it up via the NetBIOS name resolution 
271                 mechanism described above in the <parameter>name resolve order</parameter> 
272                 parameter above. Using this parameter will force the client
273                 to assume that the server is on the machine with the specified IP 
274                 address and the NetBIOS name component of the resource being 
275                 connected to will be ignored. </para>
276
277                 <para>There is no default for this parameter. If not supplied, 
278                 it will be determined automatically by the client as described 
279                 above. </para></listitem>
280                 </varlistentry>
281                 
282                 <varlistentry>
283                 <term>-E</term>
284                 <listitem><para>This parameter causes the client to write messages 
285                 to the standard error stream (stderr) rather than to the standard 
286                 output stream. </para>
287                 
288                 <para>By default, the client writes messages to standard output 
289                 - typically the user's tty. </para></listitem>
290                 </varlistentry>
291                 
292                 <varlistentry>
293                 <term>-L</term>
294                 <listitem><para>This option allows you to look at what services 
295                 are available on a server. You use it as <command>smbclient -L 
296                 host</command> and a list should appear.  The <parameter>-I
297                 </parameter> option may be useful if your NetBIOS names don't 
298                 match your TCP/IP DNS host names or if you are trying to reach a 
299                 host on another network. </para></listitem>
300                 </varlistentry>
301                 
302                 <varlistentry>
303                 <term>-t terminal code</term>
304                 <listitem><para>This option tells <command>smbclient</command> how to interpret 
305                 filenames coming from the remote server. Usually Asian language 
306                 multibyte UNIX implementations use different character sets than 
307                 SMB/CIFS servers (<emphasis>EUC</emphasis> instead of <emphasis>
308                 SJIS</emphasis> for example). Setting this parameter will let 
309                 <command>smbclient</command> convert between the UNIX filenames and 
310                 the SMB filenames correctly. This option has not been seriously tested 
311                 and may have some problems. </para>
312
313                 <para>The terminal codes include CWsjis, CWeuc, CWjis7, CWjis8,
314                 CWjunet, CWhex, CWcap. This is not a complete list, check the Samba 
315                 source code for the complete list. </para></listitem>
316                 </varlistentry>
317                         
318                 <varlistentry>  
319                 <term>-b buffersize</term>
320                 <listitem><para>This option changes the transmit/send buffer 
321                 size when getting or putting a file from/to the server. The default 
322                 is 65520 bytes. Setting this value smaller (to 1200 bytes) has been 
323                 observed to speed up file transfers to and from a Win9x server. 
324                 </para></listitem>
325                 </varlistentry>
326                 
327                 <varlistentry>
328                 <term>-e</term>
329                 <listitem><para>This command line parameter requires the remote
330                 server support the UNIX extensions. Request that the connection be
331                 encrypted. This is new for Samba 3.2 and will only work with Samba
332                 3.2 or above servers. Negotiates SMB encryption using GSSAPI. Uses
333                 the given credentials for the encryption negotiaion (either kerberos
334                 or NTLMv1/v2 if given domain/username/password triple. Fails the
335                 connection if encryption cannot be negotiated.
336                 </para></listitem>
337                 </varlistentry>
338                 
339                 &stdarg.client.debug;
340                 &popt.common.samba;
341                 &popt.common.credentials;
342                 &popt.common.connection;
343                 
344                 <varlistentry>
345                 <term>-T tar options</term>
346                 <listitem><para>smbclient may be used to create <command>tar(1)
347                 </command> compatible backups of all the files on an SMB/CIFS
348                 share. The secondary tar flags that can be given to this option 
349                 are : </para>
350                 
351                 <itemizedlist>
352                         <listitem><para><parameter>c</parameter> - Create a tar file on UNIX. 
353                         Must be followed by the name of a tar file, tape device
354                         or "-" for standard output. If using standard output you must 
355                         turn the log level to its lowest value -d0 to avoid corrupting 
356                         your tar file. This flag is mutually exclusive with the 
357                         <parameter>x</parameter> flag. </para></listitem>
358                         
359                         <listitem><para><parameter>x</parameter> - Extract (restore) a local 
360                         tar file back to a share. Unless the -D option is given, the tar 
361                         files will be restored from the top level of the share. Must be 
362                         followed by the name of the tar file, device or "-" for standard 
363                         input. Mutually exclusive with the <parameter>c</parameter> flag. 
364                         Restored files have their creation times (mtime) set to the
365                         date saved in the tar file. Directories currently do not get 
366                         their creation dates restored properly. </para></listitem>
367                         
368                         <listitem><para><parameter>I</parameter> - Include files and directories. 
369                         Is the default behavior when filenames are specified above. Causes 
370                         files to be included in an extract or create (and therefore 
371                         everything else to be excluded). See example below.  Filename globbing 
372                         works  in one of two ways.  See <parameter>r</parameter> below. </para></listitem>
373                         
374                         <listitem><para><parameter>X</parameter> - Exclude files and directories. 
375                         Causes files to be excluded from an extract or create. See 
376                         example below.  Filename globbing works in one of two ways now. 
377                         See <parameter>r</parameter> below. </para></listitem>
378                         
379                         <listitem><para><parameter>F</parameter> - File containing a list of files and directories.
380                         The <parameter>F</parameter> causes the name following the tarfile to
381                         create to be read as a filename that contains a list of files and directories to 
382                         be included in an extract or create (and therefore everything else to be excluded).
383                         See example below. Filename globbing works in one of two ways.
384                         See <parameter>r</parameter> below.
385                         </para></listitem>
386                         
387                         <listitem><para><parameter>b</parameter> - Blocksize. Must be followed 
388                         by a valid (greater than zero) blocksize.  Causes tar file to be 
389                         written out in blocksize*TBLOCK (usually 512 byte) blocks. 
390                         </para></listitem>
391                         
392                         <listitem><para><parameter>g</parameter> - Incremental. Only back up 
393                         files that have the archive bit set. Useful only with the 
394                         <parameter>c</parameter> flag. </para></listitem>
395
396                         <listitem><para><parameter>q</parameter> - Quiet. Keeps tar from printing 
397                         diagnostics as it works.  This is the same as tarmode quiet. 
398                         </para></listitem>
399                         
400                         <listitem><para><parameter>r</parameter> - Regular expression include
401                         or exclude.  Uses regular  expression matching for 
402                         excluding or excluding files if  compiled with HAVE_REGEX_H. 
403                         However this mode can be very slow. If  not compiled with 
404                         HAVE_REGEX_H, does a limited wildcard match on '*' and  '?'. 
405                         </para></listitem>
406                         
407                         <listitem><para><parameter>N</parameter> - Newer than. Must be followed 
408                         by the name of a file whose date is compared against files found 
409                         on the share during a create. Only files newer than the file 
410                         specified are backed up to the tar file. Useful only with the 
411                         <parameter>c</parameter> flag. </para></listitem>
412                         
413                         <listitem><para><parameter>a</parameter> - Set archive bit. Causes the 
414                         archive bit to be reset when a file is backed up. Useful with the 
415                         <parameter>g</parameter> and <parameter>c</parameter> flags. 
416                         </para></listitem>
417                 </itemizedlist>
418                         
419                 <para><emphasis>Tar Long File Names</emphasis></para>
420                         
421                 <para><command>smbclient</command>'s tar option now supports long 
422                 file names both on backup and restore. However, the full path 
423                 name of the file must be less than 1024 bytes.  Also, when
424                 a tar archive is created, <command>smbclient</command>'s tar option places all 
425                 files in the archive with relative names, not absolute names. 
426                 </para>
427
428                 <para><emphasis>Tar Filenames</emphasis></para>
429                         
430                 <para>All file names can be given as DOS path names (with '\\' 
431                 as the component separator) or as UNIX path names (with '/' as 
432                 the component separator). </para>
433                         
434                 <para><emphasis>Examples</emphasis></para>
435                 
436                 <para>Restore from tar file <filename>backup.tar</filename> into myshare on mypc 
437                 (no password on share). </para>
438                 
439                 <para><command>smbclient //mypc/yshare "" -N -Tx backup.tar
440                 </command></para>
441                 
442                 <para>Restore everything except <filename>users/docs</filename>
443                 </para>
444                 
445                 <para><command>smbclient //mypc/myshare "" -N -TXx backup.tar 
446                 users/docs</command></para>
447                 
448                 <para>Create a tar file of the files beneath <filename>
449                 users/docs</filename>. </para>
450                 
451                 <para><command>smbclient //mypc/myshare "" -N -Tc
452                 backup.tar users/docs </command></para>
453                 
454                 <para>Create the same tar file as above, but now use 
455                 a DOS path name. </para>
456                 
457                 <para><command>smbclient //mypc/myshare "" -N -tc backup.tar 
458                 users\edocs </command></para>
459                 
460                 <para>Create a tar file of the files listed in the file <filename>tarlist</filename>.</para>
461                 
462                 <para><command>smbclient //mypc/myshare "" -N -TcF
463                 backup.tar tarlist</command></para>
464                 
465                 <para>Create a tar file of all the files and directories in 
466                 the share. </para>
467                 
468                 <para><command>smbclient //mypc/myshare "" -N -Tc backup.tar *
469                 </command></para>
470                 </listitem>
471                 </varlistentry>
472                 
473                 <varlistentry>
474                 <term>-D initial directory</term>
475                 <listitem><para>Change to initial directory before starting. Probably 
476                 only of any use with the tar -T option. </para></listitem>
477                 </varlistentry>
478                 
479                 <varlistentry>
480                 <term>-c command string</term>
481                 <listitem><para>command string is a semicolon-separated list of 
482                 commands to be executed instead of prompting from stdin. <parameter>
483                 -N</parameter> is implied by <parameter>-c</parameter>.</para>
484
485                 <para>This is particularly useful in scripts and for printing stdin 
486                 to the server, e.g. <command>-c 'print -'</command>. </para></listitem>
487                 </varlistentry>
488
489         </variablelist>
490 </refsect1>
491
492
493 <refsect1>
494         <title>OPERATIONS</title>
495
496         <para>Once the client is running, the user is presented with 
497         a prompt : </para>
498
499         <para><prompt>smb:\&gt; </prompt></para>
500
501         <para>The backslash ("\\") indicates the current working directory 
502         on the server, and will change if the current working directory 
503         is changed. </para>
504
505         <para>The prompt indicates that the client is ready and waiting to 
506         carry out a user command. Each command is a single word, optionally 
507         followed by parameters specific to that command. Command and parameters 
508         are space-delimited unless these notes specifically
509         state otherwise. All commands are case-insensitive.  Parameters to 
510         commands may or may not be case sensitive, depending on the command. 
511         </para>
512
513         <para>You can specify file names which have spaces in them by quoting 
514         the name with double quotes, for example "a long file name". </para>
515
516         <para>Parameters shown in square brackets (e.g., "[parameter]") are 
517         optional.  If not given, the command will use suitable defaults. Parameters 
518         shown in angle brackets (e.g., "&lt;parameter&gt;") are required.
519         </para>
520
521
522         <para>Note that all commands operating on the server are actually 
523         performed by issuing a request to the server. Thus the behavior may 
524         vary from server to server, depending on how the server was implemented. 
525         </para>
526
527         <para>The commands available are given here in alphabetical order. </para>
528
529         <variablelist>
530                 <varlistentry>
531                 <term>? [command]</term>
532                 <listitem><para>If <replaceable>command</replaceable> is specified, the ? command will display
533                 a brief informative message about the specified command.  If no
534                 command is specified, a list of available commands will
535                 be displayed. </para></listitem>
536                 </varlistentry>
537
538                 <varlistentry>
539                 <term>! [shell command]</term>
540                 <listitem><para>If <replaceable>shell command</replaceable> is specified, the !
541                 command will execute a shell locally and run the specified shell
542                 command. If no command is specified, a local shell will be run.
543                 </para></listitem>
544                 </varlistentry>
545
546                 <varlistentry>
547                 <term>allinfo file</term>
548                 <listitem><para>The client will request that the server return
549                 all known information about a file or directory (including streams).
550                 </para></listitem>
551                 </varlistentry>
552
553                 <varlistentry>
554                 <term>altname file</term>
555                 <listitem><para>The client will request that the server return
556                 the "alternate" name (the 8.3 name) for a file or directory.
557                 </para></listitem>
558                 </varlistentry>
559
560                 <varlistentry>
561                 <term>archive &lt;number&gt;</term>
562                 <listitem><para>Sets the archive level when operating on files.
563                 0 means ignore the archive bit, 1 means only operate on files with this bit set,
564                 2 means only operate on files with this bit set and reset it after operation,
565                 3 means operate on all files and reset it after operation. The default is 0.
566                 </para></listitem>
567                 </varlistentry>
568
569                 <varlistentry>
570                 <term>blocksize &lt;number&gt;</term>
571                 <listitem><para>Sets the blocksize parameter for a tar operation. The default is 20.
572                 Causes tar file to be written out in blocksize*TBLOCK (normally 512 byte) units.
573                 </para></listitem>
574                 </varlistentry>
575
576                 <varlistentry>
577                 <term>cancel jobid0 [jobid1] ... [jobidN]</term>
578                 <listitem><para>The client will request that the server cancel
579                 the printjobs identified by the given numeric print job ids.
580                 </para></listitem>
581                 </varlistentry>
582
583                 <varlistentry>
584                 <term>case_sensitive</term>
585                 <listitem><para>Toggles the setting of the flag in SMB packets that
586                 tells the server to treat filenames as case sensitive. Set to OFF by
587                 default (tells file server to treat filenames as case insensitive). Only
588                 currently affects Samba 3.0.5 and above file servers with the case sensitive
589                 parameter set to auto in the smb.conf.
590                 </para></listitem>
591                 </varlistentry>
592
593                 <varlistentry>
594                 <term>cd &lt;directory name&gt;</term>
595                 <listitem><para>If "directory name" is specified, the current
596                 working directory on the server will be changed to the directory
597                 specified. This operation will fail if for any reason the specified
598                 directory is inaccessible. </para>
599
600                 <para>If no directory name is specified, the current working
601                 directory on the server will be reported. </para></listitem>
602                 </varlistentry>
603
604                 <varlistentry>
605                 <term>chmod file mode in octal</term>
606                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
607                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. The client requests that the server
608                 change the UNIX permissions to the given octal mode, in standard UNIX format.
609                 </para></listitem>
610                 </varlistentry>
611
612                 <varlistentry>
613                 <term>chown file uid gid</term>
614                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
615                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. The client requests that the server
616                 change the UNIX user and group ownership to the given decimal values. Note there is
617                 currently no way to remotely look up the UNIX uid and gid values for a given name.
618                 This may be addressed in future versions of the CIFS UNIX extensions.
619                 </para></listitem>
620                 </varlistentry>
621
622                 <varlistentry>
623                 <term>close &lt;fileid&gt;</term>
624                 <listitem><para>Closes a file explicitly opened by the open command. Used for
625                 internal Samba testing purposes.
626                 </para></listitem>
627                 </varlistentry>
628
629                 <varlistentry>
630                 <term>del &lt;mask&gt;</term>
631                 <listitem><para>The client will request that the server attempt
632                 to delete all files matching <replaceable>mask</replaceable> from the current working
633                 directory on the server. </para></listitem>
634                 </varlistentry>
635
636                 <varlistentry>
637                 <term>dir &lt;mask&gt;</term>
638                 <listitem><para>A list of the files matching <replaceable>mask</replaceable> in the current
639                 working directory on the server will be retrieved from the server
640                 and displayed. </para></listitem>
641                 </varlistentry>
642
643                 <varlistentry>
644                 <term>du &lt;filename&gt;</term>
645                 <listitem><para>Does a directory listing and then prints out the current disk useage and free space on a share.
646                 </para></listitem>
647                 </varlistentry>
648
649                 <varlistentry>
650                 <term>echo &lt;number&gt; &lt;data&gt;</term>
651                 <listitem><para>Does an SMBecho request to ping the server. Used for internal Samba testing purposes.
652                 </para></listitem>
653                 </varlistentry>
654
655                 <varlistentry>
656                 <term>exit</term>
657                 <listitem><para>Terminate the connection with the server and exit
658                 from the program. </para></listitem>
659                 </varlistentry>
660
661                 <varlistentry>
662                 <term>get &lt;remote file name&gt; [local file name]</term>
663                 <listitem><para>Copy the file called <filename>remote file name</filename> from
664                 the server to the machine running the client. If specified, name
665                 the local copy <filename>local file name</filename>.  Note that all transfers in
666                 <command>smbclient</command> are binary. See also the
667                 lowercase command. </para></listitem>
668                 </varlistentry>
669
670                 <varlistentry>
671                 <term>getfacl &lt;filename&gt;</term>
672                 <listitem><para>Requires the server support the UNIX extensions. Requests and prints
673                 the POSIX ACL on a file.
674                 </para></listitem>
675                 </varlistentry>
676
677                 <varlistentry>
678                 <term>hardlink &lt;src&gt; &lt;dest&gt;</term>
679                 <listitem><para>Creates a hardlink on the server using Windows CIFS semantics.
680                 </para></listitem>
681                 </varlistentry>
682
683                 <varlistentry>
684                 <term>help [command]</term>
685                 <listitem><para>See the ? command above. </para></listitem>
686                 </varlistentry>
687
688                 <varlistentry>
689                 <term>history</term> <listitem><para>Displays the command history.</para></listitem>
690                 </varlistentry>
691
692                 <varlistentry>
693                 <term>iosize &lt;bytes&gt;</term>
694                 <listitem><para>When sending or receiving files, smbclient uses an
695                 internal memory buffer by default of size 64512 bytes. This command
696                 allows this size to be set to any range between 16384 (0x4000) bytes
697                 and 16776960 (0xFFFF00) bytes. Larger sizes may mean more efficient
698                 data transfer as smbclient will try and use the most efficient
699                 read and write calls for the connected server.
700                 </para></listitem>
701                 </varlistentry>
702
703                 <varlistentry>
704                 <term>lcd [directory name]</term>
705                 <listitem><para>If <replaceable>directory name</replaceable> is specified, the current
706                 working directory on the local machine will be changed to
707                 the directory specified. This operation will fail if for any
708                 reason the specified directory is inaccessible. </para>
709
710                 <para>If no directory name is specified, the name of the
711                 current working directory on the local machine will be reported.
712                 </para></listitem>
713                 </varlistentry>
714
715                 <varlistentry>
716                 <term>link target linkname</term>
717                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
718                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. The client requests that the server
719                 create a hard link between the linkname and target files. The linkname file
720                 must not exist.
721                 </para></listitem>
722                 </varlistentry>
723
724                 <varlistentry>
725                 <term>listconnect</term>
726                 <listitem><para>Show the current connections held for DFS purposes.
727                 </para></listitem>
728                 </varlistentry>
729
730                 <varlistentry>
731                 <term>lock &lt;filenum&gt; &lt;r|w&gt; &lt;hex-start&gt; &lt;hex-len&gt;</term>
732                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
733                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Tries to set a POSIX
734                 fcntl lock of the given type on the given range. Used for internal Samba testing purposes.
735                 </para></listitem>
736                 </varlistentry>
737
738                 <varlistentry>
739                 <term>logon &lt;username&gt; &lt;password&gt;</term>
740                 <listitem><para>Establishes a new vuid for this session by logging on again.
741                 Replaces the current vuid. Prints out the new vuid. Used for internal Samba testing purposes.
742                 </para></listitem>
743                 </varlistentry>
744
745                 <varlistentry>
746                 <term>lowercase</term>
747                 <listitem><para>Toggle lowercasing of filenames for the get and
748                 mget commands.          
749                 </para> 
750
751                 <para>When lowercasing is toggled ON, local filenames are converted
752                 to lowercase when using the get and mget commands. This is
753                 often useful when copying (say) MSDOS files from a server, because
754                 lowercase filenames are the norm on UNIX systems. </para></listitem>
755                 </varlistentry>
756
757                 <varlistentry>
758                 <term>ls &lt;mask&gt;</term>
759                 <listitem><para>See the dir command above. </para></listitem>
760                 </varlistentry>
761
762                 <varlistentry>
763                 <term>mask &lt;mask&gt;</term>
764                 <listitem><para>This command allows the user to set up a mask
765                 which will be used during recursive operation of the mget and
766                 mput commands. </para>
767
768                 <para>The masks specified to the mget and mput commands act as
769                 filters for directories rather than files when recursion is
770                 toggled ON. </para>
771
772                 <para>The mask specified with the mask command is necessary
773                 to filter files within those directories. For example, if the
774                 mask specified in an mget command is "source*" and the mask
775                 specified with the mask command is "*.c" and recursion is
776                 toggled ON, the mget command will retrieve all files matching
777                 "*.c" in all directories below and including all directories
778                 matching "source*" in the current working directory. </para>
779
780                 <para>Note that the value for mask defaults to blank (equivalent
781                 to "*") and remains so until the mask command is used to change it.
782                 It retains the most recently specified value indefinitely. To
783                 avoid unexpected results it would be wise to change the value of
784                 mask back to "*" after using the mget or mput commands. </para></listitem>
785                 </varlistentry>
786
787                 <varlistentry>
788                 <term>md &lt;directory name&gt;</term>
789                 <listitem><para>See the mkdir command. </para></listitem>
790                 </varlistentry>
791
792                 <varlistentry>
793                 <term>mget &lt;mask&gt;</term>
794                 <listitem><para>Copy all files matching <replaceable>mask</replaceable> from the server to
795                 the machine running the client. </para>
796
797                 <para>Note that <replaceable>mask</replaceable> is interpreted differently during recursive
798                 operation and non-recursive operation - refer to the recurse and
799                 mask commands for more information. Note that all transfers in
800                 <command>smbclient</command> are binary. See also the lowercase command. </para></listitem>
801                 </varlistentry>
802
803                 <varlistentry>
804                 <term>mkdir &lt;directory name&gt;</term>
805                 <listitem><para>Create a new directory on the server (user access
806                 privileges permitting) with the specified name. </para></listitem>
807                 </varlistentry>
808
809                 <varlistentry>
810                 <term>more &lt;file name&gt;</term>
811                 <listitem><para>Fetch a remote file and view it with the contents
812                 of your PAGER environment variable.
813                 </para></listitem>
814                 </varlistentry>
815
816                 <varlistentry>
817                 <term>mput &lt;mask&gt;</term>
818                 <listitem><para>Copy all files matching <replaceable>mask</replaceable> in the current working
819                 directory on the local machine to the current working directory on
820                 the server. </para>
821
822                 <para>Note that <replaceable>mask</replaceable> is interpreted differently during recursive
823                 operation and non-recursive operation - refer to the recurse and mask
824                 commands for more information. Note that all transfers in <command>smbclient</command>
825                 are binary. </para></listitem>
826                 </varlistentry>
827
828                 <varlistentry>
829                 <term>posix</term>
830                 <listitem><para>Query the remote server to see if it supports the CIFS UNIX
831                 extensions and prints out the list of capabilities supported. If so, turn
832                 on POSIX pathname processing and large file read/writes (if available),.
833                 </para></listitem>
834                 </varlistentry>
835
836                 <varlistentry>
837                 <term>posix_encrypt &lt;domain&gt; &lt;username&gt; &lt;password&gt;</term>
838                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
839                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Attempt to negotiate
840                 SMB encryption on this connection. If smbclient connected with kerberos
841                 credentials (-k) the arguments to this command are ignored and the kerberos
842                 credentials are used to negotiate GSSAPI signing and sealing instead. See
843                 also the -e option to smbclient to force encryption on initial connection.
844                 This command is new with Samba 3.2.
845                 </para></listitem>
846                 </varlistentry>
847
848                 <varlistentry>
849                 <term>posix_open &lt;filename&gt; &lt;octal mode&gt;</term>
850                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
851                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Opens a remote file
852                 using the CIFS UNIX extensions and prints a fileid. Used for internal Samba
853                 testing purposes.
854                 </para></listitem>
855                 </varlistentry>
856
857                 <varlistentry>
858                 <term>posix_mkdir &lt;directoryname&gt; &lt;octal mode&gt;</term>
859                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
860                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Creates a remote directory
861                 using the CIFS UNIX extensions with the given mode.
862                 </para></listitem>
863                 </varlistentry>
864
865                 <varlistentry>
866                 <term>posix_rmdir &lt;directoryname&gt;</term>
867                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
868                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Deletes a remote directory
869                 using the CIFS UNIX extensions.
870                 </para></listitem>
871                 </varlistentry>
872
873                 <varlistentry>
874                 <term>posix_unlink &lt;filename&gt;</term>
875                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
876                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Deletes a remote file
877                 using the CIFS UNIX extensions.
878                 </para></listitem>
879                 </varlistentry>
880
881                 <varlistentry>
882                 <term>print &lt;file name&gt;</term>
883                 <listitem><para>Print the specified file from the local machine
884                 through a printable service on the server. </para></listitem>
885                 </varlistentry>
886
887                 <varlistentry>
888                 <term>prompt</term>
889                 <listitem><para>Toggle prompting for filenames during operation
890                 of the mget and mput commands. </para>
891
892                 <para>When toggled ON, the user will be prompted to confirm
893                 the transfer of each file during these commands. When toggled
894                 OFF, all specified files will be transferred without prompting.
895                 </para></listitem>
896                 </varlistentry>
897
898                 <varlistentry>
899                 <term>put &lt;local file name&gt; [remote file name]</term>
900                 <listitem><para>Copy the file called <filename>local file name</filename> from the
901                 machine running the client to the server. If specified,
902                 name the remote copy <filename>remote file name</filename>. Note that all transfers
903                 in <command>smbclient</command> are binary. See also the lowercase command.
904                 </para></listitem>
905                 </varlistentry>
906
907                 <varlistentry>
908                 <term>queue</term>
909                 <listitem><para>Displays the print queue, showing the job id,
910                 name, size and current status. </para></listitem>
911                 </varlistentry>
912
913                 <varlistentry>
914                 <term>quit</term>
915                 <listitem><para>See the exit command. </para></listitem>
916                 </varlistentry>
917
918                 <varlistentry>
919                 <term>rd &lt;directory name&gt;</term>
920                 <listitem><para>See the rmdir command. </para></listitem>
921                 </varlistentry>
922
923                 <varlistentry>
924                 <term>recurse</term>
925                 <listitem><para>Toggle directory recursion for the commands mget
926                 and mput. </para>
927
928                 <para>When toggled ON, these commands will process all directories
929                 in the source directory (i.e., the directory they are copying
930                 from ) and will recurse into any that match the mask specified
931                 to the command. Only files that match the mask specified using
932                 the mask command will be retrieved. See also the mask command.
933                 </para>
934
935                 <para>When recursion is toggled OFF, only files from the current
936                 working directory on the source machine that match the mask specified
937                 to the mget or mput commands will be copied, and any mask specified
938                 using the mask command will be ignored. </para></listitem>
939                 </varlistentry>
940
941                 <varlistentry>
942                 <term>rename &lt;old filename&gt; &lt;new filename&gt;</term>
943                 <listitem><para>Rename files in the current working directory on the
944                 server from <replaceable>old filename</replaceable> to
945                 <replaceable>new filename</replaceable>. </para></listitem>
946                 </varlistentry>
947
948                 <varlistentry>
949                 <term>rm &lt;mask&gt;</term>
950                 <listitem><para>Remove all files matching <replaceable>mask</replaceable> from the current
951                 working directory on the server. </para></listitem>
952                 </varlistentry>
953
954                 <varlistentry>
955                 <term>rmdir &lt;directory name&gt;</term>
956                 <listitem><para>Remove the specified directory (user access
957                 privileges permitting) from the server. </para></listitem>
958                 </varlistentry>
959
960                 <varlistentry>
961                 <term>setmode &lt;filename&gt; &lt;perm=[+|\-]rsha&gt;</term>
962                 <listitem><para>A version of the DOS attrib command to set
963                 file permissions. For example: </para>
964
965                 <para><command>setmode myfile +r </command></para>
966
967                 <para>would make myfile read only. </para></listitem>
968                 </varlistentry>
969
970                 <varlistentry>
971                 <term>showconnect</term>
972                 <listitem><para>Show the currently active connection held for DFS purposes.
973                 </para></listitem>
974                 </varlistentry>
975
976                 <varlistentry>
977                 <term>stat file</term>
978                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
979                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. The client requests the
980                 UNIX basic info level and prints out the same info that the Linux stat command
981                 would about the file. This includes the size, blocks used on disk, file type,
982                 permissions, inode number, number of links and finally the three timestamps
983                 (access, modify and change). If the file is a special file (symlink, character or
984                 block device, fifo or socket) then extra information may also be printed.
985                 </para></listitem>
986                 </varlistentry>
987
988                 <varlistentry>
989                 <term>symlink target linkname</term>
990                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
991                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. The client requests that the server
992                 create a symbolic hard link between the target and linkname files. The linkname file
993                 must not exist. Note that the server will not create a link to any path that lies
994                 outside the currently connected share. This is enforced by the Samba server.
995                 </para></listitem>
996                 </varlistentry>
997
998                 <varlistentry>
999                 <term>tar &lt;c|x&gt;[IXbgNa]</term>
1000                 <listitem><para>Performs a tar operation - see the <parameter>-T
1001                 </parameter> command line option above. Behavior may be affected
1002                 by the tarmode command (see below). Using g (incremental) and N
1003                 (newer) will affect tarmode settings. Note that using the "-" option
1004                 with tar x may not work - use the command line option instead.
1005                 </para></listitem>
1006                 </varlistentry>
1007
1008                 <varlistentry>
1009                 <term>blocksize &lt;blocksize&gt;</term>
1010                 <listitem><para>Blocksize. Must be followed by a valid (greater
1011                 than zero) blocksize. Causes tar file to be written out in
1012                 <replaceable>blocksize</replaceable>*TBLOCK (usually 512 byte) blocks. </para></listitem>
1013                 </varlistentry>
1014
1015                 <varlistentry>
1016                 <term>tarmode &lt;full|inc|reset|noreset&gt;</term>
1017                 <listitem><para>Changes tar's behavior with regard to archive
1018                 bits. In full mode, tar will back up everything regardless of the
1019                 archive bit setting (this is the default mode). In incremental mode,
1020                 tar will only back up files with the archive bit set. In reset mode,
1021                 tar will reset the archive bit on all files it backs up (implies
1022                 read/write share). </para></listitem>
1023                 </varlistentry>
1024
1025                 <varlistentry>
1026                 <term>unlock &lt;filenum&gt; &lt;hex-start&gt; &lt;hex-len&gt;</term>
1027                 <listitem><para>This command depends on the server supporting the CIFS
1028                 UNIX extensions and will fail if the server does not. Tries to unlock a POSIX
1029                 fcntl lock on the given range. Used for internal Samba testing purposes.
1030                 </para></listitem>
1031                 </varlistentry>
1032
1033                 <varlistentry>
1034                 <term>volume</term>
1035                 <listitem><para>Prints the current volume name of the share.
1036                 </para></listitem>
1037                 </varlistentry>
1038
1039                 <varlistentry>
1040                 <term>vuid &lt;number&gt;</term>
1041                 <listitem><para>Changes the currently used vuid in the protocol to
1042                 the given arbitrary number. Without an argument prints out the current
1043                 vuid being used. Used for internal Samba testing purposes.
1044                 </para></listitem>
1045                 </varlistentry>
1046
1047         </variablelist>
1048 </refsect1>
1049
1050 <refsect1>
1051         <title>NOTES</title>
1052
1053         <para>Some servers are fussy about the case of supplied usernames,
1054         passwords, share names (AKA service names) and machine names.
1055         If you fail to connect try giving all parameters in uppercase.
1056         </para>
1057
1058         <para>It is often necessary to use the -n option when connecting
1059         to some types of servers. For example OS/2 LanManager insists
1060         on a valid NetBIOS name being used, so you need to supply a valid
1061         name that would be known to the server.</para>
1062
1063         <para>smbclient supports long file names where the server 
1064         supports the LANMAN2 protocol or above. </para>
1065 </refsect1>
1066
1067 <refsect1>
1068         <title>ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES</title>
1069
1070         <para>The variable <envar>USER</envar> may contain the 
1071         username of the person  using the client. This information is 
1072         used only if the protocol  level is high enough to support 
1073         session-level passwords.</para>
1074
1075
1076         <para>The variable <envar>PASSWD</envar> may contain 
1077         the password of the person using the client.  This information is 
1078         used only if the protocol level is high enough to support 
1079         session-level passwords. </para>
1080
1081         <para>The variable <envar>LIBSMB_PROG</envar> may contain 
1082         the path, executed with system(), which the client should connect 
1083         to instead of connecting to a server.  This functionality is primarily
1084         intended as a development aid, and works best when using a LMHOSTS 
1085         file</para>
1086 </refsect1>
1087
1088
1089 <refsect1>
1090         <title>INSTALLATION</title>
1091
1092         <para>The location of the client program is a matter for 
1093         individual system administrators. The following are thus
1094         suggestions only. </para>
1095
1096         <para>It is recommended that the smbclient software be installed
1097         in the <filename>/usr/local/samba/bin/</filename> or <filename>
1098         /usr/samba/bin/</filename> directory, this directory readable 
1099         by all, writeable only by root. The client program itself should 
1100         be executable by all. The client should <emphasis>NOT</emphasis> be 
1101         setuid or setgid! </para>
1102
1103         <para>The client log files should be put in a directory readable 
1104         and writeable only by the user. </para>
1105
1106         <para>To test the client, you will need to know the name of a 
1107         running SMB/CIFS server. It is possible to run <citerefentry><refentrytitle>smbd</refentrytitle>
1108         <manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry> as an ordinary user - running that server as a daemon 
1109         on a user-accessible port (typically any port number over 1024)
1110         would provide a suitable test server. </para>
1111 </refsect1>
1112
1113
1114 <refsect1>
1115         <title>DIAGNOSTICS</title>
1116
1117         <para>Most diagnostics issued by the client are logged in a 
1118         specified log file. The log file name is specified at compile time, 
1119         but may be overridden on the command line. </para>
1120
1121         <para>The number and nature of diagnostics available depends 
1122         on the debug level used by the client. If you have problems, 
1123         set the debug level to 3 and peruse the log files. </para>
1124 </refsect1>
1125
1126
1127 <refsect1>
1128         <title>VERSION</title>
1129
1130         <para>This man page is correct for version 3.2 of the Samba suite.</para>
1131 </refsect1>
1132
1133
1134 <refsect1>
1135         <title>AUTHOR</title>
1136         
1137         <para>The original Samba software and related utilities 
1138         were created by Andrew Tridgell. Samba is now developed
1139         by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar 
1140         to the way the Linux kernel is developed.</para>
1141         
1142         <para>The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. 
1143         The man page sources were converted to YODL format (another 
1144         excellent piece of Open Source software, available at <ulink url="ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/">
1145         ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/</ulink>) and updated for the Samba 2.0 
1146         release by Jeremy Allison.  The conversion to DocBook for 
1147         Samba 2.2 was done by Gerald Carter. The conversion to DocBook XML 4.2 for Samba 3.0
1148         was done by Alexander Bokovoy.</para>
1149 </refsect1>
1150
1151 </refentry>