ff2552515b12549823eddce0460c59378c89b59e
[ira/wip.git] / docs-xml / Samba3-HOWTO / TOSHARG-FastStart.xml
1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE chapter PUBLIC "-//Samba-Team//DTD DocBook V4.2-Based Variant V1.0//EN" "http://www.samba.org/samba/DTD/samba-doc">
3 <chapter id="FastStart">
4 <chapterinfo>
5         &author.jht;
6 </chapterinfo>
7
8 <title>Fast Start: Cure for Impatience</title>
9
10 <para>
11 When we first asked for suggestions for inclusion in the Samba HOWTO documentation,
12 someone wrote asking for example configurations &smbmdash; and lots of them. That is remarkably
13 difficult to do without losing a lot of value that can be derived from presenting
14 many extracts from working systems. That is what the rest of this document does.
15 It does so with extensive descriptions of the configuration possibilities within the
16 context of the chapter that covers it. We hope that this chapter is the medicine 
17 that has been requested.
18 </para>
19
20 <para>
21 The information in this chapter is very sparse compared with the book <quote>Samba-3 by Example</quote>
22 that was written after the original version of this book was nearly complete. <quote>Samba-3 by Example</quote>
23 was the result of feedback from reviewers during the final copy editing of the first edition. It
24 was interesting to see that reader feedback mirrored that given by the original reviewers.
25 In any case, a month and a half was spent in doing basic research to better understand what
26 new as well as experienced network administrators would best benefit from. The book <quote>Samba-3 by Example</quote>
27 is the result of that research. What is presented in the few pages of this book is covered
28 far more comprehensively in the second edition of <quote>Samba-3 by Example</quote>. The second edition
29 of both books will be released at the same time.
30 </para>
31
32 <para>
33 So in summary, the book <quote>The Official Samba-3 HOWTO &amp; Reference Guide</quote> is intended
34 as the equivalent of an auto mechanic's repair guide. The book <quote>Samba-3 by Example</quote> is the
35 equivalent of the driver's guide that explains how to drive the car. If you want complete network
36 configuration examples, go to <ulink url="http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/Samba3-ByExample.pdf">Samba-3 by
37 Example</ulink>.
38 </para>
39
40 <sect1>
41 <title>Features and Benefits</title>
42
43 <para>
44 Samba needs very little configuration to create a basic working system.
45 In this chapter we progress from the simple to the complex, for each providing
46 all steps and configuration file changes needed to make each work. Please note
47 that a comprehensively configured system will likely employ additional smart
48 features. These additional features are covered in the remainder of this document.
49 </para>
50
51 <para>
52 The examples used here have been obtained from a number of people who made
53 requests for example configurations. All identities have been obscured to protect
54 the guilty, and any resemblance to unreal nonexistent sites is deliberate.
55 </para>
56
57 </sect1>
58
59 <sect1>
60 <title>Description of Example Sites</title>
61
62 <para>
63 In the first set of configuration examples we consider the case of exceptionally simple system requirements.
64 There is a real temptation to make something that should require little effort much too complex.
65 </para>
66
67 <para>
68 <link linkend="anon-ro"></link> documents the type of server that might be sufficient to serve CD-ROM images,
69 or reference document files for network client use. This configuration is also discussed in <link
70 linkend="StandAloneServer"></link>, <link linkend="RefDocServer"></link>.  The purpose for this configuration
71 is to provide a shared volume that is read-only that anyone, even guests, can access.
72 </para>
73
74 <para>
75 The second example shows a minimal configuration for a print server that anyone can print to as long as they
76 have the correct printer drivers installed on their computer. This is a mirror of the system described in
77 <link linkend="StandAloneServer"></link>, <link linkend="SimplePrintServer"></link>.
78 </para>
79
80 <para>
81 The next example is of a secure office file and print server that will be accessible only to users who have an
82 account on the system. This server is meant to closely resemble a workgroup file and print server, but has to
83 be more secure than an anonymous access machine.  This type of system will typically suit the needs of a small
84 office. The server provides no network logon facilities, offers no domain control; instead it is just a
85 network-attached storage (NAS) device and a print server.
86 </para>
87
88 <para>
89 The later example consider more complex systems that will either integrate into existing MS Windows networks
90 or replace them entirely. These cover domain member servers as well as Samba domain control (PDC/BDC) and
91 finally describes in detail a large distributed network with branch offices in remote locations.
92 </para>
93
94 </sect1>
95
96 <sect1>
97 <title>Worked Examples</title>
98
99 <para>
100 The configuration examples are designed to cover everything necessary to get Samba 
101 running. They do not cover basic operating system platform configuration, which is
102 clearly beyond the scope of this text.
103 </para>
104
105 <para>
106 It is also assumed that Samba has been correctly installed, either by way of installation
107 of the packages that are provided by the operating system vendor or through other means.
108 </para>
109
110         <sect2>
111         <title>Standalone Server</title>
112
113         <para>
114         <indexterm><primary>Server Type</primary><secondary>Stand-alone</secondary></indexterm>
115         A standalone server implies no more than the fact that it is not a domain controller
116         and it does not participate in domain control. It can be a simple, workgroup-like
117         server, or it can be a complex server that is a member of a domain security context.
118         </para>
119
120         <para>
121         As the examples are developed, every attempt is made to progress the system toward greater capability, just as
122         one might expect would happen in a real business office as that office grows in size and its needs change.
123         </para>
124
125                 <sect3 id="anon-ro">
126                 <title>Anonymous Read-Only Document Server</title>
127
128                 <para>
129                 <indexterm><primary>read only</primary><secondary>server</secondary></indexterm>
130                 The purpose of this type of server is to make available to any user
131                 any documents or files that are placed on the shared resource. The
132                 shared resource could be a CD-ROM drive, a CD-ROM image, or a file
133                 storage area.
134                 </para>
135
136                 <itemizedlist>
137                         <listitem><para>
138                         The file system share point will be <filename>/export</filename>.
139                         </para></listitem>
140
141                         <listitem><para>
142                         All files will be owned by a user called Jack Baumbach.
143                         Jack's login name will be <emphasis>jackb</emphasis>. His password will be
144                         <emphasis>m0r3pa1n</emphasis> &smbmdash; of course, that's just the example we are
145                         using; do not use this in a production environment because
146                         all readers of this document will know it.
147                         </para></listitem>
148                 </itemizedlist>
149
150                 <procedure>
151                 <title>Installation Procedure: Read-Only Server</title>
152                         <step><para>
153                         Add user to system (with creation of the user's home directory):
154 <screen>
155 &rootprompt;<userinput>useradd -c "Jack Baumbach" -m -g users -p m0r3pa1n jackb</userinput>
156 </screen>
157                         </para></step>
158
159                         <step><para>
160                         Create directory, and set permissions and ownership:
161 <screen>
162 &rootprompt;<userinput>mkdir /export</userinput>
163 &rootprompt;<userinput>chmod u+rwx,g+rx,o+rx /export</userinput>
164 &rootprompt;<userinput>chown jackb.users /export</userinput>
165 </screen>
166                         </para></step>
167
168                         <step><para>
169                         Copy the files that should be shared to the <filename>/export</filename>
170                         directory.
171                         </para></step>
172
173                         <step><para>
174                         Install the Samba configuration file (<filename>/etc/samba/smb.conf</filename>)
175                         as shown in <link linkend="anon-example">Anonymous Read-Only Server Configuration</link>.
176                         </para></step>
177
178 <example id="anon-example">
179 <title>Anonymous Read-Only Server Configuration</title>
180 <smbconfblock>
181 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
182 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
183 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
184 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">HOBBIT</smbconfoption>
185 <smbconfoption name="security">share</smbconfoption>
186
187 <smbconfsection name="[data]"/>
188 <smbconfoption name="comment">Data</smbconfoption>
189 <smbconfoption name="path">/export</smbconfoption>
190 <smbconfoption name="read only">Yes</smbconfoption>
191 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
192 </smbconfblock>
193 </example>
194
195                         <step><para>
196                         Test the configuration file by executing the following command:
197 <screen>
198 &rootprompt;<userinput>testparm</userinput>
199 </screen>
200                         Alternatively, where you are operating from a master configuration file called
201                         <filename>smb.conf.master</filename>, the following sequence of commands might prove
202                         more appropriate:
203 <screen>
204 &rootprompt; cd /etc/samba
205 &rootprompt; testparm -s smb.conf.master > smb.conf
206 &rootprompt; testparm
207 </screen>
208                         Note any error messages that might be produced. Proceed only if error-free output has been
209                         obtained. An example of typical output that should be generated from the above configuration
210                         file is shown here:
211 <screen>
212 Load smb config files from /etc/samba/smb.conf
213 Processing section "[data]"
214 Loaded services file OK.
215 Server role: ROLE_STANDALONE
216 Press enter to see a dump of your service definitions
217 <userinput>[Press enter]</userinput>
218
219 # Global parameters
220 [global]
221         workgroup = MIDEARTH
222         netbios name = HOBBIT
223         security = share
224
225 [data]
226         comment = Data
227         path = /export
228         read only = Yes
229         guest only = Yes
230 </screen>
231                         </para></step>
232
233                         <step><para>
234                         Start Samba using the method applicable to your operating system platform. The method that
235                         should be used is platform dependent. Refer to <link linkend="startingSamba">Starting Samba</link>
236                         for further information regarding the starting of Samba.
237                         </para></step>
238
239                         <step><para>
240                         Configure your MS Windows client for workgroup <emphasis>MIDEARTH</emphasis>,
241                         set the machine name to ROBBINS, reboot, wait a few (2 - 5) minutes,
242                         then open Windows Explorer and visit the Network Neighborhood.
243                         The machine HOBBIT should be visible. When you click this machine
244                         icon, it should open up to reveal the <emphasis>data</emphasis> share. After
245                         you click the share, it should open up to reveal the files previously
246                         placed in the <filename>/export</filename> directory.
247                         </para></step>
248                 </procedure>
249
250                 <para>
251                 The information above (following # Global parameters) provides the complete
252                 contents of the <filename>/etc/samba/smb.conf</filename> file.
253                 </para>
254
255                 </sect3>
256
257                 <sect3>
258                 <title>Anonymous Read-Write Document Server</title>
259
260                 <para>
261                 <indexterm><primary>anonymous</primary><secondary>read-write server</secondary></indexterm>
262                 We should view this configuration as a progression from the previous example.
263                 The difference is that shared access is now forced to the user identity of jackb
264                 and to the primary group jackb belongs to. One other refinement we can make is to
265                 add the user <emphasis>jackb</emphasis> to the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file.
266                 To do this, execute:
267 <screen>
268 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -a jackb</userinput>
269 New SMB password: <userinput>m0r3pa1n</userinput>
270 Retype new SMB password: <userinput>m0r3pa1n</userinput>
271 Added user jackb.
272 </screen>
273                 Addition of this user to the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file allows all files
274                 to be displayed in the Explorer Properties boxes as belonging to <emphasis>jackb</emphasis>
275                 instead of to <emphasis>User Unknown</emphasis>.
276                 </para>
277
278                 <para>
279                 The complete, modified &smb.conf; file is as shown in <link linkend="anon-rw"/>.
280                 </para>
281
282 <example id="anon-rw">
283 <title>Modified Anonymous Read-Write smb.conf</title>
284 <smbconfblock>
285 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
286 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
287 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
288 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">HOBBIT</smbconfoption>
289 <smbconfoption name="security">SHARE</smbconfoption>
290
291 <smbconfsection name="[data]"/>
292 <smbconfoption name="comment">Data</smbconfoption>
293 <smbconfoption name="path">/export</smbconfoption>
294 <smbconfoption name="force user">jackb</smbconfoption>
295 <smbconfoption name="force group">users</smbconfoption>
296 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
297 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
298 </smbconfblock>
299 </example>
300
301                 </sect3>
302
303                 <sect3>
304                 <title>Anonymous Print Server</title>
305
306                 <para>
307                 <indexterm><primary>anonymous</primary><secondary>print server</secondary></indexterm>
308                 An anonymous print server serves two purposes:
309                 </para>
310
311                 <itemizedlist>
312                         <listitem><para>
313                         It allows printing to all printers from a single location.
314                         </para></listitem>
315
316                         <listitem><para>
317                         It reduces network traffic congestion due to many users trying
318                         to access a limited number of printers.
319                         </para></listitem>
320                 </itemizedlist>
321
322                 <para>
323                 In the simplest of anonymous print servers, it is common to require the installation
324                 of the correct printer drivers on the Windows workstation. In this case the print
325                 server will be designed to just pass print jobs through to the spooler, and the spooler
326                 should be configured to do raw pass-through to the printer. In other words, the print
327                 spooler should not filter or process the data stream being passed to the printer.
328                 </para>
329
330                 <para>
331                 In this configuration, it is undesirable to present the Add Printer Wizard, and we do
332                 not want to have automatic driver download, so we disable it in the following
333                 configuration. <link linkend="anon-print"></link> is the resulting &smb.conf; file.
334                 </para>
335
336 <example id="anon-print">
337 <title>Anonymous Print Server smb.conf</title>
338 <smbconfblock>
339 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
340 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
341 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
342 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">LUTHIEN</smbconfoption>
343 <smbconfoption name="security">share</smbconfoption>
344 <smbconfoption name="printcap name">cups</smbconfoption>
345 <smbconfoption name="disable spoolss">Yes</smbconfoption>
346 <smbconfoption name="show add printer wizard">No</smbconfoption>
347 <smbconfoption name="printing">cups</smbconfoption>
348
349 <smbconfsection name="[printers]"/>
350 <smbconfoption name="comment">All Printers</smbconfoption>
351 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/spool/samba</smbconfoption>
352 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
353 <smbconfoption name="printable">Yes</smbconfoption>
354 <smbconfoption name="use client driver">Yes</smbconfoption>
355 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
356 </smbconfblock>
357 </example>
358
359                 <para>
360                 The above configuration is not ideal. It uses no smart features, and it deliberately
361                 presents a less than elegant solution. But it is basic, and it does print. Samba makes
362                 use of the direct printing application program interface that is provided by CUPS.
363                 When Samba has been compiled and linked with the CUPS libraries, the default printing
364                 system will be CUPS. By specifying that the printcap name is CUPS, Samba will use
365                 the CUPS library API to communicate directly with CUPS for all printer functions.
366                 It is possible to force the use of external printing commands by setting the value
367                 of the <parameter>printing</parameter> to either SYSV or BSD, and thus the value of
368                 the parameter <parameter>printcap name</parameter> must be set to something other than
369                 CUPS. In such case, it could be set to the name of any file that contains a list
370                 of printers that should be made available to Windows clients.
371                 </para>
372
373                 <note><para>
374                 Windows users will need to install a local printer and then change the print
375                 to device after installation of the drivers. The print to device can then be set to
376                 the network printer on this machine.
377                 </para></note>
378
379                 <para>
380                 Make sure that the directory <filename>/var/spool/samba</filename> is capable of being used
381                 as intended. The following steps must be taken to achieve this:
382                 </para>
383
384                 <itemizedlist>
385                         <listitem><para>
386                         The directory must be owned by the superuser (root) user and group:
387 <screen>
388 &rootprompt;<userinput>chown root.root /var/spool/samba</userinput>
389 </screen>
390                         </para></listitem>
391
392                         <listitem><para>
393                         Directory permissions should be set for public read-write with the
394                         sticky bit set as shown:
395 <screen>
396 &rootprompt;<userinput>chmod a+twrx /var/spool/samba</userinput>
397 </screen>
398                 The purpose of setting the sticky bit is to prevent who does not own the temporary print file
399                 from being able to take control of it with the potential for devious misuse.
400                         </para></listitem>
401                 </itemizedlist>
402
403
404                 <note><para>
405                 <indexterm><primary>MIME</primary><secondary>raw</secondary></indexterm>
406                 <indexterm><primary>raw printing</primary></indexterm>
407                 On CUPS-enabled systems there is a facility to pass raw data directly to the printer without
408                 intermediate processing via CUPS print filters. Where use of this mode of operation is desired,
409                 it is necessary to configure a raw printing device. It is also necessary to enable the raw mime
410                 handler in the <filename>/etc/mime.conv</filename> and <filename>/etc/mime.types</filename>
411                 files. Refer to <link linkend="cups-raw"></link>.
412                 </para></note>
413
414                 </sect3>
415
416                 <sect3>
417
418                 <title>Secure Read-Write File and Print Server</title>
419
420                 <para>
421                 We progress now from simple systems to a server that is slightly more complex.
422                 </para>
423
424                 <para>
425                 Our new server will require a public data storage area in which only authenticated
426                 users (i.e., those with a local account) can store files, as well as a home directory.
427                 There will be one printer that should be available for everyone to use.
428                 </para>
429
430                 <para>
431                 In this hypothetical environment (no espionage was conducted to obtain this data),
432                 the site is demanding a simple environment that is <emphasis>secure enough</emphasis>
433                 but not too difficult to use. 
434                 </para>
435
436                 <para>
437                 Site users will be Jack Baumbach, Mary Orville, and Amed Sehkah. Each will have
438                 a password (not shown in further examples). Mary will be the printer administrator and will
439                 own all files in the public share.
440                 </para>
441
442                 <para>
443                 This configuration will be based on <emphasis>user-level security</emphasis> that
444                 is the default, and for which the default is to store Microsoft Windows-compatible
445                 encrypted passwords in a file called <filename>/etc/samba/smbpasswd</filename>.
446                 The default &smb.conf; entry that makes this happen is
447                 <smbconfoption name="passdb backend">smbpasswd, guest</smbconfoption>. Since this is the default,
448                 it is not necessary to enter it into the configuration file. Note that the guest backend is
449                 added to the list of active passdb backends no matter whether it specified directly in Samba configuration
450                 file or not.
451                 </para>
452
453
454                 <procedure>
455                 <title>Installing the Secure Office Server</title>
456                         <step><para>
457                 <indexterm><primary>office server</primary></indexterm>
458                         Add all users to the operating system:
459 <screen>
460 &rootprompt;<userinput>useradd -c "Jack Baumbach" -m -g users -p m0r3pa1n jackb</userinput>
461 &rootprompt;<userinput>useradd -c "Mary Orville" -m -g users -p secret maryo</userinput>
462 &rootprompt;<userinput>useradd -c "Amed Sehkah" -m -g users -p secret ameds</userinput>
463 </screen>
464                         </para></step>
465
466                         <step><para>
467                         Configure the Samba &smb.conf; file as shown in <link linkend="OfficeServer"/>.
468                         </para></step>
469
470 <example id="OfficeServer">
471 <title>Secure Office Server smb.conf</title>
472 <smbconfblock>
473 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
474 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
475 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
476 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">OLORIN</smbconfoption>
477 <smbconfoption name="printcap name">cups</smbconfoption>
478 <smbconfoption name="disable spoolss">Yes</smbconfoption>
479 <smbconfoption name="show add printer wizard">No</smbconfoption>
480 <smbconfoption name="printing">cups</smbconfoption>
481
482 <smbconfsection name="[homes]"/>
483 <smbconfoption name="comment">Home Directories</smbconfoption>
484 <smbconfoption name="valid users">%S</smbconfoption>
485 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
486 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
487
488 <smbconfsection name="[public]"/>
489 <smbconfoption name="comment">Data</smbconfoption>
490 <smbconfoption name="path">/export</smbconfoption>
491 <smbconfoption name="force user">maryo</smbconfoption>
492 <smbconfoption name="force group">users</smbconfoption>
493 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
494
495 <smbconfsection name="[printers]"/>
496 <smbconfoption name="comment">All Printers</smbconfoption>
497 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/spool/samba</smbconfoption>
498 <smbconfoption name="printer admin">root, maryo</smbconfoption>
499 <smbconfoption name="create mask">0600</smbconfoption>
500 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
501 <smbconfoption name="printable">Yes</smbconfoption>
502 <smbconfoption name="use client driver">Yes</smbconfoption>
503 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
504 </smbconfblock>
505 </example>
506
507                         <step><para>
508                         Initialize the Microsoft Windows password database with the new users:
509 <screen>
510 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -a root</userinput>
511 New SMB password: <userinput>bigsecret</userinput>
512 Reenter smb password: <userinput>bigsecret</userinput>
513 Added user root.
514
515 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -a jackb</userinput>
516 New SMB password: <userinput>m0r3pa1n</userinput>
517 Retype new SMB password: <userinput>m0r3pa1n</userinput>
518 Added user jackb.
519
520 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -a maryo</userinput>
521 New SMB password: <userinput>secret</userinput>
522 Reenter smb password: <userinput>secret</userinput>
523 Added user maryo.
524
525 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -a ameds</userinput>
526 New SMB password: <userinput>mysecret</userinput>
527 Reenter smb password: <userinput>mysecret</userinput>
528 Added user ameds.
529 </screen>
530                         </para></step>
531
532                         <step><para>
533                         Install printer using the CUPS Web interface. Make certain that all
534                         printers that will be shared with Microsoft Windows clients are installed
535                         as raw printing devices.
536                         </para></step>
537
538                         <step><para>
539                         Start Samba using the operating system administrative interface.
540                         Alternately, this can be done manually by executing:
541                         <indexterm><primary>smbd</primary></indexterm>
542                         <indexterm><primary>nmbd</primary></indexterm>
543                         <indexterm><primary>starting samba</primary><secondary>smbd</secondary></indexterm>
544                         <indexterm><primary>starting samba</primary><secondary>nmbd</secondary></indexterm>
545 <screen>
546 &rootprompt;<userinput> nmbd; smbd;</userinput>
547 </screen>
548                         Both applications automatically execute as daemons. Those who are paranoid about
549                         maintaining control can add the <constant>-D</constant> flag to coerce them to start
550                         up in daemon mode.
551                         </para></step>
552
553                         <step><para>
554                         Configure the <filename>/export</filename> directory:
555 <screen>
556 &rootprompt;<userinput>mkdir /export</userinput>
557 &rootprompt;<userinput>chown maryo.users /export</userinput>
558 &rootprompt;<userinput>chmod u=rwx,g=rwx,o-rwx /export</userinput>
559 </screen>
560                         </para></step>
561
562                         <step><para>
563                         Check that Samba is running correctly:
564 <screen>
565 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbclient -L localhost -U%</userinput>
566 Domain=[MIDEARTH] OS=[UNIX] Server=[Samba-3.0.20]
567
568 Sharename      Type      Comment
569 ---------      ----      -------
570 public         Disk      Data
571 IPC$           IPC       IPC Service (Samba-3.0.20)
572 ADMIN$         IPC       IPC Service (Samba-3.0.20)
573 hplj4          Printer   hplj4
574
575 Server               Comment
576 ---------            -------
577 OLORIN               Samba-3.0.20
578
579 Workgroup            Master
580 ---------            -------
581 MIDEARTH             OLORIN
582 </screen>
583                         The following error message indicates that Samba was not running:
584 <screen>
585 &rootprompt; smbclient -L olorin -U%
586 Error connecting to 192.168.1.40 (Connection refused)
587 Connection to olorin failed
588 </screen>
589                         </para></step>
590
591                         <step><para>
592                         Connect to OLORIN as maryo:
593 <screen>
594 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbclient //olorin/maryo -Umaryo%secret</userinput>
595 OS=[UNIX] Server=[Samba-3.0.20]
596 smb: \> <userinput>dir</userinput>
597 .                              D        0  Sat Jun 21 10:58:16 2003
598 ..                             D        0  Sat Jun 21 10:54:32 2003
599 Documents                      D        0  Fri Apr 25 13:23:58 2003
600 DOCWORK                        D        0  Sat Jun 14 15:40:34 2003
601 OpenOffice.org                 D        0  Fri Apr 25 13:55:16 2003
602 .bashrc                        H     1286  Fri Apr 25 13:23:58 2003
603 .netscape6                    DH        0  Fri Apr 25 13:55:13 2003
604 .mozilla                      DH        0  Wed Mar  5 11:50:50 2003
605 .kermrc                        H      164  Fri Apr 25 13:23:58 2003
606 .acrobat                      DH        0  Fri Apr 25 15:41:02 2003
607
608                 55817 blocks of size 524288. 34725 blocks available
609 smb: \> <userinput>q</userinput>
610 </screen>
611                         </para></step>
612                 </procedure>
613
614                         <para>
615                         By now you should be getting the hang of configuration basics. Clearly, it is time to
616                         explore slightly more complex examples. For the remainder of this chapter we abbreviate
617                         instructions, since there are previous examples.
618                         </para>
619
620                 </sect3>
621
622         </sect2>
623
624         <sect2>
625         <title>Domain Member Server</title>
626
627         <para>
628         <indexterm><primary>Server Type</primary><secondary>Domain Member</secondary></indexterm>
629         In this instance we consider the simplest server configuration we can get away with
630         to make an accounting department happy. Let's be warned, the users are accountants and they
631         do have some nasty demands. There is a budget for only one server for this department.
632         </para>
633
634         <para>
635         The network is managed by an internal Information Services Group (ISG), to which we belong.
636         Internal politics are typical of a medium-sized organization; Human Resources is of the
637         opinion that they run the ISG because they are always adding and disabling users. Also,
638         departmental managers have to fight tooth and nail to gain basic network resources access for
639         their staff. Accounting is different, though, they get exactly what they want. So this should
640         set the scene.
641         </para>
642
643         <para>
644         We use the users from the last example. The accounting department
645         has a general printer that all departmental users may use. There is also a check printer
646         that may be used only by the person who has authority to print checks. The chief financial
647         officer (CFO) wants that printer to be completely restricted and for it to be located in the
648         private storage area in her office. It therefore must be a network printer.
649         </para>
650
651         <para>
652         The accounting department uses an accounting application called <emphasis>SpytFull</emphasis>
653         that must be run from a central application server. The software is licensed to run only off
654         one server, there are no workstation components, and it is run off a mapped share. The data
655         store is in a UNIX-based SQL backend. The UNIX gurus look after that, so this is not our
656         problem.
657         </para>
658
659         <para>
660         The accounting department manager (maryo) wants a general filing system as well as a separate
661         file storage area for form letters (nastygrams). The form letter area should be read-only to
662         all accounting staff except the manager. The general filing system has to have a structured
663         layout with a general area for all staff to store general documents as well as a separate
664         file area for each member of her team that is private to that person, but she wants full
665         access to all areas. Users must have a private home share for personal work-related files
666         and for materials not related to departmental operations.
667         </para>
668         
669                 <sect3>
670                 <title>Example Configuration</title>
671                 
672                 <para>
673                 The server <emphasis>valinor</emphasis> will be a member server of the company domain.
674                 Accounting will have only a local server. User accounts will be on the domain controllers,
675                 as will desktop profiles and all network policy files.
676                 </para>
677
678                 <procedure>
679                         <step><para>
680                         Do not add users to the UNIX/Linux server; all of this will run off the
681                         central domain.
682                         </para></step>
683
684                         <step><para>
685                         Configure &smb.conf; according to <link linkend="fast-member-server">Member server smb.conf
686                         (globals)</link> and <link linkend="fast-memberserver-shares">Member server smb.conf (shares
687                         and services)</link>.
688                         </para></step>
689
690 <example id="fast-member-server">
691 <title>Member Server smb.conf (Globals)</title>
692 <smbconfblock>
693 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
694 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
695 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
696 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">VALINOR</smbconfoption>
697 <smbconfoption name="security">DOMAIN</smbconfoption>
698 <smbconfoption name="printcap name">cups</smbconfoption>
699 <smbconfoption name="disable spoolss">Yes</smbconfoption>
700 <smbconfoption name="show add printer wizard">No</smbconfoption>
701 <smbconfoption name="idmap uid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
702 <smbconfoption name="idmap gid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
703 <smbconfoption name="winbind use default domain">Yes</smbconfoption>
704 <smbconfoption name="printing">cups</smbconfoption>
705 </smbconfblock>
706 </example>
707
708 <example id="fast-memberserver-shares">
709 <title>Member Server smb.conf (Shares and Services)</title>
710 <smbconfblock>
711 <smbconfsection name="[homes]"/>
712 <smbconfoption name="comment">Home Directories</smbconfoption>
713 <smbconfoption name="valid users">%S</smbconfoption>
714 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
715 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
716
717 <smbconfsection name="[spytfull]"/>
718 <smbconfoption name="comment">Accounting Application Only</smbconfoption>
719 <smbconfoption name="path">/export/spytfull</smbconfoption>
720 <smbconfoption name="valid users">@Accounts</smbconfoption>
721 <smbconfoption name="admin users">maryo</smbconfoption>
722 <smbconfoption name="read only">Yes</smbconfoption>
723
724 <smbconfsection name="[public]"/>
725 <smbconfoption name="comment">Data</smbconfoption>
726 <smbconfoption name="path">/export/public</smbconfoption>
727 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
728
729 <smbconfsection name="[printers]"/>
730 <smbconfoption name="comment">All Printers</smbconfoption>
731 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/spool/samba</smbconfoption>
732 <smbconfoption name="printer admin">root, maryo</smbconfoption>
733 <smbconfoption name="create mask">0600</smbconfoption>
734 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
735 <smbconfoption name="printable">Yes</smbconfoption>
736 <smbconfoption name="use client driver">Yes</smbconfoption>
737 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
738 </smbconfblock>
739 </example>
740
741                         <step><para>
742                         <indexterm><primary>net</primary><secondary>rpc</secondary></indexterm>
743                         Join the domain. Note: Do not start Samba until this step has been completed!
744 <screen>
745 &rootprompt;<userinput>net rpc join -Uroot%'bigsecret'</userinput>
746 Joined domain MIDEARTH.
747 </screen>
748                         </para></step>
749
750                         <step><para>
751                         Make absolutely certain that you disable (shut down) the <command>nscd</command>
752                         daemon on any system on which <command>winbind</command> is configured to run.
753                         </para></step>
754
755                         <step><para>
756                         Start Samba following the normal method for your operating system platform.
757                         If you wish to do this manually, execute as root:
758                         <indexterm><primary>smbd</primary></indexterm>
759                         <indexterm><primary>nmbd</primary></indexterm>
760                         <indexterm><primary>winbindd</primary></indexterm>
761                         <indexterm><primary>starting samba</primary><secondary>smbd</secondary></indexterm>
762                         <indexterm><primary>starting samba</primary><secondary>nmbd</secondary></indexterm>
763                         <indexterm><primary>starting samba</primary><secondary>winbindd</secondary></indexterm>
764 <screen>
765 &rootprompt;<userinput>nmbd; smbd; winbindd;</userinput>
766 </screen>
767                         </para></step>
768
769                         <step><para>
770                         Configure the name service switch (NSS) control file on your system to resolve user and group names
771                         via winbind. Edit the following lines in <filename>/etc/nsswitch.conf</filename>:
772 <programlisting>
773 passwd: files winbind
774 group:  files winbind
775 hosts:  files dns winbind
776 </programlisting>
777                         </para></step>
778
779                         <step><para>
780                         Set the password for <command>wbinfo</command> to use:
781 <screen>
782 &rootprompt;<userinput>wbinfo --set-auth-user=root%'bigsecret'</userinput>
783 </screen>
784                         </para></step>
785
786                         <step><para>
787                         Validate that domain user and group credentials can be correctly resolved by executing:
788 <screen>
789 &rootprompt;<userinput>wbinfo -u</userinput>
790 MIDEARTH\maryo
791 MIDEARTH\jackb
792 MIDEARTH\ameds
793 ...
794 MIDEARTH\root
795
796 &rootprompt;<userinput>wbinfo -g</userinput>
797 MIDEARTH\Domain Users
798 MIDEARTH\Domain Admins
799 MIDEARTH\Domain Guests
800 ...
801 MIDEARTH\Accounts
802 </screen>
803                         </para></step>
804
805                         <step><para>
806                         Check that <command>winbind</command> is working. The following demonstrates correct
807                         username resolution via the <command>getent</command> system utility:
808 <screen>
809 &rootprompt;<userinput>getent passwd maryo</userinput>
810 maryo:x:15000:15003:Mary Orville:/home/MIDEARTH/maryo:/bin/false
811 </screen>
812                         </para></step>
813
814                         <step><para>
815                         A final test that we have this under control might be reassuring:
816 <screen>
817 &rootprompt;<userinput>touch /export/a_file</userinput>
818 &rootprompt;<userinput>chown maryo /export/a_file</userinput>
819 &rootprompt;<userinput>ls -al /export/a_file</userinput>
820 ...
821 -rw-r--r--    1 maryo    users       11234 Jun 21 15:32 a_file
822 ...
823
824 &rootprompt;<userinput>rm /export/a_file</userinput>
825 </screen>
826                         </para></step>
827
828                         <step><para>
829                         Configuration is now mostly complete, so this is an opportune time
830                         to configure the directory structure for this site:
831 <screen>
832 &rootprompt;<userinput>mkdir -p /export/{spytfull,public}</userinput>
833 &rootprompt;<userinput>chmod ug=rwxS,o=x /export/{spytfull,public}</userinput>
834 &rootprompt;<userinput>chown maryo.Accounts /export/{spytfull,public}</userinput>
835 </screen>
836                         </para></step>
837                 </procedure>
838
839                 </sect3>
840
841         </sect2>
842
843         <sect2>
844         <title>Domain Controller</title>
845
846
847         <para>
848         <indexterm><primary>Server Type</primary><secondary>Domain Controller</secondary></indexterm>
849         For the remainder of this chapter the focus is on the configuration of domain control.
850         The examples that follow are for two implementation strategies. Remember, our objective is
851         to create a simple but working solution. The remainder of this book should help to highlight
852         opportunity for greater functionality and the complexity that goes with it.
853         </para>
854
855         <para>
856         A domain controller configuration can be achieved with a simple configuration using the new
857         tdbsam password backend. This type of configuration is good for small
858         offices, but has limited scalability (cannot be replicated), and performance can be expected
859         to fall as the size and complexity of the domain increases.
860         </para>
861
862         <para>
863         The use of tdbsam is best limited to sites that do not need
864         more than a Primary Domain Controller (PDC). As the size of a domain grows the need
865         for additional domain controllers becomes apparent. Do not attempt to under-resource
866         a Microsoft Windows network environment; domain controllers provide essential
867         authentication services. The following are symptoms of an under-resourced domain control
868         environment:
869         </para>
870
871         <itemizedlist>  
872                 <listitem><para>
873                  Domain logons intermittently fail.
874                 </para></listitem>
875
876                 <listitem><para>
877                 File access on a domain member server intermittently fails, giving a permission denied
878                 error message.
879                 </para></listitem>
880         </itemizedlist>
881
882         <para>
883         A more scalable domain control authentication backend option might use
884         Microsoft Active Directory or an LDAP-based backend. Samba-3 provides
885         for both options as a domain member server. As a PDC, Samba-3 is not able to provide
886         an exact alternative to the functionality that is available with Active Directory.
887         Samba-3 can provide a scalable LDAP-based PDC/BDC solution.
888         </para>
889
890         <para>
891         The tdbsam authentication backend provides no facility to replicate
892         the contents of the database, except by external means (i.e., there is no self-contained protocol
893         in Samba-3 for Security Account Manager database [SAM] replication).
894         </para>
895
896         <note><para>
897         If you need more than one domain controller, do not use a tdbsam authentication backend.
898         </para></note>
899
900                 <sect3>
901                 <title>Example: Engineering Office</title>
902
903                 <para>
904                 The engineering office network server we present here is designed to demonstrate use
905                 of the new tdbsam password backend. The tdbsam
906                 facility is new to Samba-3. It is designed to provide many user and machine account controls
907                 that are possible with Microsoft Windows NT4. It is safe to use this in smaller networks.
908                 </para>
909
910                 <procedure>
911                         <step><para>
912                         A working PDC configuration using the tdbsam
913                         password backend can be found in <link linkend="fast-engoffice-global">Engineering Office smb.conf
914                         (globals)</link> together with <link linkend="fast-engoffice-shares">Engineering Office smb.conf
915                         (shares and services)</link>:
916                         <indexterm><primary>pdbedit</primary></indexterm>
917                         </para></step>
918
919 <example id="fast-engoffice-global">
920 <title>Engineering Office smb.conf (globals)</title>
921 <smbconfblock>
922 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
923 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
924 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">FRODO</smbconfoption>
925 <smbconfoption name="passdb backend">tdbsam</smbconfoption>
926 <smbconfoption name="printcap name">cups</smbconfoption>
927 <smbconfoption name="add user script">/usr/sbin/useradd -m %u</smbconfoption>
928 <smbconfoption name="delete user script">/usr/sbin/userdel -r %u</smbconfoption>
929 <smbconfoption name="add group script">/usr/sbin/groupadd %g</smbconfoption>
930 <smbconfoption name="delete group script">/usr/sbin/groupdel %g</smbconfoption>
931 <smbconfoption name="add user to group script">/usr/sbin/groupmod -A %u %g</smbconfoption>
932 <smbconfoption name="delete user from group script">/usr/sbin/groupmod -R %u %g</smbconfoption>
933 <smbconfoption name="add machine script">/usr/sbin/useradd -s /bin/false -d /var/lib/nobody %u</smbconfoption>
934 <smbconfcomment>Note: The following specifies the default logon script.</smbconfcomment>
935 <smbconfcomment>Per user logon scripts can be specified in the user account using pdbedit </smbconfcomment>
936 <smbconfoption name="logon script">scripts\logon.bat</smbconfoption>
937 <smbconfcomment>This sets the default profile path. Set per user paths with pdbedit</smbconfcomment>
938 <smbconfoption name="logon path">\\%L\Profiles\%U</smbconfoption>
939 <smbconfoption name="logon drive">H:</smbconfoption>
940 <smbconfoption name="logon home">\\%L\%U</smbconfoption>
941 <smbconfoption name="domain logons">Yes</smbconfoption>
942 <smbconfoption name="os level">35</smbconfoption>
943 <smbconfoption name="preferred master">Yes</smbconfoption>
944 <smbconfoption name="domain master">Yes</smbconfoption>
945 <smbconfoption name="idmap uid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
946 <smbconfoption name="idmap gid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
947 <smbconfoption name="printing">cups</smbconfoption>
948 </smbconfblock>
949 </example>
950
951 <example id="fast-engoffice-shares">
952 <title>Engineering Office smb.conf (shares and services)</title>
953 <smbconfblock>
954 <smbconfsection name="[homes]"/>
955 <smbconfoption name="comment">Home Directories</smbconfoption>
956 <smbconfoption name="valid users">%S</smbconfoption>
957 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
958 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
959
960 <smbconfcomment>Printing auto-share (makes printers available thru CUPS)</smbconfcomment>
961 <smbconfsection name="[printers]"/>
962 <smbconfoption name="comment">All Printers</smbconfoption>
963 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/spool/samba</smbconfoption>
964 <smbconfoption name="printer admin">root, maryo</smbconfoption>
965 <smbconfoption name="create mask">0600</smbconfoption>
966 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
967 <smbconfoption name="printable">Yes</smbconfoption>
968 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
969
970 <smbconfsection name="[print$]"/>
971 <smbconfoption name="comment">Printer Drivers Share</smbconfoption>
972 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/lib/samba/drivers</smbconfoption>
973 <smbconfoption name="write list">maryo, root</smbconfoption>
974 <smbconfoption name="printer admin">maryo, root</smbconfoption>
975
976 <smbconfcomment>Needed to support domain logons</smbconfcomment>
977 <smbconfsection name="[netlogon]"/>
978 <smbconfoption name="comment">Network Logon Service</smbconfoption>
979 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/lib/samba/netlogon</smbconfoption>
980 <smbconfoption name="admin users">root, maryo</smbconfoption>
981 <smbconfoption name="guest ok">Yes</smbconfoption>
982 <smbconfoption name="browseable">No</smbconfoption>
983
984 <smbconfcomment>For profiles to work, create a user directory under the path</smbconfcomment>
985 <smbconfcomment> shown. i.e., mkdir -p /var/lib/samba/profiles/maryo</smbconfcomment>
986 <smbconfsection name="[Profiles]"/>
987 <smbconfoption name="comment">Roaming Profile Share</smbconfoption>
988 <smbconfoption name="path">/var/lib/samba/profiles</smbconfoption>
989 <smbconfoption name="read only">No</smbconfoption>
990 <smbconfoption name="profile acls">Yes</smbconfoption>
991
992 <smbconfcomment>Other resource (share/printer) definitions would follow below.</smbconfcomment>
993 </smbconfblock>
994 </example>
995
996                         <step><para>
997                         Create UNIX group accounts as needed using a suitable operating system tool:
998 <screen>
999 &rootprompt;<userinput>groupadd ntadmins</userinput>
1000 &rootprompt;<userinput>groupadd designers</userinput>
1001 &rootprompt;<userinput>groupadd engineers</userinput>
1002 &rootprompt;<userinput>groupadd qateam</userinput>
1003 </screen>
1004                         </para></step>
1005
1006                         <step><para>
1007                         Create user accounts on the system using the appropriate tool
1008                         provided with the operating system. Make sure all user home directories
1009                         are created also. Add users to groups as required for access control
1010                         on files, directories, printers, and as required for use in the Samba
1011                         environment.
1012                         </para></step>
1013
1014
1015                         <step><para>
1016                         <indexterm><primary>net</primary><secondary>groupmap</secondary></indexterm>
1017                         <indexterm><primary>initGroups.sh</primary></indexterm>
1018                         Assign each of the UNIX groups to NT groups by executing this shell script
1019                         (You could name the script <filename>initGroups.sh</filename>):
1020 <screen>
1021 #!/bin/bash
1022 #### Keep this as a shell script for future re-use
1023                         
1024 # First assign well known groups
1025 net groupmap add ntgroup="Domain Admins" unixgroup=ntadmins rid=512 type=d
1026 net groupmap add ntgroup="Domain Users"  unixgroup=users rid=513 type=
1027 net groupmap add ntgroup="Domain Guests" unixgroup=nobody rid=514 type=d
1028
1029 # Now for our added Domain Groups
1030 net groupmap add ntgroup="Designers" unixgroup=designers type=d
1031 net groupmap add ntgroup="Engineers" unixgroup=engineers type=d
1032 net groupmap add ntgroup="QA Team"   unixgroup=qateam    type=d
1033 </screen>
1034                         </para></step>
1035
1036                         <step><para>
1037                         Create the <filename>scripts</filename> directory for use in the 
1038                         <smbconfsection name="[NETLOGON]"/> share:
1039 <screen>
1040 &rootprompt;<userinput>mkdir -p /var/lib/samba/netlogon/scripts</userinput>
1041 </screen>
1042                         Place the logon scripts that will be used (batch or cmd scripts)
1043                         in this directory.
1044                         </para></step>
1045                 </procedure>
1046
1047                 <para>
1048                 The above configuration provides a functional PDC
1049                 system to which must be added file shares and printers as required.
1050                 </para>
1051
1052                 </sect3>
1053
1054                 <sect3>
1055                 <title>A Big Organization</title>
1056
1057                 <para>
1058                 In this section we finally get to review in brief a Samba-3 configuration that
1059                 uses a Lightweight Directory Access (LDAP)-based authentication backend. The
1060                 main reasons for this choice are to provide the ability to host primary
1061                 and Backup Domain Control (BDC), as well as to enable a higher degree of
1062                 scalability to meet the needs of a very distributed environment.
1063                 </para>
1064
1065                         <sect4>
1066                         <title>The Primary Domain Controller</title>
1067
1068                         <para>
1069                         This is an example of a minimal configuration to run a Samba-3 PDC
1070                         using an LDAP authentication backend. It is assumed that the operating system
1071                         has been correctly configured.
1072                         </para>
1073
1074                         <para>
1075                         The Idealx scripts (or equivalent) are needed to manage LDAP-based POSIX and/or
1076                         SambaSamAccounts. The Idealx scripts may be downloaded from the <ulink url="http://www.idealx.org">
1077                         Idealx</ulink> Web site. They may also be obtained from the Samba tarball. Linux
1078                         distributions tend to install the Idealx scripts in the 
1079                         <filename>/usr/share/doc/packages/sambaXXXXXX/examples/LDAP/smbldap-tools</filename> directory.
1080                         Idealx scripts version <constant>smbldap-tools-0.9.1</constant> are known to work well.
1081                         </para>
1082
1083                         <procedure>
1084                                 <step><para>
1085                                 Obtain from the Samba sources <filename>~/examples/LDAP/samba.schema</filename>
1086                                 and copy it to the <filename>/etc/openldap/schema/</filename> directory.
1087                                 </para></step>
1088
1089                                 <step><para>
1090                                 Set up the LDAP server. This example is suitable for OpenLDAP 2.1.x.
1091                                 The <filename>/etc/openldap/slapd.conf</filename> file.
1092                                 <indexterm><primary>/etc/openldap/slapd.conf</primary></indexterm>
1093 <title>Example slapd.conf File</title>
1094 <screen>
1095 # Note commented out lines have been removed
1096 include         /etc/openldap/schema/core.schema
1097 include         /etc/openldap/schema/cosine.schema
1098 include         /etc/openldap/schema/inetorgperson.schema
1099 include         /etc/openldap/schema/nis.schema
1100 include         /etc/openldap/schema/samba.schema
1101
1102 pidfile         /var/run/slapd/slapd.pid
1103 argsfile        /var/run/slapd/slapd.args
1104
1105 database        bdb
1106 suffix          "dc=quenya,dc=org"
1107 rootdn          "cn=Manager,dc=quenya,dc=org"
1108 rootpw          {SSHA}06qDkonA8hk6W6SSnRzWj0/pBcU3m0/P
1109 # The password for the above is 'nastyon3'
1110
1111 directory     /var/lib/ldap
1112
1113 index   objectClass     eq
1114 index cn                      pres,sub,eq
1115 index sn                      pres,sub,eq
1116 index uid                     pres,sub,eq
1117 index displayName             pres,sub,eq
1118 index uidNumber               eq
1119 index gidNumber               eq
1120 index memberUid               eq
1121 index   sambaSID              eq
1122 index   sambaPrimaryGroupSID  eq
1123 index   sambaDomainName       eq
1124 index   default               sub
1125 </screen>
1126                                 </para></step>
1127
1128                                 <step><para>
1129                                 Create the following file <filename>initdb.ldif</filename>:
1130                                 <indexterm><primary>initdb.ldif</primary></indexterm>
1131 <programlisting>
1132 # Organization for SambaXP Demo
1133 dn: dc=quenya,dc=org
1134 objectclass: dcObject
1135 objectclass: organization
1136 dc: quenya
1137 o: SambaXP Demo
1138 description: The SambaXP Demo LDAP Tree
1139
1140 # Organizational Role for Directory Management
1141 dn: cn=Manager,dc=quenya,dc=org
1142 objectclass: organizationalRole
1143 cn: Manager
1144 description: Directory Manager
1145
1146 # Setting up the container for users
1147 dn: ou=People, dc=quenya, dc=org
1148 objectclass: top
1149 objectclass: organizationalUnit
1150 ou: People
1151
1152 # Set up an admin handle for People OU
1153 dn: cn=admin, ou=People, dc=quenya, dc=org
1154 cn: admin
1155 objectclass: top
1156 objectclass: organizationalRole
1157 objectclass: simpleSecurityObject
1158 userPassword: {SSHA}0jBHgQ1vp4EDX2rEMMfIudvRMJoGwjVb
1159 # The password for above is 'mordonL8'
1160 </programlisting>
1161                                 </para></step>
1162
1163                                 <step><para>
1164                                 Load the initial data above into the LDAP database:
1165 <screen>
1166 &rootprompt;<userinput>slapadd -v -l initdb.ldif</userinput>
1167 </screen>
1168                                 </para></step>
1169
1170                                 <step><para>
1171                                 Start the LDAP server using the appropriate tool or method for
1172                                 the operating system platform on which it is installed.
1173                                 </para></step>
1174
1175                                 <step><para>
1176                                 Install the Idealx script files in the <filename>/usr/local/sbin</filename> directory,
1177                                 then configure the smbldap_conf.pm file to match your system configuration.
1178                                 </para></step>
1179
1180                                 <step><para>
1181                                 The &smb.conf; file that drives this backend can be found in example <link
1182                                 linkend="fast-ldap">LDAP backend smb.conf for PDC</link>. Add additional stanzas
1183                                 as required.
1184                                 </para></step>
1185
1186 <example id="fast-ldap">
1187 <title>LDAP backend smb.conf for PDC</title>
1188 <smbconfblock>
1189 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
1190 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
1191 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
1192 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">FRODO</smbconfoption>
1193 <smbconfoption name="passdb backend">ldapsam:ldap://localhost</smbconfoption>
1194 <smbconfoption name="username map">/etc/samba/smbusers</smbconfoption>
1195 <smbconfoption name="printcap name">cups</smbconfoption>
1196 <smbconfoption name="add user script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-useradd -m '%u'</smbconfoption>
1197 <smbconfoption name="delete user script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-userdel %u</smbconfoption>
1198 <smbconfoption name="add group script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-groupadd -p '%g'</smbconfoption>
1199 <smbconfoption name="delete group script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-groupdel '%g'</smbconfoption>
1200 <smbconfoption name="add user to group script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-groupmod -m '%u' '%g'</smbconfoption>
1201 <smbconfoption name="delete user from group script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-groupmod -x '%u' '%g'</smbconfoption>
1202 <smbconfoption name="set primary group script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-usermod -g '%g' '%u'</smbconfoption>
1203 <smbconfoption name="add machine script">/usr/local/sbin/smbldap-useradd -w '%u'</smbconfoption>
1204 <smbconfoption name="logon script">scripts\logon.bat</smbconfoption>
1205 <smbconfoption name="logon path">\\%L\Profiles\%U</smbconfoption>
1206 <smbconfoption name="logon drive">H:</smbconfoption>
1207 <smbconfoption name="logon home">\\%L\%U</smbconfoption>
1208 <smbconfoption name="domain logons">Yes</smbconfoption>
1209 <smbconfoption name="os level">35</smbconfoption>
1210 <smbconfoption name="preferred master">Yes</smbconfoption>
1211 <smbconfoption name="domain master">Yes</smbconfoption>
1212 <smbconfoption name="ldap suffix">dc=quenya,dc=org</smbconfoption>
1213 <smbconfoption name="ldap machine suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1214 <smbconfoption name="ldap user suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1215 <smbconfoption name="ldap group suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1216 <smbconfoption name="ldap idmap suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1217 <smbconfoption name="ldap admin dn">cn=Manager</smbconfoption>
1218 <smbconfoption name="ldap ssl">no</smbconfoption>
1219 <smbconfoption name="ldap passwd sync">Yes</smbconfoption>
1220 <smbconfoption name="idmap uid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
1221 <smbconfoption name="idmap gid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
1222 <smbconfoption name="printing">cups</smbconfoption>
1223 </smbconfblock>
1224 </example>
1225
1226                                 <step><para>
1227                                 Add the LDAP password to the <filename>secrets.tdb</filename> file so Samba can update
1228                                 the LDAP database:
1229 <screen>
1230 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -w mordonL8</userinput>
1231 </screen>
1232                                 </para></step>
1233
1234                                 <step><para>
1235                                 Add users and groups as required. Users and groups added using Samba tools
1236                                 will automatically be added to both the LDAP backend and the operating
1237                                 system as required.
1238                                 </para></step>
1239
1240                         </procedure>
1241
1242                         </sect4>
1243
1244                         <sect4>
1245                         <title>Backup Domain Controller</title>
1246
1247                         <para>
1248                         <link linkend="fast-bdc"/> shows the example configuration for the BDC. Note that
1249                         the &smb.conf; file does not specify the smbldap-tools scripts &smbmdash; they are
1250                         not needed on a BDC. Add additional stanzas for shares and printers as required.
1251                         </para>
1252
1253                         <procedure>
1254                                 <step><para>
1255                                 Decide if the BDC should have its own LDAP server or not. If the BDC is to be
1256                                 the LDAP server, change the following &smb.conf; as indicated. The default
1257                                 configuration in <link linkend="fast-bdc">Remote LDAP BDC smb.conf</link>
1258                                 uses a central LDAP server.
1259                                 </para></step>
1260
1261 <example id="fast-bdc">
1262 <title>Remote LDAP BDC smb.conf</title>
1263 <smbconfblock>
1264 <smbconfcomment>Global parameters</smbconfcomment>
1265 <smbconfsection name="[global]"/>
1266 <smbconfoption name="workgroup">MIDEARTH</smbconfoption>
1267 <smbconfoption name="netbios name">GANDALF</smbconfoption>
1268 <smbconfoption name="passdb backend">ldapsam:ldap://frodo.quenya.org</smbconfoption>
1269 <smbconfoption name="username map">/etc/samba/smbusers</smbconfoption>
1270 <smbconfoption name="printcap name">cups</smbconfoption>
1271 <smbconfoption name="logon script">scripts\logon.bat</smbconfoption>
1272 <smbconfoption name="logon path">\\%L\Profiles\%U</smbconfoption>
1273 <smbconfoption name="logon drive">H:</smbconfoption>
1274 <smbconfoption name="logon home">\\%L\%U</smbconfoption>
1275 <smbconfoption name="domain logons">Yes</smbconfoption>
1276 <smbconfoption name="os level">33</smbconfoption>
1277 <smbconfoption name="preferred master">Yes</smbconfoption>
1278 <smbconfoption name="domain master">No</smbconfoption>
1279 <smbconfoption name="ldap suffix">dc=quenya,dc=org</smbconfoption>
1280 <smbconfoption name="ldap machine suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1281 <smbconfoption name="ldap user suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1282 <smbconfoption name="ldap group suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1283 <smbconfoption name="ldap idmap suffix">ou=People</smbconfoption>
1284 <smbconfoption name="ldap admin dn">cn=Manager</smbconfoption>
1285 <smbconfoption name="ldap ssl">no</smbconfoption>
1286 <smbconfoption name="ldap passwd sync">Yes</smbconfoption>
1287 <smbconfoption name="idmap uid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
1288 <smbconfoption name="idmap gid">15000-20000</smbconfoption>
1289 <smbconfoption name="printing">cups</smbconfoption>
1290 </smbconfblock>
1291 </example>
1292
1293                                 <step><para>
1294                                 Configure the NETLOGON and PROFILES directory as for the PDC in <link linkend="fast-bdc"/>.
1295                                 </para></step>
1296                         </procedure>
1297
1298                         </sect4>
1299
1300                 </sect3>
1301
1302         </sect2>
1303
1304 </sect1>
1305
1306 </chapter>