added some notes on the new "interfaces" option
authorAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Thu, 6 Jun 1996 11:24:54 +0000 (11:24 +0000)
committerAndrew Tridgell <tridge@samba.org>
Thu, 6 Jun 1996 11:24:54 +0000 (11:24 +0000)
(This used to be commit 8eb701d0d6483d0f5c6de3640b38f98128cd321c)

docs/INSTALL.txt
docs/manpages/smb.conf.5
docs/textdocs/BROWSING.txt

index b91367cd59a284026059d562b0d332a2276912d3..6455a0fe18723c83ba543b415f34710cb195dd31 100644 (file)
@@ -113,11 +113,12 @@ NOTE: Some unixes already have entries like netbios_ns (note the
 underscore) in /etc/services. You must either edit /etc/services or
 /etc/inetd.conf to make them consistant.
 
-NOTE: On many systems you may need to give the nmbd a -B parameter to
-specify the broadcast address of your interface. Run ifconfig as root
-if you don't know what the broadcast is for your net. nmbd tries to
-determine it at run time, but fails on some unixes. See the section on
-"testing nmbd" for a method of finding if you need to do this.
+NOTE: On many systems you may need to use the "interfaces" option in
+smb.conf to specify the IP address and netmask of your interfaces. Run
+ifconfig as root if you don't know what the broadcast is for your
+net. nmbd tries to determine it at run time, but fails on some
+unixes. See the section on "testing nmbd" for a method of finding if
+you need to do this.
 
 !!!WARNING!!! Many unixes only accept around 5 parameters on the
 command line in inetd. This means you shouldn't use spaces between the
index 7149be6a473134828353ffd65c083eecf9cfe53b..d5100181de1b4a1c61b08423ad01cfe60fd8b419 100644 (file)
@@ -1048,6 +1048,31 @@ or perhaps on a home network where you trust your wife and kids :-)
 .B Example
        hosts equiv = /etc/hosts.equiv
 
+.SS interfaces (G)
+
+This option allows you to setup multiple network interfaces, so that
+Samba can properly handle browsing on all interfaces.
+
+The option takes a list of ip/netmask pairs. The netmask may either be
+a bitmask, or a bitlength. 
+
+For example, the following line:
+
+interfaces = 192.168.2.10/24 192.168.3.10/24
+
+would configure two network interfaces with IP addresses 192.168.2.10
+and 192.168.3.10. The netmasks of both interfaces would be set to
+255.255.255.0. 
+
+You could produce an equivalent result by using:
+
+interfaces = 192.168.2.10/255.255.255.0 192.168.3.10/255.255.255.0
+
+if you prefer that format.
+
+If this option is not set then Samba will attempt to find a primary
+interface, but won't attempt to configure more than one interface.
+
 .SS invalid users (S)
 This is a list of users that should not be allowed to login to this
 service. This is really a "paranoid" check to absolutely ensure an
index 8a09d2274fbdbf1a683e52d5a8c65ab972ecd102..c63e0f7febd3b050ad187654c04bac3ff928e577 100644 (file)
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ A simple lmhosts file might be:
 #
 # first put ourselves in workgroup MYGROUP using
 # our own net address
-0.0.0.0 MYGROUP G
+0.0.0.0 MYGROUP 255.255.255.0 G
 
 Note in the above that I overrode what workgroup Samba is in using the
 G flag. Also note that the 0.0.0.0 address is used, which will be
@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ the network which has a broadcast of 192.0.3.255 then this entry would
 do the trick:
 
 # put ourselves in the STAFF workgroup on the other subnet
-192.0.3.255 STAFF G
+192.0.3.255 STAFF 255.255.255.0 G
 
 Notice the G at the end! It is very important you include this as this
 entry without the G could cause a broadcast storm! 
@@ -142,4 +142,12 @@ the -B option. This only works if your network setup listens on both
 0s and 1s based broadcasts. The -B option can only control what
 address it sends to, not what it listens on.
 
+MULTIPLE INTERFACES
+===================
+
+Samba now supports machines with multiple network interfaces. If you
+have multiple interfaces then you will need to use the "interfaces"
+option in smb.conf to configure them. See smb.conf(5) for details.
+
+