r6622: Add talloc manpage in DocBook XML, based on SGML version by Garry Williams
authorJelmer Vernooij <jelmer@samba.org>
Thu, 5 May 2005 22:31:49 +0000 (22:31 +0000)
committerGerald (Jerry) Carter <jerry@samba.org>
Wed, 10 Oct 2007 18:16:32 +0000 (13:16 -0500)
(This used to be commit 62550eac1e56e95c8080a0519579fd97ee5d465a)

source4/lib/talloc/Makefile.in
source4/lib/talloc/configure.in
source4/lib/talloc/talloc.3.xml [new file with mode: 0644]

index a3dd3f3e0b059254e14d23c8245f8e9bc905e69c..f3fdf5f01ccae6281b84c34cf9a1deef69bc5d9f 100644 (file)
@@ -5,6 +5,8 @@ prefix = @prefix@
 exec_prefix = @exec_prefix@
 includedir = @includedir@
 libdir = @libdir@
+mandir = @mandir@
+XSLTPROC = @XSLTPROC@
 
 CFLAGS = $(OPT) -Wall
 
@@ -17,10 +19,19 @@ testsuite: $(LIBOBJ) testsuite.o
 
 libtalloc.a: libtalloc.a($(LIBOBJ))
 
-install:
+install: all doc
        cp libtalloc.a $(libdir)
        cp talloc.h $(includedir)
        cp talloc.pc $(libdir)/pkgconfig
+       cp talloc.3 $(mandir)/man3
+
+doc: talloc.3
+
+%.3: %.3.xml
+       $(XSLTPROC) -o $@ http://docbook.sourceforge.net/release/xsl/current/manpages/docbook.xsl $<
+
+%.html: %.xml
+       $(XSLTPROC) -o $@ http://docbook.sourceforge.net/release/xsl/current/html/docbook.xsl $<
 
 clean:
        rm -f *~ *.o testsuite *.gc??
index 0ebbde9fcf1134230633a8ba4722387a5902348f..c0e307ab050cf5f41f2a9c09f0a301ac36d5854b 100644 (file)
@@ -2,6 +2,7 @@ AC_DEFUN([SMB_MODULE_DEFAULT], [echo -n ""])
 AC_DEFUN([SMB_LIBRARY_ENABLE], [echo -n ""])
 AC_INIT(talloc.h)
 AC_PROG_CC
+AC_PATH_PROG(XSLTPROC,xsltproc)
 AC_PATH_PROG(GCOV,gcov)
 sinclude(config.m4)
 AC_OUTPUT(Makefile talloc.pc)
diff --git a/source4/lib/talloc/talloc.3.xml b/source4/lib/talloc/talloc.3.xml
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..7b254ae
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,637 @@
+<?xml version="1.0"?>
+<!DOCTYPE refentry PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.2//EN" "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.2/docbookx.dtd">
+<refentry>
+  <refmeta>
+    <refentrytitle>talloc</refentrytitle>
+    <manvolnum>3</manvolnum>
+  </refmeta>
+  <refnamediv>
+    <refname>talloc</refname>
+<refpurpose>hierarchical reference counted memory pool system with destructors</refpurpose>
+  </refnamediv>
+  <refsynopsisdiv>
+<synopsis>#include &lt;talloc/talloc.h&gt;</synopsis>
+  </refsynopsisdiv>
+  <refsect1><title>DESCRIPTION</title>
+    <para>
+      If you are used to talloc from Samba3 then please read this
+      carefully, as talloc has changed a lot.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      The new talloc is a hierarchical, reference counted memory pool
+      system with destructors. Quite a mouthful really, but not too bad
+      once you get used to it.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Perhaps the biggest change from Samba3 is that there is no
+      distinction between a "talloc context" and a "talloc pointer".  Any
+      pointer returned from talloc() is itself a valid talloc context. 
+      This means you can do this:
+    </para>
+    <programlisting>
+    struct foo *X = talloc(mem_ctx, struct foo);
+    X->name = talloc_strdup(X, "foo");
+    </programlisting>
+    <para>
+      and the pointer <literal role="code">X-&gt;name</literal>
+      would be a "child" of the talloc context <literal
+      role="code">X</literal> which is itself a child of
+      <literal role="code">mem_ctx</literal>.  So if you do
+      <literal role="code">talloc_free(mem_ctx)</literal> then
+      it is all destroyed, whereas if you do <literal
+      role="code">talloc_free(X)</literal> then just <literal
+      role="code">X</literal> and <literal
+      role="code">X-&gt;name</literal> are destroyed, and if
+      you do <literal
+      role="code">talloc_free(X-&gt;name)</literal> then just
+      the name element of <literal role="code">X</literal> is
+      destroyed.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      If you think about this, then what this effectively gives you is an
+      n-ary tree, where you can free any part of the tree with
+      talloc_free().
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      If you find this confusing, then I suggest you run the <literal
+      role="code">testsuite</literal> program to watch talloc
+      in action.  You may also like to add your own tests to <literal
+      role="code">testsuite.c</literal> to clarify how some
+      particular situation is handled.
+    </para>
+  </refsect1>
+  <refsect1><title>TALLOC API</title>
+    <para>
+      The following is a complete guide to the talloc API. Read it all at
+      least twice.
+    </para>
+    <refsect2><title>(type *)talloc(const void *ctx, type);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc() macro is the core of the talloc library.  It takes a
+         memory <emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis> and a <emphasis
+         role="italic">type</emphasis>, and returns a pointer to a new
+         area of memory of the given <emphasis
+         role="italic">type</emphasis>.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The returned pointer is itself a talloc context, so you can use
+         it as the <emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis> argument to more
+         calls to talloc() if you wish.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The returned pointer is a "child" of the supplied context.  This
+         means that if you talloc_free() the <emphasis
+         role="italic">ctx</emphasis> then the new child disappears as
+         well.  Alternatively you can free just the child.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The <emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis> argument to talloc()
+         can be NULL, in which case a new top level context is created.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_size(const void *ctx, size_t size);</title>
+        <para>
+         The function talloc_size() should be used when you don't have a
+         convenient type to pass to talloc().  Unlike talloc(), it is not
+         type safe (as it returns a void *), so you are on your own for
+         type checking.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>int talloc_free(void *ptr);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_free() function frees a piece of talloc memory, and
+         all its children.  You can call talloc_free() on any pointer
+         returned by talloc().
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The return value of talloc_free() indicates success or failure,
+         with 0 returned for success and -1 for failure.  The only
+         possible failure condition is if <emphasis
+         role="italic">ptr</emphasis> had a destructor attached to it and
+         the destructor returned -1.  See <link
+         linkend="talloc_set_destructor"><quote>talloc_set_destructor()</quote></link>
+         for details on destructors.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         If this pointer has an additional parent when talloc_free() is
+         called then the memory is not actually released, but instead the
+         most recently established parent is destroyed.  See <link
+         linkend="talloc_reference"><quote>talloc_reference()</quote></link>
+         for details on establishing additional parents.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         For more control on which parent is removed, see <link
+         linkend="talloc_unlink"><quote>talloc_unlink()</quote></link>.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         talloc_free() operates recursively on its children.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_reference"><title>void *talloc_reference(const void *ctx, const void *ptr);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_reference() function makes <emphasis
+         role="italic">ctx</emphasis> an additional parent of <emphasis
+         role="italic">ptr</emphasis>.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The return value of talloc_reference() is always the original
+         pointer <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>, unless talloc ran
+         out of memory in creating the reference in which case it will
+         return NULL (each additional reference consumes around 48 bytes
+         of memory on intel x86 platforms).
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         If <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis> is NULL, then the
+         function is a no-op, and simply returns NULL.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         After creating a reference you can free it in one of the
+         following ways:
+        </para>
+      <para>
+        <itemizedlist>
+          <listitem>
+            <para>
+             you can talloc_free() any parent of the original pointer. 
+             That will reduce the number of parents of this pointer by 1,
+             and will cause this pointer to be freed if it runs out of
+             parents.
+            </para>
+          </listitem>
+          <listitem>
+            <para>
+             you can talloc_free() the pointer itself.  That will destroy
+             the most recently established parent to the pointer and leave
+             the pointer as a child of its current parent.
+            </para>
+          </listitem>
+        </itemizedlist>
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       For more control on which parent to remove, see <link
+       linkend="talloc_unlink"><quote>talloc_unlink()</quote></link>.
+      </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_unlink"><title>int talloc_unlink(const void *ctx, const void *ptr);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_unlink() function removes a specific parent from
+         <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>. The <emphasis
+         role="italic">ctx</emphasis> passed must either be a context used
+         in talloc_reference() with this pointer, or must be a direct
+         parent of ptr.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         Note that if the parent has already been removed using
+         talloc_free() then this function will fail and will return -1. 
+         Likewise, if <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis> is NULL, then
+         the function will make no modifications and return -1.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         Usually you can just use talloc_free() instead of
+         talloc_unlink(), but sometimes it is useful to have the
+         additional control on which parent is removed.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_set_destructor"><title>void talloc_set_destructor(const void *ptr, int (*destructor)(void *));</title>
+        <para>
+         The function talloc_set_destructor() sets the <emphasis
+         role="italic">destructor</emphasis> for the pointer <emphasis
+         role="italic">ptr</emphasis>.  A <emphasis
+         role="italic">destructor</emphasis> is a function that is called
+         when the memory used by a pointer is about to be released.  The
+         destructor receives <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis> as an
+         argument, and should return 0 for success and -1 for failure.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The <emphasis role="italic">destructor</emphasis> can do anything
+         it wants to, including freeing other pieces of memory.  A common
+         use for destructors is to clean up operating system resources
+         (such as open file descriptors) contained in the structure the
+         destructor is placed on.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         You can only place one destructor on a pointer.  If you need more
+         than one destructor then you can create a zero-length child of
+         the pointer and place an additional destructor on that.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         To remove a destructor call talloc_set_destructor() with NULL for
+         the destructor.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         If your destructor attempts to talloc_free() the pointer that it
+         is the destructor for then talloc_free() will return -1 and the
+         free will be ignored.  This would be a pointless operation
+         anyway, as the destructor is only called when the memory is just
+         about to go away.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void talloc_increase_ref_count(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_increase_ref_count(<emphasis
+         role="italic">ptr</emphasis>) function is exactly equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_reference(NULL, ptr);</programlisting>
+        <para>
+         You can use either syntax, depending on which you think is
+         clearer in your code.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_set_name"><title>void talloc_set_name(const void *ptr, const char *fmt, ...);</title>
+        <para>
+         Each talloc pointer has a "name".  The name is used principally
+         for debugging purposes, although it is also possible to set and
+         get the name on a pointer in as a way of "marking" pointers in
+         your code.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The main use for names on pointer is for "talloc reports".  See
+         <link
+         linkend="talloc_report"><quote>talloc_report()</quote></link>
+         and <link
+         linkend="talloc_report_full"><quote>talloc_report_full()</quote></link>
+         for details.  Also see <link
+         linkend="talloc_enable_leak_report"><quote>talloc_enable_leak_report()</quote></link>
+         and <link
+         linkend="talloc_enable_leak_report_full"><quote>talloc_enable_leak_report_full()</quote></link>.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_set_name() function allocates memory as a child of the
+         pointer.  It is logically equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_set_name_const(ptr, talloc_asprintf(ptr, fmt, ...));</programlisting>
+        <para>
+         Note that multiple calls to talloc_set_name() will allocate more
+         memory without releasing the name.  All of the memory is released
+         when the ptr is freed using talloc_free().
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void talloc_set_name_const(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">name</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The function talloc_set_name_const() is just like
+         talloc_set_name(), but it takes a string constant, and is much
+         faster.  It is extensively used by the "auto naming" macros, such
+         as talloc_p().
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         This function does not allocate any memory.  It just copies the
+         supplied pointer into the internal representation of the talloc
+         ptr. This means you must not pass a <emphasis
+         role="italic">name</emphasis> pointer to memory that will
+         disappear before <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis> is freed
+         with talloc_free().
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_named(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, size_t <emphasis role="italic">size</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">fmt</emphasis>, ...);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_named() function creates a named talloc pointer.  It
+         is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>ptr = talloc_size(ctx, size);
+talloc_set_name(ptr, fmt, ....);</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_named_const(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, size_t <emphasis role="italic">size</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">name</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         This is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>ptr = talloc_size(ctx, size);
+talloc_set_name_const(ptr, name);</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>const char *talloc_get_name(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         This returns the current name for the given talloc pointer,
+         <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>. See <link
+         linkend="talloc_set_name"><quote>talloc_set_name()</quote></link>
+         for details.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_init(const char *<emphasis role="italic">fmt</emphasis>, ...);</title>
+        <para>
+         This function creates a zero length named talloc context as a top
+         level context.  It is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_named(NULL, 0, fmt, ...);</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_new(void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         This is a utility macro that creates a new memory context hanging
+         off an exiting context, automatically naming it "talloc_new:
+         __location__" where __location__ is the source line it is called
+         from.  It is particularly useful for creating a new temporary
+         working context.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>(<emphasis role="italic">type</emphasis> *)talloc_realloc(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">type</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">count</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_realloc() macro changes the size of a talloc pointer. 
+         It has the following equivalences:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_realloc(ctx, NULL, type, 1) ==> talloc(ctx, type);
+talloc_realloc(ctx, ptr, type, 0)  ==> talloc_free(ptr);</programlisting>
+        <para>
+         The <emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis> argument is only used
+         if <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis> is not NULL, otherwise
+         it is ignored.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         talloc_realloc() returns the new pointer, or NULL on failure. 
+         The call will fail either due to a lack of memory, or because the
+         pointer has more than one parent (see <link
+         linkend="talloc_reference"><quote>talloc_reference()</quote></link>).
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_realloc_size(const void *ctx, void *ptr, size_t size);</title>
+        <para>
+         the talloc_realloc_size() function is useful when the type is not
+         known so the type-safe talloc_realloc() cannot be used.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_steal(const void *<emphasis role="italic">new_ctx</emphasis>, const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_steal() function changes the parent context of a
+         talloc pointer.  It is typically used when the context that the
+         pointer is currently a child of is going to be freed and you wish
+         to keep the memory for a longer time.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_steal() function returns the pointer that you pass it.
+          It does not have any failure modes.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         NOTE: It is possible to produce loops in the parent/child
+         relationship if you are not careful with talloc_steal().  No
+         guarantees are provided as to your sanity or the safety of your
+         data if you do this.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>off_t talloc_total_size(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_total_size() function returns the total size in bytes
+         used by this pointer and all child pointers.  Mostly useful for
+         debugging.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         Passing NULL is allowed, but it will only give a meaningful
+         result if talloc_enable_leak_report() or
+         talloc_enable_leak_report_full() has been called.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>off_t talloc_total_blocks(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_total_blocks() function returns the total memory block
+         count used by this pointer and all child pointers.  Mostly useful
+         for debugging.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         Passing NULL is allowed, but it will only give a meaningful
+         result if talloc_enable_leak_report() or
+         talloc_enable_leak_report_full() has been called.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_report"><title>void talloc_report(const void *ptr, FILE *f);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_report() function prints a summary report of all
+         memory used by <emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>.  One line
+         of report is printed for each immediate child of ptr, showing the
+         total memory and number of blocks used by that child.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         You can pass NULL for the pointer, in which case a report is
+         printed for the top level memory context, but only if
+         talloc_enable_leak_report() or talloc_enable_leak_report_full()
+         has been called.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_report_full"><title>void talloc_report_full(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ptr</emphasis>, FILE *<emphasis role="italic">f</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         This provides a more detailed report than talloc_report().  It
+         will recursively print the entire tree of memory referenced by
+         the pointer. References in the tree are shown by giving the name
+         of the pointer that is referenced.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         You can pass NULL for the pointer, in which case a report is
+         printed for the top level memory context, but only if
+         talloc_enable_leak_report() or talloc_enable_leak_report_full()
+         has been called.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_enable_leak_report"><title>void talloc_enable_leak_report(void);</title>
+        <para>
+         This enables calling of talloc_report(NULL, stderr) when the
+         program exits.  In Samba4 this is enabled by using the
+         --leak-report command line option.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         For it to be useful, this function must be called before any
+         other talloc function as it establishes a "null context" that
+         acts as the top of the tree.  If you don't call this function
+         first then passing NULL to talloc_report() or
+         talloc_report_full() won't give you the full tree printout.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         Here is a typical talloc report:
+        </para>
+        <screen format="linespecific">talloc report on 'null_context' (total 267 bytes in 15 blocks)
+libcli/auth/spnego_parse.c:55  contains   31 bytes in   2 blocks
+libcli/auth/spnego_parse.c:55  contains   31 bytes in   2 blocks
+iconv(UTF8,CP850)              contains   42 bytes in   2 blocks
+libcli/auth/spnego_parse.c:55  contains   31 bytes in   2 blocks
+iconv(CP850,UTF8)              contains   42 bytes in   2 blocks
+iconv(UTF8,UTF-16LE)           contains   45 bytes in   2 blocks
+iconv(UTF-16LE,UTF8)           contains   45 bytes in   2 blocks
+      </screen>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2 id="talloc_enable_leak_report_full"><title>void talloc_enable_leak_report_full(void);</title>
+        <para>
+         This enables calling of talloc_report_full(NULL, stderr) when the
+         program exits.  In Samba4 this is enabled by using the
+         --leak-report-full command line option.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         For it to be useful, this function must be called before any
+         other talloc function as it establishes a "null context" that
+         acts as the top of the tree.  If you don't call this function
+         first then passing NULL to talloc_report() or
+         talloc_report_full() won't give you the full tree printout.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         Here is a typical full report:
+        </para>
+        <screen format="linespecific">full talloc report on 'root' (total 18 bytes in 8 blocks)
+p1               contains     18 bytes in   7 blocks (ref 0)
+    r1               contains     13 bytes in   2 blocks (ref 0)
+        reference to: p2
+    p2               contains      1 bytes in   1 blocks (ref 1)
+    x3               contains      1 bytes in   1 blocks (ref 0)
+    x2               contains      1 bytes in   1 blocks (ref 0)
+    x1               contains      1 bytes in   1 blocks (ref 0)
+      </screen>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>(<emphasis role="italic">type</emphasis> *)talloc_zero(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">type</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_zero() macro is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>ptr = talloc(ctx, type);
+if (ptr) memset(ptr, 0, sizeof(type));</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_zero_size(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, size_t <emphasis role="italic">size</emphasis>)</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_zero_size() function is useful when you don't have a
+         known type.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_memdup(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, const void *<emphasis role="italic">p</emphasis>, size_t size);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_memdup() function is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>ptr = talloc_size(ctx, size);
+if (ptr) memcpy(ptr, p, size);</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>char *talloc_strdup(const void *<emphasis role="italic">ctx</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">p</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_strdup() function is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>ptr = talloc_size(ctx, strlen(p)+1);
+if (ptr) memcpy(ptr, p, strlen(p)+1);</programlisting>
+        <para>
+         This function sets the name of the new pointer to the passed
+         string. This is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_set_name_const(ptr, ptr)</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>char *talloc_strndup(const void *<emphasis role="italic">t</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">p</emphasis>, size_t <emphasis role="italic">n</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_strndup() function is the talloc equivalent of the C
+         library function strndup(3).
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         This function sets the name of the new pointer to the passed
+         string. This is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_set_name_const(ptr, ptr)</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>char *talloc_vasprintf(const void *<emphasis role="italic">t</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">fmt</emphasis>, va_list <emphasis role="italic">ap</emphasis>);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_vasprintf() function is the talloc equivalent of the C
+         library function vasprintf(3).
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>char *talloc_asprintf(const void *<emphasis role="italic">t</emphasis>, const char *<emphasis role="italic">fmt</emphasis>, ...);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_asprintf() function is the talloc equivalent of the C
+         library function asprintf(3).
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         This function sets the name of the new pointer to the passed
+         string. This is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_set_name_const(ptr, ptr)</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>char *talloc_asprintf_append(char *s, const char *fmt, ...);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_asprintf_append() function appends the given formatted
+         string to the given string.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>(type *)talloc_array(const void *ctx, type, uint_t count);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_array() macro is equivalent to:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>(type *)talloc_size(ctx, sizeof(type) * count);</programlisting>
+        <para>
+         except that it provides integer overflow protection for the
+         multiply, returning NULL if the multiply overflows.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_array_size(const void *ctx, size_t size, uint_t count);</title>
+        <para>
+         The talloc_array_size() function is useful when the type is not
+         known. It operates in the same way as talloc_array(), but takes a
+         size instead of a type.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_realloc_fn(const void *ctx, void *ptr, size_t size)</title>
+        <para>
+         This is a non-macro version of talloc_realloc(), which is useful
+         as libraries sometimes want a realloc function pointer.  A
+         realloc(3) implementation encapsulates the functionality of
+         malloc(3), free(3) and realloc(3) in one call, which is why it is
+         useful to be able to pass around a single function pointer.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_autofree_context(void);</title>
+        <para>
+         This is a handy utility function that returns a talloc context
+         which will be automatically freed on program exit.  This can be
+         used to reduce the noise in memory leak reports.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>void *talloc_check_name(const void *ptr, const char *name);</title>
+        <para>
+         This function checks if a pointer has the specified <emphasis
+         role="italic">name</emphasis>.  If it does then the pointer is
+         returned.  It it doesn't then NULL is returned.
+        </para>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>(type *)talloc_get_type(const void *ptr, type);</title>
+        <para>
+         This macro allows you to do type checking on talloc pointers.  It
+         is particularly useful for void* private pointers.  It is
+         equivalent to this:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>(type *)talloc_check_name(ptr, #type)</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+    <refsect2><title>talloc_set_type(const void *ptr, type);</title>
+        <para>
+         This macro allows you to force the name of a pointer to be a
+         particular <emphasis>type</emphasis>.  This can be
+         used in conjunction with talloc_get_type() to do type checking on
+         void* pointers.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+         It is equivalent to this:
+        </para>
+        <programlisting>talloc_set_name_const(ptr, #type)</programlisting>
+    </refsect2>
+  </refsect1>
+  <refsect1><title>PERFORMANCE</title>
+    <para>
+      All the additional features of talloc(3) over malloc(3) do come at a
+      price.  We have a simple performance test in Samba4 that measures
+      talloc() versus malloc() performance, and it seems that talloc() is
+      about 10% slower than malloc() on my x86 Debian Linux box.  For
+      Samba, the great reduction in code complexity that we get by using
+      talloc makes this worthwhile, especially as the total overhead of
+      talloc/malloc in Samba is already quite small.
+    </para>
+  </refsect1>
+  <refsect1><title>SEE ALSO</title>
+    <para>
+      malloc(3), strndup(3), vasprintf(3), asprintf(3), 
+      <ulink url="http://talloc.samba.org/"/>
+    </para>
+  </refsect1>
+  <refsect1><title>COPYRIGHT/LICENSE</title>
+    <para>
+      Copyright (C) Andrew Tridgell 2004
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+      it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
+      the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at
+      your option) any later version.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
+      WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+      MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
+      General Public License for more details.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+      along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
+      Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
+    </para>
+  </refsect1>
+</refentry>