First versions of the man pages auto-generated from the YODL
authorJeremy Allison <jra@samba.org>
Wed, 11 Nov 1998 01:27:18 +0000 (01:27 +0000)
committerJeremy Allison <jra@samba.org>
Wed, 11 Nov 1998 01:27:18 +0000 (01:27 +0000)
source.
Jeremy.
(This used to be commit 00241b15fa8ccd21e1b43726ea131a189c14074e)

13 files changed:
docs/manpages/make_smbcodepage.1
docs/manpages/nmbd.8
docs/manpages/nmblookup.1
docs/manpages/samba.7
docs/manpages/smb.conf.5
docs/manpages/smbclient.1
docs/manpages/smbd.8
docs/manpages/smbpasswd.8
docs/manpages/smbrun.1
docs/manpages/smbstatus.1
docs/manpages/smbtar.1
docs/manpages/testparm.1
docs/manpages/testprns.1

index 049fa73a2a679622f303572c512a5e5fbf849bae..93edd9322a38575134501162088831ee7a034c61 100644 (file)
-.TH MAKE_SMBCODEPAGE 1 "09 Oct 1998" "make_smbcodepage 2.0.0-alpha11"
-.SH NAME
-make_smbcodepage \- create a binary codepage definition file from an ascii codepage definition source file, or reverse the process.
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B make_smbcodepage
-.I c|d
-.I codepage
-.I inputfile
-.I outputfile
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-This program is part of the Samba suite.
-
-.B make_smbcodepage
-compiles or de-compiles codepage files for use with the internationalization
-features of Samba 1.9.18.
-
-An ascii Samba codepage definition file is a description that tells Samba
-how to map from upper to lower case for characters greater than ascii 127
-in the specified DOS code page.  Note that for certain DOS codepages 
-(437 for example) mapping from lower to upper case may be asynchronous. 
-For example, in code page 437 lower case a acute maps to a plain upper 
-case A when going from lower to upper case, but maps from plain upper 
-case A to plain lower case a when lower casing a character.
-
-A binary Samba codepage definition file is a binary representation
-of the same information, including a value that specifies what codepage
-this file is describing.
-
-As Samba does not yet use UNICODE (current for Samba version 1.9.18)
-you must specify the client code page that your DOS and Windows clients
+.TH "make_smbcodepage" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.PP 
+.SH "NAME" 
+make_codepage \- Construct a codepage file for Samba
+.PP 
+.SH "SYNOPSIS" 
+.PP 
+\fBmake_smbcodepage\fP [c|d] codepage inputfile outputfile
+.PP 
+.SH "DESCRIPTION" 
+.PP 
+This program is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
+.PP 
+\fBmake_smbcodepage\fP compiles or de-compiles codepage files for use
+with the internationalization features of Samba 2\&.0
+.PP 
+.SH "OPTIONS" 
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP "c|d" 
+This tells make_smbcodepage if it is compiling (c) a text
+format code page file to binary, or (d) de-compiling a binary codepage
+file to text\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "codepage" 
+This is the codepage we are processing (a number, eg\&. 850)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "inputfile" 
+This is the input file to process\&. In the \'c\' case this
+will be a text codepage definition file such as the ones found in the
+Samba \fIsource/codepages\fP directory\&. In the \'d\' case this will be the
+binary format codepage definition file normally found in the
+\fIlib/codepages\fP directory in the Samba install directory path\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "outputfile" 
+This is the output file to produce\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "Samba Codepage Files" 
+.PP 
+A text Samba codepage definition file is a description that tells
+Samba how to map from upper to lower case for characters greater than
+ascii 127 in the specified DOS code page\&.  Note that for certain DOS
+codepages (437 for example) mapping from lower to upper case may be
+asynchronous\&. For example, in code page 437 lower case a acute maps to
+a plain upper case A when going from lower to upper case, but maps
+from plain upper case A to plain lower case a when lower casing a
+character\&.
+.PP 
+A binary Samba codepage definition file is a binary representation of
+the same information, including a value that specifies what codepage
+this file is describing\&.
+.PP 
+As Samba does not yet use UNICODE (current for Samba version 2\&.0) you
+must specify the client code page that your DOS and Windows clients
 are using if you wish to have case insensitivity done correctly for
-your particular language. The default codepage Samba uses is 850
-(Western European). Ascii codepage definition sample files are provided
-in the Samba distribution for codepages 437 (USA), 850 (Western European)
-852 (MS-DOS Latin 2) and 932 (Kanji SJIS). Users are encouraged to
-write ascii codepage definition files for their own code pages and
-donate them to samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au. All codepage files in the
-Samba source directory are compiled and installed when a 'make install'
-command is issued there.
-
-An ascii codepage definition file consists of multiple lines containing
-four fields. These fields are :
-.B lower
-which is the (hex) lower case character mapped on this line.
-.B upper
-which is the (hex) upper case character that the lower case character
-will map to.
-.B map upper to lower
-which is a boolean value (put either True or False here) which tells
-Samba if it is to map the given upper case character to the given
-lower case character when lower casing a filename.
-.B map lower to upper
-which is a boolean value (put either True or False here) which tells
-Samba if it is to map the given lower case character to the given
-upper case character when upper casing a filename.
-
-.SH OPTIONS
-.I c|d
-
-.RS 3
-This tells make_smbcodepage if it is compiling (c) an ascii code page file
-to binary, or de-compiling a binary codepage file to ascii.
-.RE
-
-.I codepage
-
-.RS 3
-This is the codepage we are processing (a number, eg. 850)
-.RE
-
-.I inputfile
-
-.RS 3
-This is the input file to process.
-.RE
-
-.I outputfile
-
-.RS 3
-This is the output file to produce.
-.RE
-
-.SH FILES
-.B codepage_def.<codepage>
-.RS 3
-These are the input (ascii) codepage files provided in the Samba
-source/ directory.
-.RE
-.SH FILES
-.B codepage.<codepage>
-.RS 3
-These are the output (binary) codepage files produced and placed in the Samba
-destination lib/codepage/ directory.
-.RE 
-
-.SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
-Not applicable.
-.SH INSTALLATION
-The location of the server and its support files is a matter for individual
-system administrators. The following are thus suggestions only.
-
-It is recommended that the
-.B make_smbcodepage
-program be installed under the /usr/local/samba hierarchy, in a directory readable
-by all, writeable only by root. The program itself should be executable by all.
-The program should NOT be setuid or setgid!
-.SH VERSION
-This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.18 of the Samba suite, plus some
-of the recent patches to it. These notes will necessarily lag behind 
-development of the software, so it is possible that your version of 
-the program has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not 
-covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
-rectification.
-.SH SEE ALSO
-.BR smb.conf (5),
-.BR smbd (8)
-
-.SH BUGS
-None known.
-.SH CREDITS
-The
-.B make_smbcodepage
-program was written by Jeremy Allison (jallison@whistle.com) as part of the 
-Internationalization effort of the Samba software.
-
-Please send bug reports to samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au.
-
-See
-.BR samba (7)
-for a full list of contributors and details on how to 
-submit bug reports, comments etc.
+your particular language\&. The default codepage Samba uses is 850
+(Western European)\&. Text codepage definition sample files are
+provided in the Samba distribution for codepages 437 (USA), 737
+(Greek), 850 (Western European) 852 (MS-DOS Latin 2), 861 (Icelandic),
+866 (Cyrillic), 932 (Kanji SJIS), 936 (Simplified Chinese), 949
+(Hangul) and 950 (Traditional Chinese)\&. Users are encouraged to write
+text codepage definition files for their own code pages and donate
+them to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. All codepage files in the
+Samba \fIsource/codepages\fP directory are compiled and installed when a
+\fI\'make install\'\fP command is issued there\&.
+.PP 
+The client codepage used by the \fBsmbd\fP server is
+configured using the \fBclient code
+page\fP parameter in the
+\fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "FILES" 
+.PP 
+\fBcodepage_def\&.<codepage>\fP
+.PP 
+These are the input (text) codepage files provided in the Samba
+\fIsource/codepages\fP directory\&.
+.PP 
+A text codepage definition file consists of multiple lines
+containing four fields\&. These fields are : 
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlower\fP: which is the (hex) lower case character mapped on this
+line\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBupper\fP: which is the (hex) upper case character that the lower
+case character will map to\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmap upper to lower\fP which is a boolean value (put either True
+or False here) which tells Samba if it is to map the given upper case
+character to the given lower case character when lower casing a
+filename\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmap lower to upper\fP which is a boolean value (put either True
+or False here) which tells Samba if it is to map the given lower case
+character to the given upper case character when upper casing a
+filename\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+\fBcodepage\&.<codepage>\fP These are the output (binary) codepage files
+produced and placed in the Samba destination \fIlib/codepage\fP
+directory\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "INSTALLATION" 
+.PP 
+The location of the server and its support files is a matter for
+individual system administrators\&. The following are thus suggestions
+only\&.
+.PP 
+It is recommended that the \fBmake_smbcodepage\fP program be installed
+under the \fI/usr/local/samba\fP hierarchy, in a directory readable by
+all, writeable only by root\&. The program itself should be executable
+by all\&.  The program should NOT be setuid or setgid!
+.PP 
+.SH "VERSION" 
+.PP 
+This man page is correct for version 2\&.0 of the Samba suite\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "SEE ALSO" 
+.PP 
+\fBsmb\&.conf(5)\fP, \fBsmbd (8)\fP
+.PP 
+.SH "AUTHOR" 
+.PP 
+The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
+by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
+Linux kernel is developed\&.
+.PP 
+The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer\&. The man page
+sources were converted to YODL format (another excellent piece of Open
+Source software) and updated for the Samba2\&.0 release by Jeremy
+Allison, \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
+.PP 
+See \fBsamba (7)\fP to find out how to get a full
+list of contributors and details on how to submit bug reports,
+comments etc\&.
index 0922982f008ec8b3b2f0cba942080fb6d602a4c6..57ded0c54b2040d42221a0851eb3994ab9b80aac 100644 (file)
-.TH NMBD 8 "09 Oct 1998" "nmbd 2.0.0-alpha11"
-.SH NAME
-nmbd \- provide netbios nameserver support to clients
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B nmbd
-[
-.B \-D
-] [
-.B \-H
-.I netbios hosts file
-] [
-.B \-d
-.I debuglevel
-] [
-.B \-l
-.I log basename
-] [
-.B \-n
-.I netbios name
-] [
-.B \-p
-.I port number
-] [
-.B \-s
-.I configuration file
-]
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-This program is part of the Samba suite.
-
-.B nmbd
-is a server that understands and can reply to netbios
-name service requests, like those produced by LanManager
-clients. It also controls browsing.
-
-LanManager clients, when they start up, may wish to locate a LanManager server.
-That is, they wish to know what IP number a specified host is using.
-
-This program simply listens for such requests, and if its own name is specified
-it will respond with the IP number of the host it is running on.
-Its "own name" is by default the name of the host it is running on,
-but this can be overriden with the
-.B \-n
-option (see "OPTIONS" below).
-
-.B nmbd 
-can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server) server. 
-What this basically means is that it will respond to all name requests that 
-it receives that are not broadcasts, as long as it can resolve the name.
-Resolvable names include all names in the netbios hosts file (if any, see 
-.B \-H
-below), its own name, and any other names that it may have learned about
-from other browsers on the network.
-A change to previous versions is that nmbd will now no longer
-do this automatically by default.
-.SH OPTIONS
-.B \-B
-
-.RS 3
-This option is obsolete. Please use the "interfaces" option in smb.conf instead.
-.RE
-
-.B \-I
-
-.RS 3
-This option is obsolete. Please use the "interfaces" option in smb.conf instead.
-.RE
-
-.B \-D
-
-.RS 3
-If specified, this parameter causes the server to operate as a daemon. That is,
-it detaches itself and runs in the background, fielding requests on the 
-appropriate port.
-
-By default, the server will NOT operate as a daemon.
-.RE
-
-.B \-C comment string
-
-.RS 3
-This option is obsolete. Please use the "server string" option in smb.conf 
-instead.
-.RE
-
-.B \-G
-
-.RS 3
-This option is obsolete. Please use the "workgroup" option in smb.conf instead.
-.RE
-
-.B \-H
-.I netbios hosts file
-
-.RS 3
-It may be useful in some situations to be able to specify a list of
-netbios names for which the server should send a reply if queried.  
-This option allows you to specify a file containing such a list. 
-The syntax of the hosts file is similar to the standard /etc/hosts file
-format, but has some extensions.
-
-The file contains three columns. Lines beginning with a # are ignored
-as comments. The first column is an IP address, or a hostname. If it
-is a hostname then it is interpreted as the IP address returned by
-gethostbyname() when read. An IP address of 0.0.0.0 will be
-interpreted as the server's own IP address.
-
-The second column is a netbios name. This is the name that the server
-will respond to. It must be less than 20 characters long.
-
-The third column is optional, and is intended for flags. Currently the
-only flag supported is M, which means that this name is the default 
-netbios name for this machine. This has the same effect as specifying the
-.B \-n
-option to
-.BR nmbd .
-
-NOTE: The G and S flags are now obsolete and are replaced by the
-"interfaces" and "remote announce" options in smb.conf.
-
-The default hosts file name is set at compile time, typically as
-.I /etc/lmhosts,
-but this may be changed in the Samba Makefile.
-
-After startup the server waits for queries, and will answer queries for
-any name known to it. This includes all names in the netbios hosts file, 
-its own name, and any other names it may have learned about from other 
-browsers on the network.
-
-The primary intention of the
-.B \-H
-option is to allow a mapping from netbios names to internet domain names.
-
-.B Example:
-
-        # This is a sample netbios hosts file
-
-        # DO NOT USE THIS FILE AS-IS
-        # YOU MAY INCONVENIENCE THE OWNERS OF THESE IPs
-        # if you want to include a name with a space in it then 
-        # use double quotes.
-
-        # next add a netbios alias for a faraway host
-        arvidsjaur.anu.edu.au ARVIDSJAUR
-
-        # finally put in an IP for a hard to find host
-        130.45.3.213 FREDDY
-
-.RE
-.B \-N
-
-.RS 3
-This option is obsolete. Please use the "interfaces" option in smb.conf instead.
-.RE
-
-.B \-d
-.I debuglevel
-
-.RS 3
-This option sets the debug level. See
-.BR smb.conf (5).
-.RE
-
-.B \-l
-.I log file
-
-.RS 3
-The
-.I log file
-parameter specifies a path and base filename into which operational data 
-from the running 
-.B nmbd
-server will be logged.
-The actual log file name is generated by appending the extension ".nmb" to 
-the specified base name.
-For example, if the name specified was "log" then the file log.nmb would
-contain the debugging data.
-
-The default log file is specified at compile time, typically as
-.I /var/log/log.nmb.
-.RE
-
-.B \-n
-.I netbios name
-
-.RS 3
-This option allows you to override the Netbios name that Samba uses for itself. 
-.RE
-
-.B \-a
-
-.RS 3
-If this parameter is specified, the log files will be appended to with each 
-new connection.  This is the default.
-.RE
-
-.B \-o
-
-.RS 3
-Overwrite existing log files instead of appending to them.  (This was the
-default until version 2.0.0.)
-.RE
-
-.B \-p
-.I port number
-.RS 3
-
-port number is a positive integer value.
-
-Don't use this option unless you are an expert, in which case you
-won't need help!
-.RE
-
-.B \-s
-.I configuration file
-
-.RS 3
-The default configuration file name is set at compile time, typically as
-.I /etc/smb.conf,
-but this may be changed in the Samba Makefile.
-
-The file specified contains the configuration details required by the server.
-See
-.BR smb.conf (5)
-for more information.
-.RE
-.SH SIGNALS
-
-In version 1.9.18 and above, nmbd will accept SIGHUP, which will cause it to dump out
-it's namelists into the file namelist.debug in the SAMBA/var/locks directory. This
-will also cause nmbd to dump out it's server database in the log.nmb file.
-Also new in version 1.9.18 and above is the ability to raise the debug log
-level of nmbd by sending it a SIGUSR1 (kill -USR1 <nmbd-pid>) and to lower
-the nmbd log level by sending it a SIGUSR2 (kill -USR2 <nmbd-pid>). This
-is to allow transient problems to be diagnosed, whilst still running at
-a normally low log level.
-
-.SH VERSION
-
-This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.16 of the Samba
-suite, plus some of the recent patches to it. These notes will
-necessarily lag behind development of the software, so it is possible
-that your version of the server has extensions or parameter semantics
-that differ from or are not covered by this man page. Please notify
-these to the address below for rectification.
-.SH SEE ALSO
-.BR inetd (8),
-.BR smbd (8), 
-.BR smb.conf (5),
-.BR smbclient (1),
-.BR testparm (1), 
-.BR testprns (1)
-.SH CREDITS
-The original Samba software and related utilities were created by 
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
-of the Source for this project.
-
+.TH "nmbd" "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.PP 
+.SH "NAME" 
+nmbd \- NetBIOS name server to provide NetBIOS over IP
+naming services to clients
+.PP 
+.SH "SYNOPSIS" 
+.PP 
+\fBnmbd\fP [-D] [-o] [-a] [-H lmhosts file] [-d debuglevel] [-l log file basename] [-n primary NetBIOS name] [-p port number] [-s configuration file] [-i NetBIOS scope] [-h]
+.PP 
+.SH "DESCRIPTION" 
+.PP 
+This program is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
+.PP 
+\fBnmbd\fP is a server that understands and can reply to NetBIOS over IP
+name service requests, like those produced by SMBD/CIFS clients such
+as Windows 95/98, Windows NT and LanManager clients\&. It also
+participates in the browsing protocols which make up the Windows
+"Network Neighborhood" view\&.
+.PP 
+SMB/CIFS clients, when they start up, may wish to locate an SMB/CIFS
+server\&. That is, they wish to know what IP number a specified host is
+using\&.
+.PP 
+Amongst other services, this program will listen for such requests,
+and if its own NetBIOS name is specified it will respond with the IP
+number of the host it is running on\&.  Its "own NetBIOS name" is by
+default the primary DNS name of the host it is running on, but this
+can be overriden with the \fB-n\fP option (see \fIOPTIONS\fP below)\&. Thus
+nmbd will reply to broadcast queries for its own name(s)\&. Additional
+names for nmbd to respond on can be set via parameters in the
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP configuration file\&.
+.PP 
+nmbd can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server)
+server\&. What this basically means is that it will act as a WINS
+database server, creating a database from name registration requests
+that it receives and replying to queries from clients for these names\&.
+.PP 
+In addition, nmbd can act as a WINS proxy, relaying broadcast queries
+from clients that do not understand how to talk the WINS protocol to a
+WIN server\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "OPTIONS" 
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-D\fP" 
+If specified, this parameter causes the server to operate
+as a daemon\&. That is, it detaches itself and runs in the background,
+fielding requests on the appropriate port\&. By default, the server will
+NOT operate as a daemon\&. nmbd can also be operated from the inetd
+meta-daemon, although this is not recommended\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-a\fP" 
+If this parameter is specified, each new connection will
+append log messages to the log file\&.  This is the default\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-o\fP" 
+If this parameter is specified, the log files will be
+overwritten when opened\&.  By default, the log files will be appended
+to\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-H filename\fP" 
+NetBIOS lmhosts file\&.
+.IP 
+The lmhosts file is a list of NetBIOS names to IP addresses that is
+loaded by the nmbd server and used via the name resolution mechanism
+\fIname resolve order\fP described in \fBsmbd\&.conf (5)\fP to resolve any
+NetBIOS name queries needed by the server\&. Note that the contents of
+this file are \fINOT\fP used by nmbd to answer any name queries, adding
+a line to this file affects name NetBIOS resolution from this host
+\fIONLY\fP\&.
+.IP 
+The default path to this file is compiled into Samba as part of the
+build process\&. Common defaults are \fI/usr/local/samba/lib/lmhosts\fP,
+\fI/usr/samba/lib/lmhosts\fP or \fI/etc/lmhosts\fP\&. See the \fBlmhosts
+(5)\fP man page for details on the contents of this file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-d debuglevel\fP" 
+debuglevel is an integer from 0 to 10\&.
+.IP 
+The default value if this parameter is not specified is zero\&.
+.IP 
+The higher this value, the more detail will be logged to the log files
+about the activities of the server\&. At level 0, only critical errors
+and serious warnings will be logged\&. Level 1 is a reasonable level for
+day to day running - it generates a small amount of information about
+operations carried out\&.
+.IP 
+Levels above 1 will generate considerable amounts of log data, and
+should only be used when investigating a problem\&. Levels above 3 are
+designed for use only by developers and generate HUGE amounts of log
+data, most of which is extremely cryptic\&.
+.IP 
+Note that specifying this parameter here will override the \fBlog
+level\fP parameter in the \fBsmb\&.conf
+(5)\fP file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-l logfile\fP" 
+The \fB-l\fP parameter specifies a path and base
+filename into which operational data from the running nmbd server will
+be logged\&.  The actual log file name is generated by appending the
+extension "\&.nmb" to the specified base name\&.  For example, if the name
+specified was "log" then the file log\&.nmb would contain the debugging
+data\&.
+.IP 
+The default log file path is is compiled into Samba as part of the
+build process\&. Common defaults are \fI/usr/local/samba/var/log\&.nmb\fP,
+\fI/usr/samba/var/log\&.nmb\fP or \fI/var/log/log\&.nmb\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-n primary NetBIOS name\fP" 
+This option allows you to override
+the NetBIOS name that Samba uses for itself\&. This is identical to
+setting the \fBNetBIOS name\fP parameter
+in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file
+but will override the setting in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-p UDP port number\fP" 
+UDP port number is a positive integer value\&.
+.IP 
+This option changes the default UDP port number (normally 137) that
+nmbd responds to name queries on\&. Don\'t use this option unless you are
+an expert, in which case you won\'t need help!
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-s configuration file\fP" 
+The default configuration file name is
+set at build time, typically as \fI/usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP, but
+this may be changed when Samba is autoconfigured\&.
+.IP 
+The file specified contains the configuration details required by the
+server\&. See \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP for more information\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-i scope\fP" 
+This specifies a NetBIOS scope that the server will use
+to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names\&. For details on the
+use of NetBIOS scopes, see rfc1001\&.txt and rfc1002\&.txt\&. NetBIOS scopes
+are \fIvery\fP rarely used, only set this parameter if you are the
+system administrator in charge of all the NetBIOS systems you
+communicate with\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-h\fP" 
+Prints the help information (usage) for nmbd\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "FILES" 
+.PP 
+\fB/etc/inetd\&.conf\fP
+.PP 
+If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must
+contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon\&.
+.PP 
+\fB/etc/rc\fP
+.PP 
+(or whatever initialisation script your system uses)\&.
+.PP 
+If running the server as a daemon at startup, this file will need to
+contain an appropriate startup sequence for the server\&.
+.PP 
+\fB/usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP
+.PP 
+This is the default location of the \fIsmb\&.conf\fP server configuration
+file\&. Other common places that systems install this file are
+\fI/usr/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP and \fI/etc/smb\&.conf\fP\&.
+.PP 
+When run as a \fBWINS\fP server (see the \fBwins support\fP
+parameter in the \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP man page), \fBnmbd\fP will
+store the WINS database in the file \f(CWwins\&.dat\fP in the \f(CWvar/locks\fP directory
+configured under wherever Samba was configured to install itself\&.
+.PP 
+If \fBnmbd\fP is acting as a \fBbrowse master\fP (see the \fBlocal master\fP
+parameter in the \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP man page), \fBnmbd\fP will
+store the browsing database in the file \f(CWbrowse\&.dat\fP in the \f(CWvar/locks\fP directory
+configured under wherever Samba was configured to install itself\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "SIGNALS" 
+.PP 
+To shut down an nmbd process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
+\fINOT\fP be used, except as a last resort, as this may leave the name
+database in an inconsistant state\&. The correct way to terminate
+nmbd is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
+its own\&.
+.PP 
+nmbd will accept SIGHUP, which will cause it to dump out it\'s
+namelists into the file namelist\&.debug in the
+\fI/usr/local/samba/var/locks\fP directory (or the \fIvar/locks\fP
+directory configured under wherever Samba was configured to install
+itself)\&. This will also cause nmbd to dump out it\'s server database in
+the log\&.nmb file\&. In addition, the the debug log level of nmbd may be raised
+by sending it a SIGUSR1 (\f(CWkill -USR1 <nmbd-pid>\fP) and lowered by sending it a
+SIGUSR2 (\f(CWkill -USR2 <nmbd-pid>\fP)\&. This is to allow transient
+problems to be diagnosed, whilst still running at a normally low log
+level\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "VERSION" 
+.PP 
+This man page is correct for version 2\&.0 of the Samba suite\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "SEE ALSO" 
+.PP 
+\fBinetd (8)\fP, \fBsmbd (8)\fP, \fBsmb\&.conf
+(5)\fP, \fBsmbclient (1)\fP,
+\fBtestparm (1)\fP, \fBtestprns
+(1)\fP, and the Internet RFC\'s \fBrfc1001\&.txt\fP,
+\fBrfc1002\&.txt\fP\&. In addition the CIFS (formerly SMB) specification is
+available as a link from the Web page :
+http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/cifs/\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "AUTHOR" 
+.PP 
+The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
+Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
+Linux kernel is developed\&.
+.PP 
+The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer\&. The man page
+sources were converted to YODL format (another excellent piece of Open
+Source software) and updated for the Samba2\&.0 release by Jeremy
+Allison, \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
+.PP 
+See \fBsamba (7)\fP to find out how to get a full list of contributors
+and details on how to submit bug reports, comments etc\&.
index 50cbbe2c2dca83c2d870e4ccf3169fa3e3f5abe5..c2b43bb8eaf2f9ebcabb4ce02f4fcef9a6fef26d 100644 (file)
-.TH NMBLOOKUP 1 "09 Oct 1998" "nmblookup 2.0.0-alpha11"
-.SH NAME
-nmblookup \- NBT client used to lookup netbios names
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B nmblookup
-[
-.B \-M
-] [
-.B \-R
-] [
-.B \-S
-] [
-.B \-r
-] [
-.B \-A
-] [
-.B \-B
-.I broadcast address
-] [
-.B \-U
-.I unicast address
-] [
-.B \-d
-.I debuglevel
-]
-.B name
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-This program is part of the Samba suite.
-
-.B nmblookup
-is used to find out NetBIOS names in a network.
-.SH OPTIONS
-.B \-d
-.I debuglevel
-
-.RS 3
-This option sets the debug level. See
-.BR smb.conf (5).
-.RE
-
-.B \-B
-.I broadcast address
-.RS 3
-
-Send the query to the broadcast address
-.I broadcast address.
-The default behavior of nmblookup is to send the query to the broadcast
-address of the primary network interface.
-.RE
-
-.B \-U
-.I unicast address
-.RS 3
-
-Do a unicast query to the specified address or host
-.I unicast address.
-This is needed to query a WINS server.
-.RE
-
-.B \-M
-
-.RS 3
-Searches for a master browser.
-.RE
-
-.B \-R
-
-.RS 3
-Do a recursive lookup (needed to direct the query to the WINS portion
-of the server rather than the broadcast portion.)
-
-.RE
-
-.B \-S
-
-.RS 3
-Lookup node status as well.
-.RE
-
-.B \-r
-
-.RS 3
-Use root port 137 (Win95 only replies to this.)
-.RE
-
-.B \-A
-
-.RS 3
-Do a node status on <name> as an IP Address.
-.RE
-
-.SH EXAMPLES
-
-.B nmblookup
-can be used to query a WINS server (in the same way
-.B nslookup
-is used to query DNS servers). To query a WINS server,
-.B nmblookup
-must be called like this:
-
-.B nmblookup
--U server -R 'query'
-
-For example, running '
-.B nmblookup
--U samba.anu.edu.au -R IRIX#1B' would query the WINS server
-samba.anu.edu.au for the domain master browser (1B name) for the 
-IRIX workgroup.
-
-.SH VERSION
-
-This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.16 of the Samba
-suite, plus some of the recent patches to it. These notes will
-necessarily lag behind development of the software, so it is possible
-that your version of the server has extensions or parameter semantics
-that differ from or are not covered by this man page. Please notify
-these to the address below for rectification.
-.SH SEE ALSO
-.BR samba (8), 
-.BR nmbd (8), 
-.BR smb.conf (5)
-.SH CREDITS
-The original Samba software and related utilities were created by 
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Andrew is also the Keeper
-of the Source for this project.
-
+.TH "nmblookup" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.PP 
+.SH "NAME" 
+nmblookup \- NetBIOS over TCP/IP client used to lookup NetBIOS names
+.PP 
+.SH "SYNOPSIS" 
+.PP 
+\fBnmblookup\fP [-M] [-R] [-S] [-r] [-A] [-h] [-B broadcast address] [-U unicast address] [-d debuglevel] [-s smb config file] [-i NetBIOS scope] name
+.PP 
+.SH "DESCRIPTION" 
+.PP 
+This program is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
+.PP 
+\fBnmblookup\fP is used to query NetBIOS names and map them to IP
+addresses in a network using NetBIOS over TCP/IP queries\&. The options
+allow the name queries to be directed at a particlar IP broadcast area
+or to a particular machine\&. All queries are done over UDP\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "OPTIONS" 
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-M\fP" 
+Searches for a master browser\&. This is done by doing a
+broadcast lookup on the special name \f(CW__MSBROWSE__\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-R\fP" 
+Set the recursion desired bit in the packet to do a
+recursive lookup\&. This is used when sending a name query to a machine
+running a WINS server and the user wishes to query the names in the
+WINS server\&.  If this bit is unset the normal (broadcast responding)
+NetBIOS processing code on a machine is used instead\&. See rfc1001,
+rfc1002 for details\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-S\fP" 
+Once the name query has returned an IP address then do a
+node status query as well\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-r\fP" 
+Try and bind to UDP port 137 to send and receive UDP
+datagrams\&. The reason for this option is a bug in Windows 95 where it
+ignores the source port of the requesting packet and only replies to
+UDP port 137\&. Unfortunately, on most UNIX systems root privillage is
+needed to bind to this port, and in addition, if the
+\fBnmbd\fP daemon is running on this machine it also
+binds to this port\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-A\fP" 
+Interpret <name> as an IP Address and do a node status
+query on this address\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-h\fP" 
+Print a help (usage) message\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-B broadcast address\fP" 
+Send the query to the given broadcast
+address\&. Without this option the default behavior of nmblookup is to
+send the query to the broadcast address of the primary network
+interface as either auto-detected or defined in the 
+\fBinterfaces\fP parameter of the 
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-U unicast address\fP" 
+Do a unicast query to the specified
+address or host \f(CW"unicast address"\fP\&. This option (along with the
+\fB-R\fP option) is needed to query a WINS server\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-d debuglevel\fP" 
+debuglevel is an integer from 0 to 10\&.
+.IP 
+The default value if this parameter is not specified is zero\&.
+.IP 
+The higher this value, the more detail will be logged about the
+activities of \fBnmblookup\fP\&. At level 0, only critical errors and
+serious warnings will be logged\&.
+.IP 
+Levels above 1 will generate considerable amounts of log data, and
+should only be used when investigating a problem\&. Levels above 3 are
+designed for use only by developers and generate HUGE amounts of
+data, most of which is extremely cryptic\&.
+.IP 
+Note that specifying this parameter here will override the \fBlog
+level\fP parameter in the \fBsmb\&.conf
+(5)\fP file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-s smb\&.conf\fP" 
+This parameter specifies the pathname to the
+Samba configuration file, smb\&.conf\&. This file controls all aspects of
+the Samba setup on the machine and smbclient also needs to read this
+file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB-i scope\fP" 
+This specifies a NetBIOS scope that smbclient will use
+to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names\&. For details on the
+use of NetBIOS scopes, see rfc1001\&.txt and rfc1002\&.txt\&. NetBIOS scopes
+are \fIvery\fP rarely used, only set this parameter if you are the
+system administrator in charge of all the NetBIOS systems you
+communicate with\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBname\fP" 
+This is the NetBIOS name being queried\&. Depending upon
+the previous options this may be a NetBIOS name or IP address\&. If a
+NetBIOS name then the different name types may be specified by
+appending \f(CW#<type>\fP to the name\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "EXAMPLES" 
+.PP 
+\fBnmblookup\fP can be used to query a WINS server (in the same way \&.B
+nslookup is used to query DNS servers)\&. To query a WINS server,
+nmblookup must be called like this:
+.PP 
+\f(CWnmblookup -U server -R \'name\'\fP
+.PP 
+For example, running :
+.PP 
+\f(CWnmblookup -U samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au -R IRIX#1B\'\fP
+.PP 
+would query the WINS server samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au for the domain master
+browser (1B name type) for the IRIX workgroup\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "VERSION" 
+.PP 
+This man page is correct for version 2\&.0 of the Samba suite\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "SEE ALSO" 
+.PP 
+\fBsamba (7)\fP, \fBnmbd (8)\fP,
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP
+.PP 
+.SH "AUTHOR" 
+.PP 
+The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
+Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
+Linux kernel is developed\&.
+.PP 
+The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer\&. The man page
+sources were converted to YODL format (another excellent piece of Open
+Source software) and updated for the Samba2\&.0 release by Jeremy
+Allison, \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
+.PP 
+See \fBsamba (7)\fP to find out how to get a full
+list of contributors and details on how to submit bug reports,
+comments etc\&.
+.PP 
index c87dd4b856fd800deba4a49497b72202b7020c21..6cb6883e2728c1c8acefc453df02ab059a27cb69 100644 (file)
-.TH SAMBA 7 "09 Oct 1998" "samba 2.0.0-alpha11"
-.SH NAME
-Samba \- a LanManager like fileserver for UNIX
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B Samba
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-The
-.B Samba
-software suite is a collection of programs that implements the SMB
-protocol for UNIX systems. This protocol is sometimes also referred to
-as the LanManager or Netbios protocol.
-.SH COMPONENTS
-
-The Samba suite is made up of several components. Each component is
-described in a separate manual page. It is strongly recommended that
+.TH "Samba" "7" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "" 
+.PP 
+.SH "NAME" 
+Samba \- A Windows SMB/CIFS fileserver for UNIX
+.PP 
+.SH "SYNOPSIS" 
+\fBSamba\fP
+.PP 
+.SH "DESCRIPTION" 
+.PP 
+The Samba software suite is a collection of programs that implements
+the Server Message Block(commenly abbreviated as SMB) protocol for
+UNIX systems\&. This protocol is sometimes also referred to as the
+Common Internet File System (CIFS), LanManager or NetBIOS protocol\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "COMPONENTS" 
+.PP 
+The Samba suite is made up of several components\&. Each component is
+described in a separate manual page\&. It is strongly recommended that
 you read the documentation that comes with Samba and the manual pages
-of those components that you use. If the manual pages aren't clear
-enough then please send me a patch!
-
-The
-.BR smbd (8)
-daemon provides the file and print services to SMB clients,
-such as Windows for Workgroups, Windows NT or LanManager. The
-configuration file for this daemon is described in
-.BR smb.conf (5).
-
-The
-.BR nmbd (8)
-daemon provides Netbios nameserving and browsing
-support. It can also be run interactively to query other name service
-daemons.
-
-The
-.BR smbclient (1)
-program implements a simple ftp-like client. This is
-useful for accessing SMB shares on other compatible servers (such as
-WfWg), and can also be used to allow a UNIX box to print to a printer
-attached to any SMB server (such as a PC running WfWg).
-
-The
-.BR testparm (1)
-utility allows you to test your
-.BR smb.conf (5)
-configuration file.
-
+of those components that you use\&. If the manual pages aren\'t clear
+enough then please send a patch to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsmbd\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+The \fBsmbd\fP
+(8) daemon provides the file and print services to SMB
+clients, such as Windows 95/98, Windows NT, Windows for Workgroups or
+LanManager\&. The configuration file for this daemon is described in
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnmbd\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+The \fBnmbd\fP
+(8) daemon provides NetBIOS nameserving and browsing
+support\&. The configuration file for this daemon is described in
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsmbclient\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+The \fBsmbclient\fP
+(1) program implements a simple ftp-like
+client\&. This is useful for accessing SMB shares on other compatible
+servers (such as Windows NT), and can also be used to allow a UNIX box
+to print to a printer attached to any SMB server (such as a PC running
+Windows NT)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBtestparm\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+The \fBtestparm
+(1)\fP utility allows you to test your \fBsmb\&.conf
+(5)\fP configuration file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBtestprns\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+the \fBtestprns
+(1)\fP utility allows you to test the printers defined
+in your printcap file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsmbstatus\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+The \fBsmbstatus\fP
+(1) utility allows you to tell who is currently
+using the \fBsmbd (8)\fP server\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnmblookup\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+the
+\fBnmblookup (1)\fP utility allows NetBIOS name
+queries to be made from the UNIX machine\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmake_smbcodepage\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
 The
-.BR smbstatus (1)
-utility allows you to tell who is currently using the
-.BR smbd (8)
-server.
-.SH AVAILABILITY
-
-The Samba software suite is licensed under the Gnu Public License. A
-copy of that license should have come with the package. You are
-encouraged to distribute copies of the Samba suite, but please keep it
-intact.
-
+\fBmake_smbcodepage (1)\fP utility allows
+you to create SMB code page definition files for your \fBsmbd
+(8)\fP server\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsmbpasswd\fP" 
+.br 
+.br 
+The \fBsmbpasswd
+(8)\fP utility allows you to change SMB encrypted
+passwords on Samba and Windows NT(tm) servers\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "AVAILABILITY" 
+.PP 
+The Samba software suite is licensed under the GNU Public License
+(GPL)\&. A copy of that license should have come with the package in the
+file COPYING\&. You are encouraged to distribute copies of the Samba
+suite, but please keep obey the terms of this license\&.
+.PP 
 The latest version of the Samba suite can be obtained via anonymous
-ftp from samba.anu.edu.au in the directory pub/samba/. It is
-also available on several mirror sites worldwide.
-
+ftp from samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au in the directory pub/samba/\&. It is
+also available on several mirror sites worldwide\&.
+.PP 
 You may also find useful information about Samba on the newsgroup
-comp.protocols.smb and the Samba mailing list. Details on how to join
-the mailing list are given in the README file that comes with Samba.
-
+comp\&.protocols\&.smb and the Samba mailing list\&. Details on how to join
+the mailing list are given in the README file that comes with Samba\&.
+.PP 
 If you have access to a WWW viewer (such as Netscape or Mosaic) then
 you will also find lots of useful information, including back issues
-of the Samba mailing list, at http://samba.anu.edu.au/samba/
-.SH AUTHOR
-
-The main author of the Samba suite is Andrew Tridgell. He may be
-contacted via e-mail at samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au.
-
-There have also been an enormous number of contributors to Samba from
-all over the world. A partial list of these contributors is included
-in the CREDITS section below. The list is, however, badly out of
-date. More up to date info may be obtained from the change-log that
-comes with the Samba source code.
-.SH CONTRIBUTIONS
-
+of the Samba mailing list, at
+http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/samba/\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "VERSION" 
+.PP 
+This man page is correct for version 2\&.0 of the Samba suite\&. 
+.PP 
+.SH "CONTRIBUTIONS" 
+.PP 
 If you wish to contribute to the Samba project, then I suggest you
-join the Samba mailing list.
-
+join the Samba mailing list at \fIsamba@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. See the
+Web page at
+http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/listproc
+for details on how to do this\&.
+.PP 
 If you have patches to submit or bugs to report then you may mail them
-directly to samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au. Note, however, that due to the
-enormous popularity of this package I may take some time to repond to
-mail. I prefer patches in "diff \-u" format.
-.SH CREDITS
-
-Contributors to the project are (in alphabetical order by email address):
-
-(NOTE: This list is very out of date)
-
- Adams, Graham
-       (gadams@ddrive.demon.co.uk)
- Allison, Jeremy
-       (jeremy@netcom.com)
- Andrus, Ross
-       (ross@augie.insci.com)
- Auer, Karl
-       (Karl.Auer@anu.edu.au)
- Bogstad, Bill
-       (bogstad@cs.jhu.edu)
- Boreham, Bryan
-       (Bryan@alex.com)
- Boreham, David
-       (davidb@ndl.co.uk)
- Butler, Michael
-       (imb@asstdc.scgt.oz.au)
- ???
-       (charlie@edina.demon.co.uk)
- Chua, Michael
-       (lpc@solomon.technet.sg)
- Cochran, Marc
-       (mcochran@wellfleet.com)
- Dey, Martin N
-       (mnd@netmgrs.co.uk)
- Errath, Maximilian
-       (errath@balu.kfunigraz.ac.at)
- Fisher, Lee
-       (leefi@microsoft.com)
- Foderaro, Sean
-       (jkf@frisky.Franz.COM)
- Greer, Brad
-       (brad@cac.washington.edu)
- Griffith, Michael A
-       (grif@cs.ucr.edu)
- Grosen, Mark
-       (MDGrosen@spectron.COM)
- ????
-       (gunjkoa@dep.sa.gov.au)
- Haapanen, Tom
-       (tomh@metrics.com)
- Hench, Mike
-       (hench@cae.uwm.edu)
- Horstman, Mark A
-       (mh2620@sarek.sbc.com)
- Hudson, Tim
-       (tim.hudson@gslmail.mincom.oz.au)
- Hulthen, Erik Magnus
-       (magnus@axiom.se)
- ???
-       (imb@asstdc.scgt.oz.au)
- Iversen, Per Steinar
-       (iversen@dsfys1.fi.uib.no)
- Kaara, Pasi
-       (ppk@atk.tpo.fi)
- Karman, Merik
-       (merik@blackadder.dsh.oz.au)
- Kiff, Martin
-       (mgk@newton.npl.co.uk)
- Kiick, Chris
-       (cjkiick@flinx.b11.ingr.com)
- Kukulies, Christoph
-       (kuku@acds.physik.rwth-aachen.de)
- ???
-       (lance@fox.com)
- Leighton, Luke
-       (lkcl@pires.co.uk)
- Lendecke, Volker
-       (lendecke@namu01.gwdg.de)
- ???
-       (lonnie@itg.ti.com)
- Mahoney, Paul Thomas
-       (ptm@xact1.xact.com)
- Mauelshagen, Heinz
-       (mauelsha@ez.da.telekom.de)
- Merrick, Barry G
-       (bgm@atml.co.uk)
- Mol, Marcel
-       (marcel@fanout.et.tudeflt.nl)
- ???
-       (njw@cpsg.com.au)
- ???
-       (noses@oink.rhein.de)
- Owens, John
-       (john@micros.com)
- Pierson, Jacques
-       (pierson@ketje.enet.dec.com)
- Powell, Mark
-       (mark@scot1.ucsalf.ac.uk)
- Reiz, Steven
-       (sreiz@aie.nl)
- Schlaeger, Joerg
-       (joergs@toppoint.de)
- S{rkel{, Vesa
-       (vesku@rankki.kcl.fi)
- Terpstra, John
-       (jht@aquasoft.com.au)
- Tridgell, Andrew
-       (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au)
- Troyer, Dean
-       (troyer@saifr00.ateng.az.honeywell.com)
- Wakelin, Ross
-       (rossw@march.co.uk)
- Wessels, Stefan
-       (SWESSELS@dos-lan.cs.up.ac.za)
- Young, Ian A
-       (iay@threel.co.uk)
- van der Zwan, Paul
-       (paulzn@olivetti.nl)
-
+directly to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Note, however, that due to
+the enormous popularity of this package the Samba Team may take some
+time to repond to mail\&. We prefer patches in \fIdiff -u\fP format\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "CREDITS" 
+.PP 
+Contributors to the project are now too numerous to mention here but
+all deserve the thanks of all Samba users\&. To see a full list, look at
+ftp://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/pub/samba/alpha/change-log
+for the pre-CVS changes and at
+ftp://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/pub/samba/alpha/cvs\&.log
+for the contributors to Samba post-CVS\&. CVS is the Open Source source
+code control system used by the Samba Team to develop Samba\&. The
+project would have been unmanageable without it\&.
+.PP 
+In addition, several commercial organisations now help fund the Samba
+Team with money and equipment\&. For details see the Samba Web pages at
+http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/samba/samba-thanks\&.html\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "AUTHOR" 
+.PP 
+The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
+by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
+Linux kernel is developed\&.
+.PP 
+The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer\&. The man page
+sources were converted to YODL format (another excellent piece of Open
+Source software) and updated for the Samba2\&.0 release by Jeremy
+Allison, \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
index 569f262006649f18388a6d41a0b24b959ec1c511..09ddd148d1ccd0df1c08de24527533fd5f20b547 100644 (file)
-.TH SMB.CONF 5 "13 Jun 1998" "smb.conf 1.9.18p8"
-.SH NAME
-smb.conf \- configuration file for smbd
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B smb.conf
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-The
-.B smb.conf
-file is a configuration file for the Samba suite.
-
-.B smb.conf
-contains runtime configuration information for the
-.B smbd
-program. The
-.B smbd
-program provides LanManager-like services to clients
-using the SMB protocol.
-.SH FILE FORMAT
-The file consists of sections and parameters. A section begins with the 
-name of the section in square brackets and continues until the next
-section begins. Sections contain parameters of the form 'name = value'.
-
-The file is line-based - that is, each newline-terminated line represents
-either a comment, a section name or a parameter.
-
-Section and parameter names are not case sensitive.
-
-Only the first equals sign in a parameter is significant. Whitespace before 
-or after the first equals sign is discarded. Leading, trailing and internal
-whitespace in section and parameter names is irrelevant. Leading and
-trailing whitespace in a parameter value is discarded. Internal whitespace
-within a parameter value is retained verbatim.
-
-Any line beginning with a semicolon is ignored, as are lines containing 
-only whitespace.
-
-Any line ending in a \e is "continued" on the next line in the
-customary UNIX fashion.
-
-The values following the equals sign in parameters are all either a string
-(no quotes needed) or a boolean, which may be given as yes/no, 0/1 or
-true/false. Case is not significant in boolean values, but is preserved
-in string values. Some items such as create modes are numeric.
-.SH SERVICE DESCRIPTIONS
-Each section in the configuration file describes a service. The section name
-is the service name and the parameters within the section define the service's
-attributes.
-
-There are three special sections, [global], [homes] and [printers], which are
-described under 'special sections'. The following notes apply to ordinary 
-service descriptions.
-
-A service consists of a directory to which access is being given plus a 
-description of the access rights which are granted to the user of the 
-service. Some housekeeping options are also specifiable.
-
-Services are either filespace services (used by the client as an extension of
-their native file systems) or printable services (used by the client to access
-print services on the host running the server).
-
-Services may be guest services, in which case no password is required to
-access them. A specified guest account is used to define access privileges
-in this case.
-
-Services other than guest services will require a password to access
-them. The client provides the username. As many clients only provide
+.TH "smb\&.conf" "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.PP 
+.SH "NAME" 
+smb\&.conf \- The configuration file for the Samba suite
+.PP 
+.SH "SYNOPSIS" 
+.PP 
+\fBsmb\&.conf\fP The \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file is a configuration file for the
+Samba suite\&. \fBsmb\&.conf\fP contains runtime configuration information
+for the Samba programs\&. The \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file is designed to be
+configured and administered by the \fBswat (8)\fP
+program\&. The complete description of the file format and possible
+parameters held within are here for reference purposes\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "FILE FORMAT" 
+.PP 
+The file consists of sections and parameters\&. A section begins with
+the name of the section in square brackets and continues until the
+next section begins\&. Sections contain parameters of the form 
+.PP 
+\f(CW\'name = value\'\fP
+.PP 
+The file is line-based - that is, each newline-terminated line
+represents either a comment, a section name or a parameter\&.
+.PP 
+Section and parameter names are not case sensitive\&.
+.PP 
+Only the first equals sign in a parameter is significant\&. Whitespace
+before or after the first equals sign is discarded\&. Leading, trailing
+and internal whitespace in section and parameter names is
+irrelevant\&. Leading and trailing whitespace in a parameter value is
+discarded\&. Internal whitespace within a parameter value is retained
+verbatim\&.
+.PP 
+Any line beginning with a semicolon (\';\') or a hash (\'#\') character is
+ignored, as are lines containing only whitespace\&.
+.PP 
+Any line ending in a \f(CW\'\e\'\fP is "continued" on the next line in the
+customary UNIX fashion\&.
+.PP 
+The values following the equals sign in parameters are all either a
+string (no quotes needed) or a boolean, which may be given as yes/no,
+0/1 or true/false\&. Case is not significant in boolean values, but is
+preserved in string values\&. Some items such as create modes are
+numeric\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "SECTION DESCRIPTIONS" 
+.PP 
+Each section in the configuration file (except for the
+\fB[global]\fP section) describes a shared resource (known
+as a \fI"share"\fP)\&. The section name is the name of the shared resource
+and the parameters within the section define the shares attributes\&.
+.PP 
+There are three special sections, \fB[global]\fP,
+\fB[homes]\fP and \fB[printers]\fP, which are
+described under \fB\'special sections\'\fP\&. The
+following notes apply to ordinary section descriptions\&.
+.PP 
+A share consists of a directory to which access is being given plus
+a description of the access rights which are granted to the user of
+the service\&. Some housekeeping options are also specifiable\&.
+.PP 
+Sections are either filespace services (used by the client as an
+extension of their native file systems) or printable services (used by
+the client to access print services on the host running the server)\&.
+.PP 
+Sections may be designated \fBguest\fP services, in which
+case no password is required to access them\&. A specified UNIX
+\fBguest account\fP is used to define access
+privileges in this case\&.
+.PP 
+Sections other than guest services will require a password to access
+them\&. The client provides the username\&. As older clients only provide
 passwords and not usernames, you may specify a list of usernames to
-check against the password using the "user=" option in the service
-definition. 
-
-Note that the access rights granted by the server are masked by the access
-rights granted to the specified or guest user by the host system. The 
-server does not grant more access than the host system grants.
+check against the password using the \fB"user="\fP option in
+the share definition\&. For modern clients such as Windows 95/98 and
+Windows NT, this should not be neccessary\&.
+.PP 
+Note that the access rights granted by the server are masked by the
+access rights granted to the specified or guest UNIX user by the host
+system\&. The server does not grant more access than the host system
+grants\&.
+.PP 
+The following sample section defines a file space share\&. The user has
+write access to the path \f(CW/home/bar\fP\&. The share is accessed via
+the share name "foo":
+.PP 
+
+.DS 
 
-The following sample section defines a file space service. The user has write
-access to the path /home/bar. The service is accessed via the service name 
-"foo":
 
        [foo]
                path = /home/bar
                writable = true
 
-The following sample section defines a printable service. The service is 
-readonly, but printable. That is, the only write access permitted is via 
-calls to open, write to and close a spool file. The 'guest ok' parameter 
-means access will be permitted as the default guest user (specified elsewhere):
+
+.DE 
+
+.PP 
+The following sample section defines a printable share\&. The share
+is readonly, but printable\&. That is, the only write access permitted
+is via calls to open, write to and close a spool file\&. The
+\fB\'guest ok\'\fP parameter means access will be permitted
+as the default guest user (specified elsewhere):
+.PP 
+
+.DS 
 
        [aprinter]
                path = /usr/spool/public
                read only = true
                printable = true
-               public = true
-.SH SPECIAL SECTIONS
-
-.SS The [global] section
-.RS 3
-Parameters in this section apply to the server as a whole, or are defaults
-for services which do not specifically define certain items. See the notes
-under 'Parameters' for more information.
-.RE
-
-.SS The [homes] section
-.RS 3
-If a section called 'homes' is included in the configuration file, services
-connecting clients to their home directories can be created on the fly by the
-server.
-
-When the connection request is made, the existing services are scanned. If a
-match is found, it is used. If no match is found, the requested service name is
-treated as a user name and looked up in the local passwords file. If the
-name exists and the correct password has been given, a service is created
-by cloning the [homes] section.
-
-Some modifications are then made to the newly created section:
-
-.RS 3
-The service name is changed from 'homes' to the located username
+               guest ok = true
 
-If no path was given, the path is set to the user's home directory.
-.RE
+.DE 
 
-If you decide to use a path= line in your [homes] section then you may
-find it useful to use the %S macro. For example path=/data/pchome/%S
+.PP 
+.SH "SPECIAL SECTIONS" 
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBThe [global] section\fP" 
+.IP 
+Parameters in this section apply to the server as a whole, or are
+defaults for sections which do not specifically define certain
+items\&. See the notes under \fB\'PARAMETERS\'\fP for more
+information\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBThe [homes] section\fP" 
+.IP 
+If a section called \f(CW\'homes\'\fP is included in the configuration file,
+services connecting clients to their home directories can be created
+on the fly by the server\&.
+.IP 
+When the connection request is made, the existing sections are
+scanned\&. If a match is found, it is used\&. If no match is found, the
+requested section name is treated as a user name and looked up in the
+local password file\&. If the name exists and the correct password has
+been given, a share is created by cloning the [homes] section\&.
+.IP 
+Some modifications are then made to the newly created share:
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+The share name is changed from \f(CW\'homes\'\fP to the located
+username
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+If no path was given, the path is set to the user\'s home
+directory\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+If you decide to use a \fBpath=\fP line in your [homes]
+section then you may find it useful to use the \fB%S\fP
+macro\&. For example :
+.IP 
+\f(CWpath=/data/pchome/%S\fP
+.IP 
 would be useful if you have different home directories for your PCs
-than for UNIX access.
-
-This is a fast and simple way to give a large number of clients access to
-their home directories with a minimum of fuss.
-
-A similar process occurs if the requested service name is "homes", except that
-the service name is not changed to that of the requesting user. This method
-of using the [homes] section works well if different users share a client PC.
-
-The [homes] section can specify all the parameters a normal service section
-can specify, though some make more sense than others. The following is a 
-typical and suitable [homes] section:
+than for UNIX access\&.
+.IP 
+This is a fast and simple way to give a large number of clients access
+to their home directories with a minimum of fuss\&.
+.IP 
+A similar process occurs if the requested section name is \f(CW"homes"\fP,
+except that the share name is not changed to that of the requesting
+user\&. This method of using the [homes] section works well if different
+users share a client PC\&.
+.IP 
+The [homes] section can specify all the parameters a normal service
+section can specify, though some make more sense than others\&. The
+following is a typical and suitable [homes] section:
+.IP 
+
+.DS 
 
        [homes]
                writable = yes
 
-An important point:
-
-.RS 3
-If guest access is specified in the [homes] section, all home directories will
-be accessible to all clients
-.B without a password.
-In the very unlikely event
-that this is actually desirable, it would be wise to also specify read only
-access.
-.RE
-.RE
-
-Note that the browseable flag for auto home directories will be
-inherited from the global browseable flag, not the [homes] browseable
-flag. This is useful as it means setting browseable=no in the [homes]
-section will hide the [homes] service but make any auto home
-directories visible.
-
-.SS The [printers] section
-.RS 3
-This section works like [homes], but for printers.
-
-If a [printers] section occurs in the configuration file, users are able 
-to connect to any printer specified in the local host's printcap file.
-
-When a connection request is made, the existing services are scanned. If a
-match is found, it is used. If no match is found, but a [homes] section
-exists, it is used as described above. Otherwise, the requested service name is
-treated as a printer name and the appropriate printcap file is scanned to
-see if the requested service name is a valid printer name. If a match is
-found, a new service is created by cloning the [printers] section.
-
-A few modifications are then made to the newly created section:
-
-.RS 3
-The service name is set to the located printer name
-
-If no printer name was given, the printer name is set to the located printer
-name
-
-If the service does not permit guest access and no username was given, the 
-username is set to the located printer name.
-.RE
-
-Note that the [printers] service MUST be printable - if you specify otherwise,
-the server will refuse to load the configuration file.
+.DE 
 
-Typically the path specified would be that of a world-writable spool directory
-with the sticky bit set on it. A typical [printers] entry would look like this:
+.IP 
+An important point is that if guest access is specified in the [homes]
+section, all home directories will be visible to all clients
+\fBwithout a password\fP\&. In the very unlikely event that this is
+actually desirable, it would be wise to also specify \fBread only
+access\fP\&.
+.IP 
+Note that the \fBbrowseable\fP flag for auto home
+directories will be inherited from the global browseable flag, not the
+[homes] browseable flag\&. This is useful as it means setting
+browseable=no in the [homes] section will hide the [homes] share but
+make any auto home directories visible\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBThe [printers] section\fP" 
+.IP 
+This section works like \fB[homes]\fP, but for printers\&.
+.IP 
+If a [printers] section occurs in the configuration file, users are
+able to connect to any printer specified in the local host\'s printcap
+file\&.
+.IP 
+When a connection request is made, the existing sections are
+scanned\&. If a match is found, it is used\&. If no match is found, but a
+\fB[homes]\fP section exists, it is used as described
+above\&. Otherwise, the requested section name is treated as a printer
+name and the appropriate printcap file is scanned to see if the
+requested section name is a valid printer share name\&. If a match is
+found, a new printer share is created by cloning the [printers]
+section\&.
+.IP 
+A few modifications are then made to the newly created share:
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+The share name is set to the located printer name
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+If no printer name was given, the printer name is set to the
+located printer name
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+If the share does not permit guest access and no username was
+given, the username is set to the located printer name\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+Note that the [printers] service MUST be printable - if you specify
+otherwise, the server will refuse to load the configuration file\&.
+.IP 
+Typically the path specified would be that of a world-writable spool
+directory with the sticky bit set on it\&. A typical [printers] entry
+would look like this:
+.IP 
+
+.DS 
 
        [printers]
                path = /usr/spool/public
                writable = no
-               public = yes
+               guest ok = yes
                printable = yes 
 
-All aliases given for a printer in the printcap file are legitimate printer
-names as far as the server is concerned. If your printing subsystem doesn't
-work like that, you will have to set up a pseudo-printcap. This is a file
-consisting of one or more lines like this:
-
-        alias|alias|alias|alias...
+.DE 
 
-Each alias should be an acceptable printer name for your printing 
-subsystem. In the [global] section, specify the new file as your printcap.
-The server will then only recognise names found in your pseudo-printcap,
-which of course can contain whatever aliases you like. The same technique
-could be used simply to limit access to a subset of your local printers.
+.IP 
+All aliases given for a printer in the printcap file are legitimate
+printer names as far as the server is concerned\&. If your printing
+subsystem doesn\'t work like that, you will have to set up a
+pseudo-printcap\&. This is a file consisting of one or more lines like
+this:
+.IP 
 
-An alias, by the way, is defined as any component of the first entry of a 
-printcap record. Records are separated by newlines, components (if there are 
-more than one) are separated by vertical bar symbols ("|").
+.DS 
+        alias|alias|alias|alias\&.\&.\&.    
+.DE 
 
+.IP 
+Each alias should be an acceptable printer name for your printing
+subsystem\&. In the \fB[global]\fP section, specify the new
+file as your printcap\&.  The server will then only recognise names
+found in your pseudo-printcap, which of course can contain whatever
+aliases you like\&. The same technique could be used simply to limit
+access to a subset of your local printers\&.
+.IP 
+An alias, by the way, is defined as any component of the first entry
+of a printcap record\&. Records are separated by newlines, components
+(if there are more than one) are separated by vertical bar symbols
+("|")\&.
+.IP 
 NOTE: On SYSV systems which use lpstat to determine what printers are
-defined on the system you may be able to use "printcap name = lpstat" 
-to automatically obtain a list of printers. See the "printcap name"
-option for more detils.
-
-.RE
-.SH PARAMETERS
-Parameters define the specific attributes of services.
-
-Some parameters are specific to the [global] section (eg., security).
-Some parameters are usable in all sections (eg., create mode). All others are
-permissible only in normal sections. For the purposes of the following
-descriptions the [homes] and [printers] sections will be considered normal.
-The letter 'G' in parentheses indicates that a parameter is specific to the
-[global] section. The letter 'S' indicates that a parameter can be
-specified in a service specific section. Note that all S parameters
-can also be specified in the [global] section - in which case they
-will define the default behaviour for all services.
-
-Parameters are arranged here in alphabetical order - this may not create
-best bedfellows, but at least you can find them! Where there are synonyms,
-the preferred synonym is described, others refer to the preferred synonym.
-
-.SS VARIABLE SUBSTITUTIONS
-
+defined on the system you may be able to use \fB"printcap name =
+lpstat"\fP to automatically obtain a list of
+printers\&. See the \fB"printcap name"\fP option for
+more detils\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "PARAMETERS" 
+.PP 
+Parameters define the specific attributes of sections\&.
+.PP 
+Some parameters are specific to the \fB[global]\fP section
+(eg\&., \fBsecurity\fP)\&.  Some parameters are usable in
+all sections (eg\&., \fBcreate mode\fP)\&. All others are
+permissible only in normal sections\&. For the purposes of the following
+descriptions the \fB[homes]\fP and
+\fB[printers]\fP sections will be considered normal\&.
+The letter \f(CW\'G\'\fP in parentheses indicates that a parameter is
+specific to the \fB[global]\fP section\&. The letter \f(CW\'S\'\fP
+indicates that a parameter can be specified in a service specific
+section\&. Note that all \f(CW\'S\'\fP parameters can also be specified in the
+\fB[global]\fP section - in which case they will define
+the default behaviour for all services\&.
+.PP 
+Parameters are arranged here in alphabetical order - this may not
+create best bedfellows, but at least you can find them! Where there
+are synonyms, the preferred synonym is described, others refer to the
+preferred synonym\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "VARIABLE SUBSTITUTIONS" 
+.PP 
 Many of the strings that are settable in the config file can take
-substitutions. For example the option "path = /tmp/%u" would be
-interpreted as "path = /tmp/john" if the user connected with the
-username john.
-
+substitutions\&. For example the option \fB\f(CW"path =
+/tmp/%u"\fP\fP would be interpreted as \f(CW"path = /tmp/john"\fP if
+the user connected with the username john\&.
+.PP 
 These substitutions are mostly noted in the descriptions below, but
-there are some general substitutions which apply whenever they might be
-relevant. These are:
-
-%S = the name of the current service, if any
-
-%P = the root directory of the current service, if any
-
-%u = user name of the current service, if any
-
-%g = primary group name of %u
-
-%U = session user name (the user name that the client wanted, not
-necessarily the same as the one they got)
-
-%G = primary group name of %U
-
-%H = the home directory of the user given by %u
-
-%v = the Samba version
-
-%h = the hostname that Samba is running on
-
-%m = the netbios name of the client machine (very useful)
-
-%L = the netbios name of the server. This allows you to change your
-config based on what the client calls you. Your server can have a "dual
-personality".
-
-%M = the internet name of the client machine
-
-%N = the name of your NIS home directory server.  This is obtained from
-your NIS auto.map entry.  If you have not compiled Samba with -DAUTOMOUNT
-then this value will be the same as %L.
-
-%p = the path of the service's home directory, obtained from your NIS
-auto.map entry. The NIS auto.map entry is split up as "%N:%p".
-
-%R = the selected protocol level after protocol negotiation. As of 
-Samba 1.9.18 it can be one of CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2 or NT1.
-
-%d = The process id of the current server process
-
-%a = the architecture of the remote machine. Only some are recognised,
-and those may not be 100% reliable. It currently recognises Samba,
-WfWg, WinNT and Win95. Anything else will be known as "UNKNOWN". If it
-gets it wrong then sending me a level 3 log should allow me to fix it.
-
-%I = The IP address of the client machine
-
-%T = the current date and time
-
+there are some general substitutions which apply whenever they might
+be relevant\&. These are:
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%S\fP = the name of the current service, if any\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%P\fP = the root directory of the current service, if any\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%u\fP = user name of the current service, if any\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%g\fP = primary group name of \fB%u\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%U\fP = session user name (the user name that
+the client wanted, not necessarily the same as the one they got)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%G\fP = primary group name of \fB%U\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%H\fP = the home directory of the user given by \fB%u\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%v\fP = the Samba version\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%h\fP = the internet hostname that Samba is running on\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%m\fP = the NetBIOS name of the client machine (very useful)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%L\fP = the NetBIOS name of the server\&. This allows you to change your
+config based on what the client calls you\&. Your server can have a "dual
+personality"\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%M\fP = the internet name of the client machine\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%N\fP = the name of your NIS home directory server\&.  This is
+obtained from your NIS auto\&.map entry\&.  If you have not compiled Samba
+with the \fB--with-automount\fP option then this value will be the same
+as \fB%L\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%p\fP = the path of the service\'s home directory, obtained from your NIS
+auto\&.map entry\&. The NIS auto\&.map entry is split up as "%N:%p"\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%R\fP = the selected protocol level after protocol
+negotiation\&. It can be one of CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2 or NT1\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%d\fP = The process id of the current server process\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%a\fP = the architecture of the remote
+machine\&. Only some are recognised, and those may not be 100%
+reliable\&. It currently recognises Samba, WfWg, WinNT and
+Win95\&. Anything else will be known as "UNKNOWN"\&. If it gets it wrong
+then sending a level 3 log to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
+should allow it to be fixed\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%I\fP = The IP address of the client machine\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB%T\fP = the current date and time\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
 There are some quite creative things that can be done with these
-substitutions and other smb.conf options.
-
-.SS NAME MANGLING
-
-Samba supports "name mangling" so that DOS and Windows clients can use
-files that don't conform to the 8.3 format. It can also be set to adjust
-the case of 8.3 format filenames.
-
+substitutions and other smb\&.conf options\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "NAME MANGLING" 
+.PP 
+Samba supports \fI"name mangling"\fP so that DOS and Windows clients can
+use files that don\'t conform to the 8\&.3 format\&. It can also be set to
+adjust the case of 8\&.3 format filenames\&.
+.PP 
 There are several options that control the way mangling is performed,
-and they are grouped here rather than listed separately. For the
-defaults look at the output of the testparm program.
-
+and they are grouped here rather than listed separately\&. For the
+defaults look at the output of the testparm program\&.
+.PP 
 All of these options can be set separately for each service (or
-globally, of course).
-
+globally, of course)\&.
+.PP 
 The options are:
+.PP 
+\fB"mangle case = yes/no"\fP controls if names that have characters that
+aren\'t of the "default" case are mangled\&. For example, if this is yes
+then a name like \f(CW"Mail"\fP would be mangled\&. Default \fIno\fP\&.
+.PP 
+\fB"case sensitive = yes/no"\fP controls whether filenames are case
+sensitive\&. If they aren\'t then Samba must do a filename search and
+match on passed names\&. Default \fIno\fP\&.
+.PP 
+\fB"default case = upper/lower"\fP controls what the default case is for new
+filenames\&. Default \fIlower\fP\&.
+.PP 
+\fB"preserve case = yes/no"\fP controls if new files are created with the
+case that the client passes, or if they are forced to be the \f(CW"default"\fP
+case\&. Default \fIYes\fP\&.
+.PP 
+.PP 
+\fB"short preserve case = yes/no"\fP controls if new files which conform
+to 8\&.3 syntax, that is all in upper case and of suitable length, are
+created upper case, or if they are forced to be the \f(CW"default"\fP
+case\&. This option can be use with \fB"preserve case =
+yes"\fP to permit long filenames to retain their
+case, while short names are lowered\&. Default \fIYes\fP\&.
+.PP 
+By default, Samba 2\&.0 has the same semantics as a Windows NT
+server, in that it is case insensitive but case preserving\&.
+.PP 
+.SH "NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD VALIDATION" 
+.PP 
+There are a number of ways in which a user can connect to a
+service\&. The server follows the following steps in determining if it
+will allow a connection to a specified service\&. If all the steps fail
+then the connection request is rejected\&. If one of the steps pass then
+the following steps are not checked\&.
+.PP 
+If the service is marked \fB"guest only = yes"\fP then
+steps 1 to 5 are skipped\&.
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP 1\&. 
+Step 1: If the client has passed a username/password pair and
+that username/password pair is validated by the UNIX system\'s password
+programs then the connection is made as that username\&. Note that this
+includes the \f(CW\e\eserver\eservice%username\fP method of passing a
+username\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 2\&. 
+Step 2: If the client has previously registered a username with
+the system and now supplies a correct password for that username then
+the connection is allowed\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 3\&. 
+Step 3: The client\'s netbios name and any previously used user
+names are checked against the supplied password, if they match then
+the connection is allowed as the corresponding user\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 4\&. 
+Step 4: If the client has previously validated a
+username/password pair with the server and the client has passed the
+validation token then that username is used\&. This step is skipped if
+\fB"revalidate = yes"\fP for this service\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 5\&. 
+Step 5: If a \fB"user = "\fP field is given in the
+smb\&.conf file for the service and the client has supplied a password,
+and that password matches (according to the UNIX system\'s password
+checking) with one of the usernames from the \fBuser=\fP
+field then the connection is made as the username in the
+\fB"user="\fP line\&. If one of the username in the
+\fBuser=\fP list begins with a \f(CW\'@\'\fP then that name
+expands to a list of names in the group of the same name\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 6\&. 
+Step 6: If the service is a guest service then a connection is
+made as the username given in the \fB"guest account
+="\fP for the service, irrespective of the supplied
+password\&.
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "COMPLETE LIST OF GLOBAL PARAMETERS" 
+.PP 
+Here is a list of all global parameters\&. See the section of each
+parameter for details\&.  Note that some are synonyms\&.
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBannounce as\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBannounce version\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBauto services\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBbind interfaces only\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBbrowse list\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBchange notify timeout\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcharacter set\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBclient code page\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcoding system\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBconfig file\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdeadtime\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdebug timestamp\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdebuglevel\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdefault\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdefault service\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdfree command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdns proxy\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain admin group\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain admin users\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain controller\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain groups\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain guest group\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain guest users\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain logons\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdomain master\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBencrypt passwords\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBgetwd cache\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhomedir map\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhosts equiv\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBinterfaces\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBkeepalive\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBkernel oplocks\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBldap filter\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBldap port\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBldap root\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBldap root passwd\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBldap server\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBldap suffix\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlm announce\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlm interval\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBload printers\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlocal master\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlock dir\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlock directory\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlog file\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlog level\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlogon drive\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlogon home\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlogon path\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlogon script\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlpq cache time\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmachine password timeout\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmangled stack\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax disk size\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax log size\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax mux\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax open files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax packet\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax ttl\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax wins ttl\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax xmit\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmessage command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmin wins ttl\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBname resolve order\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBnetbios aliases\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBnetbios name\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBnis homedir\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBnt pipe support\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBnt smb support\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBnull passwords\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBole locking compatibility\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBos level\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpacket size\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpanic action\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpasswd chat\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpasswd chat debug\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpasswd program\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpassword level\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpassword server\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprefered master\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpreferred master\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpreload\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprintcap\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprintcap name\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprinter driver file\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprotocol\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBread bmpx\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBread prediction\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBread raw\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBread size\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBremote announce\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBremote browse sync\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBroot\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBroot dir\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBroot directory\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsecurity\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBserver string\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBshared mem size\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsmb passwd file\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsmbrun\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsocket address\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsocket options\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl CA certDir\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl CA certFile\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl ciphers\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl client cert\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl client key\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl compatibility\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl hosts\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl hosts resign\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl require clientcert\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl require servercert\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl server cert\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl server key\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBssl version\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBstat cache\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBstat cache size\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBstrip dot\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsyslog\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsyslog only\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBtime offset\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBtime server\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBtimestamp logs\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBunix password sync\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBunix realname\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBupdate encrypted\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBuse rhosts\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBusername level\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBusername map\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBvalid chars\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwins proxy\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwins server\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwins support\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBworkgroup\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwrite raw\fP
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "COMPLETE LIST OF SERVICE PARAMETERS" 
+.PP 
+Here is a list of all service parameters\&. See the section of each
+parameter for details\&. Note that some are synonyms\&.
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBadmin users\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBallow hosts\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBalternate permissions\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBavailable\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBblocking locks\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBbrowsable\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBbrowseable\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcase sensitive\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcasesignames\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcomment\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcopy\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcreate mask\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBcreate mode\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdefault case\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdelete readonly\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdelete veto files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdeny hosts\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdirectory\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdirectory mask\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdirectory mode\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdont descend\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdos filetime resolution\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBdos filetimes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBexec\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBfake directory create times\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBfake oplocks\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBfollow symlinks\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBforce create mode\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBforce directory mode\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBforce group\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBforce user\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBfstype\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBgroup\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBguest account\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBguest ok\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBguest only\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhide dot files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhide files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhosts allow\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhosts deny\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBinclude\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBinvalid users\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlocking\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlppause command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlpq command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlpresume command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlprm command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmagic output\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmagic script\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmangle case\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmangled map\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmangled names\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmangling char\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmap archive\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmap hidden\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmap system\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmap to guest\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmax connections\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBmin print space\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBonly guest\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBonly user\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBoplocks\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpath\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpostexec\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpostscript\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpreexec\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpreserve case\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprint command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprint ok\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprintable\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprinter\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprinter driver\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprinter driver location\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprinter name\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBprinting\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBpublic\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBqueuepause command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBqueueresume command\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBread list\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBread only\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBrevalidate\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBroot postexec\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBroot preexec\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBset directory\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBshare modes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBshort preserve case\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBstatus\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBstrict locking\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBstrict sync\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBsync always\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBuser\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBusername\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBusers\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBvalid users\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBveto files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBveto oplock files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBvolume\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwide links\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwritable\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwrite list\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwrite ok\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwriteable\fP
+.IP 
+.PP 
+.SH "EXPLANATION OF EACH PARAMETER" 
+.PP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBadmin users (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a list of users who will be granted administrative privileges
+on the share\&. This means that they will do all file operations as the
+super-user (root)\&.
+.IP 
+You should use this option very carefully, as any user in this list
+will be able to do anything they like on the share, irrespective of
+file permissions\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP 
+.br 
+\f(CW  no admin users\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP 
+.br 
+\f(CW  admin users = jason\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBallow hosts (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+A synonym for this parameter is \fB\'hosts allow\'\fP
+.IP 
+This parameter is a comma, space, or tab delimited set of hosts which
+are permitted to access a service\&.
+.IP 
+If specified in the \fB[global]\fP section then it will
+apply to all services, regardless of whether the individual service
+has a different setting\&.
+.IP 
+You can specify the hosts by name or IP number\&. For example, you could
+restrict access to only the hosts on a Class C subnet with something
+like \f(CW"allow hosts = 150\&.203\&.5\&."\fP\&. The full syntax of the list is
+described in the man page \fBhosts_access (5)\fP\&. Note that this man
+page may not be present on your system, so a brief description will
+be given here also\&.
+.IP 
+\fINOTE:\fP IF you wish to allow the \fBsmbpasswd
+(8)\fP program to be run by local users to change
+their Samba passwords using the local \fBsmbd (8)\fP
+daemon, then you \fIMUST\fP ensure that the localhost is listed in your
+\fBallow hosts\fP list, as \fBsmbpasswd (8)\fP runs
+in client-server mode and is seen by the local
+\fBsmbd\fP process as just another client\&.
+.IP 
+You can also specify hosts by network/netmask pairs and by netgroup
+names if your system supports netgroups\&. The \fIEXCEPT\fP keyword can also
+be used to limit a wildcard list\&. The following examples may provide
+some help:
+.IP 
+\fBExample 1\fP: allow localhost and all IPs in 150\&.203\&.*\&.* except one
+.IP 
+\f(CW  hosts allow = localhost, 150\&.203\&. EXCEPT 150\&.203\&.6\&.66\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample 2\fP: allow localhost and hosts that match the given network/netmask
+.IP 
+\f(CW  hosts allow = localhost, 150\&.203\&.15\&.0/255\&.255\&.255\&.0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample 3\fP: allow a localhost plus a couple of hosts
+.IP 
+\f(CW  hosts allow = localhost, lapland, arvidsjaur\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample 4\fP: allow only hosts in NIS netgroup "foonet" or localhost, but 
+deny access from one particular host
+.IP 
+\f(CW  hosts allow = @foonet, localhost\fP
+\f(CW  hosts deny = pirate\fP
+.IP 
+Note that access still requires suitable user-level passwords\&.
+.IP 
+See \fBtestparm (1)\fP for a way of testing your
+host access to see if it does what you expect\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  none (i\&.e\&., all hosts permitted access)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  allow hosts = 150\&.203\&.5\&. localhost myhost\&.mynet\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBalternate permissions (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a deprecated parameter\&. It no longer has any effect in Samba2\&.0\&.
+In previous versions of Samba it affected the way the DOS "read only"
+attribute was mapped for a file\&. In Samba2\&.0 a file is marked "read only"
+if the UNIX file does not have the \'w\' bit set for the owner of the file,
+regardless if the owner of the file is the currently logged on user or not\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBannounce as (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This specifies what type of server \fBnmbd\fP will
+announce itself as, to a network neighborhood browse list\&. By default
+this is set to Windows NT\&. The valid options are : "NT", "Win95" or
+"WfW" meaining Windows NT, Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups
+respectively\&. Do not change this parameter unless you have a specific
+need to stop Samba appearing as an NT server as this may prevent Samba
+servers from participating as browser servers correctly\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  announce as = NT\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample\fP
+\f(CW  announce as = Win95\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBannounce version (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This specifies the major and minor version numbers that nmbd will use
+when announcing itself as a server\&. The default is 4\&.2\&.  Do not change
+this parameter unless you have a specific need to set a Samba server
+to be a downlevel server\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  announce version = 4\&.2\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  announce version = 2\&.0\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBauto services (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a list of services that you want to be automatically added to
+the browse lists\&. This is most useful for homes and printers services
+that would otherwise not be visible\&.
+.IP 
+Note that if you just want all printers in your printcap file loaded
+then the \fB"load printers"\fP option is easier\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  no auto services\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  auto services = fred lp colorlp\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBavailable (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter lets you \fI\'turn off\'\fP a service\&. If \f(CW\'available = no\'\fP,
+then \fIALL\fP attempts to connect to the service will fail\&. Such failures
+are logged\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  available = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  available = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBbind interfaces only (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This global parameter allows the Samba admin to limit what interfaces
+on a machine will serve smb requests\&. If affects file service
+\fBsmbd\fP and name service \fBnmbd\fP
+in slightly different ways\&.
+.IP 
+For name service it causes \fBnmbd\fP to bind to ports
+137 and 138 on the interfaces listed in the
+\fB\'interfaces\'\fP
+parameter\&. \fBnmbd\fP also binds to the \'all
+addresses\' interface (0\&.0\&.0\&.0) on ports 137 and 138 for the purposes
+of reading broadcast messages\&. If this option is not set then
+\fBnmbd\fP will service name requests on all of these
+sockets\&. If \fB"bind interfaces only"\fP is set then
+\fBnmbd\fP will check the source address of any
+packets coming in on the broadcast sockets and discard any that don\'t
+match the broadcast addresses of the interfaces in the
+\fB\'interfaces\'\fP parameter list\&. As unicast packets
+are received on the other sockets it allows \fBnmbd\fP
+to refuse to serve names to machines that send packets that arrive
+through any interfaces not listed in the
+\fB"interfaces"\fP list\&.  IP Source address spoofing
+does defeat this simple check, however so it must not be used
+seriously as a security feature for \fBnmbd\fP\&.
+.IP 
+For file service it causes \fBsmbd\fP to bind only to
+the interface list given in the \fB\'interfaces\'\fP
+parameter\&. This restricts the networks that \fBsmbd\fP
+will serve to packets coming in those interfaces\&.  Note that you
+should not use this parameter for machines that are serving PPP or
+other intermittant or non-broadcast network interfaces as it will not
+cope with non-permanent interfaces\&.
+.IP 
+In addition, to change a users SMB password, the
+\fBsmbpasswd\fP by default connects to the
+\fI"localhost" - 127\&.0\&.0\&.1\fP address as an SMB client to issue the
+password change request\&. If \fB"bind interfaces only"\fP is set then
+unless the network address \fI127\&.0\&.0\&.1\fP is added to the
+\fB\'interfaces\'\fP parameter list then
+\fBsmbpasswd\fP will fail to connect in it\'s
+default mode\&. \fBsmbpasswd\fP can be forced to
+use the primary IP interface of the local host by using its
+\fB"-r remote machine"\fP parameter, with
+\fB"remote machine"\fP set to the IP name of the primary interface
+of the local host\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  bind interfaces only = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  bind interfaces only = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBblocking locks (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter controls the behavior of \fBsmbd\fP when
+given a request by a client to obtain a byte range lock on a region
+of an open file, and the request has a time limit associated with it\&.
+.IP 
+If this parameter is set and the lock range requested cannot be
+immediately satisfied, Samba 2\&.0 will internally queue the lock 
+request, and periodically attempt to obtain the lock until the
+timeout period expires\&.
+.IP 
+If this parameter is set to "False", then Samba 2\&.0 will behave
+as previous versions of Samba would and will fail the lock
+request immediately if the lock range cannot be obtained\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter can be set per share\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  blocking locks = True\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  blocking locks = False\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBbroweable (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether this share is seen in the list of available
+shares in a net view and in the browse list\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  browsable = Yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  browsable = No\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBbrowse list(G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether \fBsmbd\fP will serve a browse
+list to a client doing a NetServerEnum call\&. Normally set to true\&. You
+should never need to change this\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  browse list = Yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBbrowseable\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBbrowsable\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcase sensitive (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+See the discussion in the section \fBNAME MANGLING\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcasesignames (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"case sensitive"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBchange notify timeout (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+One of the new NT SMB requests that Samba 2\&.0 supports is the
+"ChangeNotify" requests\&. This SMB allows a client to tell a server to
+\fI"watch"\fP a particular directory for any changes and only reply to
+the SMB request when a change has occurred\&. Such constant scanning of
+a directory is expensive under UNIX, hence an
+\fBsmbd\fP daemon only performs such a scan on each
+requested directory once every \fBchange notify timeout\fP seconds\&.
+.IP 
+\fBchange notify timeout\fP is specified in units of seconds\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  change notify timeout = 60\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  change notify timeout = 300\fP
+.IP 
+Would change the scan time to every 5 minutes\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcharacter set (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This allows a smbd to map incoming filenames from a DOS Code page (see
+the \fBclient code page\fP parameter) to several
+built in UNIX character sets\&. The built in code page translations are:
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBISO8859-1\fP Western European UNIX character set\&. The parameter
+\fBclient code page\fP \fIMUST\fP be set to code
+page 850 if the \fBcharacter set\fP parameter is set to iso8859-1
+in order for the conversion to the UNIX character set to be done
+correctly\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBISO8859-2\fP Eastern European UNIX character set\&. The parameter
+\fBclient code page\fP \fIMUST\fP be set to code
+page 852 if the \fBcharacter set\fP parameter is set to ISO8859-2
+in order for the conversion to the UNIX character set to be done
+correctly\&. 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBISO8859-5\fP Russian Cyrillic UNIX character set\&. The parameter
+\fBclient code page\fP \fIMUST\fP be set to code
+page 866 if the \fBcharacter set\fP parameter is set to ISO8859-2
+in order for the conversion to the UNIX character set to be done
+correctly\&. 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBKOI8-R\fP Alternate mapping for Russian Cyrillic UNIX
+character set\&. The parameter \fBclient code
+page\fP \fIMUST\fP be set to code page 866 if the
+\fBcharacter set\fP parameter is set to KOI8-R in order for the
+conversion to the UNIX character set to be done correctly\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+\fIBUG\fP\&. These MSDOS code page to UNIX character set mappings should
+be dynamic, like the loading of MS DOS code pages, not static\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fBclient code page\fP\&.  Normally this
+parameter is not set, meaning no filename translation is done\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  character set = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  character set = ISO8859-1\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBclient code page (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the DOS code page that the clients accessing
+Samba are using\&. To determine what code page a Windows or DOS client
+is using, open a DOS command prompt and type the command "chcp"\&. This
+will output the code page\&. The default for USA MS-DOS, Windows 95, and
+Windows NT releases is code page 437\&. The default for western european
+releases of the above operating systems is code page 850\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter tells \fBsmbd\fP which of the
+\f(CWcodepage\&.XXX\fP files to dynamically load on startup\&. These files,
+described more fully in the manual page \fBmake_smbcodepage
+(1)\fP, tell \fBsmbd\fP how
+to map lower to upper case characters to provide the case insensitivity
+of filenames that Windows clients expect\&.
+.IP 
+Samba currenly ships with the following code page files :
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 437 - MS-DOS Latin US\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 737 - Windows \'95 Greek\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 850 - MS-DOS Latin 1\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 852 - MS-DOS Latin 2\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 861 - MS-DOS Icelandic\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 866 - MS-DOS Cyrillic\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 932 - MS-DOS Japanese SJIS\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 936 - MS-DOS Simplified Chinese\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 949 - MS-DOS Korean Hangul\fP
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCode Page 950 - MS-DOS Traditional Chinese\fP
+.IP 
+.IP 
+Thus this parameter may have any of the values 437, 737, 850, 852,
+861, 932, 936, 949, or 950\&.  If you don\'t find the codepage you need,
+read the comments in one of the other codepage files and the
+\fBmake_smbcodepage (1)\fP man page and
+write one\&. Please remember to donate it back to the Samba user
+community\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter co-operates with the \fB"valid
+chars"\fP parameter in determining what characters are
+valid in filenames and how capitalization is done\&. If you set both
+this parameter and the \fB"valid chars"\fP parameter
+the \fB"client code page"\fP parameter \fIMUST\fP be set before the
+\fB"valid chars"\fP parameter in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP
+file\&. The \fB"valid chars"\fP string will then augment
+the character settings in the "client code page" parameter\&.
+.IP 
+If not set, \fB"client code page"\fP defaults to 850\&.
+.IP 
+See also : \fB"valid chars"\fP
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  client code page = 850\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  client code page = 936\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcodingsystem (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is used to determine how incoming Shift-JIS Japanese
+characters are mapped from the incoming \fB"client code
+page"\fP used by the client, into file names in the
+UNIX filesystem\&. Only useful if \fB"client code
+page"\fP is set to 932 (Japanese Shift-JIS)\&.
+.IP 
+The options are :
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBSJIS\fP  Shift-JIS\&. Does no conversion of the incoming filename\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBJIS8, J8BB, J8BH, J8@B, J8@J, J8@H \fP Convert from incoming
+Shift-JIS to eight bit JIS code with different shift-in, shift out
+codes\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBJIS7, J7BB, J7BH, J7@B, J7@J, J7@H \fP Convert from incoming
+Shift-JIS to seven bit JIS code with different shift-in, shift out
+codes\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBJUNET, JUBB, JUBH, JU@B, JU@J, JU@H \fP Convert from incoming
+Shift-JIS to JUNET code with different shift-in, shift out codes\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBEUC\fP  Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to EUC code\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBHEX\fP Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to a 3 byte hex
+representation, ie\&. \f(CW:AB\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBCAP\fP Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to the 3 byte hex
+representation used by the Columbia Appletalk Program (CAP),
+ie\&. \f(CW:AB\fP\&.  This is used for compatibility between Samba and CAP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcomment (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a text field that is seen next to a share when a client does a
+queries the server, either via the network neighborhood or via "net
+view" to list what shares are available\&.
+.IP 
+If you want to set the string that is displayed next to the machine
+name then see the server string command\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  No comment string\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  comment = Fred\'s Files\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBconfig file (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This allows you to override the config file to use, instead of the
+default (usually \fBsmb\&.conf\fP)\&. There is a chicken and egg problem
+here as this option is set in the config file!
+.IP 
+For this reason, if the name of the config file has changed when the
+parameters are loaded then it will reload them from the new config
+file\&.
+.IP 
+This option takes the usual substitutions, which can be very useful\&.
+.IP 
+If the config file doesn\'t exist then it won\'t be loaded (allowing you
+to special case the config files of just a few clients)\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  config file = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\&.%m\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcopy (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter allows you to \fI\'clone\'\fP service entries\&. The specified
+service is simply duplicated under the current service\'s name\&. Any
+parameters specified in the current section will override those in the
+section being copied\&.
+.IP 
+This feature lets you set up a \'template\' service and create similar
+services easily\&. Note that the service being copied must occur earlier
+in the configuration file than the service doing the copying\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  none\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  copy = otherservice\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcreate mask (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+A synonym for this parameter is \fB\'create mode\'\fP\&.
+.IP 
+When a file is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
+according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and the
+resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise \'AND\'ed with this parameter\&.
+This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX modes
+of a file\&. Any bit \fI*not*\fP set here will be removed from the modes set
+on a file when it is created\&.
+.IP 
+The default value of this parameter removes the \'group\' and \'other\'
+write and execute bits from the UNIX modes\&.
+.IP 
+Following this Samba will bit-wise \'OR\' the UNIX mode created from
+this parameter with the value of the "force create mode" parameter
+which is set to 000 by default\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter does not affect directory modes\&. See the parameter
+\fB\'directory mode\'\fP for details\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"force create mode"\fP parameter
+for forcing particular mode bits to be set on created files\&. See also
+the \fB"directory mode"\fP parameter for masking
+mode bits on created directories\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  create mask = 0744\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  create mask = 0775\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBcreate mode (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a synonym for \fBcreate mask\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdeadtime (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The value of the parameter (a decimal integer) represents the number
+of minutes of inactivity before a connection is considered dead, and
+it is disconnected\&. The deadtime only takes effect if the number of
+open files is zero\&.
+.IP 
+This is useful to stop a server\'s resources being exhausted by a large
+number of inactive connections\&.
+.IP 
+Most clients have an auto-reconnect feature when a connection is
+broken so in most cases this parameter should be transparent to users\&.
+.IP 
+Using this parameter with a timeout of a few minutes is recommended
+for most systems\&.
+.IP 
+A deadtime of zero indicates that no auto-disconnection should be
+performed\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  deadtime = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  deadtime = 15\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdebug timestamp (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Samba2\&.0 debug log messages are timestamped by default\&. If you are
+running at a high \fB"debug level"\fP these timestamps
+can be distracting\&. This boolean parameter allows them to be turned
+off\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  debug timestamp = Yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  debug timestamp = No\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdebug level (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The value of the parameter (an integer) allows the debug level
+(logging level) to be specified in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&. This is to
+give greater flexibility in the configuration of the system\&.
+.IP 
+The default will be the debug level specified on the command line
+or level zero if none was specified\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  debug level = 3\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdefault (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+A synonym for \fBdefault service\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdefault case (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+See the section on \fB"NAME MANGLING"\fP\&. Also note
+the \fB"short preserve case"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdefault service (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the name of a service which will be connected
+to if the service actually requested cannot be found\&. Note that the
+square brackets are \fINOT\fP given in the parameter value (see example
+below)\&.
+.IP 
+There is no default value for this parameter\&. If this parameter is not
+given, attempting to connect to a nonexistent service results in an
+error\&.
+.IP 
+Typically the default service would be a \fBguest ok\fP,
+\fBread-only\fP service\&.
+.IP 
+Also note that the apparent service name will be changed to equal that
+of the requested service, this is very useful as it allows you to use
+macros like \fB%S\fP to make a wildcard service\&.
+.IP 
+Note also that any \f(CW\'_\'\fP characters in the name of the service used
+in the default service will get mapped to a \f(CW\'/\'\fP\&. This allows for
+interesting things\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+
+.DS 
 
-"mangle case = yes/no" controls if names that have characters that
-aren't of the "default" case are mangled. For example, if this is yes
-then a name like "Mail" would be mangled. Default no.
-
-"case sensitive = yes/no" controls whether filenames are case
-sensitive. If they aren't then Samba must do a filename search and
-match on passed names. Default no.
-
-"default case = upper/lower" controls what the default case is for new
-filenames. Default lower.
-
-"preserve case = yes/no" controls if new files are created with the
-case that the client passes, or if they are forced to be the "default"
-case. Default no.
-
-"short preserve case = yes/no" controls if new files which conform to 8.3
-syntax, that is all in upper case and of suitable length, are created
-upper case, or if they are forced to be the "default" case. This option can
-be use with "preserve case = yes" to permit long filenames to retain their
-case, while short names are lowered. Default no.
-
-.SS COMPLETE LIST OF GLOBAL PARAMETERS
-
-Here is a list of all global parameters. See the section of each
-parameter for details.  Note that some are synonyms.
-
-announce as
-
-announce version
-
-auto services
-
-bind interfaces only
-
-browse list
-
-character set
-
-client code page
-
-config file
-
-deadtime
-
-debuglevel
-
-default
-
-default service
-
-dfree command
-
-dns proxy
-
-domain controller
-
-domain logons
-
-domain master
-
-encrypt passwords
-
-getwd cache
-
-hide files
-
-hide dot files
-
-homedir map
-
-hosts equiv
-
-include
-
-interfaces
-
-keepalive
-
-lm announce
-
-lm interval
-
-lock dir
-
-load printers
-
-local master
-
-lock directory
-
-log file
-
-log level
-
-logon drive
-
-logon home
-
-logon path
-
-logon script
-
-lpq cache time
-
-mangled stack
-
-max log size
-
-max mux
-
-max packet
-
-max ttl
-
-max xmit
-
-max wins ttl
-
-message command
-
-min wins ttl
-
-name resolve order
-
-netbios aliases
-
-netbios name
-
-networkstation user login
+       default service = pub
+        
+       [pub]
+               path = /%S
 
-nis homedir
+.DE 
 
-null passwords
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdelete readonly (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter allows readonly files to be deleted\&.  This is not
+normal DOS semantics, but is allowed by UNIX\&.
+.IP 
+This option may be useful for running applications such as rcs, where
+UNIX file ownership prevents changing file permissions, and DOS
+semantics prevent deletion of a read only file\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  delete readonly = No\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  delete readonly = Yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdelete veto files (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option is used when Samba is attempting to delete a directory
+that contains one or more vetoed directories (see the \fB\'veto
+files\'\fP option)\&.  If this option is set to False (the
+default) then if a vetoed directory contains any non-vetoed files or
+directories then the directory delete will fail\&. This is usually what
+you want\&.
+.IP 
+If this option is set to True, then Samba will attempt to recursively
+delete any files and directories within the vetoed directory\&. This can
+be useful for integration with file serving systems such as \fBNetAtalk\fP,
+which create meta-files within directories you might normally veto
+DOS/Windows users from seeing (eg\&. \f(CW\&.AppleDouble\fP)
+.IP 
+Setting \f(CW\'delete veto files = True\'\fP allows these directories to be 
+transparently deleted when the parent directory is deleted (so long
+as the user has permissions to do so)\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fBveto files\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  delete veto files = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  delete veto files = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdeny hosts (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The opposite of \fB\'allow hosts\'\fP - hosts listed
+here are \fINOT\fP permitted access to services unless the specific
+services have their own lists to override this one\&. Where the lists
+conflict, the \fB\'allow\'\fP list takes precedence\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  none (i\&.e\&., no hosts specifically excluded)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  deny hosts = 150\&.203\&.4\&. badhost\&.mynet\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdfree command (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The dfree command setting should only be used on systems where a
+problem occurs with the internal disk space calculations\&. This has
+been known to happen with Ultrix, but may occur with other operating
+systems\&. The symptom that was seen was an error of "Abort Retry
+Ignore" at the end of each directory listing\&.
+.IP 
+This setting allows the replacement of the internal routines to
+calculate the total disk space and amount available with an external
+routine\&. The example below gives a possible script that might fulfill
+this function\&.
+.IP 
+The external program will be passed a single parameter indicating a
+directory in the filesystem being queried\&. This will typically consist
+of the string \f(CW"\&./"\fP\&. The script should return two integers in
+ascii\&. The first should be the total disk space in blocks, and the
+second should be the number of available blocks\&. An optional third
+return value can give the block size in bytes\&. The default blocksize
+is 1024 bytes\&.
+.IP 
+Note: Your script should \fINOT\fP be setuid or setgid and should be
+owned by (and writable only by) root!
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  By default internal routines for determining the disk capacity
+and remaining space will be used\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  dfree command = /usr/local/samba/bin/dfree\fP
+.IP 
+Where the script dfree (which must be made executable) could be:
+.IP 
+
+.DS 
 
-ole locking compatibility
+       #!/bin/sh
+       df $1 | tail -1 | awk \'{print $2" "$4}\'
 
-os level
+.DE 
 
-packet size
+.IP 
+or perhaps (on Sys V based systems):
+.IP 
 
-passwd chat
+.DS 
 
-passwd chat debug
+       #!/bin/sh
+       /usr/bin/df -k $1 | tail -1 | awk \'{print $3" "$5}\'
 
-passwd program
+.DE 
 
-password level
+.IP 
+Note that you may have to replace the command names with full
+path names on some systems\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdirectory (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBpath\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdirectory mask (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is the octal modes which are used when converting DOS
+modes to UNIX modes when creating UNIX directories\&.
+.IP 
+When a directory is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
+according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and the
+resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise \'AND\'ed with this parameter\&.
+This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX modes
+of a directory\&. Any bit \fI*not*\fP set here will be removed from the
+modes set on a directory when it is created\&.
+.IP 
+The default value of this parameter removes the \'group\' and \'other\'
+write bits from the UNIX mode, allowing only the user who owns the
+directory to modify it\&.
+.IP 
+Following this Samba will bit-wise \'OR\' the UNIX mode created from
+this parameter with the value of the "force directory mode"
+parameter\&. This parameter is set to 000 by default (ie\&. no extra mode
+bits are added)\&.
+.IP 
+See the \fB"force directory mode"\fP parameter
+to cause particular mode bits to always be set on created directories\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"create mode"\fP parameter for masking
+mode bits on created files\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  directory mask = 0755\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  directory mask = 0775\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdirectory mode (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBdirectory mask\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdns proxy (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Specifies that \fBnmbd\fP when acting as a WINS
+server and finding that a NetBIOS name has not been registered, should
+treat the NetBIOS name word-for-word as a DNS name and do a lookup
+with the DNS server for that name on behalf of the name-querying
+client\&.
+.IP 
+Note that the maximum length for a NetBIOS name is 15 characters, so
+the DNS name (or DNS alias) can likewise only be 15 characters,
+maximum\&.
+.IP 
+\fBnmbd\fP spawns a second copy of itself to do the
+DNS name lookup requests, as doing a name lookup is a blocking action\&.
+.IP 
+See also the parameter \fBwins support\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  dns proxy = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBdomain admin group (G)\fP
+.IP 
+This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
+Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
+To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
+\fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain admin users (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
+Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
+To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
+\fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain controller (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a \fBDEPRECATED\fP parameter\&. It is currently not used within
+the Samba source and should be removed from all current smb\&.conf
+files\&. It is left behind for compatibility reasons\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain groups (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
+Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
+To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
+\fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain guest group (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
+Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
+To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
+\fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain guest users (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
+Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
+To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
+\fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain logons (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If set to true, the Samba server will serve Windows 95/98 Domain
+logons for the \fBworkgroup\fP it is in\&. For more
+details on setting up this feature see the file DOMAINS\&.txt in the
+Samba documentation directory \f(CWdocs/\fP shipped with the source code\&.
+.IP 
+Note that Win95/98 Domain logons are \fINOT\fP the same as Windows
+NT Domain logons\&. NT Domain logons require a Primary Domain Controller
+(PDC) for the Domain\&. It is inteded that in a future release Samba
+will be able to provide this functionality for Windows NT clients
+also\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  domain logons = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdomain master (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Tell \fBnmbd\fP to enable WAN-wide browse list
+collation\&.Setting this option causes \fBnmbd\fP to
+claim a special domain specific NetBIOS name that identifies it as a
+domain master browser for its given
+\fBworkgroup\fP\&. Local master browsers in the same
+\fBworkgroup\fP on broadcast-isolated subnets will give
+this \fBnmbd\fP their local browse lists, and then
+ask \fBsmbd\fP for a complete copy of the browse list
+for the whole wide area network\&.  Browser clients will then contact
+their local master browser, and will receive the domain-wide browse
+list, instead of just the list for their broadcast-isolated subnet\&.
+.IP 
+Note that Windows NT Primary Domain Controllers expect to be able to
+claim this \fBworkgroup\fP specific special NetBIOS
+name that identifies them as domain master browsers for that
+\fBworkgroup\fP by default (ie\&. there is no way to
+prevent a Windows NT PDC from attempting to do this)\&. This means that
+if this parameter is set and \fBnmbd\fP claims the
+special name for a \fBworkgroup\fP before a Windows NT
+PDC is able to do so then cross subnet browsing will behave strangely
+and may fail\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  domain master = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdont descend (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+There are certain directories on some systems (eg\&., the \f(CW/proc\fP tree
+under Linux) that are either not of interest to clients or are
+infinitely deep (recursive)\&. This parameter allows you to specify a
+comma-delimited list of directories that the server should always show
+as empty\&.
+.IP 
+Note that Samba can be very fussy about the exact format of the "dont
+descend" entries\&. For example you may need \f(CW"\&./proc"\fP instead of
+just \f(CW"/proc"\fP\&. Experimentation is the best policy :-)
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  none (i\&.e\&., all directories are OK to descend)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  dont descend = /proc,/dev\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdos filetime resolution (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Under the DOS and Windows FAT filesystem, the finest granulatity on
+time resolution is two seconds\&. Setting this parameter for a share
+causes Samba to round the reported time down to the nearest two second
+boundary when a query call that requires one second resolution is made
+to \fBsmbd\fP\&.
+.IP 
+This option is mainly used as a compatibility option for Visual C++
+when used against Samba shares\&. If oplocks are enabled on a share,
+Visual C++ uses two different time reading calls to check if a file
+has changed since it was last read\&. One of these calls uses a
+one-second granularity, the other uses a two second granularity\&. As
+the two second call rounds any odd second down, then if the file has a
+timestamp of an odd number of seconds then the two timestamps will not
+match and Visual C++ will keep reporting the file has changed\&. Setting
+this option causes the two timestamps to match, and Visual C++ is
+happy\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  dos filetime resolution = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  dos filetime resolution = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBdos filetimes (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Under DOS and Windows, if a user can write to a file they can change
+the timestamp on it\&. Under POSIX semantics, only the owner of the file
+or root may change the timestamp\&. By default, Samba runs with POSIX
+semantics and refuses to change the timestamp on a file if the user
+smbd is acting on behalf of is not the file owner\&. Setting this option
+to True allows DOS semantics and smbd will change the file timstamp as
+DOS requires\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  dos filetimes = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  dos filetimes = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBencrypt passwords (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean controls whether encrypted passwords will be negotiated
+with the client\&. Note that Windows NT 4\&.0 SP3 and above and also
+Windows 98 will by default expect encrypted passwords unless a
+registry entry is changed\&. To use encrypted passwords in Samba see the
+file ENCRYPTION\&.txt in the Samba documentation directory \f(CWdocs/\fP
+shipped with the source code\&.
+.IP 
+In order for encrypted passwords to work correctly
+\fBsmbd\fP must either have access to a local
+\fBsmbpasswd (5)\fP file (see the
+\fBsmbpasswd (8)\fP program for information on
+how to set up and maintain this file), or set the
+\fBsecurity=\fP parameter to either
+\fB"server"\fP or
+\fB"domain"\fP which causes
+\fBsmbd\fP to authenticate against another server\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBexec (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a synonym for \fBpreexec\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBfake directory create times (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+NTFS and Windows VFAT file systems keep a create time for all files
+and directories\&. This is not the same as the ctime - status change
+time - that Unix keeps, so Samba by default reports the earliest of
+the various times Unix does keep\&. Setting this parameter for a share
+causes Samba to always report midnight 1-1-1980 as the create time for
+directories\&.
+.IP 
+This option is mainly used as a compatibility option for Visual C++
+when used against Samba shares\&. Visual C++ generated makefiles have
+the object directory as a dependency for each object file, and a make
+rule to create the directory\&. Also, when NMAKE compares timestamps it
+uses the creation time when examining a directory\&. Thus the object
+directory will be created if it does not exist, but once it does exist
+it will always have an earlier timestamp than the object files it
+contains\&.
+.IP 
+However, Unix time semantics mean that the create time reported by
+Samba will be updated whenever a file is created or deleted in the
+directory\&. NMAKE therefore finds all object files in the object
+directory bar the last one built are out of date compared to the
+directory and rebuilds them\&. Enabling this option ensures directories
+always predate their contents and an NMAKE build will proceed as
+expected\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  fake directory create times = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  fake directory create times = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBfake oplocks (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Oplocks are the way that SMB clients get permission from a server to
+locally cache file operations\&. If a server grants an oplock
+(opportunistic lock) then the client is free to assume that it is the
+only one accessing the file and it will aggressively cache file
+data\&. With some oplock types the client may even cache file open/close
+operations\&. This can give enormous performance benefits\&.
+.IP 
+When you set \f(CW"fake oplocks = yes"\fP \fBsmbd\fP will
+always grant oplock requests no matter how many clients are using the
+file\&.
+.IP 
+It is generally much better to use the real \fBoplocks\fP
+support rather than this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+If you enable this option on all read-only shares or shares that you
+know will only be accessed from one client at a time such as
+physically read-only media like CDROMs, you will see a big performance
+improvement on many operations\&. If you enable this option on shares
+where multiple clients may be accessing the files read-write at the
+same time you can get data corruption\&. Use this option carefully!
+.IP 
+This option is disabled by default\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBfollow symlinks (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter allows the Samba administrator to stop
+\fBsmbd\fP from following symbolic links in a
+particular share\&. Setting this parameter to \fI"No"\fP prevents any file
+or directory that is a symbolic link from being followed (the user
+will get an error)\&.  This option is very useful to stop users from
+adding a symbolic link to \f(CW/etc/pasword\fP in their home directory for
+instance\&.  However it will slow filename lookups down slightly\&.
+.IP 
+This option is enabled (ie\&. \fBsmbd\fP will follow
+symbolic links) by default\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBforce create mode (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that will
+\fI*always*\fP be set on a file created by Samba\&. This is done by
+bitwise \'OR\'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a file that is being
+created\&. The default for this parameter is (in octel) 000\&. The modes
+in this parameter are bitwise \'OR\'ed onto the file mode after the mask
+set in the \fB"create mask"\fP parameter is applied\&.
+.IP 
+See also the parameter \fB"create mask"\fP for details
+on masking mode bits on created files\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  force create mode = 000\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  force create mode = 0755\fP
+.IP 
+would force all created files to have read and execute permissions set
+for \'group\' and \'other\' as well as the read/write/execute bits set for
+the \'user\'\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBforce directory mode (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that will
+\fI*always*\fP be set on a directory created by Samba\&. This is done by
+bitwise \'OR\'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a directory that is
+being created\&. The default for this parameter is (in octel) 0000 which
+will not add any extra permission bits to a created directory\&. This
+operation is done after the mode mask in the parameter
+\fB"directory mask"\fP is applied\&.
+.IP 
+See also the parameter \fB"directory mask"\fP for
+details on masking mode bits on created directories\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  force directory mode = 000\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  force directory mode = 0755\fP
+.IP 
+would force all created directories to have read and execute
+permissions set for \'group\' and \'other\' as well as the
+read/write/execute bits set for the \'user\'\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBforce group (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This specifies a UNIX group name that will be assigned as the default
+primary group for all users connecting to this service\&. This is useful
+for sharing files by ensuring that all access to files on service will
+use the named group for their permissions checking\&. Thus, by assigning
+permissions for this group to the files and directories within this
+service the Samba administrator can restrict or allow sharing of these
+files\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  no forced group\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  force group = agroup\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBforce user (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This specifies a UNIX user name that will be assigned as the default
+user for all users connecting to this service\&. This is useful for
+sharing files\&. You should also use it carefully as using it
+incorrectly can cause security problems\&.
+.IP 
+This user name only gets used once a connection is established\&. Thus
+clients still need to connect as a valid user and supply a valid
+password\&. Once connected, all file operations will be performed as the
+\f(CW"forced user"\fP, no matter what username the client connected as\&.
+.IP 
+This can be very useful\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  no forced user\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  force user = auser\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBfstype (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter allows the administrator to configure the string that
+specifies the type of filesystem a share is using that is reported by
+\fBsmbd\fP when a client queries the filesystem type
+for a share\&. The default type is \fB"NTFS"\fP for compatibility with
+Windows NT but this can be changed to other strings such as "Samba" or
+"FAT" if required\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  fstype = NTFS\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  fstype = Samba\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBgetwd cache (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a tuning option\&. When this is enabled a cacheing algorithm
+will be used to reduce the time taken for getwd() calls\&. This can have
+a significant impact on performance, especially when the
+\fBwidelinks\fP parameter is set to False\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  getwd cache = No\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  getwd cache = Yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBgroup (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"force group"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBguest account (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a username which will be used for access to services which are
+specified as \fB\'guest ok\'\fP (see below)\&. Whatever
+privileges this user has will be available to any client connecting to
+the guest service\&. Typically this user will exist in the password
+file, but will not have a valid login\&. The user account \fB"ftp"\fP is
+often a good choice for this parameter\&. If a username is specified in
+a given service, the specified username overrides this one\&.
+.IP 
+One some systems the default guest account "nobody" may not be able to
+print\&. Use another account in this case\&. You should test this by
+trying to log in as your guest user (perhaps by using the \f(CW"su -"\fP
+command) and trying to print using the system print command such as
+\fBlpr (1)\fP or \fBlp (1)\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  specified at compile time, usually "nobody"\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  guest account = ftp\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBguest ok (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If this parameter is \fI\'yes\'\fP for a service, then no password is
+required to connect to the service\&. Privileges will be those of the
+\fBguest account\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See the section below on \fBsecurity\fP for more
+information about this option\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  guest ok = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  guest ok = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBguest only (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If this parameter is \fI\'yes\'\fP for a service, then only guest
+connections to the service are permitted\&. This parameter will have no
+affect if \fB"guest ok"\fP or \fB"public"\fP
+is not set for the service\&.
+.IP 
+See the section below on \fBsecurity\fP for more
+information about this option\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  guest only = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  guest only = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBhide dot files (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a boolean parameter that controls whether files starting with
+a dot appear as hidden files\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  hide dot files = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  hide dot files = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBhide files(S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a list of files or directories that are not visible but are
+accessible\&.  The DOS \'hidden\' attribute is applied to any files or
+directories that match\&.
+.IP 
+Each entry in the list must be separated by a \f(CW\'/\'\fP, which allows
+spaces to be included in the entry\&.  \f(CW\'*\'\fP and \f(CW\'?\'\fP can be used
+to specify multiple files or directories as in DOS wildcards\&.
+.IP 
+Each entry must be a unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
+unix directory separator \f(CW\'/\'\fP\&.
+.IP 
+Note that the case sensitivity option is applicable in hiding files\&.
+.IP 
+Setting this parameter will affect the performance of Samba, as it
+will be forced to check all files and directories for a match as they
+are scanned\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"hide dot files"\fP, \fB"veto
+files"\fP and \fB"case sensitive"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault\fP
+
+.DS 
 
-password server
+       No files or directories are hidden by this option (dot files are
+       hidden by default because of the "hide dot files" option)\&.
 
-preferred master
+.DE 
 
-preload
+.IP 
+\fBExample\fP
+\f(CW  hide files = /\&.*/DesktopFolderDB/TrashFor%m/resource\&.frk/\fP
+.IP 
+The above example is based on files that the Macintosh SMB client
+(DAVE) available from \fBThursby\fP creates for
+internal use, and also still hides all files beginning with a dot\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBhomedir map (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If \fB"nis homedir"\fP is true, and
+\fBsmbd\fP is also acting as a Win95/98 \fBlogon
+server\fP then this parameter specifies the NIS (or YP)
+map from which the server for the user\'s home directory should be
+extracted\&.  At present, only the Sun auto\&.home map format is
+understood\&. The form of the map is:
+.IP 
+\f(CWusername  server:/some/file/system\fP
+.IP 
+and the program will extract the servername from before the first
+\f(CW\':\'\fP\&.  There should probably be a better parsing system that copes
+with different map formats and also Amd (another automounter) maps\&.
+.IP 
+NB: A working NIS is required on the system for this option to work\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"nis homedir"\fP, \fBdomain
+logons\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  homedir map = auto\&.home\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  homedir map = amd\&.homedir\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBhosts allow (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBallow hosts\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBhosts deny (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBdenyhosts\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBhosts equiv (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If this global parameter is a non-null string, it specifies the name
+of a file to read for the names of hosts and users who will be allowed
+access without specifying a password\&.
+.IP 
+This is not be confused with \fBallow hosts\fP which
+is about hosts access to services and is more useful for guest
+services\&. \fBhosts equiv\fP may be useful for NT clients which will not
+supply passwords to samba\&.
+.IP 
+NOTE: The use of \fBhosts equiv\fP can be a major security hole\&. This is
+because you are trusting the PC to supply the correct username\&. It is
+very easy to get a PC to supply a false username\&. I recommend that the
+\fBhosts equiv\fP option be only used if you really know what you are
+doing, or perhaps on a home network where you trust your spouse and
+kids\&. And only if you \fIreally\fP trust them :-)\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault\fP
+\f(CW  No host equivalences\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample\fP
+\f(CW  hosts equiv = /etc/hosts\&.equiv\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBinclude (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This allows you to include one config file inside another\&.  The file
+is included literally, as though typed in place\&.
+.IP 
+It takes the standard substitutions, except \fB%u\fP,
+\fB%P\fP and \fB%S\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBinterfaces (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to setup multiple network interfaces, so that
+Samba can properly handle browsing on all interfaces\&.
+.IP 
+The option takes a list of ip/netmask pairs\&. The netmask may either be
+a bitmask, or a bitlength\&.
+.IP 
+For example, the following line:
+.IP 
+\f(CWinterfaces = 192\&.168\&.2\&.10/24 192\&.168\&.3\&.10/24\fP
+.IP 
+would configure two network interfaces with IP addresses 192\&.168\&.2\&.10
+and 192\&.168\&.3\&.10\&. The netmasks of both interfaces would be set to
+255\&.255\&.255\&.0\&.
+.IP 
+You could produce an equivalent result by using:
+.IP 
+\f(CWinterfaces = 192\&.168\&.2\&.10/255\&.255\&.255\&.0 192\&.168\&.3\&.10/255\&.255\&.255\&.0\fP
+.IP 
+if you prefer that format\&.
+.IP 
+If this option is not set then Samba will attempt to find a primary
+interface, but won\'t attempt to configure more than one interface\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"bind interfaces only"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBinvalid users (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a list of users that should not be allowed to login to this
+service\&. This is really a \fI"paranoid"\fP check to absolutely ensure an
+improper setting does not breach your security\&.
+.IP 
+A name starting with a \f(CW\'@\'\fP is interpreted as an NIS netgroup first
+(if your system supports NIS), and then as a UNIX group if the name
+was not found in the NIS netgroup database\&.
+.IP 
+A name starting with \f(CW\'+\'\fP is interpreted only by looking in the
+UNIX group database\&. A name starting with \f(CW\'&\'\fP is interpreted only
+by looking in the NIS netgroup database (this requires NIS to be
+working on your system)\&. The characters \f(CW\'+\'\fP and \f(CW\'&\'\fP may be
+used at the start of the name in either order so the value
+\f(CW"+&group"\fP means check the UNIX group database, followed by the NIS
+netgroup database, and the value \f(CW"&+group"\fP means check the NIS
+netgroup database, followed by the UNIX group database (the same as
+the \f(CW\'@\'\fP prefix)\&.
+.IP 
+The current servicename is substituted for
+\fB%S\fP\&. This is useful in the \fB[homes]\fP
+section\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"valid users"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  No invalid users\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  invalid users = root fred admin @wheel\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBkeepalive (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The value of the parameter (an integer) represents the number of
+seconds between \fB\'keepalive\'\fP packets\&. If this parameter is zero, no
+keepalive packets will be sent\&. Keepalive packets, if sent, allow the
+server to tell whether a client is still present and responding\&.
+.IP 
+Keepalives should, in general, not be needed if the socket being used
+has the SO_KEEPALIVE attribute set on it (see \fB"socket
+options"\fP)\&. Basically you should only use this option
+if you strike difficulties\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  keep alive = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  keep alive = 60\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBkernel oplocks (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+For UNIXs that support kernel based \fBoplocks\fP
+(currently only IRIX but hopefully also Linux and FreeBSD soon) this
+parameter allows the use of them to be turned on or off\&.
+.IP 
+Kernel oplocks support allows Samba \fBoplocks\fP to be
+broken whenever a local UNIX process or NFS operation accesses a file
+that \fBsmbd\fP has oplocked\&. This allows complete
+data consistancy between SMB/CIFS, NFS and local file access (and is a
+\fIvery\fP cool feature :-)\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter defaults to \fI"On"\fP on systems that have the support,
+and \fI"off"\fP on systems that don\'t\&. You should never need to touch
+this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBldap filter (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is part of the \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP Samba support for a
+password database stored on an LDAP server back-end\&. These options
+are only available if your version of Samba was configured with
+the \fB--with-ldap\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies an LDAP search filter used to search for a
+user name in the LDAP database\&. It must contain the string
+\fB%u\fP which will be replaced with the user being
+searched for\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  empty string\&.\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBldap port (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is part of the \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP Samba support for a
+password database stored on an LDAP server back-end\&. These options
+are only available if your version of Samba was configured with
+the \fB--with-ldap\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the TCP port number to use to contact
+the LDAP server on\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ldap port = 389\&.\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBldap root (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is part of the \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP Samba support for a
+password database stored on an LDAP server back-end\&. These options
+are only available if your version of Samba was configured with
+the \fB--with-ldap\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the entity to bind to the LDAP server
+as (essentially the LDAP username) in order to be able to perform
+queries and modifications on the LDAP database\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fBldap root passwd\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  empty string (no user defined)\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBldap root passwd (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is part of the \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP Samba support for a
+password database stored on an LDAP server back-end\&. These options
+are only available if your version of Samba was configured with
+the \fB--with-ldap\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the password for the entity to bind to the
+LDAP server as (the password for this LDAP username) in order to be
+able to perform queries and modifications on the LDAP database\&.
+.IP 
+\fIBUGS:\fP This parameter should \fINOT\fP be a readable parameter
+in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file and will be removed once a correct
+storage place is found\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fBldap root\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  empty string\&.\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBldap server (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is part of the \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP Samba support for a
+password database stored on an LDAP server back-end\&. These options
+are only available if your version of Samba was configured with
+the \fB--with-ldap\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the DNS name of the LDAP server to use
+for SMB/CIFS authentication purposes\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ldap server = localhost\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBldap suffix (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is part of the \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP Samba support for a
+password database stored on an LDAP server back-end\&. These options
+are only available if your version of Samba was configured with
+the \fB--with-ldap\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the \f(CW"dn"\fP or LDAP \fI"distinguished name"\fP
+that tells \fBsmbd\fP to start from when searching
+for an entry in the LDAP password database\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  empty string\&.\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlm announce (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter determines if \fBnmbd\fP will produce
+Lanman announce broadcasts that are needed by \fBOS/2\fP clients in order
+for them to see the Samba server in their browse list\&. This parameter
+can have three values, \f(CW"true"\fP, \f(CW"false"\fP, or \f(CW"auto"\fP\&. The
+default is \f(CW"auto"\fP\&.  If set to \f(CW"false"\fP Samba will never produce
+these broadcasts\&. If set to \f(CW"true"\fP Samba will produce Lanman
+announce broadcasts at a frequency set by the parameter \fB"lm
+interval"\fP\&. If set to \f(CW"auto"\fP Samba will not send Lanman
+announce broadcasts by default but will listen for them\&. If it hears
+such a broadcast on the wire it will then start sending them at a
+frequency set by the parameter \fB"lm interval"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"lm interval"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  lm announce = auto\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  lm announce = true\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlm interval (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If Samba is set to produce Lanman announce broadcasts needed by
+\fBOS/2\fP clients (see the \fB"lm announce"\fP
+parameter) then this parameter defines the frequency in seconds with
+which they will be made\&.  If this is set to zero then no Lanman
+announcements will be made despite the setting of the \fB"lm
+announce"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"lm announce"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  lm interval = 60\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  lm interval = 120\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBload printers (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+A boolean variable that controls whether all printers in the printcap
+will be loaded for browsing by default\&. See the
+\fB"printers"\fP section for more details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  load printers = yes\fP
+.IP 
+bg(Example:)
+\f(CW  load printers = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlocal master (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows \fBnmbd\fP to try and become a
+local master browser on a subnet\&. If set to False then
+\fBnmbd\fP will not attempt to become a local master
+browser on a subnet and will also lose in all browsing elections\&. By
+default this value is set to true\&. Setting this value to true doesn\'t
+mean that Samba will \fIbecome\fP the local master browser on a subnet,
+just that \fBnmbd\fP will \fIparticipate\fP in
+elections for local master browser\&.
+.IP 
+Setting this value to False will cause \fBnmbd\fP
+\fInever\fP to become a local master browser\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  local master = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlock dir (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"lock directory"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlock directory (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option specifies the directory where lock files will be placed\&.
+The lock files are used to implement the \fB"max
+connections"\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  lock directory = /tmp/samba\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  lock directory = /usr/local/samba/var/locks\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlocking (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether or not locking will be performed by the server
+in response to lock requests from the client\&.
+.IP 
+If \f(CW"locking = no"\fP, all lock and unlock requests will appear to
+succeed and all lock queries will indicate that the queried lock is
+clear\&.
+.IP 
+If \f(CW"locking = yes"\fP, real locking will be performed by the server\&.
+.IP 
+This option \fImay\fP be useful for read-only filesystems which \fImay\fP
+not need locking (such as cdrom drives), although setting this
+parameter of \f(CW"no"\fP is not really recommended even in this case\&.
+.IP 
+Be careful about disabling locking either globally or in a specific
+service, as lack of locking may result in data corruption\&. You should
+never need to set this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  locking = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  locking = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlog file (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This options allows you to override the name of the Samba log file
+(also known as the debug file)\&.
+.IP 
+This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
+separate log files for each user or machine\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log\&.%m\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlog level (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"debug level"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlogon drive (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the local path to which the home directory
+will be connected (see \fB"logon home"\fP) and is only
+used by NT Workstations\&. 
+.IP 
+Note that this option is only useful if Samba is set up as a
+\fBlogon server\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  logon drive = h:\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlogon home (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the home directory location when a Win95/98 or
+NT Workstation logs into a Samba PDC\&.  It allows you to do 
+.IP 
+\f(CW"NET USE H: /HOME"\fP
+.IP 
+from a command prompt, for example\&.
+.IP 
+This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
+separate logon scripts for each user or machine\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this option is only useful if Samba is set up as a
+\fBlogon server\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  logon home = "\e\eremote_smb_server\e%U"\fP
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  logon home = "\e\e%N\e%U"\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlogon path (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the home directory where roaming profiles
+(USER\&.DAT / USER\&.MAN files for Windows 95/98) are stored\&.
+.IP 
+This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
+separate logon scripts for each user or machine\&.  It also specifies
+the directory from which the \f(CW"desktop"\fP, \f(CW"start menu"\fP,
+\f(CW"network neighborhood"\fP and \f(CW"programs"\fP folders, and their
+contents, are loaded and displayed on your Windows 95/98 client\&.
+.IP 
+The share and the path must be readable by the user for the
+preferences and directories to be loaded onto the Windows 95/98
+client\&.  The share must be writeable when the logs in for the first
+time, in order that the Windows 95/98 client can create the user\&.dat
+and other directories\&.
+.IP 
+Thereafter, the directories and any of contents can, if required, be
+made read-only\&.  It is not adviseable that the USER\&.DAT file be made
+read-only - rename it to USER\&.MAN to achieve the desired effect (a
+\fIMAN\fPdatory profile)\&.
+.IP 
+Windows clients can sometimes maintain a connection to the [homes]
+share, even though there is no user logged in\&.  Therefore, it is vital
+that the logon path does not include a reference to the homes share
+(i\&.e setting this parameter to \f(CW\e\e%N\eHOMES\eprofile_path\fP will cause
+problems)\&.
+.IP 
+This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
+separate logon scripts for each user or machine\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this option is only useful if Samba is set up as a
+\fBlogon server\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  logon path = \e\e%N\e%U\eprofile\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  logon path = \e\ePROFILESERVER\eHOME_DIR\e%U\ePROFILE\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlogon script (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the batch file (\&.bat) or NT command file
+(\&.cmd) to be downloaded and run on a machine when a user successfully
+logs in\&.  The file must contain the DOS style cr/lf line endings\&.
+Using a DOS-style editor to create the file is recommended\&.
+.IP 
+The script must be a relative path to the \f(CW[netlogon]\fP service\&.  If
+the \f(CW[netlogon]\fP service specifies a \fBpath\fP of
+/usr/local/samba/netlogon, and logon script = STARTUP\&.BAT, then the
+file that will be downloaded is:
+.IP 
+\f(CW/usr/local/samba/netlogon/STARTUP\&.BAT\fP
+.IP 
+The contents of the batch file is entirely your choice\&.  A suggested
+command would be to add \f(CWNET TIME \e\eSERVER /SET /YES\fP, to force every
+machine to synchronise clocks with the same time server\&.  Another use
+would be to add \f(CWNET USE U: \e\eSERVER\eUTILS\fP for commonly used
+utilities, or \f(CWNET USE Q: \e\eSERVER\eISO9001_QA\fP for example\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is particularly important not to allow write access to
+the \f(CW[netlogon]\fP share, or to grant users write permission on the
+batch files in a secure environment, as this would allow the batch
+files to be arbitrarily modified and security to be breached\&.
+.IP 
+This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
+separate logon scripts for each user or machine\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this option is only useful if Samba is set up as a
+\fBlogon server\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  logon script = scripts\e%U\&.bat\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlppause command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
+in order to stop printing or spooling a specific print job\&.
+.IP 
+This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
+and job number to pause the print job\&. One way of implementing this is
+by using job priorities, where jobs having a too low priority won\'t be
+sent to the printer\&.
+.IP 
+If a \f(CW"%p"\fP is given then the printername is put in its place\&. A
+\f(CW"%j"\fP is replaced with the job number (an integer)\&.  On HPUX (see
+\fBprinting=hpux\fP), if the \f(CW"-p%p"\fP option is added
+to the lpq command, the job will show up with the correct status,
+i\&.e\&. if the job priority is lower than the set fence priority it will
+have the PAUSED status, whereas if the priority is equal or higher it
+will have the SPOOLED or PRINTING status\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the
+lppause command as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"printing"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+Currently no default value is given to this string, unless the
+value of the \fB"printing"\fP parameter is \f(CWSYSV\fP, in
+which case the default is :
+.IP 
+\f(CW  lp -i %p-%j -H hold\fP
+.IP 
+or if the value of the \fB"printing"\fP parameter is \f(CWsoftq\fP,
+then the default is:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  qstat -s -j%j -h\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample for HPUX:\fP
+lppause command = /usr/bin/lpalt %p-%j -p0
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlpq cache time (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls how long lpq info will be cached for to prevent the
+\fBlpq\fP command being called too often\&. A separate cache is kept for
+each variation of the \fBlpq\fP command used by the system, so if you
+use different \fBlpq\fP commands for different users then they won\'t
+share cache information\&.
+.IP 
+The cache files are stored in \f(CW/tmp/lpq\&.xxxx\fP where xxxx is a hash of
+the \fBlpq\fP command in use\&.
+.IP 
+The default is 10 seconds, meaning that the cached results of a
+previous identical \fBlpq\fP command will be used if the cached data is
+less than 10 seconds old\&. A large value may be advisable if your
+\fBlpq\fP command is very slow\&.
+.IP 
+A value of 0 will disable cacheing completely\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"printing"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  lpq cache time = 10\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  lpq cache time = 30\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlpq command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
+in order to obtain \f(CW"lpq"\fP-style printer status information\&.
+.IP 
+This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
+as its only parameter and outputs printer status information\&.
+.IP 
+Currently eight styles of printer status information are supported;
+BSD, AIX, LPRNG, PLP, SYSV, HPUX, QNX and SOFTQ\&. This covers most UNIX
+systems\&. You control which type is expected using the
+\fB"printing ="\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+Some clients (notably Windows for Workgroups) may not correctly send
+the connection number for the printer they are requesting status
+information about\&. To get around this, the server reports on the first
+printer service connected to by the client\&. This only happens if the
+connection number sent is invalid\&.
+.IP 
+If a \f(CW%p\fP is given then the printername is put in its place\&. Otherwise
+it is placed at the end of the command\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the \fBlpq
+command\fP as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"printing"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW        depends on the setting of printing =\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  lpq command = /usr/bin/lpq %p\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlpresume command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
+in order to restart or continue printing or spooling a specific print
+job\&.
+.IP 
+This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
+and job number to resume the print job\&. See also the \fB"lppause
+command"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+If a \f(CW%p\fP is given then the printername is put in its place\&. A
+\f(CW%j\fP is replaced with the job number (an integer)\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the \fBlpresume
+command\fP as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"printing"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+.IP 
+Currently no default value is given to this string, unless the
+value of the \fB"printing"\fP parameter is \f(CWSYSV\fP, in
+which case the default is :
+.IP 
+\f(CW  lp -i %p-%j -H resume\fP
+.IP 
+or if the value of the \fB"printing"\fP parameter is \f(CWsoftq\fP,
+then the default is:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  qstat -s -j%j -r\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample for HPUX:\fP
+\f(CW        lpresume command = /usr/bin/lpalt %p-%j -p2\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBlprm command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
+in order to delete a print job\&.
+.IP 
+This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
+and job number, and deletes the print job\&.
+.IP 
+If a \f(CW%p\fP is given then the printername is put in its place\&. A
+\f(CW%j\fP is replaced with the job number (an integer)\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the
+\fBlprm command\fP as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"printing"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  depends on the setting of "printing ="\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample 1:\fP
+\f(CW  lprm command = /usr/bin/lprm -P%p %j\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample 2:\fP
+\f(CW  lprm command = /usr/bin/cancel %p-%j\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmachine password timeout (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If a Samba server is a member of an Windows NT Domain (see the
+\fB"security=domain"\fP) parameter) then
+periodically a running \fBsmbd\fP process will try and
+change the \fBMACHINE ACCOUNT PASWORD\fP stored in the file called
+\f(CW<Domain>\&.<Machine>\&.mac\fP where \f(CW<Domain>\fP is the name of the
+Domain we are a member of and tt<Machine> is the primary
+\fB"NetBIOS name"\fP of the machine
+\fBsmbd\fP is running on\&. This parameter specifies how
+often this password will be changed, in seconds\&. The default is one
+week (expressed in seconds), the same as a Windows NT Domain member
+server\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fBsmbpasswd (8)\fP, and the
+\fB"security=domain"\fP) parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  machine password timeout = 604800\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmagic output (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the name of a file which will contain output
+created by a magic script (see the \fB"magic
+script"\fP parameter below)\&.
+.IP 
+Warning: If two clients use the same \fB"magic
+script"\fP in the same directory the output file content
+is undefined\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  magic output = <magic script name>\&.out\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  magic output = myfile\&.txt\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmagic script (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the name of a file which, if opened, will be
+executed by the server when the file is closed\&. This allows a UNIX
+script to be sent to the Samba host and executed on behalf of the
+connected user\&.
+.IP 
+Scripts executed in this way will be deleted upon completion,
+permissions permitting\&.
+.IP 
+If the script generates output, output will be sent to the file
+specified by the \fB"magic output"\fP parameter (see
+above)\&.
+.IP 
+Note that some shells are unable to interpret scripts containing
+carriage-return-linefeed instead of linefeed as the end-of-line
+marker\&. Magic scripts must be executable \fI"as is"\fP on the host,
+which for some hosts and some shells will require filtering at the DOS
+end\&.
+.IP 
+Magic scripts are \fIEXPERIMENTAL\fP and should \fINOT\fP be relied upon\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  None\&. Magic scripts disabled\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  magic script = user\&.csh\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmangle case (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+See the section on \fB"NAME MANGLING"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmangled map (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which are
+not representable on Windows/DOS\&.  The mangling of names is not always
+what is needed\&.  In particular you may have documents with file
+extensions that differ between DOS and UNIX\&. For example, under UNIX
+it is common to use \f(CW"\&.html"\fP for HTML files, whereas under
+Windows/DOS \f(CW"\&.htm"\fP is more commonly used\&.
+.IP 
+So to map \f(CW"html"\fP to \f(CW"htm"\fP you would use:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  mangled map = (*\&.html *\&.htm)\fP
+.IP 
+One very useful case is to remove the annoying \f(CW";1"\fP off the ends
+of filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXes)\&. To do
+this use a map of (*;1 *)\&.
+.IP 
+\fBdefault:\fP
+\f(CW  no mangled map\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  mangled map = (*;1 *)\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmangled names (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether non-DOS names under UNIX should be mapped to
+DOS-compatible names ("mangled") and made visible, or whether non-DOS
+names should simply be ignored\&.
+.IP 
+See the section on \fB"NAME MANGLING"\fP for details
+on how to control the mangling process\&.
+.IP 
+If mangling is used then the mangling algorithm is as follows:
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+The first (up to) five alphanumeric characters before the
+rightmost dot of the filename are preserved, forced to upper case, and
+appear as the first (up to) five characters of the mangled name\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+A tilde \f(CW"~"\fP is appended to the first part of the mangled
+name, followed by a two-character unique sequence, based on the
+original root name (i\&.e\&., the original filename minus its final
+extension)\&. The final extension is included in the hash calculation
+only if it contains any upper case characters or is longer than three
+characters\&.
+.IP 
+Note that the character to use may be specified using the
+\fB"mangling char"\fP option, if you don\'t like
+\f(CW\'~\'\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+The first three alphanumeric characters of the final extension
+are preserved, forced to upper case and appear as the extension of the
+mangled name\&. The final extension is defined as that part of the
+original filename after the rightmost dot\&. If there are no dots in the
+filename, the mangled name will have no extension (except in the case
+of \fB"hidden files"\fP - see below)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+Files whose UNIX name begins with a dot will be presented as DOS
+hidden files\&. The mangled name will be created as for other filenames,
+but with the leading dot removed and \f(CW"___"\fP as its extension regardless
+of actual original extension (that\'s three underscores)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+The two-digit hash value consists of upper case alphanumeric
+characters\&.
+.IP 
+This algorithm can cause name collisions only if files in a directory
+share the same first five alphanumeric characters\&. The probability of
+such a clash is 1/1300\&.
+.IP 
+The name mangling (if enabled) allows a file to be copied between UNIX
+directories from Windows/DOS while retaining the long UNIX
+filename\&. UNIX files can be renamed to a new extension from
+Windows/DOS and will retain the same basename\&. Mangled names do not
+change between sessions\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  mangled names = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  mangled names = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmangling char (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls what character is used as the \fI"magic"\fP character in
+\fBname mangling\fP\&. The default is a \f(CW\'~\'\fP but
+this may interfere with some software\&. Use this option to set it to
+whatever you prefer\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  mangling char = ~\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  mangling char = ^\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmangled stack (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter controls the number of mangled names that should be
+cached in the Samba server \fBsmbd\fP\&.
+.IP 
+This stack is a list of recently mangled base names (extensions are
+only maintained if they are longer than 3 characters or contains upper
+case characters)\&.
+.IP 
+The larger this value, the more likely it is that mangled names can be
+successfully converted to correct long UNIX names\&. However, large
+stack sizes will slow most directory access\&. Smaller stacks save
+memory in the server (each stack element costs 256 bytes)\&.
+.IP 
+It is not possible to absolutely guarantee correct long file names, so
+be prepared for some surprises!
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  mangled stack = 50\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  mangled stack = 100\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmap archive (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether the DOS archive attribute should be mapped to
+the UNIX owner execute bit\&.  The DOS archive bit is set when a file
+has been modified since its last backup\&.  One motivation for this
+option it to keep Samba/your PC from making any file it touches from
+becoming executable under UNIX\&.  This can be quite annoying for shared
+source code, documents, etc\&.\&.\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this requires the \fB"create mask"\fP
+parameter to be set such that owner execute bit is not masked out
+(ie\&. it must include 100)\&. See the parameter \fB"create
+mask"\fP for details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW      map archive = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW      map archive = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmap hidden (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether DOS style hidden files should be mapped to the
+UNIX world execute bit\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this requires the \fB"create mask"\fP to be
+set such that the world execute bit is not masked out (ie\&. it must
+include 001)\&. See the parameter \fB"create mask"\fP
+for details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  map hidden = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  map hidden = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmap system (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls whether DOS style system files should be mapped to the
+UNIX group execute bit\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this requires the \fB"create mask"\fP to be
+set such that the group execute bit is not masked out (ie\&. it must
+include 010)\&. See the parameter \fB"create mask"\fP
+for details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  map system = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  map system = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmap to guest (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is only useful in \fBsecurity\fP modes
+other than \fB"security=share"\fP - ie\&. user,
+server, and domain\&.
+.IP 
+This parameter can take three different values, which tell
+\fBsmbd\fP what to do with user login requests that
+don\'t match a valid UNIX user in some way\&.
+.IP 
+The three settings are :
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB"Never"\fP - Means user login requests with an invalid password
+are rejected\&. This is the default\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB"Bad User"\fP - Means user logins with an invalid password are
+rejected, unless the username does not exist, in which case it is
+treated as a guest login and mapped into the \fB"guest
+account"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fB"Bad Password"\fP - Means user logins with an invalid
+password are treated as a guest login and mapped into the
+\fB"guest account"\fP\&. Note that this can
+cause problems as it means that any user mistyping their
+password will be silently logged on a \fB"guest"\fP - and 
+will not know the reason they cannot access files they think
+they should - there will have been no message given to them
+that they got their password wrong\&. Helpdesk services will
+\fI*hate*\fP you if you set the \fB"map to guest"\fP parameter
+this way :-)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+Note that this parameter is needed to set up \fB"Guest"\fP share
+services when using \fBsecurity\fP modes other than
+share\&. This is because in these modes the name of the resource being
+requested is \fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has
+successfully authenticated the client so the server cannot make
+authentication decisions at the correct time (connection to the
+share) for \fB"Guest"\fP shares\&.
+.IP 
+For people familiar with the older Samba releases, this parameter
+maps to the old compile-time setting of the GUEST_SESSSETUP value
+in local\&.h\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  map to guest = Never\fP
+\fBExample\fP:
+\f(CW  map to guest = Bad User\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax connections (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows the number of simultaneous connections to a service
+to be limited\&. If \fB"max connections"\fP is greater than 0 then
+connections will be refused if this number of connections to the
+service are already open\&. A value of zero mean an unlimited number of
+connections may be made\&.
+.IP 
+Record lock files are used to implement this feature\&. The lock files
+will be stored in the directory specified by the \fB"lock
+directory"\fP option\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max connections = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  max connections = 10\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax disk size (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to put an upper limit on the apparent size of
+disks\&. If you set this option to 100 then all shares will appear to be
+not larger than 100 MB in size\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this option does not limit the amount of data you can put on
+the disk\&. In the above case you could still store much more than 100
+MB on the disk, but if a client ever asks for the amount of free disk
+space or the total disk size then the result will be bounded by the
+amount specified in \fB"max disk size"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+This option is primarily useful to work around bugs in some pieces of
+software that can\'t handle very large disks, particularly disks over
+1GB in size\&.
+.IP 
+A \fB"max disk size"\fP of 0 means no limit\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max disk size = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  max disk size = 1000\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax log size (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option (an integer in kilobytes) specifies the max size the log
+file should grow to\&. Samba periodically checks the size and if it is
+exceeded it will rename the file, adding a \f(CW"\&.old"\fP extension\&.
+.IP 
+A size of 0 means no limit\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max log size = 5000\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  max log size = 1000\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax mux (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option controls the maximum number of outstanding simultaneous
+SMB operations that samba tells the client it will allow\&. You should
+never need to set this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max mux = 50\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmaxopenfiles (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter limits the maximum number of open files that one
+\fBsmbd\fP file serving process may have open for
+a client at any one time\&. The default for this parameter is set
+very high (10,000) as Samba uses only one bit per un-opened file\&.
+.IP 
+The limit of the number of open files is usually set by the
+UNIX per-process file descriptor limit rather than this parameter
+so you should never need to touch this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max open files = 10000\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax packet (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for (packetsize)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax ttl (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option tells \fBnmbd\fP what the default \'time
+to live\' of NetBIOS names should be (in seconds) when
+\fBnmbd\fP is requesting a name using either a
+broadcast packet or from a WINS server\&. You should never need to
+change this parameter\&. The default is 3 days\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max ttl = 259200\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax wins ttl (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option tells \fBnmbd\fP when acting as a WINS
+server \fB(wins support =true)\fP what the maximum
+\'time to live\' of NetBIOS names that \fBnmbd\fP will
+grant will be (in seconds)\&. You should never need to change this
+parameter\&.  The default is 6 days (518400 seconds)\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"min wins ttl"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW        max wins ttl = 518400\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmax xmit (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option controls the maximum packet size that will be negotiated
+by Samba\&. The default is 65535, which is the maximum\&. In some cases
+you may find you get better performance with a smaller value\&. A value
+below 2048 is likely to cause problems\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  max xmit = 65535\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  max xmit = 8192\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmessage command (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This specifies what command to run when the server receives a WinPopup
+style message\&.
+.IP 
+This would normally be a command that would deliver the message
+somehow\&. How this is to be done is up to your imagination\&.
+.IP 
+An example is:
+.IP 
+\f(CW   message command = csh -c \'xedit %s;rm %s\' &\fP
+.IP 
+This delivers the message using \fBxedit\fP, then removes it
+afterwards\&. \fINOTE THAT IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT THIS COMMAND RETURN
+IMMEDIATELY\fP\&. That\'s why I have the \f(CW\'&\'\fP on the end\&. If it doesn\'t
+return immediately then your PCs may freeze when sending messages
+(they should recover after 30secs, hopefully)\&.
+.IP 
+All messages are delivered as the global guest user\&. The command takes
+the standard substitutions, although \fB%u\fP won\'t work
+(\fB%U\fP may be better in this case)\&.
+.IP 
+Apart from the standard substitutions, some additional ones apply\&. In
+particular:
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\f(CW"%s"\fP = the filename containing the message\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\f(CW"%t"\fP = the destination that the message was sent to (probably the server
+name)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\f(CW"%f"\fP = who the message is from\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+You could make this command send mail, or whatever else takes your
+fancy\&. Please let us know of any really interesting ideas you have\&.
+.IP 
+Here\'s a way of sending the messages as mail to root:
+.IP 
+\f(CWmessage command = /bin/mail -s \'message from %f on %m\' root < %s; rm %s\fP
+.IP 
+If you don\'t have a message command then the message won\'t be
+delivered and Samba will tell the sender there was an
+error\&. Unfortunately WfWg totally ignores the error code and carries
+on regardless, saying that the message was delivered\&.
+.IP 
+If you want to silently delete it then try:
+.IP 
+\f(CW"message command = rm %s"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+For the really adventurous, try something like this:
+.IP 
+\f(CWmessage command = csh -c \'csh < %s |& /usr/local/samba/bin/smbclient -M %m; rm %s\' &\fP
+.IP 
+this would execute the command as a script on the server, then give
+them the result in a WinPopup message\&. Note that this could cause a
+loop if you send a message from the server using smbclient! You better
+wrap the above in a script that checks for this :-)
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  no message command\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW        message command = csh -c \'xedit %s;rm %s\' &\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmin print space (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This sets the minimum amount of free disk space that must be available
+before a user will be able to spool a print job\&. It is specified in
+kilobytes\&. The default is 0, which means a user can always spool a print
+job\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fBprinting\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  min print space = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  min print space = 2000\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBmin wins ttl (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option tells \fBnmbd\fP when acting as a WINS
+server \fB(wins support = true)\fP what the minimum
+\'time to live\' of NetBIOS names that \fBnmbd\fP will
+grant will be (in seconds)\&. You should never need to change this
+parameter\&.  The default is 6 hours (21600 seconds)\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  min wins ttl = 21600\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBname resolve order (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option is used by the programs in the Samba suite to determine
+what naming services and in what order to resolve host names to IP
+addresses\&. The option takes a space separated string of different name
+resolution options\&.
+.IP 
+The options are :"lmhosts", "host", "wins" and "bcast"\&. They cause
+names to be resolved as follows :
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBlmhosts\fP : Lookup an IP address in the Samba lmhosts file\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBhost\fP : Do a standard host name to IP address resolution,
+using the system /etc/hosts, NIS, or DNS lookups\&. This method of name
+resolution is operating system depended for instance on IRIX or
+Solaris this may be controlled by the \fI/etc/nsswitch\&.conf\fP file)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBwins\fP : Query a name with the IP address listed in the
+\fBwins server\fP parameter\&. If no WINS server has
+been specified this method will be ignored\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+\fBbcast\fP : Do a broadcast on each of the known local interfaces
+listed in the \fBinterfaces\fP parameter\&. This is the
+least reliable of the name resolution methods as it depends on the
+target host being on a locally connected subnet\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  name resolve order = lmhosts host wins bcast\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  name resolve order = lmhosts bcast host\fP
+.IP 
+This will cause the local lmhosts file to be examined first, followed
+by a broadcast attempt, followed by a normal system hostname lookup\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnetbios aliases (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a list of NetBIOS names that \fBnmbd\fP will
+advertise as additional names by which the Samba server is known\&. This
+allows one machine to appear in browse lists under multiple names\&. If
+a machine is acting as a \fBbrowse server\fP or
+\fBlogon server\fP none of these names will be
+advertised as either browse server or logon servers, only the primary
+name of the machine will be advertised with these capabilities\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"netbios name"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  empty string (no additional names)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  netbios aliases = TEST TEST1 TEST2\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnetbios name (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This sets the NetBIOS name by which a Samba server is known\&. By
+default it is the same as the first component of the host\'s DNS name\&.
+If a machine is a \fBbrowse server\fP or
+\fBlogon server\fP this name (or the first component
+of the hosts DNS name) will be the name that these services are
+advertised under\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"netbios aliases"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  Machine DNS name\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  netbios name = MYNAME\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnis homedir (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Get the home share server from a NIS map\&. For UNIX systems that use an
+automounter, the user\'s home directory will often be mounted on a
+workstation on demand from a remote server\&. 
+.IP 
+When the Samba logon server is not the actual home directory server,
+but is mounting the home directories via NFS then two network hops
+would be required to access the users home directory if the logon
+server told the client to use itself as the SMB server for home
+directories (one over SMB and one over NFS)\&. This can be very
+slow\&.
+.IP 
+This option allows Samba to return the home share as being on a
+different server to the logon server and as long as a Samba daemon is
+running on the home directory server, it will be mounted on the Samba
+client directly from the directory server\&. When Samba is returning the
+home share to the client, it will consult the NIS map specified in
+\fB"homedir map"\fP and return the server listed
+there\&.
+.IP 
+Note that for this option to work there must be a working NIS
+system and the Samba server with this option must also be a
+\fBlogon server\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  nis homedir = false\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  nis homedir = true\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnt pipe support (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean parameter controlls whether \fBsmbd\fP
+will allow Windows NT clients to connect to the NT SMB specific
+\f(CWIPC$\fP pipes\&. This is a developer debugging option and can be left
+alone\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  nt pipe support = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnt smb support (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean parameter controlls whether \fBsmbd\fP
+will negotiate NT specific SMB support with Windows NT
+clients\&. Although this is a developer debugging option and should be
+left alone, benchmarking has discovered that Windows NT clients give
+faster performance with this option set to \f(CW"no"\fP\&. This is still
+being investigated\&. If this option is set to \f(CW"no"\fP then Samba
+offers exactly the same SMB calls that versions prior to Samba2\&.0
+offered\&. This information may be of use if any users are having
+problems with NT SMB support\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  nt support = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBnull passwords (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Allow or disallow client access to accounts that have null passwords\&. 
+.IP 
+See also \fBsmbpasswd (5)\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  null passwords = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  null passwords = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBole locking compatibility (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter allows an administrator to turn off the byte range lock
+manipulation that is done within Samba to give compatibility for OLE
+applications\&. Windows OLE applications use byte range locking as a
+form of inter-process communication, by locking ranges of bytes around
+the 2^32 region of a file range\&. This can cause certain UNIX lock
+managers to crash or otherwise cause problems\&. Setting this parameter
+to \f(CW"no"\fP means you trust your UNIX lock manager to handle such cases
+correctly\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ole locking compatibility = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  ole locking compatibility = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBonly guest (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+A synonym for \fB"guest only"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBonly user (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a boolean option that controls whether connections with
+usernames not in the \fBuser=\fP list will be allowed\&. By
+default this option is disabled so a client can supply a username to
+be used by the server\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this also means Samba won\'t try to deduce usernames from the
+service name\&. This can be annoying for the \fB[homes]\fP
+section\&. To get around this you could use "\fBuser\fP =
+\fB%S\fP" which means your \fB"user"\fP list
+will be just the service name, which for home directories is the name
+of the user\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fBuser\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  only user = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  only user = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBoplocks (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean option tells smbd whether to issue oplocks (opportunistic
+locks) to file open requests on this share\&. The oplock code can
+dramatically (approx 30% or more) improve the speed of access to files
+on Samba servers\&. It allows the clients to agressively cache files
+locally and you may want to disable this option for unreliable network
+environments (it is turned on by default in Windows NT Servers)\&.  For
+more information see the file Speed\&.txt in the Samba docs/ directory\&.
+.IP 
+Oplocks may be selectively turned off on certain files on a per share basis\&.
+See the \'veto oplock files\' parameter\&. On some systems oplocks are recognised
+by the underlying operating system\&. This allows data synchronisation between
+all access to oplocked files, whether it be via Samba or NFS or a local
+UNIX process\&. See the \fBkernel oplocks\fP parameter
+for details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  oplocks = True\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  oplocks = False\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBos level (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This integer value controls what level Samba advertises itself as for
+browse elections\&. The value of this parameter determines whether
+\fBnmbd\fP has a chance of becoming a local master
+browser for the \fBWORKGROUP\fP in the local broadcast
+area\&. The default is zero, which means \fBnmbd\fP will
+lose elections to Windows machines\&. See BROWSING\&.txt in the Samba
+docs/ directory for details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  os level = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  os level = 65    ; This will win against any NT Server\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpacket size (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a deprecated parameter that how no effect on the current
+Samba code\&. It is left in the parameter list to prevent breaking
+old \fBsmb\&.conf\fP files\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpanic action (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a Samba developer option that allows a system command to be
+called when either \fBsmbd\fP or
+\fBnmbd\fP crashes\&. This is usually used to draw
+attention to the fact that a problem occured\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  panic action = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpasswd chat (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This string controls the \fI"chat"\fP conversation that takes places
+between \fBsmbd\fP and the local password changing
+program to change the users password\&. The string describes a sequence
+of response-receive pairs that \fBsmbd\fP uses to
+determine what to send to the \fBpasswd\fP program
+and what to expect back\&. If the expected output is not received then
+the password is not changed\&.
+.IP 
+This chat sequence is often quite site specific, depending on what
+local methods are used for password control (such as NIS etc)\&.
+.IP 
+The string can contain the macros \f(CW"%o"\fP and \f(CW"%n"\fP which are
+substituted for the old and new passwords respectively\&. It can also
+contain the standard macros \f(CW"\en"\fP, \f(CW"\er"\fP, \f(CW"\et"\fP and \f(CW"\es"\fP
+to give line-feed, carriage-return, tab and space\&.
+.IP 
+The string can also contain a \f(CW\'*\'\fP which matches any sequence of
+characters\&.
+.IP 
+Double quotes can be used to collect strings with spaces in them into
+a single string\&.
+.IP 
+If the send string in any part of the chat sequence is a fullstop
+\f(CW"\&."\fP  then no string is sent\&. Similarly, is the expect string is a
+fullstop then no string is expected\&.
+.IP 
+Note that if the \fB"unix password sync"\fP
+parameter is set to true, then this sequence is called \fI*AS ROOT*\fP
+when the SMB password in the smbpasswd file is being changed, without
+access to the old password cleartext\&. In this case the old password
+cleartext is set to \f(CW""\fP (the empty string)\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"unix password sync"\fP,
+\fB"passwd program"\fP and \fB"passwd chat
+debug"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP 
+
+.DS 
+ passwd chat = "*Enter OLD password*" %o\en "*Enter NEW password*" %n\en "*Reenter NEW password*" %n\en "*Password changed*"
 
-printcap name
+.DE 
 
-printer driver file
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
 
-protocol
-
-read bmpx
-
-read prediction
-
-read raw
-
-read size
-
-remote announce
-
-remote browse sync
-
-root
-
-root dir
-
-root directory
-
-security
-
-server string
-
-shared file entries
-
-shared mem size
-
-smb passwd file
-
-smbrun
-
-socket address
-
-socket options
-
-status
-
-strip dot
-
-syslog
-
-syslog only
-
-time offset
-
-time server
-
-unix password sync
-
-unix realname
-
-update encrypted
-
-username level
-
-username map
-
-use rhosts
-
-valid chars
-
-wins proxy
-
-wins server
-
-wins support
-
-workgroup
-
-write raw
-
-.SS COMPLETE LIST OF SERVICE PARAMETERS
-
-Here is a list of all service parameters. See the section of each
-parameter for details. Note that some are synonyms.
-
-admin users
-
-allow hosts
-
-alternate permissions
-
-available
-
-browseable
-
-case sensitive
-
-case sig names
-
-copy
-
-create mask
-
-create mode
-
-comment
-
-default case
-
-delete readonly
-
-delete veto files
-
-deny hosts
-
-directory
-
-directory mask
-
-directory mode
-
-dont descend
-
-dos filetimes
-
-dos filetime resolution
-
-exec
-
-fake directory create times
-
-fake oplocks
-
-follow symlinks
-
-force create mode
-
-force directory mode
-
-force group
-
-force user
-
-guest account
-
-guest ok
-
-guest only
-
-hide dot files
-
-hosts allow
-
-hosts deny
-
-invalid users
-
-locking
-
-lppause command
-
-lpq command
-
-lpresume command
-
-lprm command
-
-magic output
-
-magic script
-
-mangle case
-
-mangled names
-
-mangling char
-
-map archive
-
-map hidden
-
-map system
-
-max connections
-
-min print space
-
-only guest
-
-only user
-
-oplocks
-
-path
-
-postexec
-
-postscript
-
-preserve case
-
-print command
-
-printer driver
-
-printer driver location
-
-printing
-
-print ok
-
-printable
-
-printer
-
-printer name
-
-public
-
-queuepause command
-
-queueresume command
-
-read only
-
-read list
-
-revalidate
-
-root postexec
-
-root preexec
-
-set directory
-
-share modes
-
-short preserve case
-
-strict locking
-
-strict sync
-
-sync always
-
-user
-
-username
-
-users
-
-valid users
-
-veto files
-
-veto oplock files
-
-volume
-
-wide links
-
-writable
-
-write ok
-
-writeable
-
-write list
-
-.SS EXPLANATION OF EACH PARAMETER
-.RS 3
-
-.SS admin users (S)
-
-This is a list of users who will be granted administrative privileges
-on the share. This means that they will do all file operations as the
-super-user (root).
-
-You should use this option very carefully, as any user in this list
-will be able to do anything they like on the share, irrespective of
-file permissions.
-
-.B Default:
-       no admin users
-
-.B Example:
-       admin users = jason
-
-.SS announce as (G)
-
-This specifies what type of server nmbd will announce itself as in
-browse lists. By default this is set to Windows NT. The valid options
-are "NT", "Win95" or "WfW" meaining Windows NT, Windows 95 and
-Windows for Workgroups respectively. Do not change this parameter
-unless you have a specific need to stop Samba appearing as an NT
-server as this may prevent Samba servers from participating as
-browser servers correctly.
-
-.B Default:
-    announce as = NT
-
-.B Example
-    announce as = Win95
-
-.SS announce version (G)
-
-This specifies the major and minor version numbers that nmbd
-will use when announcing itself as a server. The default is 4.2.
-Do not change this parameter unless you have a specific need to
-set a Samba server to be a downlevel server.
-
-.B Default:
-   announce version = 4.2
-
-.B Example:
-   announce version = 2.0
-
-.SS auto services (G)
-This is a list of services that you want to be automatically added to
-the browse lists. This is most useful for homes and printers services
-that would otherwise not be visible.
-
-Note that if you just want all printers in your printcap file loaded
-then the "load printers" option is easier.
-
-.B Default:
-       no auto services
-
-.B Example:
-       auto services = fred lp colorlp
-
-.SS allow hosts (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'hosts allow'.
-
-This parameter is a comma delimited set of hosts which are permitted to access
-a service. 
-
-If specified in the [global] section then it will apply to all
-services, regardless of whether the individual service has a different
-setting. 
-
-You can specify the hosts by name or IP number. For example, you could
-restrict access to only the hosts on a Class C subnet with something like
-"allow hosts = 150.203.5.". The full syntax of the list is described in
-the man page
-.BR hosts_access (5).
-
-You can also specify hosts by network/netmask pairs and by netgroup
-names if your system supports netgroups. The EXCEPT keyword can also
-be used to limit a wildcard list. The following examples may provide
-some help:
-
-Example 1: allow all IPs in 150.203.*.* except one
-
-       hosts allow = 150.203. EXCEPT 150.203.6.66
-
-Example 2: allow hosts that match the given network/netmask
-
-       hosts allow = 150.203.15.0/255.255.255.0
-
-Example 3: allow a couple of hosts
-
-       hosts allow = lapland, arvidsjaur
-
-Example 4: allow only hosts in netgroup "foonet" or localhost, but 
-deny access from one particular host
-
-       hosts allow = @foonet, localhost
-       hosts deny = pirate
-
-Note that access still requires suitable user-level passwords.
-
-See
-.BR testparm (1)
-for a way of testing your host access to see if it
-does what you expect.
-
-.B Default:
-       none (i.e., all hosts permitted access)
-
-.B Example:
-       allow hosts = 150.203.5. myhost.mynet.edu.au
-
-.SS alternate permissions (S)
-
-This option affects the way the "read only" DOS attribute is produced
-for UNIX files. If this is false then the read only bit is set for
-files on writeable shares which the user cannot write to.
-
-If this is true then it is set for files whos user write bit is not set.
-
-The latter behaviour is useful for when users copy files from each
-others directories, and use a file manager that preserves
-permissions. Without this option they may get annoyed as all copied
-files will have the "read only" bit set.
-
-.B Default:
-       alternate permissions = no
-
-.B Example:
-       alternate permissions = yes
-
-.SS available (S)
-This parameter lets you 'turn off' a service. If 'available = no', then
-ALL attempts to connect to the service will fail. Such failures are logged.
-
-.B Default:
-       available = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       available = no
-
-.SS bind interfaces only (G)
-This global parameter (new for 1.9.18) allows the Samba admin to limit
-what interfaces on a machine will serve smb requests. If affects file service
-(smbd) and name service (nmbd) in slightly different ways.
-
-For name service it causes nmbd to bind to ports 137 and 138 on
-the interfaces listed in the 'interfaces' parameter. nmbd also binds
-to the 'all addresses' interface (0.0.0.0) on ports 137 and 138
-for the purposes of reading broadcast messages. If this option is
-not set then nmbd will service name requests on all of these
-sockets. If "bind interfaces only" is set then nmbd will check
-the source address of any packets coming in on the broadcast
-sockets and discard any that don't match the broadcast addresses
-of the interfaces in the 'interfaces' parameter list. As unicast
-packets are received on the other sockets it allows nmbd to
-refuse to serve names to machines that send packets that arrive
-through any interfaces not listed in the 'interfaces' list.
-IP Source address spoofing does defeat this simple check, however
-so it must not be used seriously as a security feature for nmbd.
-
-For file service it causes smbd to bind only to the interface
-list given in the 'interfaces' parameter. This restricts the
-networks that smbd will serve to packets coming in those interfaces.
-Note that you should not use this parameter for machines that
-are serving ppp or other intermittant or non-broadcast network
-interfaces as it will not cope with non-permanent interfaces.
-
-.B Default:
-       bind interfaces only = False
-
-.B Example:
-       bind interfaces only = True
-
-.SS browseable (S)
-This controls whether this share is seen in the list of available
-shares in a net view and in the browse list.
-
-.B Default:
-       browseable = Yes
-
-.B Example: 
-       browseable = No
-.SS browse list(G)
-This controls whether the smbd will serve a browse list to a client
-doing a NetServerEnum call. Normally set to true. You should never
-need to change this.
-
-.B Default:
-       browse list = Yes
-
-.SS case sensitive (G)
-See the discussion on NAME MANGLING.
-
-.SS case sig names (G)
-See "case sensitive"
-
-.SS character set (G)
-This allows a smbd to map incoming characters from a DOS 850 Code page
-to either a Western European (ISO8859-1) or Easter European (ISO8859-2)
-code page. Normally not set, meaning no filename translation is done.
-
-.B Default
-
-       character set =
-
-.B Example
-
-       character set = iso8859-1
-
-.SS client code page (G)
-Currently (Samba 1.9.17 and above) this may be set to one of two
-values, 850 or 437. It specifies the base DOS code page that the
-clients accessing Samba are using. To determine this, open a DOS
-command prompt and type the command "chcp". This will output the
-code page. The default for USA MS-DOS, Windows 95, and Windows NT
-releases is code page 437. The default for western european 
-releases of the above operating systems is code page 850.
-
-This parameter co-operates with the "valid chars" parameter in
-determining what characters are valid in filenames and how
-capitalization is done. It has been added as a convenience for
-clients whose code page is either 437 or 850 so a convoluted
-"valid chars" string does not have to be determined. If you
-set both this parameter and the "valid chars" parameter the 
-"client code page" parameter MUST be set before the "valid chars"
-in the smb.conf file. The "valid chars" string will then augment
-the character settings in the "client code page" parameter.
-
-If "client code page" is set to a value other than 850 or 437
-it will default to 850.
-
-See also : "valid chars".
-
-.B Default
-
-       client code page = 850
-
-.B Example
-
-       client code page = 437
-
-.SS comment (S)
-This is a text field that is seen next to a share when a client does a
-net view to list what shares are available.
-
-If you want to set the string that is displayed next to the machine
-name then see the server string command.
-
-.B Default:
-       No comment string
-
-.B Example:
-       comment = Fred's Files
-
-.SS config file (G)
-
-This allows you to override the config file to use, instead of the
-default (usually smb.conf). There is a chicken and egg problem here as
-this option is set in the config file! 
-
-For this reason, if the name of the config file has changed when the
-parameters are loaded then it will reload them from the new config
-file.
-
-This option takes the usual substitutions, which can be very useful.
-
-If the config file doesn't exist then it won't be loaded (allowing
-you to special case the config files of just a few clients).
-
-.B Example:
-       config file = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf.%m
-
-.SS copy (S)
-This parameter allows you to 'clone' service entries. The specified
-service is simply duplicated under the current service's name. Any 
-parameters specified in the current section will override those in the
-section being copied.
-
-This feature lets you set up a 'template' service and create similar 
-services easily. Note that the service being copied must occur earlier 
-in the configuration file than the service doing the copying.
-
-.B Default:
-       none
-
-.B Example:
-       copy = otherservice
-.SS create mask (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'create mode'.
-
-When a file is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
-according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and
-the resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise 'AND'ed with this parameter.
-This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX
-modes of a file. Any bit *not* set here will be removed from the
-modes set on a file when it is created.
-
-The default value of this parameter removes the 'group' and 'other' 
-write and execute bits from the UNIX modes.
-
-Following this Samba will bit-wise 'OR' the UNIX mode created from
-this parameter with the value of the "force create mode" parameter 
-which is set to 000 by default.
-
-For Samba 1.9.17 and above this parameter no longer affects directory
-modes. See the parameter 'directory mode' for details.
-
-See also the "force create mode" parameter for forcing particular
-mode bits to be set on created files.
-See also the "directory mode" parameter for masking mode bits on created
-directories.
-
-.B Default:
-       create mask = 0744
-
-.B Example:
-       create mask = 0775
-.SS create mode (S)
-See
-.B create mask.
-
-.SS deadtime (G)
-The value of the parameter (a decimal integer) represents the number of
-minutes of inactivity before a connection is considered dead, and it
-is disconnected. The deadtime only takes effect if the number of open files
-is zero.
-
-This is useful to stop a server's resources being exhausted by a large
-number of inactive connections.
-
-Most clients have an auto-reconnect feature when a connection is broken so
-in most cases this parameter should be transparent to users.
-
-Using this parameter with a timeout of a few minutes is recommended
-for most systems.
-
-A deadtime of zero indicates that no auto-disconnection should be performed.
-
-.B Default:
-       deadtime = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       deadtime = 15
-.SS debug level (G)
-The value of the parameter (an integer) allows the debug level
-(logging level) to be specified in the
-.B smb.conf
-file. This is to give
-greater flexibility in the configuration of the system.
-
-The default will be the debug level specified on the command line.
-
-.B Example:
-       debug level = 3
-.SS default (G)
-See
-.B default service.
-.SS default case (S)
-
-See the section on "NAME MANGLING" Also note the addition of "short
-preserve case"
-
-.SS default service (G)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'default'.
-
-This parameter specifies the name of a service which will be connected to
-if the service actually requested cannot be found. Note that the square
-brackets are NOT given in the parameter value (see example below).
-
-There is no default value for this parameter. If this parameter is not given,
-attempting to connect to a nonexistent service results in an error.
-
-Typically the default service would be a public, read-only service.
-
-Also note that as of 1.9.14 the apparent service name will be changed to
-equal that of the requested service, this is very useful as it allows
-you to use macros like %S to make a wildcard service.
-
-Note also that any _ characters in the name of the service used in the
-default service will get mapped to a /. This allows for interesting
-things.
-
-
-.B Example:
-       default service = pub
-        
-        [pub]
-             path = /%S
-          
-
-.SS delete readonly (S)
-This parameter allows readonly files to be deleted.  This is not normal DOS
-semantics, but is allowed by UNIX.
-
-This option may be useful for running applications such as rcs, where UNIX
-file ownership prevents changing file permissions, and DOS semantics prevent
-deletion of a read only file.
-
-.B Default:
-       delete readonly = No
-
-.B Example:
-       delete readonly = Yes
-.SS deny hosts (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'hosts deny'.
-
-The opposite of 'allow hosts' - hosts listed here are NOT permitted
-access to services unless the specific services have their own lists to
-override this one. Where the lists conflict, the 'allow' list takes precedence.
-
-.B Default:
-       none (i.e., no hosts specifically excluded)
-
-.B Example:
-       deny hosts = 150.203.4. badhost.mynet.edu.au
-
-.SS delete veto files (S)
-
-This option is used when Samba is attempting to delete a directory
-that contains one or more vetoed directories (see the 'veto files' option).
-If this option is set to False (the default) then if a vetoed directory
-contains any non-vetoed files or directories then the directory delete 
-will fail. This is usually what you want. 
-
-If this option is set to True, then Samba will attempt
-to recursively delete any files and directories within the vetoed
-directory. This can be useful for integration with file serving
-systems such as Netatalk, which create meta-files within directories
-you might normally veto DOS/Windows users from seeing (eg. .AppleDouble)
-
-Setting 'delete veto files = True' allows these directories to be 
-transparently deleted when the parent directory is deleted (so long
-as the user has permissions to do so).
-
-.B Default:
-    delete veto files = False
-
-.B Example:
-    delete veto files = True
-
-See
-.B veto files
-
-.SS dfree command (G)
-The dfree command setting should only be used on systems where a
-problem occurs with the internal disk space calculations. This has
-been known to happen with Ultrix, but may occur with other operating
-systems. The symptom that was seen was an error of "Abort Retry
-Ignore" at the end of each directory listing.
-
-This setting allows the replacement of the internal routines to
-calculate the total disk space and amount available with an external
-routine. The example below gives a possible script that might fulfill
-this function. 
-
-The external program will be passed a single parameter indicating a
-directory in the filesystem being queried. This will typically consist
-of the string "./". The script should return two integers in ascii. The
-first should be the total disk space in blocks, and the second should
-be the number of available blocks. An optional third return value
-can give the block size in bytes. The default blocksize is 1024 bytes.
-
-Note: Your script should NOT be setuid or setgid and should be owned by
-(and writable only by) root!
-
-.B Default:
-       By default internal routines for determining the disk capacity
-and remaining space will be used.
-
-.B Example:
-       dfree command = /usr/local/samba/bin/dfree
-
-       Where the script dfree (which must be made executable) could be
-
-.nf
-       #!/bin/sh
-       df $1 | tail -1 | awk '{print $2" "$4}'
-.fi
-
-       or perhaps (on Sys V)
-
-.nf
-       #!/bin/sh
-       /usr/bin/df -k $1 | tail -1 | awk '{print $3" "$5}'
-.fi
-
-       Note that you may have to replace the command names with full
-path names on some systems.
-.SS directory (S)
-See
-.B path.
-
-.SS directory mask (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'directory mode'.
-
-This parameter is the octal modes which are used when converting DOS modes 
-to UNIX modes when creating UNIX directories.
-
-When a directory is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
-according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and
-the resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise 'AND'ed with this parameter.
-This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX
-modes of a directory. Any bit *not* set here will be removed from the
-modes set on a directory when it is created.
-
-The default value of this parameter removes the 'group' and 'other'
-write bits from the UNIX mode, allowing only the user who owns the
-directory to modify it.
-
-Following this Samba will bit-wise 'OR' the UNIX mode created from
-this parameter with the value of the "force directory mode" parameter. 
-This parameter is set to 000 by default (ie. no extra mode bits are added).
-
-See the "force directory mode" parameter to cause particular mode
-bits to always be set on created directories.
-
-See also the "create mode" parameter for masking mode bits on created
-files.
-
-.B Default:
-       directory mask = 0755
-
-.B Example:
-       directory mask = 0775
-
-.SS directory mode (S)
-See
-.B directory mask.
-
-.SS dns proxy (G)
-
-Specifies that nmbd should (as a WINS server), on finding that a NetBIOS
-name has not been registered, treat the NetBIOS name word-for-word as
-a DNS name.
-
-Note that the maximum length for a NetBIOS name is 15
-characters, so the DNS name (or DNS alias) can likewise only be 15
-characters, maximum.
-
-Note also that nmbd will block completely until the DNS name is resolved.
-This will result in temporary loss of browsing and WINS services.
-Enable this option only if you are certain that DNS resolution is fast,
-or you can live with the consequences of periodic pauses in nmbd service.
-
-.B Default:
-        dns proxy = yes
-
-.SS domain controller (G)
-
-The meaning of this parameter changed from a string to a boolean (yes/no)
-value. It is currently not used within the Samba source and should be removed
-from all current smb.conf files. It is left behind for compatibility reasons.
-
-.B Default:
-        domain controller = no
-
-.SS domain logons (G)
-
-If set to true, the Samba server will serve Windows 95 domain logons
-for the workgroup it is in. For more details on setting up this feature
-see the file DOMAINS.txt in the Samba source documentation directory.
-
-.B Default:
-        domain logons = no
-
-.SS domain master (G)
-
-Enable WAN-wide browse list collation.  Local master browsers on 
-broadcast-isolated subnets will give samba their local browse lists, and 
-ask for a complete copy of the browse list for the whole wide area network.
-Browser clients will then contact their local master browser, and will
-receive the domain-wide browse list, instead of just the list for their
-broadcast-isolated subnet.
-
-.B Default:
-       domain master = no
-
-.SS dont descend (S)
-There are certain directories on some systems (eg., the /proc tree under
-Linux) that are either not of interest to clients or are infinitely deep
-(recursive). This parameter allows you to specify a comma-delimited list
-of directories that the server should always show as empty.
-
-Note that Samba can be very fussy about the exact format of the "dont
-descend" entries. For example you may need "./proc" instead of just
-"/proc". Experimentation is the best policy :-)
-
-.B Default:
-       none (i.e., all directories are OK to descend)
-
-.B Example:
-       dont descend = /proc,/dev
-
-.SS dos filetimes (S)
-Under DOS and Windows, if a user can write to a file they can change
-the timestamp on it. Under POSIX semantics, only the owner of the file
-or root may change the timestamp. By default, Samba runs with POSIX
-semantics and refuses to change the timestamp on a file if the user
-smbd is acting on behalf of is not the file owner. Setting this option
-to True allows DOS semantics and smbd will change the file timstamp as 
-DOS requires. This is a correct implementation of a previous compile-time
-options (UTIME_WORKAROUND) which was broken and is now removed.
-
-.B Default:
-        dos filetimes = False
-
-.B Example:
-        dos filetimes = True
-
-.SS dos filetime resolution (S)
-Under the DOS and Windows FAT filesystem, the finest granulatity on
-time resolution is two seconds. Setting this parameter for a share
-causes Samba to round the reported time down to the nearest two
-second boundary when a query call that requires one second resolution
-is made to smbd. 
-
-This option is mainly used as a compatibility option for Visual C++ 
-when used against Samba shares. If oplocks are enabled on a share,
-Visual C++ uses two different time reading calls to check if a file 
-has changed since it was last read. One of these calls uses a one-second 
-granularity, the other uses a two second granularity. As the two second 
-call rounds any odd second down, then if the file has a timestamp of an 
-odd number of seconds then the two timestamps will not match and Visual 
-C++ will keep reporting the file has changed. Setting this option causes 
-the two timestamps to match, and Visual C++ is happy.
-
-.B Default:
-        dos filetime resolution = False
-
-.B Example:
-        dos filetime resolution = True
-
-.SS encrypt passwords (G)
-
-This boolean controls whether encrypted passwords will be negotiated
-with the client. Note that Windows NT 4.0 SP3 and above will by default
-expect encrypted passwords unless a registry entry is changed. To use
-encrypted passwords in Samba see the file docs/ENCRYPTION.txt.
-
-.SS exec (S)
-
-This is an alias for preexec
-
-.SS fake directory create times (S)
-NTFS and Windows VFAT file systems keep a create time for all files
-and directories. This is not the same as the ctime - status change
-time - that Unix keeps, so Samba by default reports the earliest
-of the various times Unix does keep. Setting this parameter for a
-share causes Samba to always report midnight 1-1-1980 as
-the create time for directories.
-
-This option is mainly used as a compatibility option for Visual C++ 
-when used against Samba shares. Visual C++ generated makefiles
-have the object directory as a dependency for each object file,
-and a make rule to create the directory. Also, when NMAKE
-compares timestamps it uses the creation time when examining
-a directory. Thus the object directory will be created if it does
-not exist, but once it does exist it will always have an earlier
-timestamp than the object files it contains.
-
-However, Unix time semantics mean that the create time reported
-by Samba will be updated whenever a file is created or deleted
-in the directory. NMAKE therefore finds all object files in the
-object directory bar the last one built are out of date compared
-to the directory and rebuilds them. Enabling this option ensures
-directories always predate their contents and an NMAKE build will
-proceed as expected.
-
-.B Default:
-        fake directory create times = False
-
-.B Example:
-        fake directory create times = True
-
-.SS fake oplocks (S)
-
-Oplocks are the way that SMB clients get permission from a server to
-locally cache file operations. If a server grants an oplock
-(opportunistic lock) then the client is free to assume that it is the
-only one accessing the file and it will aggressively cache file
-data. With some oplock types the client may even cache file open/close
-operations. This can give enormous performance benefits.
-
-When you set "fake oplocks = yes" Samba will always grant oplock
-requests no matter how many clients are using the file. 
-
-By enabling this option on all read-only shares or shares that you know
-will only be accessed from one client at a time you will see a big
-performance improvement on many operations. If you enable this option
-on shares where multiple clients may be accessing the files read-write
-at the same time you can get data corruption. Use this option
-carefully! 
-
-It is generally much better to use the real oplock support except for
-physically read-only media such as CDROMs.
-
-This option is disabled by default.
-
-.SS follow symlinks (S)
-
-This parameter allows the Samba administrator to stop smbd from
-following symbolic links in a particular share. Setting this
-parameter to "No" prevents any file or directory that is a 
-symbolic link from being followed (the user will get an error).
-This option is very useful to stop users from adding a symbolic
-link to /etc/pasword in their home directory for instance.
-However it will slow filename lookups down slightly.
-
-This option is enabled (ie. smbd will follow symbolic links)
-by default.
-
-.SS force create mode (S)
-This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that
-will *always* be set on a file created by Samba. This is done
-by bitwise 'OR'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a file that
-is being created. The default for this parameter is (in octel)
-000. The modes in this parameter are bitwise 'OR'ed onto the
-file mode after the mask set in the "create mask" parameter
-is applied.
-
-See also the parameter "create mask" for details on masking mode
-bits on created files.
-
-.B Default:
-       force create mode = 000
-
-.B Example:
-       force create mode = 0755
-
-would force all created files to have read and execute permissions
-set for 'group' and 'other' as well as the read/write/execute bits 
-set for the 'user'.
-
-.SS force directory mode (S)
-This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that
-will *always* be set on a directory created by Samba. This is done
-by bitwise 'OR'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a directory that
-is being created. The default for this parameter is (in octel)
-0000 which will not add any extra permission bits to a created
-directory. This operation is done after the mode mask in the parameter 
-"directory mask" is applied.
-
-See also the parameter "directory mask" for details on masking mode
-bits on created directories.
-
-.B Default:
-       force directory mode = 000
-
-.B Example:
-       force directory mode = 0755
-
-would force all created directories to have read and execute permissions
-set for 'group' and 'other' as well as the read/write/execute bits 
-set for the 'user'.
-
-.SS force group (S)
-This specifies a group name that all connections to this service
-should be made as. This may be useful for sharing files.
-
-.B Default:
-       no forced group
-
-.B Example:
-       force group = agroup
-
-.SS force user (S)
-This specifies a user name that all connections to this service
-should be made as. This may be useful for sharing files. You should
-also use it carefully as using it incorrectly can cause security
-problems.
-
-This user name only gets used once a connection is established. Thus
-clients still need to connect as a valid user and supply a valid
-password. Once connected, all file operations will be performed as the
-"forced user", not matter what username the client connected as.
-
-.B Default:
-       no forced user
-
-.B Example:
-       force user = auser
-
-.SS getwd cache (G)
-This is a tuning option. When this is enabled a cacheing algorithm will
-be used to reduce the time taken for getwd() calls. This can have a
-significant impact on performance, especially when widelinks is False.
-
-.B Default:
-       getwd cache = No
-
-.B Example:
-       getwd cache = Yes
-
-.SS group (S)
-This is an alias for "force group" and is only kept for compatibility
-with old versions of Samba. It may be removed in future versions.
-
-.SS guest account (S)
-This is a username which will be used for access to services which are
-specified as 'guest ok' (see below). Whatever privileges this user has
-will be available to any client connecting to the guest
-service. Typically this user will exist in the password file, but will
-not have a valid login. If a username is specified in a given service,
-the specified username overrides this one.
-
-One some systems the account "nobody" may not be able to print. Use
-another account in this case. You should test this by trying to log in
-as your guest user (perhaps by using the "su \-" command) and trying to
-print using
-.BR lpr .
-
-Note that as of version 1.9 of Samba this option may be set
-differently for each service.
-
-.B Default:
-       specified at compile time
-
-.B Example:
-       guest account = nobody
-.SS guest ok (S)
-See
-.B public.
-.SS guest only (S)
-If this parameter is 'yes' for a service, then only guest connections to the
-service are permitted. This parameter will have no affect if "guest ok" or
-"public" is not set for the service.
-
-See the section below on user/password validation for more information about
-this option.
-
-.B Default:
-       guest only = no
-
-.B Example:
-       guest only = yes
-.SS hide dot files (S)
-This is a boolean parameter that controls whether files starting with
-a dot appear as hidden files.
-
-.B Default:
-       hide dot files = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       hide dot files = no
-
-
-.SS hide files(S)
-This is a list of files or directories that are not visible but are
-accessible.  The DOS 'hidden' attribute is applied to any files or
-directories that match.
-
-Each entry in the list must be separated by a "/", which allows spaces
-to be included in the entry.  '*' and '?' can be used to specify multiple 
-files or directories as in DOS wildcards.
-
-Each entry must be a unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
-unix directory separator "/".
-
-Note that the case sensitivity option is applicable in hiding files.
-
-Setting this parameter will affect the performance of Samba, as
-it will be forced to check all files and directories for a match
-as they are scanned.
-
-See also "hide dot files", "veto files" and "case sensitive"
-
-.B Default
-       No files or directories are hidden by this option (dot files are
-    hidden by default because of the "hide dot files" option).
-
-.B Example
-       hide files = /.*/DesktopFolderDB/TrashFor%m/resource.frk/
-
-The above example is based on files that the Macintosh client (DAVE)
-creates for internal use, and also still hides all files beginning with
-a dot.
-
-.SS homedir map (G)
-If "nis homedir" is true, this parameter specifies the NIS (or YP) map
-from which the server for the user's home directory should be extracted.
-At present, only the Sun auto.home map format is understood. The form of
-the map is:
-
-username       server:/some/file/system
-
-and the program will extract the servername from before the first ':'.
-There should probably be a better parsing system that copes with different
-map formats and also Amd (another automounter) maps.
-
-NB: The -DNETGROUP option is required in the Makefile for option to work
-and on some architectures the line -lrpcsvc needs to be added to the
-LIBSM variable. This is required for Solaris 2, FreeBSD and HPUX.
-
-See also "nis homedir"
-
-.B Default:
-       homedir map = auto.home
-
-.B Example:
-       homedir map = amd.homedir
-.SS hosts allow (S)
-See
-.B allow hosts.
-.SS hosts deny (S)
-See
-.B deny hosts.
-
-.SS hosts equiv (G)
-If this global parameter is a non-null string, it specifies the name of
-a file to read for the names of hosts and users who will be allowed access
-without specifying a password.
-
-This is not be confused with 
-.B allow hosts
-which is about hosts access to services and is more useful for guest services.
-.B hosts equiv
-may be useful for NT clients which will not supply passwords to samba.
-
-NOTE: The use of hosts.equiv can be a major security hole. This is
-because you are trusting the PC to supply the correct username. It is
-very easy to get a PC to supply a false username. I recommend that the
-hosts.equiv option be only used if you really know what you are doing,
-or perhaps on a home network where you trust your wife and kids :-)
-
-.B Default
-       No host equivalences
-
-.B Example
-       hosts equiv = /etc/hosts.equiv
-
-.SS include (G)
-
-This allows you to include one config file inside another.  The file is
-included literally, as though typed in place.
-
-It takes the standard substitutions, except %u, %P and %S
-
-.SS interfaces (G)
-
-This option allows you to setup multiple network interfaces, so that
-Samba can properly handle browsing on all interfaces.
-
-The option takes a list of ip/netmask pairs. The netmask may either be
-a bitmask, or a bitlength. 
-
-For example, the following line:
-
-interfaces = 192.168.2.10/24 192.168.3.10/24
-
-would configure two network interfaces with IP addresses 192.168.2.10
-and 192.168.3.10. The netmasks of both interfaces would be set to
-255.255.255.0. 
-
-You could produce an equivalent result by using:
-
-interfaces = 192.168.2.10/255.255.255.0 192.168.3.10/255.255.255.0
-
-if you prefer that format.
-
-If this option is not set then Samba will attempt to find a primary
-interface, but won't attempt to configure more than one interface.
-
-.SS invalid users (S)
-This is a list of users that should not be allowed to login to this
-service. This is really a "paranoid" check to absolutely ensure an
-improper setting does not breach your security.
-
-A name starting with @ is interpreted as a yp netgroup first (if this
-has been compiled into Samba), and then as a UNIX group if the name
-was not found in the yp netgroup database.
-
-A name starting with + is interpreted only by looking in the UNIX
-group database. A name starting with & is interpreted only by looking
-in the yp netgroup database (this has no effect if Samba is compiled
-without netgroup support).
-
-The current servicename is substituted for %S. This is useful in the
-[homes] section.
-
-See also "valid users"
-
-.B Default
-       No invalid users
-
-.B Example
-       invalid users = root fred admin @wheel
-
-.SS keepalive (G)
-The value of the parameter (an integer) represents the number of seconds 
-between 'keepalive' packets. If this parameter is zero, no keepalive packets
-will be sent. Keepalive packets, if sent, allow the server to tell whether a
-client is still present and responding.
-
-Keepalives should, in general, not be needed if the socket being used
-has the SO_KEEPALIVE attribute set on it (see "socket
-options"). Basically you should only use this option if you strike
-difficulties.
-
-.B Default:
-       keep alive = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       keep alive = 60
-
-.SS lm announce (G)
-
-This parameter determines if Samba will produce Lanman announce
-broadcasts that are needed by OS/2 clients in order for them to
-see the Samba server in their browse list. This parameter can
-have three values, true, false, or auto. The default is auto.
-If set to False Samba will never produce these broadcasts. If
-set to true Samba will produce Lanman announce broadcasts at
-a frequency set by the parameter 'lm interval'. If set to auto
-Samba will not send Lanman announce broadcasts by default but
-will listen for them. If it hears such a broadcast on the wire
-it will then start sending them at a frequency set by the parameter 
-'lm interval'.
-
-See also "lm interval".
-
-.B Default:
-       lm announce = auto
-
-.B Example:
-       lm announce = true
-
-.SS lm interval (G)
-
-If Samba is set to produce Lanman announce broadcasts needed
-by OS/2 clients (see the "lm announce" parameter) this parameter
-defines the frequency in seconds with which they will be made.
-If this is set to zero then no Lanman announcements will be
-made despite the setting of the "lm announce" parameter.
-
-See also "lm announce".
-
-.B Default:
-        lm interval = 60
-
-.B Example:
-        lm interval = 120
-
-.SS load printers (G)
-A boolean variable that controls whether all printers in the printcap
-will be loaded for browsing by default. 
-
-.B Default:
-       load printers = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       load printers = no
-
-.SS local master (G)
-This option allows the nmbd to become a local master browser on a
-subnet. If set to False then nmbd will not attempt to become a local
-master browser on a subnet and will also lose in all browsing elections. 
-By default this value is set to true. Setting this value to true doesn't 
-mean that Samba will become the local master browser on a subnet, just 
-that the nmbd will participate in elections for local master browser.
-
-.B Default:
-       local master = yes
-
-.SS lock directory (G)
-This option specifies the directory where lock files will be placed.
-The lock files are used to implement the "max connections" option.
-
-.B Default:
-       lock directory = /tmp/samba
-
-.B Example: 
-       lock directory = /usr/local/samba/var/locks
-
-.SS locking (S)
-This controls whether or not locking will be performed by the server in 
-response to lock requests from the client.
-
-If "locking = no", all lock and unlock requests will appear to succeed and 
-all lock queries will indicate that the queried lock is clear.
-
-If "locking = yes", real locking will be performed by the server.
-
-This option may be particularly useful for read-only filesystems which
-do not need locking (such as cdrom drives).
-
-Be careful about disabling locking either globally or in a specific
-service, as lack of locking may result in data corruption.
-
-.B Default:
-       locking = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       locking = no
-
-.SS log file (G)
-
-This options allows you to override the name of the Samba log file
-(also known as the debug file).
-
-This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
-separate log files for each user or machine.
-
-.B Example:
-       log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
-
-.SS log level (G)
-see "debug level"
-
-.SS logon drive (G)
-
-This parameter specifies the local path to which the home directory
-will be connected (see "logon home") and is only used by NT Workstations.
-
-.B Example:
-       logon drive = h:
-
-.SS logon home (G)
-
-This parameter specifies the home directory location when a Win95 or
-NT Workstation logs into a Samba PDC.  It allows you to do "NET USE
-H: /HOME" from a command prompt, for example.
-
-.B
-This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
-separate logon scripts for each user or machine.
-
-.B Example:
-       logon home = "\\\\remote_smb_server\\%U"
-
-.B Default:
-       logon home = "\\\\%N\\%U"
-
-.SS logon path (G)
-
-This parameter specifies the home directory where roaming profiles 
-(USER.DAT / USER.MAN files for Windows 95) are stored.
-
-This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
-separate logon scripts for each user or machine.  It also specifies
-the directory from which the "desktop", "start menu", "nethood" and
-"programs" folders, and their contents, are loaded and displayed
-on your Windows 95 client.
-
-The share and the path must be readable by the user for the preferences
-and directories to be loaded onto the Windows 95 client.  The share
-must be writeable when the logs in for the first time, in order that
-the Windows 95 client can create the user.dat and other directories.
-
-Thereafter, the directories and any of contents can, if required,
-be made read-only.  It is not adviseable that the USER.DAT file be made
-read-only - rename it to USER.MAN to achieve the desired effect
-(a MANdatory profile).
-
-Windows clients can sometimes maintain a connection to the [homes]
-share, even though there is no user logged in.  Therefore, it is
-vital that the logon path does not include a reference to the
-homes share (i.e \\\\%N\\HOMES\profile_path will cause problems).
-
-.B
-This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
-separate logon scripts for each user or machine.
-
-.B Default:
-       logon path = \\\\%N\\%U\\profile
-
-.B Example:
-       logon path = \\\\PROFILESERVER\\HOME_DIR\\%U\\PROFILE
-
-.SS logon script (G)
-
-This parameter specifies the batch file (.bat) or NT command file (.cmd)
-to be downloaded and run on a machine when a user successfully logs in.
-The file must contain the DOS style cr/lf line endings.  Using a DOS-style
-editor to create the file is recommended.
-
-The script must be a relative path to the [netlogon] service.  If the
-[netlogon] service specifies a path of /usr/local/samba/netlogon, and
-logon script = STARTUP.BAT, then file that will be downloaded is:
-
-.B /usr/local/samba/netlogon/STARTUP.BAT
-
-The contents of the batch file is entirely your choice.  A suggested
-command would be to add NET TIME \\\\SERVER /SET /YES, to force every
-machine to synchronise clocks with the same time server.  Another use
-would be to add NET USE U: \\\\SERVER\\UTILS for commonly used utilities,
-or NET USE Q: \\\\SERVER\\ISO9001_QA.
-
-Note that it is particularly important not to allow write access to
-the [netlogon] share, or to grant users write permission on the
-batch files in a secure environment, as this would allow the batch
-files to be arbitrarily modified.
-
-.B
-This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
-separate logon scripts for each user or machine.
-
-.B Example:
-       logon script = scripts\\%U.bat
-
-.SS lppause command (S)
-This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host in
-order to stop printing or spooling a specific print job.
-
-This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name and
-job number to pause the print job. Currently I don't know of any print
-spooler system that can do this with a simple option, except for the PPR
-system from Trinity College (ppr\-dist.trincoll.edu/pub/ppr). One way
-of implementing this is by using job priorities, where jobs having a too
-low priority won't be sent to the printer. See also the
-.B lppause
-command.
-
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. A %j is
-replaced with the job number (an integer).
-On HPUX (see printing=hpux), if the -p%p option is added to the lpq
-command, the job will show up with the correct status, i.e. if the job
-priority is lower than the set fence priority it will have the PAUSED
-status, whereas if the priority is equal or higher it will have the
-SPOOLED or PRINTING status.
-
-Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lppause
-command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
-
-.B Default:
-        Currently no default value is given to this string
-
-.B Example for HPUX:
-        lppause command = /usr/bin/lpalt %p-%j -p0
-
-.SS lpq cache time (G)
-
-This controls how long lpq info will be cached for to prevent the lpq
-command being called too often. A separate cache is kept for each
-variation of the lpq command used by the system, so if you use
-different lpq commands for different users then they won't share cache
-information.
-
-The cache files are stored in /tmp/lpq.xxxx where xxxx is a hash
-of the lpq command in use.
-
-The default is 10 seconds, meaning that the cached results of a
-previous identical lpq command will be used if the cached data is less
-than 10 seconds old. A large value may be advisable if your lpq
-command is very slow.
-
-A value of 0 will disable cacheing completely.
-
-.B Default:
-       lpq cache time = 10
-
-.B Example:
-       lpq cache time = 30
-
-.SS lpq command (S)
-This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host in
-order to obtain "lpq"-style printer status information. 
-
-This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
-as its only parameter and outputs printer status information. 
-
-Currently six styles of printer status information are supported; BSD,
-SYSV, AIX, HPUX, QNX, LPRNG and PLP. This covers most UNIX systems. You
-control which type is expected using the "printing =" option.
-
-Some clients (notably Windows for Workgroups) may not correctly send the
-connection number for the printer they are requesting status information
-about. To get around this, the server reports on the first printer service
-connected to by the client. This only happens if the connection number sent
-is invalid.
-
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. Otherwise
-it is placed at the end of the command.
-
-Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lpq
-command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
-
-.B Default:
-        depends on the setting of "printing ="
-
-.B Example:
-       lpq command = /usr/bin/lpq %p
-
-.SS lpresume command (S)
-This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host in
-order to restart or continue printing or spooling a specific print job.
-
-This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name and
-job number to resume the print job. See also the lppause command.
-
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. A %j is
-replaced with the job number (an integer).
-
-Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lpresume
-command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
-
-.B Default:
-        Currently no default value is given to this string
-
-.B Example for HPUX:
-        lpresume command = /usr/bin/lpalt %p-%j -p2
-
-.SS lprm command (S)
-This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host in
-order to delete a print job.
-
-This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
-and job number, and deletes the print job.
-
-Currently seven styles of printer control are supported; BSD, SYSV, AIX
-HPUX, QNX, LPRNG and PLP. This covers most UNIX systems. You control
-which type is expected using the "printing =" option.
-
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. A %j is
-replaced with the job number (an integer).
-
-Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the lprm
-command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
-
-.B Default:
-        depends on the setting of "printing ="
-
-.B Example 1:
-       lprm command = /usr/bin/lprm -P%p %j
-
-.B Example 2:
-       lprm command = /usr/bin/cancel %p-%j
-
-.SS magic output (S)
-This parameter specifies the name of a file which will contain output
-created by a magic script (see
-.I magic script
-below).
-
-Warning: If two clients use the same magic script in the same directory the
-output file content is undefined.
-.B Default:
-       magic output = <magic script name>.out
-
-.B Example:
-       magic output = myfile.txt
-.SS magic script (S)
-This parameter specifies the name of a file which, if opened, will be
-executed by the server when the file is closed. This allows a UNIX script
-to be sent to the Samba host and executed on behalf of the connected user.
-
-Scripts executed in this way will be deleted upon completion, permissions
-permitting.
-
-If the script generates output, output will be sent to the file specified by
-the
-.I magic output
-parameter (see above).
-
-Note that some shells are unable to interpret scripts containing
-carriage-return-linefeed instead of linefeed as the end-of-line
-marker. Magic scripts must be executable "as is" on the host, which
-for some hosts and some shells will require filtering at the DOS end.
-
-Magic scripts are EXPERIMENTAL and should NOT be relied upon.
-
-.B Default:
-       None. Magic scripts disabled.
-
-.B Example:
-       magic script = user.csh
-
-.SS mangle case (S)
-
-See the section on "NAME MANGLING"
-
-.SS mangled map (S)
-This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which are
-not representable on DOS.  The mangling of names is not always what is
-needed.  In particular you may have documents with file extensions
-that differ between DOS and UNIX. For example, under UNIX it is common
-to use .html for HTML files, whereas under DOS .htm is more commonly
-used.
-
-So to map 'html' to 'htm' you put:
-
-  mangled map = (*.html *.htm)
-
-One very useful case is to remove the annoying ;1 off the ends of
-filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXes). To do this
-use a map of (*;1 *)
-
-.B default:
-       no mangled map
-
-.B Example:
-       mangled map = (*;1 *)
-
-.SS mangled names (S)
-This controls whether non-DOS names under UNIX should be mapped to
-DOS-compatible names ("mangled") and made visible, or whether non-DOS names
-should simply be ignored.
-
-See the section on "NAME MANGLING" for details on how to control the
-mangling process.
-
-If mangling is used then the mangling algorithm is as follows:
-.RS
-- the first (up to) five alphanumeric characters before the rightmost dot of
-the filename are preserved, forced to upper case, and appear as the first (up
-to) five characters of the mangled name.
-
-- a tilde ("~") is appended to the first part of the mangled name, followed
-by a two-character unique sequence, based on the original root name 
-(i.e., the original filename minus its final extension). The final
-extension is included in the hash calculation only if it contains any upper
-case characters or is longer than three characters.
-
-Note that the character to use may be specified using the "mangling
-char" option, if you don't like ~.
-
-- the first three alphanumeric characters of the final extension are preserved,
-forced to upper case and appear as the extension of the mangled name. The 
-final extension is defined as that part of the original filename after the
-rightmost dot. If there are no dots in the filename, the mangled name will
-have no extension (except in the case of hidden files - see below).
-
-- files whose UNIX name begins with a dot will be presented as DOS hidden
-files. The mangled name will be created as for other filenames, but with the
-leading dot removed and "___" as its extension regardless of actual original
-extension (that's three underscores).
-.RE
-
-The two-digit hash value consists of upper case alphanumeric characters.
-
-This algorithm can cause name collisions only if files in a directory share
-the same first five alphanumeric characters. The probability of such a clash 
-is 1/1300.
-
-The name mangling (if enabled) allows a file to be copied between UNIX
-directories from DOS while retaining the long UNIX filename. UNIX files can
-be renamed to a new extension from DOS and will retain the same basename. 
-Mangled names do not change between sessions.
-
-.B Default:
-       mangled names = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       mangled names = no
-.SS mangling char (S)
-This controls what character is used as the "magic" character in name
-mangling. The default is a ~ but this may interfere with some
-software. Use this option to set it to whatever you prefer.
-
-.B Default:
-       mangling char = ~
-
-.B Example:
-       mangling char = ^
-
-.SS mangled stack (G)
-This parameter controls the number of mangled names that should be cached in
-the Samba server.
-
-This stack is a list of recently mangled base names (extensions are only
-maintained if they are longer than 3 characters or contains upper case
-characters).
-
-The larger this value, the more likely it is that mangled names can be
-successfully converted to correct long UNIX names. However, large stack
-sizes will slow most directory access. Smaller stacks save memory in the
-server (each stack element costs 256 bytes).
-
-It is not possible to absolutely guarantee correct long file names, so
-be prepared for some surprises!
-
-.B Default:
-       mangled stack = 50
-
-.B Example:
-       mangled stack = 100
-
-.SS map archive (S)
-This controls whether the DOS archive attribute should be mapped to the
-UNIX owner execute bit.  The DOS archive bit is set when a file has been modified
-since its last backup.  One motivation for this option it to keep Samba/your
-PC from making any file it touches from becoming executable under UNIX.
-This can be quite annoying for shared source code, documents,  etc...
-
-Note that this requires the 'create mask' to be set such that owner
-execute bit is not masked out (ie. it must include 100). See the 
-parameter "create mask" for details.
-
-.B Default:
-      map archive = yes
-
-.B Example:
-      map archive = no
-
-.SS map hidden (S)
-This controls whether DOS style hidden files should be mapped to the
-UNIX world execute bit.
-
-Note that this requires the 'create mask' to be set such that the world
-execute bit is not masked out (ie. it must include 001). 
-See the parameter "create mask" for details.
-
-.B Default:
-       map hidden = no
-
-.B Example:
-       map hidden = yes
-.SS map system (S)
-This controls whether DOS style system files should be mapped to the
-UNIX group execute bit.
-
-Note that this requires the 'create mask' to be set such that the group
-execute bit is not masked out (ie. it must include 010). See the parameter 
-"create mask" for details.
-
-.B Default:
-       map system = no
-
-.B Example:
-       map system = yes
-.SS max connections (S)
-This option allows the number of simultaneous connections to a
-service to be limited. If "max connections" is greater than 0 then
-connections will be refused if this number of connections to the
-service are already open. A value of zero mean an unlimited number of
-connections may be made.
-
-Record lock files are used to implement this feature. The lock files
-will be stored in the directory specified by the "lock directory" option.
-
-.B Default:
-       max connections = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       max connections = 10
-
-.SS max disk size (G)
-This option allows you to put an upper limit on the apparent size of
-disks. If you set this option to 100 then all shares will appear to be
-not larger than 100 MB in size.
-
-Note that this option does not limit the amount of data you can put on
-the disk. In the above case you could still store much more than 100
-MB on the disk, but if a client ever asks for the amount of free disk
-space or the total disk size then the result will be bounded by the
-amount specified in "max disk size".
-
-This option is primarily useful to work around bugs in some pieces of
-software that can't handle very large disks, particularly disks over
-1GB in size.
-
-A "max disk size" of 0 means no limit.
-
-.B Default:
-       max disk size = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       max disk size = 1000
-
-.SS max log size (G)
-
-This option (an integer in kilobytes) specifies the max size the log
-file should grow to. Samba periodically checks the size and if it is
-exceeded it will rename the file, adding a .old extension.
-
-A size of 0 means no limit.
-
-.B Default:
-       max log size = 5000
-
-.B Example:
-       max log size = 1000
-
-.SS max mux (G)
-
-This option controls the maximum number of outstanding simultaneous SMB 
-operations that samba tells the client it will allow. You should never need 
-to set this parameter.
-
-.B Default:
-       max mux = 50
-
-.SS max packet (G)
-
-A synonym for this parameter is 'packet size'.
-
-.SS max ttl (G)
-
-This option tells nmbd what the default 'time to live' of NetBIOS
-names should be (in seconds) when nmbd is requesting a name using
-either a broadcast or from a WINS server. You should never need to 
-change this parameter.
-
-.B Default:
-       max ttl = 14400
-
-.SS max wins ttl (G)
-
-This option tells nmbd when acting as a WINS server (wins support = true)
-what the maximum 'time to live' of NetBIOS names that nmbd will grant will
-be (in seconds). You should never need to change this parameter.     
-The default is 3 days (259200 seconds).
-
-.B Default:
-        max wins ttl = 259200
-
-.SS max xmit (G)
-
-This option controls the maximum packet size that will be negotiated
-by Samba. The default is 65535, which is the maximum. In some cases
-you may find you get better performance with a smaller value. A value
-below 2048 is likely to cause problems.
-
-.B Default:
-       max xmit = 65535
-
-.B Example:
-       max xmit = 8192
-
-.SS message command (G)
-
-This specifies what command to run when the server receives a WinPopup
-style message.
-
-This would normally be a command that would deliver the message
-somehow. How this is to be done is up to your imagination.
-
-What I use is:
-
-   message command = csh -c 'xedit %s;rm %s' &
-
-This delivers the message using xedit, then removes it
-afterwards. NOTE THAT IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT THIS COMMAND RETURN
-IMMEDIATELY. That's why I have the & on the end. If it doesn't return
-immediately then your PCs may freeze when sending messages (they
-should recover after 30secs, hopefully).
-
-All messages are delivered as the global guest user. The command takes
-the standard substitutions, although %u won't work (%U may be better
-in this case).
-
-Apart from the standard substitutions, some additional ones apply. In
-particular:
-
-%s = the filename containing the message
-
-%t = the destination that the message was sent to (probably the server
-name)
-
-%f = who the message is from
-
-You could make this command send mail, or whatever else takes your
-fancy. Please let me know of any really interesting ideas you have.
-
-Here's a way of sending the messages as mail to root:
-
-message command = /bin/mail -s 'message from %f on %m' root < %s; rm %s
-
-If you don't have a message command then the message won't be
-delivered and Samba will tell the sender there was an
-error. Unfortunately WfWg totally ignores the error code and carries
-on regardless, saying that the message was delivered.
-
-If you want to silently delete it then try "message command = rm %s".
-
-For the really adventurous, try something like this:
-
-message command = csh -c 'csh < %s |& /usr/local/samba/bin/smbclient \e
-                  -M %m; rm %s' &
-
-this would execute the command as a script on the server, then give
-them the result in a WinPopup message. Note that this could cause a
-loop if you send a message from the server using smbclient! You better
-wrap the above in a script that checks for this :-)
-
-.B Default:
-       no message command
-
-.B Example:
-        message command = csh -c 'xedit %s;rm %s' &
-
-.SS min print space (S)
-
-This sets the minimum amount of free disk space that must be available
-before a user will be able to spool a print job. It is specified in
-kilobytes. The default is 0, which means no limit.
-
-.B Default:
-       min print space = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       min print space = 2000
-
-.SS min wins ttl (G)
-
-This option tells nmbd when acting as a WINS server (wins support = true)
-what the minimum 'time to live' of NetBIOS names that nmbd will grant will
-be (in seconds). You should never need to change this parameter.
-The default is 6 hours (21600 seconds).
-
-.B Default:
-        min wins ttl = 21600
-
-.SS name resolve order (G)
-
-This option is used by the programs smbd, nmbd and smbclient to determine
-what naming services and in what order to resolve host names to IP addresses.
-This option is most useful in smbclient. The option takes a space separated
-string of different name resolution options. These are "lmhosts", "host",
-"wins" and "bcast". They cause names to be resolved as follows :
-
-lmhosts : Lookup an IP address in the Samba lmhosts file.
-host    : Do a standard host name to IP address resolution, using the
-          system /etc/hosts, NIS, or DNS lookups. This method of name
-          resolution is operating system depended (for instance on Solaris
-          this may be controlled by the /etc/nsswitch.conf file).
-wins    : Query a name with the IP address listed in the "wins server ="
-          parameter. If no WINS server has been specified this method will
-          be ignored.
-bcast   : Do a broadcast on each of the known local interfaces listed in
-          the "interfaces =" parameter. This is the least reliable of the
-          name resolution methods as it depends on the target host being
-          on a locally connected subnet.
-
-The default order is lmhosts, host, wins, bcast and these name resolution
-methods will be attempted in this order.
-
-This option was first introduced in Samba 1.9.18p4.
-
-.B Default:
-        name resolve order = lmhosts host wins bcast
-
-.Example:
-        name resolve order = lmhosts bcast host
-
-This will cause the local lmhosts file to be examined first, followed
-by a broadcast attempt, followed by a normal system hostname lookup.
-
-.SS netbios aliases (G)
-
-This is a list of names that nmbd will advertise as additional
-names by which the Samba server is known. This allows one machine
-to appear in browse lists under multiple names. If a machine is
-acting as a browse server or logon server none of these names
-will be advertised as either browse server or logon servers, only
-the primary name of the machine will be advertised with these
-capabilities.
-
-See also 'netbios name'.
-
-.B Example:
-   netbios aliases = TEST TEST1 TEST2
-
-.SS netbios name (G)
-
-This sets the NetBIOS name by which a Samba server is known. By
-default it is the same as the first component of the host's DNS name.
-If a machine is a browse server or logon server this name (or the
-first component of the hosts DNS name) will be the name that these
-services are advertised under.
-
-See also 'netbios aliases'.
-
-.B Example:
-   netbios name = MYNAME
-
-.SS nis homedir (G)
-Get the home share server from a NIS (or YP) map. For unix systems that
-use an automounter, the user's home directory will often be mounted on
-a workstation on demand from a remote server. When the Samba logon server
-is not the actual home directory server, two network hops are required
-to access the home directory and this can be very slow especially with 
-writing via Samba to an NFS mounted directory. This option allows samba
-to return the home share as being on a different server to the logon
-server and as long as a samba daemon is running on the home directory 
-server, it will be mounted on the Samba client directly from the directory
-server. When Samba is returning the home share to the client, it will
-consult the NIS (or YP) map specified in "homedir map" and return the
-server listed there.
-
-.B Default:
-       nis homedir = false
-
-.B Example:
-       nis homedir = true
-
-.SS networkstation user login (G)
-This global parameter (new for 1.9.18p3) affects server level security.
-With this set (recommended) samba will do a full NetWkstaUserLogon to
-confirm that the client really should have login rights. This can cause
-problems with machines in trust relationships in which case you can
-disable it here, but be warned, we have heard that some NT machines
-will then allow anyone in with any password! Make sure you test it.
-
-In Samba 1.9.18p5 this parameter is of limited use, as smbd now
-explicitly tests for this NT bug and will refuse to use a password
-server that has the problem. The parameter now defaults to off,
-and it should not be neccessary to set this parameter to on. It will
-be removed in a future Samba release.
-
-.B Default:
-       networkstation user login = no
-
-.B Example:
-       networkstation user login = yes
-
-.SS null passwords (G)
-Allow or disallow access to accounts that have null passwords. 
-
-.B Default:
-       null passwords = no
-
-.B Example:
-       null passwords = yes
-
-.SS ole locking compatibility (G)
-
-This parameter allows an administrator to turn off the byte range
-lock manipulation that is done within Samba to give compatibility
-for OLE applications. Windows OLE applications use byte range locking
-as a form of inter-process communication, by locking ranges of bytes
-around the 2^32 region of a file range. This can cause certain UNIX
-lock managers to crash or otherwise cause problems. Setting this
-parameter to "no" means you trust your UNIX lock manager to handle
-such cases correctly.
-
-.B Default:
-     ole locking compatibility = yes
-
-.B Example:
-     ole locking compatibility = no
-
-
-.SS only guest (S)
-A synonym for this command is 'guest only'.
-
-.SS only user (S)
-This is a boolean option that controls whether connections with
-usernames not in the user= list will be allowed. By default this
-option is disabled so a client can supply a username to be used by
-the server.
-
-Note that this also means Samba won't try to deduce usernames from the
-service name. This can be annoying for the [homes] section. To get
-around this you could use "user = %S" which means your "user" list
-will be just the service name, which for home directories is the name
-of the user.
-
-.B Default: 
-       only user = False
-
-.B Example: 
-       only user = True
-
-.SS oplocks (S)
-This boolean option tells smbd whether to issue oplocks (opportunistic
-locks) to file open requests on this share. The oplock code was introduced in
-Samba 1.9.18 and can dramatically (approx 30% or more) improve the speed
-of access to files on Samba servers. It allows the clients to agressively
-cache files locally and you may want to disable this option for unreliable
-network environments (it is turned on by default in Windows NT Servers).
-For more information see the file Speed.txt in the Samba docs/ directory.
-
-Oplocks may be selectively turned off on certain files on a per share basis.
-See the 'veto oplock files' parameter.
-
-.B Default:
-    oplocks = True
-
-.B Example:
-    oplocks = False
-
-
-.SS os level (G)
-This integer value controls what level Samba advertises itself as for
-browse elections. See BROWSING.txt for details.
-
-.SS packet size (G)
-The maximum transmit packet size during a raw read. This option is no
-longer implemented as of version 1.7.00, and is kept only so old
-configuration files do not become invalid.
-
-.SS passwd chat (G)
-This string controls the "chat" conversation that takes places
-between smbd and the local password changing program to change the
-users password. The string describes a sequence of response-receive
-pairs that smbd uses to determine what to send to the passwd program
-and what to expect back. If the expected output is not received then
-the password is not changed.
-
-This chat sequence is often quite site specific, depending on what
-local methods are used for password control (such as NIS+ etc).
-
-The string can contain the macros %o and %n which are substituted for
-the old and new passwords respectively. It can also contain the
-standard macros \en \er \et and \es to give line-feed, carriage-return,
-tab and space.
-
-The string can also contain a * which matches any sequence of
-characters.
-
-Double quotes can be used to collect strings with spaces in them into
-a single string.
-
-If the send string in any part of the chat sequence is a fullstop "."
-then no string is sent. Similarly, is the expect string is a fullstop
-then no string is expected.
-
-Note that if the 'unix password sync' parameter is set to true,
-then this sequence is called *AS ROOT* when the SMB password in the
-smbpasswd file is being changed, without access to the old password
-cleartext. In this case the old password cleartext is set to ""
-(the empty string).
-
-See also 'unix password sync' and 'passwd chat debug'
-
-.B Example:
-        passwd chat = "*Enter OLD password*" %o\en "*Enter NEW password*" %n\en \e
-                       "*Reenter NEW password*" %n\en "*Password changed*"
-
-
-.B Default:
-       passwd chat = *old*password* %o\en *new*password* %n\en *new*password* %n\en *changed*
-
-.SS passwd chat debug (G)
-
-This boolean specifies if the passwd chat script parameter is run
-in 'debug' mode. In this mode the strings passed to and received
-from the passwd chat are printed in the smbd log with a debug level
-of 100. This is a dangerous option as it will allow plaintext passwords
-to be seen in the smbd log. It is available to help Samba admins
-debug their passwd chat scripts and should be turned off after
-this has been done. This parameter is off by default.
-
-.B Example:
-     passwd chat debug = True
-
-.B Default:
-     passwd chat debug = False
-
-.SS passwd program (G)
-The name of a program that can be used to set user passwords.
-
-This is only available if you have enabled remote password changing at
-compile time (see the comments in the Makefile for details). Any occurrences 
-of %u will be replaced with the user name. The user name is checked
-for existance before calling the password changing program.
-
-Also note that many passwd programs insist in "reasonable" passwords,
-such as a minimum length, or the inclusion of mixed case chars and
-digits. This can pose a problem as some clients (such as Windows for
-Workgroups) uppercase the password before sending it. 
-
-Note that if the 'unix password sync' parameter is set to true,
-then this sequence is called *AS ROOT* when the SMB password in the
-smbpasswd file is being changed. If the 'unix passwd sync' parameter
-is set this parameter MUST USE ABSOLUTE PATHS for ALL programs called,
-and must be examined for security implications. Note that by default
-'unix password sync' is set to False.
-
-See also 'unix password sync'
-
-.B Default:
-       passwd program = /bin/passwd
-
-.B Example:
-       passwd program = /sbin/passwd %u
-
-.SS password level (G)
-Some client/server combinations have difficulty with mixed-case passwords.
-One offending client is Windows for Workgroups, which for some reason forces
-passwords to upper case when using the LANMAN1 protocol, but leaves them alone
-when using COREPLUS!
-
-This parameter defines the maximum number of characters that may be upper case
-in passwords.
-
-For example, say the password given was "FRED". If
-.B password level
-is set to 1 (one), the following combinations would be tried if "FRED" failed:
-"Fred", "fred", "fRed", "frEd", "freD". If
-.B password level was set to 2 (two), the following combinations would also be
-tried: "FRed", "FrEd", "FreD", "fREd", "fReD", "frED". And so on.
-
-The higher value this parameter is set to the more likely it is that a mixed
-case password will be matched against a single case password. However, you
-should be aware that use of this parameter reduces security and increases the
-time taken to process a new connection.
-
-A value of zero will cause only two attempts to be made - the password as is
-and the password in all-lower case.
-
-If you find the connections are taking too long with this option then
-you probably have a slow crypt() routine. Samba now comes with a fast
-"ufc crypt" that you can select in the Makefile. You should also make
-sure the PASSWORD_LENGTH option is correct for your system in local.h
-and includes.h. On most systems only the first 8 chars of a password
-are significant so PASSWORD_LENGTH should be 8, but on some longer
-passwords are significant. The includes.h file tries to select the
-right length for your system.
-
-.B Default:
-       password level = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       password level = 4
-
-.SS password server (G)
+.DS 
+       passwd chat = *old*password* %o\en *new*password* %n\en *new*password* %n\en *changed*
+.DE 
 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpasswd chat debug (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean specifies if the passwd chat script parameter is run in
+\f(CW"debug"\fP mode\&. In this mode the strings passed to and received from
+the passwd chat are printed in the \fBsmbd\fP log with
+a \fB"debug level"\fP of 100\&. This is a dangerous
+option as it will allow plaintext passwords to be seen in the
+\fBsmbd\fP log\&. It is available to help Samba admins
+debug their \fB"passwd chat"\fP scripts when calling
+the \fB"passwd program"\fP and should be turned off
+after this has been done\&. This parameter is off by default\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"passwd chat"\fP, \fB"passwd
+program"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW     passwd chat debug = True\fP
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW     passwd chat debug = False\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpasswd program (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The name of a program that can be used to set UNIX user passwords\&.
+Any occurrences of \fB%u\fP will be replaced with the
+user name\&. The user name is checked for existance before calling the
+password changing program\&.
+.IP 
+Also note that many passwd programs insist in \fI"reasonable"\fP
+passwords, such as a minimum length, or the inclusion of mixed case
+chars and digits\&. This can pose a problem as some clients (such as
+Windows for Workgroups) uppercase the password before sending it\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that if the \fB"unix password sync"\fP
+parameter is set to \f(CW"True"\fP then this program is called \fI*AS
+ROOT*\fP before the SMB password in the
+\fBsmbpassswd\fP file is changed\&. If this UNIX
+password change fails, then \fBsmbd\fP will fail to
+change the SMB password also (this is by design)\&.
+.IP 
+If the \fB"unix password sync"\fP parameter is
+set this parameter \fIMUST USE ABSOLUTE PATHS\fP for \fIALL\fP programs
+called, and must be examined for security implications\&. Note that by
+default \fB"unix password sync"\fP is set to
+\f(CW"False"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"unix password sync"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  passwd program = /bin/passwd\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  passwd program = /sbin/passwd %u\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpassword level (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Some client/server combinations have difficulty with mixed-case
+passwords\&.  One offending client is Windows for Workgroups, which for
+some reason forces passwords to upper case when using the LANMAN1
+protocol, but leaves them alone when using COREPLUS!
+.IP 
+This parameter defines the maximum number of characters that may be
+upper case in passwords\&.
+.IP 
+For example, say the password given was \f(CW"FRED"\fP\&. If \fBpassword
+level\fP is set to 1, the following combinations would be tried if
+\f(CW"FRED"\fP failed:
+.IP 
+\f(CW"Fred"\fP, \f(CW"fred"\fP, \f(CW"fRed"\fP, \f(CW"frEd"\fP, \f(CW"freD"\fP
+.IP 
+If \fBpassword level\fP was set to 2, the following combinations would
+also be tried: 
+.IP 
+\f(CW"FRed"\fP, \f(CW"FrEd"\fP, \f(CW"FreD"\fP, \f(CW"fREd"\fP, \f(CW"fReD"\fP,
+\f(CW"frED"\fP, \f(CW\&.\&.\fP
+.IP 
+And so on\&.
+.IP 
+The higher value this parameter is set to the more likely it is that a
+mixed case password will be matched against a single case
+password\&. However, you should be aware that use of this parameter
+reduces security and increases the time taken to process a new
+connection\&.
+.IP 
+A value of zero will cause only two attempts to be made - the password
+as is and the password in all-lower case\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  password level = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  password level = 4\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpassword server (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 By specifying the name of another SMB server (such as a WinNT box)
-with this option, and using "security = server" you can get Samba to
-do all its username/password validation via a remote server.
-
-This options sets the name of the password server to use. It must be a
-netbios name, so if the machine's netbios name is different from its
-internet name then you may have to add its netbios name to
-/etc/hosts.
-
-Note that with Samba 1.9.18p4 and above the name of the password
-server is looked up using the parameter "name resolve order=" and
-so may resolved by any method and order described in that parameter.
-
-The password server much be a machine capable of using the "LM1.2X002"
-or the "LM NT 0.12" protocol, and it must be in user level security
-mode. 
-
+with this option, and using \fB"security = domain"\fP or
+\fB"security = server"\fP you can get Samba to do all
+its username/password validation via a remote server\&.
+.IP 
+This options sets the name of the password server to use\&. It must be a
+NetBIOS name, so if the machine\'s NetBIOS name is different from its
+internet name then you may have to add its NetBIOS name to the lmhosts 
+file which is stored in the same directory as the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&.
+.IP 
+The name of the password server is looked up using the parameter
+\fB"name resolve order="\fP and so may resolved
+by any method and order described in that parameter\&.
+.IP 
+The password server much be a machine capable of using the "LM1\&.2X002"
+or the "LM NT 0\&.12" protocol, and it must be in user level security
+mode\&. 
+.IP 
 NOTE: Using a password server means your UNIX box (running Samba) is
-only as secure as your password serverDO NOT CHOOSE A PASSWORD
-SERVER THAT YOU DON'T COMPLETELY TRUST.
-
-Never point a Samba server at itself for password serving. This will
+only as secure as your password server\&. \fIDO NOT CHOOSE A PASSWORD
+SERVER THAT YOU DON\'T COMPLETELY TRUST\fP\&.
+.IP 
+Never point a Samba server at itself for password serving\&. This will
 cause a loop and could lock up your Samba server!
-
+.IP 
 The name of the password server takes the standard substitutions, but
-probably the only useful one is %m, which means the Samba server will
-use the incoming client as the password server. If you use this then
-you better trust your clients, and you better restrict them with hosts
-allow!
-
-If you list several hosts in the "password server" option then smbd
-will try each in turn till it finds one that responds. This is useful
-in case your primary server goes down.
-
-If you are using a WindowsNT server as your password server then you
-will have to ensure that your users are able to login from the Samba 
-server, as the network logon will appear to come from there rather
-than from the users workstation.
-
-.SS path (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'directory'.
-
-This parameter specifies a directory to which the user of the service is to
-be given access. In the case of printable services, this is where print data 
-will spool prior to being submitted to the host for printing.
-
-For a printable service offering guest access, the service should be readonly
-and the path should be world-writable and have the sticky bit set. This is not
-mandatory of course, but you probably won't get the results you expect if you
-do otherwise.
-
-Any occurrences of %u in the path will be replaced with the username
-that the client is connecting as. Any occurrences of %m will be
-replaced by the name of the machine they are connecting from. These
+probably the only useful one is \fB%m\fP, which means
+the Samba server will use the incoming client as the password
+server\&. If you use this then you better trust your clients, and you
+better restrict them with hosts allow!
+.IP 
+If the \fB"security"\fP parameter is set to
+\fB"domain"\fP, then the list of machines in this option must be a list
+of Primary or Backup Domain controllers for the
+\fBDomain\fP, as the Samba server is cryptographically
+in that domain, and will use crpytographically authenticated RPC calls
+to authenticate the user logging on\&. The advantage of using
+\fB"security=domain"\fP is that if you list
+several hosts in the \fB"password server"\fP option then
+\fBsmbd\fP will try each in turn till it finds one
+that responds\&. This is useful in case your primary server goes down\&.
+.IP 
+If the \fB"security"\fP parameter is set to
+\fB"server"\fP, then there are different
+restrictions that \fB"security=domain"\fP
+doesn\'t suffer from:
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+You may list several password servers in the \fB"password server"
+parameter, however if an \fBsmbd\fP makes a connection
+to a password server, and then the password server fails, no more
+users will be able to be authenticated from this
+\fBsmbd\fP\&.  This is a restriction of the SMB/CIFS
+protocol when in \fB"security=server"\fP mode
+and cannot be fixed in Samba\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+If you are using a Windows NT server as your password server then
+you will have to ensure that your users are able to login from the
+Samba server, as when in
+\fB"security=server"\fP mode the network
+logon will appear to come from there rather than from the users
+workstation\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"security"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  password server = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  password server = NT-PDC, NT-BDC1, NT-BDC2\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpath (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies a directory to which the user of the service
+is to be given access\&. In the case of printable services, this is
+where print data will spool prior to being submitted to the host for
+printing\&.
+.IP 
+For a printable service offering guest access, the service should be
+readonly and the path should be world-writable and have the sticky bit
+set\&. This is not mandatory of course, but you probably won\'t get the
+results you expect if you do otherwise\&.
+.IP 
+Any occurrences of \fB%u\fP in the path will be replaced
+with the UNIX username that the client is using on this
+connection\&. Any occurrences of \fB%m\fP will be replaced
+by the NetBIOS name of the machine they are connecting from\&. These
 replacements are very useful for setting up pseudo home directories
-for users.
-
-Note that this path will be based on 'root dir' if one was specified.
-.B Default:
-       none
-
-.B Example:
-       path = /home/fred+ 
-
-.SS postexec (S)
-
+for users\&.
+.IP 
+Note that this path will be based on \fB"root dir"\fP if
+one was specified\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  none\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  path = /home/fred\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpostexec (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This option specifies a command to be run whenever the service is
-disconnected. It takes the usual substitutions. The command may be run
-as the root on some systems.
-
+disconnected\&. It takes the usual substitutions\&. The command may be run
+as the root on some systems\&.
+.IP 
 An interesting example may be do unmount server resources:
-
-postexec = /etc/umount /cdrom
-
-See also preexec
-
-.B Default:
-      none (no command executed)
-
-.B Example:
-      postexec = echo \e"%u disconnected from %S from %m (%I)\e" >> /tmp/log
-
-.SS postscript (S)
+.IP 
+\f(CWpostexec = /etc/umount /cdrom\fP
+.IP 
+See also \fBpreexec\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW      none (no command executed)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW      postexec = echo "%u disconnected from %S from %m (%I)" >> /tmp/log\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpostscript (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This parameter forces a printer to interpret the print files as
-postscript. This is done by adding a %! to the start of print output. 
-
+postscript\&. This is done by adding a \f(CW%!\fP to the start of print output\&.
+.IP 
 This is most useful when you have lots of PCs that persist in putting
 a control-D at the start of print jobs, which then confuses your
-printer.
-
-.B Default: 
-       postscript = False
-
-.B Example: 
-       postscript = True
-
-.SS preexec (S)
-
+printer\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  postscript = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  postscript = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpreexec (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This option specifies a command to be run whenever the service is
-connected to. It takes the usual substitutions.
-
-An interesting example is to send the users a welcome message every
-time they log in. Maybe a message of the day? Here is an example:
-
-preexec = csh -c 'echo \e"Welcome to %S!\e" | \e
-       /usr/local/samba/bin/smbclient -M %m -I %I' &
-
-Of course, this could get annoying after a while :-)
-
-See also postexec
-
-.B Default:
-       none (no command executed)
-
-.B Example:
-        preexec = echo \e"%u connected to %S from %m (%I)\e" >> /tmp/log
-
-.SS preferred master (G)
-This boolean parameter controls if Samba is a preferred master browser
-for its workgroup.
-If this is set to true, on startup, samba will force an election, 
-and it will have a slight advantage in winning the election.  
-It is recommended that this parameter is used in conjunction 
-with domain master = yes, so that samba can guarantee becoming 
-a domain master.  
-
-Use this option with caution, because if there are several hosts
-(whether samba servers, Windows 95 or NT) that are preferred master
-browsers on the same subnet, they will each periodically and continuously
-attempt to become the local master browser.  This will result in
-unnecessary broadcast traffic and reduced browsing capabilities.
-
-See
-.B os level = nn
-
-.B Default:
-       preferred master = no
-
-.SS preload
-This is an alias for "auto services"
-
-.SS preserve case (S)
-
-This controls if new filenames are created with the case that the
-client passes, or if they are forced to be the "default" case.
-
-.B Default:
-       preserve case = no
-
-See the section on "NAME MANGLING" for a fuller discussion.
-
-.SS print command (S)
-After a print job has finished spooling to a service, this command will be
-used via a system() call to process the spool file. Typically the command 
-specified will submit the spool file to the host's printing subsystem, but
-there is no requirement that this be the case. The server will not remove the
-spool file, so whatever command you specify should remove the spool file when
-it has been processed, otherwise you will need to manually remove old spool
-files.
-
-The print command is simply a text string. It will be used verbatim,
-with two exceptions: All occurrences of "%s" will be replaced by the
-appropriate spool file name, and all occurrences of "%p" will be
-replaced by the appropriate printer name. The spool file name is
-generated automatically by the server, the printer name is discussed
-below.
-
-The full path name will be used for the filename if %s is not preceded
-by a /. If you don't like this (it can stuff up some lpq output) then
-use %f instead. Any occurrences of %f get replaced by the spool
-filename without the full path at the front.
-
-The print command MUST contain at least one occurrence of "%s" or %f -
-the "%p" is optional. At the time a job is submitted, if no printer
-name is supplied the "%p" will be silently removed from the printer
-command.
-
-If specified in the [global] section, the print command given will be used
-for any printable service that does not have its own print command specified.
-
-If there is neither a specified print command for a printable service nor a 
-global print command, spool files will be created but not processed and (most
-importantly) not removed.
-
-Note that printing may fail on some UNIXes from the "nobody"
-account. If this happens then create an alternative guest account that
-can print and set the "guest account" in the [global] section.
-
-You can form quite complex print commands by realising that they are
-just passed to a shell. For example the following will log a print
-job, print the file, then remove it. Note that ; is the usual
-separator for command in shell scripts.
-
-print command = echo Printing %s >> /tmp/print.log; lpr -P %p %s; rm %s
-
-You may have to vary this command considerably depending on how you
-normally print files on your system.
-
-.B Default:
-       print command = lpr -r -P %p %s
-
-.B Example:
-       print command = /usr/local/samba/bin/myprintscript %p %s
-.SS print ok (S)
-See
-.B printable.
-.SS printable (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'print ok'.
-
-If this parameter is 'yes', then clients may open, write to and submit spool 
-files on the directory specified for the service.
-
-Note that a printable service will ALWAYS allow writing to the service path
-(user privileges permitting) via the spooling of print data. The 'read only'
-parameter controls only non-printing access to the resource.
-
-.B Default:
-       printable = no
-
-.B Example:
-       printable = yes
-
-.SS printcap name (G)
-This parameter may be used to override the compiled-in default printcap
-name used by the server (usually /etc/printcap). See the discussion of the
-[printers] section above for reasons why you might want to do this.
-
-On SystemV systems that use lpstat to list available printers you
-can use "printcap name = lpstat" to automatically obtain lists of
-available printers. This is the default for systems that define 
-SYSV at compile time in Samba (this includes most SystemV based
-systems). If "printcap name" is set to lpstat on these systems then
-Samba will launch "lpstat -v" and attempt to parse the output to
-obtain a printer list.
-
-A minimal printcap file would look something like this:
-
-print1|My Printer 1
-.br
-print2|My Printer 2
-.br
-print3|My Printer 3
-.br
-print4|My Printer 4
-.br
-print5|My Printer 5
-
-where the | separates aliases of a printer. The fact that the second
-alias has a space in it gives a hint to Samba that it's a comment.
-
-NOTE: Under AIX the default printcap name is "/etc/qconfig". Samba
-will assume the file is in AIX "qconfig" format if the string
-"/qconfig" appears in the printcap filename.
-
-.B Default:
-       printcap name = /etc/printcap
-
-.B Example:
-       printcap name = /etc/myprintcap
-
-.SS printer (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'printer name'.
-
-This parameter specifies the name of the printer to which print jobs spooled
-through a printable service will be sent.
-
-If specified in the [global] section, the printer name given will be used
-for any printable service that does not have its own printer name specified.
-
-.B Default:
-       none (but may be 'lp' on many systems)
-
-.B Example:
-       printer name = laserwriter
-
-.SS printer driver (S)
-This option allows you to control the string that clients receive when
-they ask the server for the printer driver associated with a
-printer. If you are using Windows95 or WindowsNT then you can use this
-to automate the setup of printers on your system.
-
-You need to set this parameter to the exact string (case sensitive)
-that describes the appropriate printer driver for your system. 
-If you don't know the exact string to use then you should first try
-with no "printer driver" option set and the client will give you a
-list of printer drivers. The appropriate strings are shown in a
-scrollbox after you have chosen the printer manufacturer.
-
-.B Example:
-       printer driver = HP LaserJet 4L
-
-.SS printer name (S)
-See
-.B printer.
-
-.SS printer driver file (G)
-This parameter tells Samba where the printer driver definition file,
-used when serving drivers to Windows 95 clients, is to be found. If
-this is not set, the default is :
-
-SAMBA_INSTALL_DIRECTORY/lib/printers.def
-
-This file is created from Windows 95 'msprint.def' files found on the
-Windows 95 client system. For more details on setting up serving of
-printer drivers to Windows 95 clients, see the documentation file
-docs/PRINTER_DRIVER.txt.
-
-.B Default:
-    None (set in compile).
-
-.B Example:
-    printer driver file = /usr/local/samba/printers/drivers.def
-
-Related parameters.
-.B printer driver location
-
-.SS printer driver location (S)
-This parameter tells clients of a particular printer share where
-to find the printer driver files for the automatic installation
-of drivers for Windows 95 machines. If Samba is set up to serve
-printer drivers to Windows 95 machines, this should be set to
-
-\e\eMACHINE\ePRINTER$
-
-Where MACHINE is the NetBIOS name of your Samba server, and PRINTER$ 
-is a share you set up for serving printer driver files. For more 
-details on setting this up see the documentation file 
-docs/PRINTER_DRIVER.txt.
-
-.B Default:
-    None
-
-.B Example:
-    printer driver location = \e\eMACHINE\ePRINTER$
-
-Related paramerers.
-.B printer driver file
-
-
-.SS printing (S)
-This parameters controls how printer status information is interpreted
-on your system, and also affects the default values for the "print
-command", "lpq command" and "lprm command".
-
-Currently six printing styles are supported. They are "printing =
-bsd", "printing = sysv", "printing = hpux", "printing = aix",
-"printing = qnx" and "printing = plp".
-
-To see what the defaults are for the other print commands when using
-these three options use the "testparm" program.
-
-As of version 1.9.18 of Samba this option can be set on a per printer basis
-
-.SS protocol (G)
-The value of the parameter (a string) is the highest protocol level that will
-be supported by the server. 
-
-Possible values are CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2 and NT1. The relative
-merits of each are discussed in the README file.
-
-Normally this option should not be set as the automatic negotiation
-phase in the SMB protocol takes care of choosing the appropriate protocol.
-
-.B Default:
-       protocol = NT1
-
-.B Example:
-       protocol = LANMAN1
-
-.SS public (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'guest ok'.
-
-If this parameter is 'yes' for a service, then no password is required
-to connect to the service. Privileges will be those of the guest
-account.
-
-See the section below on user/password validation for more information about
-this option.
-
-.B Default:
-       public = no
-
-.B Example:
-       public = yes
-
-.SS queuepause command (S)
-This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host in
-order to pause the printerqueue.
-
-This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
-as its only parameter and stops the printerqueue, such that no longer 
-jobs are submitted to the printer.
-
-This command is not supported by Windows for Workgroups, but can be
-issued from the Printer's window under Windows 95 & NT.
-
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. Otherwise
-it is placed at the end of the command. 
-
-Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the 
-command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
-
-.B Default:
-        depends on the setting of "printing ="
-
-.B Example:
-      queuepause command = disable %p
-
-.SS queueresume command (S)
-This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host in
-order to resume the printerqueue. It is the command to undo the behaviour
-that is caused by the previous parameter (queuepause command).
-This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
-as its only parameter and resumes the printerqueue, such that queued
-jobs are resubmitted to the printer.
-
-This command is not supported by Windows for Workgroups, but can be
-issued from the Printer's window under Windows 95 & NT.
-
-If a %p is given then the printername is put in its place. Otherwise
-it is placed at the end of the command.
-
-Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the 
-command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
-
-.B Default:
-        depends on the setting of "printing ="
-
-.B Example:
-      queuepause command = enable %p
-
-.SS read list (S)
-This is a list of users that are given read-only access to a
-service. If the connecting user is in this list then they will
-not be given write access, no matter what the "read only" option
-is set to. The list can include group names using the @group syntax.
-
-See also the "write list" option
-
-.B Default:
-     read list =
-
-.B Example:
-     read list = mary, @students
-
-.SS read only (S)
-See
-.B writable
-and
-.B write ok.
-Note that this is an inverted synonym for writable and write ok.
-.SS read prediction (G)
-This options enables or disables the read prediction code used to
-speed up reads from the server. When enabled the server will try to
-pre-read data from the last accessed file that was opened read-only
-while waiting for packets.
-
-.SS Default:
-       read prediction = False
-
-.SS Example:
-       read prediction = True
-.SS read raw (G)
-This parameter controls whether or not the server will support raw reads when
-transferring data to clients.
-
-If enabled, raw reads allow reads of 65535 bytes in one packet. This
-typically provides a major performance benefit.
-
-However, some clients either negotiate the allowable block size incorrectly
-or are incapable of supporting larger block sizes, and for these clients you
-may need to disable raw reads.
-
-In general this parameter should be viewed as a system tuning tool and left
-severely alone. See also
-.B write raw.
-
-.B Default:
-       read raw = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       read raw = no
-.SS read size (G)
-
-The option "read size" affects the overlap of disk reads/writes with
-network reads/writes. If the amount of data being transferred in
-several of the SMB commands (currently SMBwrite, SMBwriteX and
-SMBreadbraw) is larger than this value then the server begins writing
-the data before it has received the whole packet from the network, or
-in the case of SMBreadbraw, it begins writing to the network before
-all the data has been read from disk.
-
-This overlapping works best when the speeds of disk and network access
-are similar, having very little effect when the speed of one is much
-greater than the other.
-
-The default value is 2048, but very little experimentation has been
-done yet to determine the optimal value, and it is likely that the best
-value will vary greatly between systems anyway. A value over 65536 is
-pointless and will cause you to allocate memory unnecessarily.
-
-.B Default:
-       read size = 2048
-
-.B Example:
-       read size = 8192
-
-.SS remote announce (G)
-
-This option allows you to setup nmbd to periodically announce itself
-to arbitrary IP addresses with an arbitrary workgroup name. 
-
-This is useful if you want your Samba server to appear in a remote
-workgroup for which the normal browse propagation rules don't
-work. The remote workgroup can be anywhere that you can send IP
-packets to.
-
-For example:
-
-       remote announce = 192.168.2.255/SERVERS 192.168.4.255/STAFF
-
-the above line would cause nmbd to announce itself to the two given IP
-addresses using the given workgroup names. If you leave out the
-workgroup name then the one given in the "workgroup" option is used
-instead. 
-
-The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
-of the remote networks, but can also be the IP addresses of known
-browse masters if your network config is that stable.
-
-This option replaces similar functionality from the nmbd lmhosts file.
-
-.SS remote browse sync (G)
-
-This option allows you to setup nmbd to periodically request synchronisation
-of browse lists with the master browser of a samba server that is on a remote
-segment. This option will allow you to gain browse lists for multiple
-workgroups across routed networks. This is done in a manner that does not work
-with any non-samba servers.
-
-This is useful if you want your Samba server and all local clients
-to appear in a remote workgroup for which the normal browse propagation
-rules don't work. The remote workgroup can be anywhere that you can send IP
-packets to.
-
-For example:
-
-       remote browse sync = 192.168.2.255 192.168.4.255
-
-the above line would cause nmbd to request the master browser on the
-specified subnets or addresses to synchronise their browse lists with
-the local server.
-
-The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
-of the remote networks, but can also be the IP addresses of known
-browse masters if your network config is that stable. If a machine IP
-address is given Samba makes NO attempt to validate that the remote
-machine is available, is listening, nor that it is in fact the browse
-master on it's segment.
-
-
-.SS revalidate (S)
-
-This option controls whether Samba will allow a previously validated
-username/password pair to be used to attach to a share. Thus if you
-connect to \e\eserver\eshare1 then to \e\eserver\eshare2 it won't
-automatically allow the client to request connection to the second
-share as the same username as the first without a password.
-
-Note that this option only works with security=share and will
-be ignored if this is not the case.
-
-If "revalidate" is True then the client will be denied automatic
-access as the same username.
-
-.B Default:
-       revalidate = False
-
-.B Example:
-       revalidate = True
-
-.SS root (G)
-See
-.B root directory.
-.SS root dir (G)
-See
-.B root directory.
-.SS root directory (G)
-Synonyms for this parameter are 'root dir' and 'root'.
-
-The server will chroot() to this directory on startup. This is not 
-strictly necessary for secure operation. Even without it the server
-will deny access to files not in one of the service entries. It may 
-also check for, and deny access to, soft links to other parts of the 
-filesystem, or attempts to use .. in file names to access other 
-directories (depending on the setting of the "wide links" parameter).
-
-Adding a "root dir" entry other than "/" adds an extra level of security, 
-but at a price. It absolutely ensures that no access is given to files not
-in the sub-tree specified in the "root dir" option, *including* some files 
-needed for complete operation of the server. To maintain full operability
-of the server you will need to mirror some system files into the "root dir"
-tree. In particular you will need to mirror /etc/passwd (or a subset of it),
-and any binaries or configuration files needed for printing (if required). 
-The set of files that must be mirrored is operating system dependent.
-
-.B Default:
-       root directory = /
-
-.B Example:
-       root directory = /homes/smb
-.SS root postexec (S)
-
-This is the same as postexec except that the command is run as
-root. This is useful for unmounting filesystems (such as cdroms) after
-a connection is closed.
-
-.SS root preexec (S)
-
-This is the same as preexec except that the command is run as
-root. This is useful for mounting filesystems (such as cdroms) before
-a connection is finalised.
-
-.SS security (G)
-This option affects how clients respond to Samba.
-
-The option sets the "security mode bit" in replies to protocol negotiations
-to turn share level security on or off. Clients decide based on this bit 
-whether (and how) to transfer user and password information to the server.
-
-The default is "security=SHARE", mainly because that was the only
-option at one stage.
-
-The alternatives are "security = user" or "security = server". 
-
-If your PCs use usernames that are the same as their usernames on the
-UNIX machine then you will want to use "security = user". If you
-mostly use usernames that don't exist on the UNIX box then use
-"security = share".
-
-There is a bug in WfWg that may affect your decision. When in user
-level security a WfWg client will totally ignore the password you type
-in the "connect drive" dialog box. This makes it very difficult (if
-not impossible) to connect to a Samba service as anyone except the
-user that you are logged into WfWg as.
-
-If you use "security = server" then Samba will try to validate the
-username/password by passing it to another SMB server, such as an NT
-box. If this fails it will revert to "security = USER", but note that
-if encrypted passwords have been negotiated then Samba cannot revert
-back to checking the UNIX password file, it must have a valid 
-smbpasswd file to check users against. See the documentation
-docs/ENCRYPTION.txt for details on how to set this up.
-
-See the "password server" option for more details.
-
-.B Default:
-       security = SHARE
-
-.B Example:
-       security = USER
-.SS server string (G)
-This controls what string will show up in the printer comment box in
-print manager and next to the IPC connection in "net view". It can be
-any string that you wish to show to your users.
-
-It also sets what will appear in browse lists next to the machine name.
-
-A %v will be replaced with the Samba version number.
-
-A %h will be replaced with the hostname.
-
-.B Default:
-       server string = Samba %v
-
-.B Example:
-       server string = University of GNUs Samba Server
-
-.SS set directory (S)
-If 'set directory = no', then users of the service may not use the setdir
-command to change directory.
-
-The setdir command is only implemented in the Digital Pathworks client. See the
-Pathworks documentation for details.
-
-.B Default:
-       set directory = no
-
-.B Example:
-       set directory = yes
-
-.SS shared file entries (G)
-This parameter has been removed (as of Samba 1.9.18 and above). The new
-System V shared memory code prohibits the user from allocating the
-share hash bucket size directly.
-
-.SS shared mem size (G)
-This parameter is only useful when Samba has been compiled with FAST_SHARE_MODES.
-It specifies the size of the shared memory (in bytes) to use between smbd 
-processes. You should never change this parameter unless you have studied 
-the source and know what you are doing. This parameter defaults to 1024
-multiplied by the setting of the maximum number of open files in the
-file local.h in the Samba source code. MAX_OPEN_FILES is normally set
-to 100, so this parameter defaults to 102400 bytes.
-
-.B Default
-       shared mem size = 102400
-
-.SS smb passwd file (G)
-This option sets the path to the encrypted smbpasswd file. This is a *VERY
-DANGEROUS OPTION* if the smb.conf is user writable. By default the path
-to the smbpasswd file is compiled into Samba.
-
-.SS smbrun (G)
-This sets the full path to the smbrun binary. This defaults to the
-value in the Makefile.
-
-You must get this path right for many services to work correctly.
-
-.B Default:
-taken from Makefile
-
-.B Example:
-       smbrun = /usr/local/samba/bin/smbrun
-
-.SS share modes (S)
-
-This enables or disables the honouring of the "share modes" during a
-file open. These modes are used by clients to gain exclusive read or
-write access to a file. 
-
-These open modes are not directly supported by UNIX, so they are
-simulated using lock files in the "lock directory". The "lock
-directory" specified in smb.conf must be readable by all users.
-
-The share modes that are enabled by this option are DENY_DOS,
-DENY_ALL, DENY_READ, DENY_WRITE, DENY_NONE and DENY_FCB.
-
-Enabling this option gives full share compatibility but may cost a bit
-of processing time on the UNIX server. They are enabled by default.
-
-.B Default:
-       share modes = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       share modes = no
-
-.SS short preserve case (S)
-
-This controls if new short filenames are created with the case that
-the client passes, or if they are forced to be the "default" case.
+connected to\&. It takes the usual substitutions\&.
+.IP 
+An interesting example is to send the users a welcome message every
+time they log in\&. Maybe a message of the day? Here is an example:
+.IP 
 
-.B Default:
-       short preserve case = no
+.DS 
 
-See the section on "NAME MANGLING" for a fuller discussion.
+       preexec = csh -c \'echo \e"Welcome to %S!\e" | /usr/local/samba/bin/smbclient -M %m -I %I\' &
 
-.SS socket address (G)
+.DE 
 
-This option allows you to control what address Samba will listen for
-connections on. This is used to support multiple virtual interfaces on
-the one server, each with a different configuration.
+.IP 
+Of course, this could get annoying after a while :-\fP
+.IP 
+See also \fBpostexec\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  none (no command executed)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW        preexec = echo \e"%u connected to %S from %m (%I)\e" >> /tmp/log\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpreferred master (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean parameter controls if \fBnmbd\fP is a
+preferred master browser for its workgroup\&.
+.IP 
+If this is set to true, on startup, \fBnmbd\fP will
+force an election, and it will have a slight advantage in winning the
+election\&.  It is recommended that this parameter is used in
+conjunction with \fB"domain master = yes"\fP, so
+that \fBnmbd\fP can guarantee becoming a domain
+master\&.
+.IP 
+Use this option with caution, because if there are several hosts
+(whether Samba servers, Windows 95 or NT) that are preferred master
+browsers on the same subnet, they will each periodically and
+continuously attempt to become the local master browser\&.  This will
+result in unnecessary broadcast traffic and reduced browsing
+capabilities\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fBos level\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  preferred master = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  preferred master = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprefered master (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"preferred master"\fP for people
+who cannot spell :-)\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpreload\fP" 
+Synonym for \fB"auto services"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpreserve case (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls if new filenames are created with the case that the
+client passes, or if they are forced to be the \f(CW"default"\fP case\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW       preserve case = yes\fP
+.IP 
+See the section on \fB"NAME MANGLING"\fP for a
+fuller discussion\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprint command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+After a print job has finished spooling to a service, this command
+will be used via a \f(CWsystem()\fP call to process the spool
+file\&. Typically the command specified will submit the spool file to
+the host\'s printing subsystem, but there is no requirement that this
+be the case\&. The server will not remove the spool file, so whatever
+command you specify should remove the spool file when it has been
+processed, otherwise you will need to manually remove old spool files\&.
+.IP 
+The print command is simply a text string\&. It will be used verbatim,
+with two exceptions: All occurrences of \f(CW"%s"\fP will be replaced by
+the appropriate spool file name, and all occurrences of \f(CW"%p"\fP will
+be replaced by the appropriate printer name\&. The spool file name is
+generated automatically by the server, the printer name is discussed
+below\&.
+.IP 
+The full path name will be used for the filename if \f(CW"%s"\fP is not
+preceded by a \f(CW\'/\'\fP\&. If you don\'t like this (it can stuff up some
+lpq output) then use \f(CW"%f"\fP instead\&. Any occurrences of \f(CW"%f"\fP get
+replaced by the spool filename without the full path at the front\&.
+.IP 
+The print command \fIMUST\fP contain at least one occurrence of \f(CW"%s"\fP
+or \f(CW"%f"\fP - the \f(CW"%p"\fP is optional\&. At the time a job is
+submitted, if no printer name is supplied the \f(CW"%p"\fP will be
+silently removed from the printer command\&.
+.IP 
+If specified in the \fB"[global]"\fP section, the print
+command given will be used for any printable service that does not
+have its own print command specified\&.
+.IP 
+If there is neither a specified print command for a printable service
+nor a global print command, spool files will be created but not
+processed and (most importantly) not removed\&.
+.IP 
+Note that printing may fail on some UNIXes from the \f(CW"nobody"\fP
+account\&. If this happens then create an alternative guest account that
+can print and set the \fB"guest account"\fP in the
+\fB"[global]"\fP section\&.
+.IP 
+You can form quite complex print commands by realising that they are
+just passed to a shell\&. For example the following will log a print
+job, print the file, then remove it\&. Note that \f(CW\';\'\fP is the usual
+separator for command in shell scripts\&.
+.IP 
+\f(CWprint command = echo Printing %s >> /tmp/print\&.log; lpr -P %p %s; rm %s\fP
+.IP 
+You may have to vary this command considerably depending on how you
+normally print files on your system\&. The default for the parameter
+varies depending on the setting of the \fB"printing="\fP
+parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+For \fB"printing="\fP BSD, AIX, QNX, LPRNG or PLP :
+\f(CW  print command = lpr -r -P%p %s\fP
+.IP 
+For \fB"printing="\fP SYS or HPUX :
+\f(CW  print command = lp -c -d%p %s; rm %s\fP
+.IP 
+For \fB"printing="\fP SOFTQ :
+\f(CW  print command = lp -d%p -s %s; rm %s\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  print command = /usr/local/samba/bin/myprintscript %p %s\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprint ok (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBprintable\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprintable (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If this parameter is \f(CW"yes"\fP, then clients may open, write to and
+submit spool files on the directory specified for the service\&.
+.IP 
+Note that a printable service will ALWAYS allow writing to the service
+path (user privileges permitting) via the spooling of print data\&. The
+\fB"read only"\fP parameter controls only non-printing
+access to the resource\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  printable = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  printable = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprintcap (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBprintcapname\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprintcap name (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter may be used to override the compiled-in default
+printcap name used by the server (usually /etc/printcap)\&. See the
+discussion of the \fB[printers]\fP section above for
+reasons why you might want to do this\&.
+.IP 
+On System V systems that use \fBlpstat\fP to list available printers you
+can use \f(CW"printcap name = lpstat"\fP to automatically obtain lists of
+available printers\&. This is the default for systems that define SYSV
+at configure time in Samba (this includes most System V based
+systems)\&. If \fB"printcap name"\fP is set to \fBlpstat\fP on these systems
+then Samba will launch \f(CW"lpstat -v"\fP and attempt to parse the output
+to obtain a printer list\&.
+.IP 
+A minimal printcap file would look something like this:
+.IP 
 
-By default samba will accept connections on any address.
+.DS 
 
-.B Example:
-       socket address = 192.168.2.20
+       print1|My Printer 1
+       print2|My Printer 2
+       print3|My Printer 3
+       print4|My Printer 4
+       print5|My Printer 5
 
-.SS socket options (G)
-This option (which can also be invoked with the -O command line
-option) allows you to set socket options to be used when talking with
-the client.
+.DE 
 
+.IP 
+where the \f(CW\'|\'\fP separates aliases of a printer\&. The fact that the
+second alias has a space in it gives a hint to Samba that it\'s a
+comment\&.
+.IP 
+\fINOTE\fP: Under AIX the default printcap name is
+\f(CW"/etc/qconfig"\fP\&. Samba will assume the file is in AIX \f(CW"qconfig"\fP
+format if the string \f(CW"/qconfig"\fP appears in the printcap filename\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  printcap name = /etc/printcap\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  printcap name = /etc/myprintcap\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprinter (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the name of the printer to which print jobs
+spooled through a printable service will be sent\&.
+.IP 
+If specified in the \fB[global]\fP section, the printer
+name given will be used for any printable service that does not have
+its own printer name specified\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+none (but may be \f(CW"lp"\fP on many systems)
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+printer name = laserwriter
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprinter driver (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to control the string that clients receive when
+they ask the server for the printer driver associated with a
+printer\&. If you are using Windows95 or WindowsNT then you can use this
+to automate the setup of printers on your system\&.
+.IP 
+You need to set this parameter to the exact string (case sensitive)
+that describes the appropriate printer driver for your system\&. If you
+don\'t know the exact string to use then you should first try with no
+\fB"printer driver"\fP option set and the client will give you a list of
+printer drivers\&. The appropriate strings are shown in a scrollbox
+after you have chosen the printer manufacturer\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"printer driver file"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+printer driver = HP LaserJet 4L
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprinter driver file (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter tells Samba where the printer driver definition file,
+used when serving drivers to Windows 95 clients, is to be found\&. If
+this is not set, the default is :
+.IP 
+\f(CWSAMBA_INSTALL_DIRECTORY/lib/printers\&.def\fP
+.IP 
+This file is created from Windows 95 \f(CW"msprint\&.def"\fP files found on
+the Windows 95 client system\&. For more details on setting up serving
+of printer drivers to Windows 95 clients, see the documentation file
+in the docs/ directory, PRINTER_DRIVER\&.txt\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  None (set in compile)\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  printer driver file = /usr/local/samba/printers/drivers\&.def\fP
+.IP 
+See also \fB"printer driver location"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprinter driver location (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter tells clients of a particular printer share where to
+find the printer driver files for the automatic installation of
+drivers for Windows 95 machines\&. If Samba is set up to serve printer
+drivers to Windows 95 machines, this should be set to
+.IP 
+\f(CW\e\eMACHINE\eaPRINTER$\fP
+.IP 
+Where MACHINE is the NetBIOS name of your Samba server, and PRINTER$
+is a share you set up for serving printer driver files\&. For more
+details on setting this up see the documentation file in the docs/
+directory, PRINTER_DRIVER\&.txt\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  None\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  printer driver location = \e\eMACHINE\ePRINTER$\fP
+.IP 
+See also \fB"printer driver file"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprinter name (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fBprinter\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprinting (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameters controls how printer status information is interpreted
+on your system, and also affects the default values for the
+\fB"print command"\fP, \fB"lpq
+command"\fP \fB"lppause command"\fP,
+\fB"lpresume command"\fP, and \fB"lprm
+command"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+Currently eight printing styles are supported\&. They are
+\fB"printing=BSD"\fP, \fB"printing=AIX"\fP, \fB"printing=LPRNG"\fP,
+\fB"printing=PLP"\fP,
+\fB"printing=SYSV"\fP,\fB"printing="HPUX"\fP,\fB"printing=QNX"\fP and
+\fB"printing=SOFTQ"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+To see what the defaults are for the other print commands when using
+these three options use the \fB"testparm"\fP program\&.
+.IP 
+This option can be set on a per printer basis
+.IP 
+See also the discussion in the \fB[printers]\fP section\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBprotocol (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The value of the parameter (a string) is the highest protocol level
+that will be supported by the server\&.
+.IP 
+Possible values are :
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+CORE: Earliest version\&. No concept of user names\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+COREPLUS: Slight improvements on CORE for efficiency\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+LANMAN1: First \fI"modern"\fP version of the protocol\&. Long
+filename support\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+LANMAN2: Updates to Lanman1 protocol\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+NT1: Current up to date version of the protocol\&. Used by Windows
+NT\&. Known as CIFS\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+Normally this option should not be set as the automatic negotiation
+phase in the SMB protocol takes care of choosing the appropriate
+protocol\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  protocol = NT1\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  protocol = LANMAN1\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBpublic (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"guest ok"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBqueuepause command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
+in order to pause the printerqueue\&.
+.IP 
+This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
+as its only parameter and stops the printerqueue, such that no longer
+jobs are submitted to the printer\&.
+.IP 
+This command is not supported by Windows for Workgroups, but can be
+issued from the Printer\'s window under Windows 95 & NT\&.
+.IP 
+If a \f(CW"%p"\fP is given then the printername is put in its
+place\&. Otherwise it is placed at the end of the command\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the
+command as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW        depends on the setting of "printing ="\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW      queuepause command = disable %p\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBqueueresume command (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
+in order to resume the printerqueue\&. It is the command to undo the
+behaviour that is caused by the previous parameter
+(\fB"queuepause command\fP)\&.
+.IP 
+This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
+as its only parameter and resumes the printerqueue, such that queued
+jobs are resubmitted to the printer\&.
+.IP 
+This command is not supported by Windows for Workgroups, but can be
+issued from the Printer\'s window under Windows 95 & NT\&.
+.IP 
+If a \f(CW"%p"\fP is given then the printername is put in its
+place\&. Otherwise it is placed at the end of the command\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it is good practice to include the absolute path in the
+command as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW        depends on the setting of "printing ="\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW      queuepause command = enable %p\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBread bmpx (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean parameter controls whether \fBsmbd\fP
+will support the "Read Block Multiplex" SMB\&. This is now rarely used
+and defaults to off\&. You should never need to set this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+read bmpx = No
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBread list (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a list of users that are given read-only access to a
+service\&. If the connecting user is in this list then they will not be
+given write access, no matter what the \fB"read only"\fP
+option is set to\&. The list can include group names using the syntax
+described in the \fB"invalid users"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"write list"\fP parameter and
+the \fB"invalid users"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  read list = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  read list = mary, @students\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBread only (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Note that this is an inverted synonym for
+\fB"writable"\fP and \fB"write ok"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"writable"\fP and \fB"write
+ok"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBread prediction (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+\fINOTE\fP: This code is currently disabled in Samba2\&.0 and
+may be removed at a later date\&. Hence this parameter has
+no effect\&.
+.IP 
+This options enables or disables the read prediction code used to
+speed up reads from the server\&. When enabled the server will try to
+pre-read data from the last accessed file that was opened read-only
+while waiting for packets\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  read prediction = False\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBread raw (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter controls whether or not the server will support the raw
+read SMB requests when transferring data to clients\&.
+.IP 
+If enabled, raw reads allow reads of 65535 bytes in one packet\&. This
+typically provides a major performance benefit\&.
+.IP 
+However, some clients either negotiate the allowable block size
+incorrectly or are incapable of supporting larger block sizes, and for
+these clients you may need to disable raw reads\&.
+.IP 
+In general this parameter should be viewed as a system tuning tool and left
+severely alone\&. See also \fB"write raw"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  read raw = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBread size (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The option \fB"read size"\fP affects the overlap of disk reads/writes
+with network reads/writes\&. If the amount of data being transferred in
+several of the SMB commands (currently SMBwrite, SMBwriteX and
+SMBreadbraw) is larger than this value then the server begins writing
+the data before it has received the whole packet from the network, or
+in the case of SMBreadbraw, it begins writing to the network before
+all the data has been read from disk\&.
+.IP 
+This overlapping works best when the speeds of disk and network access
+are similar, having very little effect when the speed of one is much
+greater than the other\&.
+.IP 
+The default value is 2048, but very little experimentation has been
+done yet to determine the optimal value, and it is likely that the
+best value will vary greatly between systems anyway\&. A value over
+65536 is pointless and will cause you to allocate memory
+unnecessarily\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  read size = 2048\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  read size = 8192\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBremote announce (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to setup \fBnmbd\fP to
+periodically announce itself to arbitrary IP addresses with an
+arbitrary workgroup name\&.
+.IP 
+This is useful if you want your Samba server to appear in a remote
+workgroup for which the normal browse propagation rules don\'t
+work\&. The remote workgroup can be anywhere that you can send IP
+packets to\&.
+.IP 
+For example:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  remote announce = 192\&.168\&.2\&.255/SERVERS 192\&.168\&.4\&.255/STAFF\fP
+.IP 
+the above line would cause nmbd to announce itself to the two given IP
+addresses using the given workgroup names\&. If you leave out the
+workgroup name then the one given in the
+\fB"workgroup"\fP parameter is used instead\&.
+.IP 
+The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
+of the remote networks, but can also be the IP addresses of known
+browse masters if your network config is that stable\&.
+.IP 
+See the documentation file BROWSING\&.txt in the docs/ directory\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  remote announce = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  remote announce = 192\&.168\&.2\&.255/SERVERS 192\&.168\&.4\&.255/STAFF\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBremote browse sync (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to setup \fBnmbd\fP to
+periodically request synchronisation of browse lists with the master
+browser of a samba server that is on a remote segment\&. This option
+will allow you to gain browse lists for multiple workgroups across
+routed networks\&. This is done in a manner that does not work with any
+non-samba servers\&.
+.IP 
+This is useful if you want your Samba server and all local clients to
+appear in a remote workgroup for which the normal browse propagation
+rules don\'t work\&. The remote workgroup can be anywhere that you can
+send IP packets to\&.
+.IP 
+For example:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  remote browse sync = 192\&.168\&.2\&.255 192\&.168\&.4\&.255\fP
+.IP 
+the above line would cause \fBnmbd\fP to request the
+master browser on the specified subnets or addresses to synchronise
+their browse lists with the local server\&.
+.IP 
+The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
+of the remote networks, but can also be the IP addresses of known
+browse masters if your network config is that stable\&. If a machine IP
+address is given Samba makes NO attempt to validate that the remote
+machine is available, is listening, nor that it is in fact the browse
+master on it\'s segment\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  remote browse sync = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  remote browse sync = 192\&.168\&.2\&.255 192\&.168\&.4\&.255\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBrevalidate (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Note that this option only works with
+\fB"security=share"\fP and will be ignored if
+this is not the case\&.
+.IP 
+This option controls whether Samba will allow a previously validated
+username/password pair to be used to attach to a share\&. Thus if you
+connect to \f(CW\e\eserver\eshare1\fP then to \f(CW\e\eserver\eshare2\fP it won\'t
+automatically allow the client to request connection to the second
+share as the same username as the first without a password\&.
+.IP 
+If \fB"revalidate"\fP is \f(CW"True"\fP then the client will be denied
+automatic access as the same username\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  revalidate = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  revalidate = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBroot (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"root directory"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBroot dir (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"root directory"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBroot directory (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+The server will \f(CW"chroot()"\fP (ie\&. Change it\'s root directory) to
+this directory on startup\&. This is not strictly necessary for secure
+operation\&. Even without it the server will deny access to files not in
+one of the service entries\&. It may also check for, and deny access to,
+soft links to other parts of the filesystem, or attempts to use
+\f(CW"\&.\&."\fP in file names to access other directories (depending on the
+setting of the \fB"wide links"\fP parameter)\&.
+.IP 
+Adding a \fB"root directory"\fP entry other than \f(CW"/"\fP adds an extra
+level of security, but at a price\&. It absolutely ensures that no
+access is given to files not in the sub-tree specified in the \fB"root
+directory"\fP option, \fI*including*\fP some files needed for complete
+operation of the server\&. To maintain full operability of the server
+you will need to mirror some system files into the \fB"root
+directory"\fP tree\&. In particular you will need to mirror /etc/passwd
+(or a subset of it), and any binaries or configuration files needed
+for printing (if required)\&. The set of files that must be mirrored is
+operating system dependent\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  root directory = /\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  root directory = /homes/smb\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBroot postexec (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is the same as the \fB"postexec"\fP parameter
+except that the command is run as root\&. This is useful for unmounting
+filesystems (such as cdroms) after a connection is closed\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"postexec"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBroot preexec (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is the same as the \fB"preexec"\fP parameter except
+that the command is run as root\&. This is useful for mounting
+filesystems (such as cdroms) before a connection is finalised\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"preexec"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsecurity (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option affects how clients respond to Samba and is one of the most
+important settings in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&.
+.IP 
+The option sets the \f(CW"security mode bit"\fP in replies to protocol
+negotiations with \fBsmbd\fP to turn share level
+security on or off\&. Clients decide based on this bit whether (and how)
+to transfer user and password information to the server\&.
+.IP 
+The default is "security=user", as this is
+the most common setting needed when talking to Windows 98 and Windows
+NT\&.
+.IP 
+The alternatives are \fB"security = share"\fP,
+\fB"security = server"\fP or
+\fB"security=domain"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fI*****NOTE THAT THIS DEFAULT IS DIFFERENT IN SAMBA2\&.0 THAN FOR
+PREVIOUS VERSIONS OF SAMBA *******\fP\&.
+.IP 
+In previous versions of Samba the default was
+\fB"security=share"\fP mainly because that was
+the only option at one stage\&.
+.IP 
+There is a bug in WfWg that has relevence to this setting\&. When in
+user or server level security a WfWg client will totally ignore the
+password you type in the "connect drive" dialog box\&. This makes it
+very difficult (if not impossible) to connect to a Samba service as
+anyone except the user that you are logged into WfWg as\&.
+.IP 
+If your PCs use usernames that are the same as their usernames on the
+UNIX machine then you will want to use \fB"security = user"\fP\&. If you
+mostly use usernames that don\'t exist on the UNIX box then use
+\fB"security = share"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+You should also use \fBsecurity=share\fP if
+you want to mainly setup shares without a password (guest
+shares)\&. This is commonly used for a shared printer server\&. It is more
+difficult to setup guest shares with
+\fBsecurity=user\fP, see the \fB"map to
+guest"\fPparameter for details\&.
+.IP 
+It is possible to use \fBsmbd\fP in a \fI"hybred
+mode"\fP where it is offers both user and share level security under
+different \fBNetBIOS aliases\fP\&. See the
+\fBNetBIOS aliases\fP and the
+\fBinclude\fP parameters for more information\&.
+.IP 
+The different settings will now be explained\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB"security=share"\fP" 
+When clients connect to a share level
+security server then need not log onto the server with a valid
+username and password before attempting to connect to a shared
+resource (although modern clients such as Windows 95/98 and Windows NT
+will send a logon request with a username but no password when talking
+to a \fBsecurity=share\fP server)\&. Instead, the clients send
+authentication information (passwords) on a per-share basis, at the
+time they attempt to connect to that share\&.
+.IP 
+Note that \fBsmbd\fP \fI*ALWAYS*\fP uses a valid UNIX
+user to act on behalf of the client, even in \fB"security=share"\fP
+level security\&.
+.IP 
+As clients are not required to send a username to the server
+in share level security, \fBsmbd\fP uses several
+techniques to determine the correct UNIX user to use on behalf
+of the client\&.
+.IP 
+A list of possible UNIX usernames to match with the given
+client password is constructed using the following methods :
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+If the \fB"guest only"\fP parameter is set, then
+all the other stages are missed and only the \fB"guest
+account"\fP username is checked\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+Is a username is sent with the share connection request, then
+this username (after mapping - see \fB"username
+map"\fP), is added as a potential username\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+If the client did a previous \fI"logon"\fP request (the
+SessionSetup SMB call) then the username sent in this SMB
+will be added as a potential username\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+The name of the service the client requested is added
+as a potential username\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+The NetBIOS name of the client is added to the list as a
+potential username\&.
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+Any users on the \fB"user"\fP list are added
+as potential usernames\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+If the \fB"guest only"\fP parameter is not set, then
+this list is then tried with the supplied password\&. The first user for
+whom the password matches will be used as the UNIX user\&.
+.IP 
+If the \fB"guest only"\fP parameter is set, or no
+username can be determined then if the share is marked as available to
+the \fB"guest account"\fP, then this guest user will
+be used, otherwise access is denied\&.
+.IP 
+Note that it can be \fI*very*\fP confusing in share-level security as to
+which UNIX username will eventually be used in granting access\&.
+.IP 
+See also the section \fB"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
+VALIDATION"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB"security=user"\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is the default security setting in Samba2\&.0\&. With user-level
+security a client must first \f(CW"log-on"\fP with a valid username and
+password (which can be mapped using the \fB"username
+map"\fP parameter)\&. Encrypted passwords (see the
+\fB"encrypted passwords"\fP parameter) can also
+be used in this security mode\&. Parameters such as
+\fB"user"\fP and \fB"guest only"\fP, if set
+are then applied and may change the UNIX user to use on this
+connection, but only after the user has been successfully
+authenticated\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that the the name of the resource being requested is
+\fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has successfully
+authenticated the client\&. This is why guest shares don\'t work in user
+level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
+users into the \fB"guest account"\fP\&. See the
+\fB"map to guest"\fP parameter for details on
+doing this\&.
+.IP 
+See also the section \fB"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
+VALIDATION"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB"security=server"\fP" 
+.IP 
+In this mode Samba will try to validate the username/password by
+passing it to another SMB server, such as an NT box\&. If this fails it
+will revert to \fB"security = user"\fP, but note that if encrypted
+passwords have been negotiated then Samba cannot revert back to
+checking the UNIX password file, it must have a valid smbpasswd file
+to check users against\&. See the documentation file in the docs/
+directory ENCRYPTION\&.txt for details on how to set this up\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that from the clients point of view \fB"security=server"\fP is
+the same as \fB"security=user"\fP\&. It only
+affects how the server deals with the authentication, it does not in
+any way affect what the client sees\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that the the name of the resource being requested is
+\fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has successfully
+authenticated the client\&. This is why guest shares don\'t work in server
+level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
+users into the \fB"guest account"\fP\&. See the
+\fB"map to guest"\fP parameter for details on
+doing this\&.
+.IP 
+See also the section \fB"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
+VALIDATION"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"password server"\fP parameter\&.
+and the \fB"encrypted passwords"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fB"security=domain"\fP" 
+.IP 
+This mode will only work correctly if
+\fBsmbpasswd\fP has been used to add this machine
+into a Windows NT Domain\&. It expects the \fB"encrypted
+passwords"\fP parameter to be set to \f(CW"true"\fP\&. In
+this mode Samba will try to validate the username/password by passing
+it to a Windows NT Primary or Backup Domain Controller, in exactly the
+same way that a Windows NT Server would do\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that a valid UNIX user must still exist as well as the
+account on the Domain Controller to allow Samba to have a valid
+UNIX account to map file access to\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that from the clients point of view \fB"security=domain"\fP is
+the same as \fB"security=user"\fP\&. It only
+affects how the server deals with the authentication, it does not in
+any way affect what the client sees\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that the the name of the resource being requested is
+\fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has successfully
+authenticated the client\&. This is why guest shares don\'t work in domain
+level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
+users into the \fB"guest account"\fP\&. See the
+\fB"map to guest"\fP parameter for details on
+doing this\&.
+.IP 
+e,(BUG:) There is currently a bug in the implementation of
+\fB"security=domain\fP with respect to multi-byte character
+set usernames\&. The communication with a Domain Controller
+must be done in UNICODE and Samba currently does not widen
+multi-byte user names to UNICODE correctly, thus a multi-byte
+username will not be recognised correctly at the Domain Controller\&.
+This issue will be addressed in a future release\&.
+.IP 
+See also the section \fB"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
+VALIDATION"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"password server"\fP parameter\&.
+and the \fB"encrypted passwords"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  security = USER\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  security = DOMAIN\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBserver string (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This controls what string will show up in the printer comment box in
+print manager and next to the IPC connection in \f(CW"net view"\fP\&. It can be
+any string that you wish to show to your users\&.
+.IP 
+It also sets what will appear in browse lists next to the machine
+name\&.
+.IP 
+A \f(CW"%v"\fP will be replaced with the Samba version number\&.
+.IP 
+A \f(CW"%h"\fP will be replaced with the hostname\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  server string = Samba %v\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  server string = University of GNUs Samba Server\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBset directory (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If \f(CW"set directory = no"\fP, then users of the service may not use the
+setdir command to change directory\&.
+.IP 
+The setdir command is only implemented in the Digital Pathworks
+client\&. See the Pathworks documentation for details\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  set directory = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  set directory = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBshare modes (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This enables or disables the honouring of the \f(CW"share modes"\fP during a
+file open\&. These modes are used by clients to gain exclusive read or
+write access to a file\&.
+.IP 
+These open modes are not directly supported by UNIX, so they are
+simulated using shared memory, or lock files if your UNIX doesn\'t
+support shared memory (almost all do)\&.
+.IP 
+The share modes that are enabled by this option are DENY_DOS,
+DENY_ALL, DENY_READ, DENY_WRITE, DENY_NONE and DENY_FCB\&.
+.IP 
+This option gives full share compatibility and enabled by default\&.
+.IP 
+You should \fI*NEVER*\fP turn this parameter off as many Windows
+applications will break if you do so\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  share modes = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBshared mem size (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+It specifies the size of the shared memory (in bytes) to use between
+\fBsmbd\fP processes\&. This parameter defaults to one
+megabyte of shared memory\&. It is possible that if you have a large
+server with many files open simultaneously that you may need to
+increase this parameter\&. Signs that this parameter is set too low are
+users reporting strange problems trying to save files (locking errors)
+and error messages in the smbd log looking like \f(CW"ERROR
+smb_shm_alloc : alloc of XX bytes failed"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  shared mem size = 1048576\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  shared mem size = 5242880 ; Set to 5mb for a large number of files\&.\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBshort preserve case (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean parameter controls if new files which conform to 8\&.3
+syntax, that is all in upper case and of suitable length, are created
+upper case, or if they are forced to be the \f(CW"default"\fP case\&. This
+option can be use with \fB"preserve case
+=yes"\fP to permit long filenames to retain their
+case, while short names are lowered\&. Default \fIYes\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See the section on \fBNAME MANGLING\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  short preserve case = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsmb passwd file (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option sets the path to the encrypted smbpasswd file\&.  By default
+the path to the smbpasswd file is compiled into Samba\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  smb passwd file= <compiled default>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  smb passwd file = /usr/samba/private/smbpasswd\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsmbrun (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This sets the full path to the \fBsmbrun\fP binary\&. This defaults to the
+value in the Makefile\&.
+.IP 
+You must get this path right for many services to work correctly\&.
+.IP 
+You should not need to change this parameter so long as Samba
+is installed correctly\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  smbrun=<compiled default>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  smbrun = /usr/local/samba/bin/smbrun\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsocket address (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to control what address Samba will listen for
+connections on\&. This is used to support multiple virtual interfaces on
+the one server, each with a different configuration\&.
+.IP 
+By default samba will accept connections on any address\&.
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  socket address = 192\&.168\&.2\&.20\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsocket options (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option allows you to set socket options to be used when talking
+with the client\&.
+.IP 
 Socket options are controls on the networking layer of the operating
-systems which allow the connection to be tuned.
-
+systems which allow the connection to be tuned\&.
+.IP 
 This option will typically be used to tune your Samba server for
-optimal performance for your local network. There is no way that Samba
+optimal performance for your local network\&. There is no way that Samba
 can know what the optimal parameters are for your net, so you must
-experiment and choose them yourself. I strongly suggest you read the
+experiment and choose them yourself\&. We strongly suggest you read the
 appropriate documentation for your operating system first (perhaps
-"man setsockopt" will help).
-
+\fB"man setsockopt"\fP will help)\&.
+.IP 
 You may find that on some systems Samba will say "Unknown socket
-option" when you supply an option. This means you either mis-typed it
-or you need to add an include file to includes.h for your OS. If the
-latter is the case please send the patch to me
-(samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au).
-
+option" when you supply an option\&. This means you either mis-typed it
+or you need to add an include file to includes\&.h for your OS\&. If the
+latter is the case please send the patch to
+\fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
+.IP 
 Any of the supported socket options may be combined in any way you
-like, as long as your OS allows it.
-
+like, as long as your OS allows it\&.
+.IP 
 This is the list of socket options currently settable using this
 option:
-
-  SO_KEEPALIVE
-
-  SO_REUSEADDR
-
-  SO_BROADCAST
-
-  TCP_NODELAY
-
-  IPTOS_LOWDELAY
-
-  IPTOS_THROUGHPUT
-
-  SO_SNDBUF *
-
-  SO_RCVBUF *
-
-  SO_SNDLOWAT *
-
-  SO_RCVLOWAT *
-
-Those marked with a * take an integer argument. The others can
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_KEEPALIVE
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_REUSEADDR
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_BROADCAST
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+TCP_NODELAY
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+IPTOS_LOWDELAY
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+IPTOS_THROUGHPUT
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_SNDBUF *
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_RCVBUF *
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_SNDLOWAT *
+.IP 
+.IP o 
+SO_RCVLOWAT *
+.IP 
+.IP 
+Those marked with a \f(CW*\fP take an integer argument\&. The others can
 optionally take a 1 or 0 argument to enable or disable the option, by
-default they will be enabled if you don't specify 1 or 0.
-
+default they will be enabled if you don\'t specify 1 or 0\&.
+.IP 
 To specify an argument use the syntax SOME_OPTION=VALUE for example
-SO_SNDBUF=8192. Note that you must not have any spaces before or after
-the = sign.
-
+\f(CWSO_SNDBUF=8192\fP\&. Note that you must not have any spaces before or after
+the = sign\&.
+.IP 
 If you are on a local network then a sensible option might be
-
-socket options = IPTOS_LOWDELAY
-
-If you have an almost unloaded local network and you don't mind a lot
-of extra CPU usage in the server then you could try
-
-socket options = IPTOS_LOWDELAY TCP_NODELAY
-
+.IP 
+\f(CWsocket options = IPTOS_LOWDELAY\fP
+.IP 
+If you have a local network then you could try:
+.IP 
+\f(CWsocket options = IPTOS_LOWDELAY TCP_NODELAY\fP
+.IP 
 If you are on a wide area network then perhaps try setting
-IPTOS_THROUGHPUT. 
-
+IPTOS_THROUGHPUT\&
+.IP 
 Note that several of the options may cause your Samba server to fail
-completely. Use these options with caution!
-
-.B Default:
-       no socket options
-
-.B Example:
-       socket options = IPTOS_LOWDELAY 
-
-
-
-
-.SS status (G)
+completely\&. Use these options with caution!
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  socket options = TCP_NODELAY\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  socket options = IPTOS_LOWDELAY\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This variable enables or disables the entire SSL mode\&. If it is set to
+"no", the SSL enabled samba behaves exactly like the non-SSL samba\&. If
+set to "yes", it depends on the variables \fB"ssl
+hosts"\fP and \fB"ssl hosts resign"\fP
+whether an SSL connection will be required\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl=no\fP
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl=yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl CA certDir (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This variable defines where to look up the Certification
+Autorities\&. The given directory should contain one file for each CA
+that samba will trust\&.  The file name must be the hash value over the
+"Distinguished Name" of the CA\&. How this directory is set up is
+explained later in this document\&. All files within the directory that
+don\'t fit into this naming scheme are ignored\&. You don\'t need this
+variable if you don\'t verify client certificates\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl CA certDir = /usr/local/ssl/certs\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl CA certFile (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This variable is a second way to define the trusted CAs\&. The
+certificates of the trusted CAs are collected in one big file and this
+variable points to the file\&. You will probably only use one of the two
+ways to define your CAs\&. The first choice is preferable if you have
+many CAs or want to be flexible, the second is perferable if you only
+have one CA and want to keep things simple (you won\'t need to create
+the hashed file names)\&. You don\'t need this variable if you don\'t
+verify client certificates\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl CA certFile = /usr/local/ssl/certs/trustedCAs\&.pem\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl ciphers (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This variable defines the ciphers that should be offered during SSL
+negotiation\&. You should not set this variable unless you know what you
+are doing\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl client cert (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+The certificate in this file is used by
+\fBsmbclient\fP if it exists\&. It\'s needed if the
+server requires a client certificate\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl client cert = /usr/local/ssl/certs/smbclient\&.pem\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl client key (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This is the private key for \fBsmbclient\fP\&. It\'s
+only needed if the client should have a certificate\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl client key = /usr/local/ssl/private/smbclient\&.pem\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl compatibility (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This variable defines whether SSLeay should be configured for bug
+compatibility with other SSL implementations\&. This is probably not
+desirable because currently no clients with SSL implementations other
+than SSLeay exist\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl compatibility = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl hosts (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+See \fB"ssl hosts resign"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl hosts resign (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+These two variables define whether samba will go into SSL mode or
+not\&. If none of them is defined, samba will allow only SSL
+connections\&. If the \fB"ssl hosts"\fP variable lists
+hosts (by IP-address, IP-address range, net group or name), only these
+hosts will be forced into SSL mode\&. If the \fB"ssl hosts resign"\fP
+variable lists hosts, only these hosts will NOT be forced into SSL
+mode\&. The syntax for these two variables is the same as for the
+\fB"hosts allow"\fP and \fB"hosts
+deny"\fP pair of variables, only that the subject of the
+decision is different: It\'s not the access right but whether SSL is
+used or not\&. See the \fB"allow hosts"\fP parameter for
+details\&. The example below requires SSL connections from all hosts
+outside the local net (which is 192\&.168\&.*\&.*)\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl hosts = <empty string>\fP
+\f(CW  ssl hosts resign = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl hosts resign = 192\&.168\&.\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl require clientcert (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+If this variable is set to \f(CW"yes"\fP, the server will not tolerate
+connections from clients that don\'t have a valid certificate\&. The
+directory/file given in \fB"ssl CA certDir"\fP and
+\fB"ssl CA certFile"\fP will be used to look up the
+CAs that issued the client\'s certificate\&. If the certificate can\'t be
+verified positively, the connection will be terminated\&.  If this
+variable is set to \f(CW"no"\fP, clients don\'t need certificates\&. Contrary
+to web applications you really \fI*should*\fP require client
+certificates\&. In the web environment the client\'s data is sensitive
+(credit card numbers) and the server must prove to be trustworthy\&. In
+a file server environment the server\'s data will be sensitive and the
+clients must prove to be trustworthy\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl require clientcert = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl require servercert (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+If this variable is set to \f(CW"yes"\fP, the
+\fBsmbclient\fP will request a certificate from
+the server\&. Same as \fB"ssl require
+clientcert"\fP for the server\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl require servercert = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl server cert (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This is the file containing the server\'s certificate\&. The server _must_
+have a certificate\&. The file may also contain the server\'s private key\&.
+See later for how certificates and private keys are created\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl server cert = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl server key (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This file contains the private key of the server\&. If this variable is
+not defined, the key is looked up in the certificate file (it may be
+appended to the certificate)\&. The server \fI*must*\fP have a private key
+and the certificate \fI*must*\fP match this private key\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl server key = <empty string>\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBssl version (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This variable is part of SSL-enabled Samba\&. This is only available if
+the SSL libraries have been compiled on your system and the configure
+option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
+.IP 
+\fINote\fP that for export control reasons this code is \fI**NOT**\fP
+enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
+.IP 
+This enumeration variable defines the versions of the SSL protocol
+that will be used\&. \f(CW"ssl2or3"\fP allows dynamic negotiation of SSL v2
+or v3, \f(CW"ssl2"\fP results in SSL v2, \f(CW"ssl3"\fP results in SSL v3 and
+"tls1" results in TLS v1\&. TLS (Transport Layer Security) is the
+(proposed?) new standard for SSL\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  ssl version = "ssl2or3"\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBstat cache (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter determines if \fBsmbd\fP will use a
+cache in order to speed up case insensitive name mappings\&. You should
+never need to change this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  stat cache = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBstat cache size (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter determines the number of entries in the \fBstat
+cache\fP\&.  You should never need to change this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  stat cache size = 50\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBstatus (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This enables or disables logging of connections to a status file that
-.B smbstatus
-can read.
-
-With this disabled
-.B smbstatus
-won't be able to tell you what
-connections are active.
-
-.B Default:
-       status = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       status = no
-
-.SS strict locking (S)
+\fBsmbstatus\fP can read\&.
+.IP 
+With this disabled \fBsmbstatus\fP won\'t be able
+to tell you what connections are active\&. You should never need to
+change this parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+status = yes
+.IP 
+dir(\fBstrict locking (S)\fP)
+.IP 
 This is a boolean that controls the handling of file locking in the
-server. When this is set to yes the server will check every read and
-write access for file locks, and deny access if locks exist. This can
-be slow on some systems.
-
-When strict locking is "no" the server does file lock checks only when
-the client explicitly asks for them. 
-
+server\&. When this is set to \f(CW"yes"\fP the server will check every read and
+write access for file locks, and deny access if locks exist\&. This can
+be slow on some systems\&.
+.IP 
+When strict locking is \f(CW"no"\fP the server does file lock checks only
+when the client explicitly asks for them\&.
+.IP 
 Well behaved clients always ask for lock checks when it is important,
-so in the vast majority of cases "strict locking = no" is preferable.
-
-.B Default:
-       strict locking = no
-
-.B Example:
-       strict locking = yes
-
-.SS strict sync (S)
-Many Windows applications (including the Windows 98 explorer
-shell) seem to confuse flushing buffer contents to disk with
-doing a sync to disk. Under UNIX, a sync call forces the process
-to be suspended until the kernel has ensured that all outstanding
-data in kernel disk buffers has been safely stored onto stable
-storate. This is very slow and should only be done rarely. Setting
-this parameter to "no" (the default) means that smbd ignores the
-Windows applications requests for a sync call. There is only a
-possibility of losing data if the operating system itself that
-Samba is running on crashes, so there is little danger in this
-default setting. In addition, this fixes many performace problems
-that people have reported with the new Windows98 explorer shell
-file copies.
-
-See also the "sync always" parameter.
-
-.B Default:
-     strict sync = no
-
-.B Example:
-     strict sync = yes
-
-
-.SS strip dot (G)
+so in the vast majority of cases \fB"strict locking = no"\fP is
+preferable\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  strict locking = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  strict locking = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBstrict sync (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Many Windows applications (including the Windows 98 explorer shell)
+seem to confuse flushing buffer contents to disk with doing a sync to
+disk\&. Under UNIX, a sync call forces the process to be suspended until
+the kernel has ensured that all outstanding data in kernel disk
+buffers has been safely stored onto stable storate\&. This is very slow
+and should only be done rarely\&. Setting this parameter to "no" (the
+default) means that smbd ignores the Windows applications requests for
+a sync call\&. There is only a possibility of losing data if the
+operating system itself that Samba is running on crashes, so there is
+little danger in this default setting\&. In addition, this fixes many
+performance problems that people have reported with the new Windows98
+explorer shell file copies\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"sync always"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  strict sync = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  strict sync = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBstrip dot (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This is a boolean that controls whether to strip trailing dots off
-UNIX filenames. This helps with some CDROMs that have filenames ending in a
-single dot.
-
-.B Default:
-       strip dot = no
-
-.B Example:
-    strip dot = yes
-
-.SS syslog (G)
-This parameter maps how Samba debug messages are logged onto the
-system syslog logging levels. Samba debug level zero maps onto
-syslog LOG_ERR, debug level one maps onto LOG_WARNING, debug
-level two maps to LOG_NOTICE, debug level three maps onto LOG_INFO.
-The paramter sets the threshold for doing the mapping, all Samba
-debug messages above this threashold are mapped to syslog LOG_DEBUG
-messages.
-
-.B Default:
-
-       syslog = 1
-
-.SS syslog only (G)
-If this parameter is set then Samba debug messages are logged into
-the system syslog only, and not to the debug log files.
-
-.B Default:
-       syslog only = no
-
-.SS sync always (S)
-
+UNIX filenames\&. This helps with some CDROMs that have filenames ending
+in a single dot\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  strip dot = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  strip dot = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsync always (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This is a boolean parameter that controls whether writes will always
-be written to stable storage before the write call returns. If this is
-false then the server will be guided by the client's request in each
+be written to stable storage before the write call returns\&. If this is
+false then the server will be guided by the client\'s request in each
 write call (clients can set a bit indicating that a particular write
-should be synchronous). If this is true then every write will be
-followed by a fsync() call to ensure the data is written to disk.
-Note that the "strict sync" parameter must be set to "yes" in
-order for this parameter to have any affect.
-
-See also the "strict sync" parameter.
-
-.B Default:
-       sync always = no
-
-.B Example:
-       sync always = yes
-
-.SS time offset (G)
+should be synchronous)\&. If this is true then every write will be
+followed by a fsync() call to ensure the data is written to disk\&.
+Note that the \fB"strict sync"\fP parameter must be
+set to \f(CW"yes"\fP in order for this parameter to have any affect\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"strict sync"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  sync always = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBxample:\fP
+\f(CW  sync always = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsyslog (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter maps how Samba debug messages are logged onto the
+system syslog logging levels\&. Samba debug level zero maps onto syslog
+LOG_ERR, debug level one maps onto LOG_WARNING, debug level two maps
+to LOG_NOTICE, debug level three maps onto LOG_INFO\&.  The paramter
+sets the threshold for doing the mapping, all Samba debug messages
+above this threashold are mapped to syslog LOG_DEBUG messages\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  syslog = 1\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBsyslog only (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If this parameter is set then Samba debug messages are logged into the
+system syslog only, and not to the debug log files\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  syslog only = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBtime offset (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This parameter is a setting in minutes to add to the normal GMT to
-local time conversion. This is useful if you are serving a lot of PCs
-that have incorrect daylight saving time handling.
-
-.B Default:
-       time offset = 0
-
-.B Example:
-       time offset = 60
-
-.SS time server (G)
-This parameter determines if nmbd advertises itself as a time server
-to Windows clients. The default is False.
-
-.B Default:
-       time server = False
-
-.B Example:
-       time server = True
-
-.SS unix password sync (G)
+local time conversion\&. This is useful if you are serving a lot of PCs
+that have incorrect daylight saving time handling\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  time offset = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  time offset = 60\fP
+.IP 
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBtime server (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter determines if \fBnmbd\fP advertises
+itself as a time server to Windows clients\&. The default is False\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  time server = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  time server = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBtimestamp logs (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Samba2\&.0 will a timestamps to all log entries by default\&. This
+can be distracting if you are attempting to debug a problem\&. This
+parameter allows the timestamping to be turned off\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  timestamp logs = True\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  timestamp logs = False\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBunix password sync (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This boolean parameter controlls whether Samba attempts to synchronise
-the UNIX password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB password
-in the smbpasswd file is changed. If this is set to true the 'passwd program'
-program is called *AS ROOT* - to allow the new UNIX password to be set
-without access to the old UNIX password (as the SMB password has change
-code has no access to the old password cleartext, only the new). By
-default this is set to false.
-
-See also 'passwd program', 'passwd chat'
-
-.B Default:
-         unix password sync = False
-
-.B Example:
-         unix password sync = True
-
-.SS unix realname (G)
-This boolean parameter when set causes samba to supply the real name field
-from the unix password file to the client. This is useful for setting up
-mail clients and WWW browsers on systems used by more than one person.
-
-.B Default:
-       unix realname = no
-
-.B Example:
-       unix realname = yes
-
-.SS update encrypted (G)
+the UNIX password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB
+password in the smbpasswd file is changed\&. If this is set to true the
+program specified in the \fB"passwd program"\fP
+parameter is called \fI*AS ROOT*\fP - to allow the new UNIX password to be
+set without access to the old UNIX password (as the SMB password has
+change code has no access to the old password cleartext, only the
+new)\&. By default this is set to \f(CW"false"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"passwd program"\fP, \fB"passwd
+chat"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  unix password sync = False\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  unix password sync = True\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBunix realname (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean parameter when set causes samba to supply the real name
+field from the unix password file to the client\&. This is useful for
+setting up mail clients and WWW browsers on systems used by more than
+one person\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  unix realname = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  unix realname = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBupdate encrypted (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This boolean parameter allows a user logging on with a plaintext
 password to have their encrypted (hashed) password in the smbpasswd
-file to be updated automatically as they log on. This option allows
-a site to migrate from plaintext password authentication (users 
+file to be updated automatically as they log on\&. This option allows a
+site to migrate from plaintext password authentication (users
 authenticate with plaintext password over the wire, and are checked
 against a UNIX account database) to encrypted password authentication
 (the SMB challenge/response authentication mechanism) without forcing
-all users to re-enter their passwords via smbpasswd at the time the change
-is made. This is a convenience option to allow the change over to
-encrypted passwords to be made over a longer period. Once all users
+all users to re-enter their passwords via smbpasswd at the time the
+change is made\&. This is a convenience option to allow the change over
+to encrypted passwords to be made over a longer period\&. Once all users
 have encrypted representations of their passwords in the smbpasswd
-file this parameter should be set to "off".
-
-In order for this parameter to work correctly the "encrypt passwords"
-must be set to "no" when this parameter is set to "yes".
-
+file this parameter should be set to \f(CW"off"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+In order for this parameter to work correctly the \fB"encrypt
+passwords"\fP parameter must be set to \f(CW"no"\fP when
+this parameter is set to \f(CW"yes"\fP\&.
+.IP 
 Note that even when this parameter is set a user authenticating to
 smbd must still enter a valid password in order to connect correctly,
-and to update their hashed (smbpasswd) passwords.
-
-.B Default:
-       update encrypted = no
-
-.B Example:
-       update encrypted = yes
-
-.SS user (S)
-See
-.B username.
-.SS username (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'user'.
-
-Multiple users may be specified in a comma-delimited list, in which case the
-supplied password will be tested against each username in turn (left to right).
-
-The username= line is needed only when the PC is unable to supply its own
-username. This is the case for the coreplus protocol or where your
-users have different WfWg usernames to UNIX usernames. In both these
-cases you may also be better using the \e\eserver\eshare%user syntax
-instead. 
-
-The username= line is not a great solution in many cases as it means Samba
-will try to validate the supplied password against each of the
-usernames in the username= line in turn. This is slow and a bad idea for
-lots of users in case of duplicate passwords. You may get timeouts or
-security breaches using this parameter unwisely.
-
-Samba relies on the underlying UNIX security. This parameter does not
+and to update their hashed (smbpasswd) passwords\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  update encrypted = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  update encrypted = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBuse rhosts (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+If this global parameter is a true, it specifies that the UNIX users
+\f(CW"\&.rhosts"\fP file in their home directory will be read to find the
+names of hosts and users who will be allowed access without specifying
+a password\&.
+.IP 
+NOTE: The use of \fBuse rhosts\fP can be a major security hole\&. This is
+because you are trusting the PC to supply the correct username\&. It is
+very easy to get a PC to supply a false username\&. I recommend that the
+\fBuse rhosts\fP option be only used if you really know what you are
+doing\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  use rhosts = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  use rhosts = yes\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBuser (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"username"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBusers (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Synonym for \fB"username"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBusername (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+Multiple users may be specified in a comma-delimited list, in which
+case the supplied password will be tested against each username in
+turn (left to right)\&.
+.IP 
+The \fBusername=\fP line is needed only when the PC is unable to supply
+its own username\&. This is the case for the COREPLUS protocol or where
+your users have different WfWg usernames to UNIX usernames\&. In both
+these cases you may also be better using the \f(CW\e\eserver\eshare%user\fP
+syntax instead\&.
+.IP 
+The \fBusername=\fP line is not a great solution in many cases as it
+means Samba will try to validate the supplied password against each of
+the usernames in the username= line in turn\&. This is slow and a bad
+idea for lots of users in case of duplicate passwords\&. You may get
+timeouts or security breaches using this parameter unwisely\&.
+.IP 
+Samba relies on the underlying UNIX security\&. This parameter does not
 restrict who can login, it just offers hints to the Samba server as to
-what usernames might correspond to the supplied password. Users can
+what usernames might correspond to the supplied password\&. Users can
 login as whoever they please and they will be able to do no more
-damage than if they started a telnet session. The daemon runs as the
+damage than if they started a telnet session\&. The daemon runs as the
 user that they log in as, so they cannot do anything that user cannot
-do.
-
+do\&.
+.IP 
 To restrict a service to a particular set of users you can use the
-"valid users=" line.
-
-If any of the usernames begin with a @ then the name will be looked up
-first in the yp netgroups list (if Samba is compiled with netgroup support),
-followed by a lookup in the UNIX groups database and will expand to a list of
-all users in the group of that name.
-
-If any of the usernames begin with a + then the name will be looked up only
-in the UNIX groups database and will expand to a list of all users in the 
-group of that name.
-
-If any of the usernames begin with a & then the name will be looked up only
-in the yp netgroups database (if Samba is compiled with netgroup support) and
-will expand to a list of all users in the netgroup group of that name.
-
-Note that searching though a groups database can take quite
-some time, and some clients may time out during the search.
-
-See the section below on username/password validation for more information
-on how this parameter determines access to the services.
-
-.B Default:
-       The guest account if a guest service, else the name of the service.
+\fB"valid users="\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+If any of the usernames begin with a \f(CW\'@\'\fP then the name will be
+looked up first in the yp netgroups list (if Samba is compiled with
+netgroup support), followed by a lookup in the UNIX groups database
+and will expand to a list of all users in the group of that name\&.
+.IP 
+If any of the usernames begin with a \f(CW\'+\'\fP then the name will be
+looked up only in the UNIX groups database and will expand to a list
+of all users in the group of that name\&.
+.IP 
+If any of the usernames begin with a \f(CW\'&\'\fP then the name will be
+looked up only in the yp netgroups database (if Samba is compiled with
+netgroup support) and will expand to a list of all users in the
+netgroup group of that name\&.
+.IP 
+Note that searching though a groups database can take quite some time,
+and some clients may time out during the search\&.
+.IP 
+See the section \fB"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
+VALIDATION"\fP for more
+information on how this parameter determines access to the services\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  The guest account if a guest service, else the name of the service\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExamples:\fP
+
+.DS 
 
-.B Examples:
        username = fred
        username = fred, mary, jack, jane, @users, @pcgroup
 
-.SS username level (G)
+.DE 
 
-This option helps Samba to try and 'guess' at the real UNIX username,
-as many DOS clients send an all-uppercase username. By default Samba
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBusername level (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This option helps Samba to try and \'guess\' at the real UNIX username,
+as many DOS clients send an all-uppercase username\&. By default Samba
 tries all lowercase, followed by the username with the first letter
-capitalized, and fails if the username is not found on the UNIX machine.
-
-If this parameter is set to non-zero the behaviour changes. This 
-parameter is a number that specifies the number of uppercase combinations 
-to try whilst trying to determine the UNIX user name. The higher the number
-the more combinations will be tried, but the slower the discovery
-of usernames will be. Use this parameter when you have strange
-usernames on your UNIX machine, such as 'AstrangeUser'.
-
-.B Default:
-    username level = 0
-
-.B Example:
-    username level = 5
-
-.SS username map (G)
-
+capitalized, and fails if the username is not found on the UNIX
+machine\&.
+.IP 
+If this parameter is set to non-zero the behaviour changes\&. This
+parameter is a number that specifies the number of uppercase
+combinations to try whilst trying to determine the UNIX user name\&. The
+higher the number the more combinations will be tried, but the slower
+the discovery of usernames will be\&. Use this parameter when you have
+strange usernames on your UNIX machine, such as \f(CW"AstrangeUser"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  username level = 0\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  username level = 5\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBusername map (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This option allows you to to specify a file containing a mapping of
-usernames from the clients to the server. This can be used for several
-purposes. The most common is to map usernames that users use on DOS or
-Windows machines to those that the UNIX box uses. The other is to map
+usernames from the clients to the server\&. This can be used for several
+purposes\&. The most common is to map usernames that users use on DOS or
+Windows machines to those that the UNIX box uses\&. The other is to map
 multiple users to a single username so that they can more easily share
-files.
-
-The map file is parsed line by line. Each line should contain a single
-UNIX username on the left then a '=' followed by a list of usernames
-on the right. The list of usernames on the right may contain names of
-the form @group in which case they will match any UNIX username in
-that group. The special client name '*' is a wildcard and matches any
-name. Each line of the map file may be up to 1023 characters long.
-
+files\&.
+.IP 
+The map file is parsed line by line\&. Each line should contain a single
+UNIX username on the left then a \f(CW\'=\'\fP followed by a list of
+usernames on the right\&. The list of usernames on the right may contain
+names of the form @group in which case they will match any UNIX
+username in that group\&. The special client name \f(CW\'*\'\fP is a wildcard
+and matches any name\&. Each line of the map file may be up to 1023
+characters long\&.
+.IP 
 The file is processed on each line by taking the supplied username and
-comparing it with each username on the right hand side of the '='
-signs. If the supplied name matches any of the names on the right
-hand side then it is replaced with the name on the left. Processing
-then continues with the next line.
-
-If any line begins with a '#' or a ';' then it is ignored
-
-If any line begins with an ! then the processing will stop after that
-line if a mapping was done by the line. Otherwise mapping continues
-with every line being processed. Using ! is most useful when you have
-a wildcard mapping line later in the file.
-
-For example to map from the name "admin" or "administrator" to the UNIX
-name "root" you would use
-
-       root = admin administrator
-
-Or to map anyone in the UNIX group "system" to the UNIX name "sys" you
-would use
-
-       sys = @system
-
-You can have as many mappings as you like in a username map file.
-
-If Samba has been compiled with the -DNETGROUP compile option
-then the netgroup database is checked before the /etc/group
-database for matching groups.
-
+comparing it with each username on the right hand side of the \f(CW\'=\'\fP
+signs\&. If the supplied name matches any of the names on the right hand
+side then it is replaced with the name on the left\&. Processing then
+continues with the next line\&.
+.IP 
+If any line begins with a \f(CW\'#\'\fP or a \f(CW\';\'\fP then it is ignored
+.IP 
+If any line begins with an \f(CW\'!\'\fP then the processing will stop after
+that line if a mapping was done by the line\&. Otherwise mapping
+continues with every line being processed\&. Using \f(CW\'!\'\fP is most
+useful when you have a wildcard mapping line later in the file\&.
+.IP 
+For example to map from the name \f(CW"admin"\fP or \f(CW"administrator"\fP to
+the UNIX name \f(CW"root"\fP you would use:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  root = admin administrator\fP
+.IP 
+Or to map anyone in the UNIX group \f(CW"system"\fP to the UNIX name
+\f(CW"sys"\fP you would use:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  sys = @system\fP
+.IP 
+You can have as many mappings as you like in a username map file\&.
+.IP 
+If your system supports the NIS NETGROUP option then the netgroup
+database is checked before the \f(CW/etc/group\fP database for matching
+groups\&.
+.IP 
 You can map Windows usernames that have spaces in them by using double
-quotes around the name. For example:
-
-       tridge = "Andrew Tridgell"
-
-would map the windows username "Andrew Tridgell" to the unix username
-tridge.
-
+quotes around the name\&. For example:
+.IP 
+\f(CW  tridge = "Andrew Tridgell"\fP
+.IP 
+would map the windows username \f(CW"Andrew Tridgell"\fP to the unix
+username tridge\&.
+.IP 
 The following example would map mary and fred to the unix user sys,
-and map the rest to guest. Note the use of the ! to tell Samba to stop
-processing if it gets a match on that line.
+and map the rest to guest\&. Note the use of the \f(CW\'!\'\fP to tell Samba
+to stop processing if it gets a match on that line\&.
+.IP 
+
+.DS 
 
        !sys = mary fred
        guest = *
 
+.DE 
 
+.IP 
 Note that the remapping is applied to all occurrences of
-usernames. Thus if you connect to "\e\eserver\efred" and "fred" is
-remapped to "mary" then you will actually be connecting to
-"\e\eserver\emary" and will need to supply a password suitable for
-"mary" not "fred". The only exception to this is the username passed
-to the "password server" (if you have one). The password server will
-receive whatever username the client supplies without modification.
-
-Also note that no reverse mapping is done. The main effect this has is
-with printing. Users who have been mapped may have trouble deleting
-print jobs as PrintManager under WfWg will think they don't own the
-print job.
-
-.B Default
-       no username map
-
-.B Example
-       username map = /usr/local/samba/lib/users.map
-
-.SS valid chars (S)
-
+usernames\&. Thus if you connect to \f(CW"\e\eserver\efred"\fP and \f(CW"fred"\fP
+is remapped to \f(CW"mary"\fP then you will actually be connecting to
+\f(CW"\e\eserver\emary"\fP and will need to supply a password suitable for
+\f(CW"mary"\fP not \f(CW"fred"\fP\&. The only exception to this is the username
+passed to the \fB"password server"\fP (if you have
+one)\&. The password server will receive whatever username the client
+supplies without modification\&.
+.IP 
+Also note that no reverse mapping is done\&. The main effect this has is
+with printing\&. Users who have been mapped may have trouble deleting
+print jobs as PrintManager under WfWg will think they don\'t own the
+print job\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  no username map\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  username map = /usr/local/samba/lib/users\&.map\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBvalid chars (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 The option allows you to specify additional characters that should be
-considered valid by the server in filenames. This is particularly
-useful for national character sets, such as adding u-umlaut or a-ring.
-
+considered valid by the server in filenames\&. This is particularly
+useful for national character sets, such as adding u-umlaut or a-ring\&.
+.IP 
 The option takes a list of characters in either integer or character
-form with spaces between them. If you give two characters with a colon
-between them then it will be taken as an lowercase:uppercase pair.
-
+form with spaces between them\&. If you give two characters with a colon
+between them then it will be taken as an lowercase:uppercase pair\&.
+.IP 
 If you have an editor capable of entering the characters into the
-config file then it is probably easiest to use this method. Otherwise
+config file then it is probably easiest to use this method\&. Otherwise
 you can specify the characters in octal, decimal or hexadecimal form
-using the usual C notation.
-
-For example to add the single character 'Z' to the charset (which is a
-pointless thing to do as it's already there) you could do one of the
-following
-
-valid chars = Z
-valid chars = z:Z
-valid chars = 0132:0172
+using the usual C notation\&.
+.IP 
+For example to add the single character \f(CW\'Z\'\fP to the charset (which
+is a pointless thing to do as it\'s already there) you could do one of
+the following
+.IP 
+
+.DS 
 
-The last two examples above actually add two characters, and alter
-the uppercase and lowercase mappings appropriately.
+       valid chars = Z
+       valid chars = z:Z
+       valid chars = 0132:0172
 
-Note that you MUST specify this parameter after the "client code page"
-parameter if you have both set. If "client code page" is set after
-the "valid chars" parameter the "valid chars" settings will be
-overwritten.
+.DE 
 
-See also the "client code page" parameter.
+.IP 
+The last two examples above actually add two characters, and alter the
+uppercase and lowercase mappings appropriately\&.
+.IP 
+Note that you MUST specify this parameter after the \fB"client
+code page"\fP parameter if you have both set\&. If
+\fB"client code page"\fP is set after the
+\fB"valid chars"\fP parameter the \fB"valid chars"\fP settings will be
+overwritten\&.
+.IP 
+See also the \fB"client code page"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+
+.DS 
 
-.B Default
-.br
        Samba defaults to using a reasonable set of valid characters
-.br
        for english systems
 
-.B Example
-        valid chars = 0345:0305 0366:0326 0344:0304
+.DE 
 
+.IP 
+\fBExample\fP
+\f(CW  valid chars = 0345:0305 0366:0326 0344:0304\fP
+.IP 
 The above example allows filenames to have the swedish characters in
-them. 
-
-NOTE: It is actually quite difficult to correctly produce a "valid
-chars" line for a particular system. To automate the process
-tino@augsburg.net has written a package called "validchars" which will
-automatically produce a complete "valid chars" line for a given client
-system. Look in the examples subdirectory for this package.
-
-.SS valid users (S)
+them\&.
+.IP 
+NOTE: It is actually quite difficult to correctly produce a \fB"valid
+chars"\fP line for a particular system\&. To automate the process
+\fItino@augsburg\&.net\fP has written a package called \fB"validchars"\fP
+which will automatically produce a complete \fB"valid chars"\fP line for
+a given client system\&. Look in the examples/validchars/ subdirectory
+of your Samba source code distribution for this package\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBvalid users (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This is a list of users that should be allowed to login to this
-service. A name starting with @ is interpreted as a UNIX group.
-
-If this is empty (the default) then any user can login. If a username
-is in both this list and the "invalid users" list then access is
-denied for that user.
-
-The current servicename is substituted for %S. This is useful in the
-[homes] section.
-
-See also "invalid users"
-
-.B Default
-       No valid users list. (anyone can login)
-
-.B Example
-       valid users = greg, @pcusers
-
-
-.SS veto files(S)
+service\&. Names starting with \f(CW\'@\'\fP, \f(CW\'+\'\fP and \f(CW\'&\'\fP are
+interpreted using the same rules as described in the \fB"invalid
+users"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+If this is empty (the default) then any user can login\&. If a username
+is in both this list and the \fB"invalid users"\fP
+list then access is denied for that user\&.
+.IP 
+The current servicename is substituted for
+\fB"%S"\fP\&. This is useful in the
+\fB[homes]\fP section\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"invalid users"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  No valid users list\&. (anyone can login)\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  valid users = greg, @pcusers\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBveto files(S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This is a list of files and directories that are neither visible nor
-accessible.  Each entry in the list must be separated by a "/", which
-allows spaces to be included in the entry.  '*' and '?' can be used to
-specify multiple files or directories as in DOS wildcards.
-
-Each entry must be a unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
-unix directory separator "/".
-
-Note that the case sensitivity option is applicable in vetoing files.
-
+accessible\&.  Each entry in the list must be separated by a \f(CW\'/\'\fP,
+which allows spaces to be included in the entry\&. \f(CW\'*\'\fP and \f(CW\'?\'\fP 
+can be used to specify multiple files or directories as in DOS
+wildcards\&.
+.IP 
+Each entry must be a unix path, not a DOS path and must \fI*not*\fP include the 
+unix directory separator \f(CW\'/\'\fP\&.
+.IP 
+Note that the \fB"case sensitive"\fP option is
+applicable in vetoing files\&.
+.IP 
 One feature of the veto files parameter that it is important to be
-aware of, is that if a directory contains nothing but files that
-match the veto files parameter (which means that Windows/DOS clients
-cannot ever see them) is deleted, the veto files within that directory
-*are automatically deleted* along with it, if the user has UNIX permissions
-to do so.
+aware of, is that if a directory contains nothing but files that match
+the veto files parameter (which means that Windows/DOS clients cannot
+ever see them) is deleted, the veto files within that directory *are
+automatically deleted* along with it, if the user has UNIX permissions
+to do so\&.
+.IP 
+Setting this parameter will affect the performance of Samba, as it
+will be forced to check all files and directories for a match as they
+are scanned\&.
+.IP 
+See also \fB"hide files"\fP and \fB"case
+sensitive"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  No files or directories are vetoed\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExamples:\fP
+.IP 
+Example 1\&.
+.IP 
+
+.DS 
  
-Setting this parameter will affect the performance of Samba, as
-it will be forced to check all files and directories for a match
-as they are scanned.
 
-See also "hide files" and "case sensitive"
 
-.B Default
-       No files or directories are vetoed.
-
-.B Examples
-    Example 1.
     Veto any files containing the word Security, 
-    any ending in .tmp, and any directory containing the
-    word root.
+    any ending in \&.tmp, and any directory containing the
+    word root\&.
 
-       veto files = /*Security*/*.tmp/*root*/
+       veto files = /*Security*/*\&.tmp/*root*/
 
-    Example 2.
-    Veto the Apple specific files that a NetAtalk server
-    creates.
+.DE 
 
-    veto files = /.AppleDouble/.bin/.AppleDesktop/Network Trash Folder/
+.IP 
+Example 2\&.
+.IP 
 
-.SS veto oplock files (S)
-This parameter is only valid when the 'oplocks' parameter is turned on
-for a share. It allows the Samba administrator to selectively turn off
-the granting of oplocks on selected files that match a wildcarded list,
-similar to the wildcarded list used in the 'veto files' parameter.
+.DS 
 
-.B Default
-    No files are vetoed for oplock grants.
+    Veto the Apple specific files that a NetAtalk server
+    creates\&.
 
-.B Examples
-You might want to do this on files that you know will be heavily
-contended for by clients. A good example of this is in the NetBench
-SMB benchmark program, which causes heavy client contention for files
-ending in .SEM. To cause Samba not to grant oplocks on these files
-you would use the line (either in the [global] section or in the section
-for the particular NetBench share :
+    veto files = /\&.AppleDouble/\&.bin/\&.AppleDesktop/Network Trash Folder/
 
-     veto oplock files = /*.SEM/
+.DE 
 
-.SS volume (S)
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBveto oplock files (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter is only valid when the \fB"oplocks"\fP
+parameter is turned on for a share\&. It allows the Samba administrator
+to selectively turn off the granting of oplocks on selected files that
+match a wildcarded list, similar to the wildcarded list used in the
+\fB"veto files"\fP parameter\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  No files are vetoed for oplock grants\&.\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExamples:\fP
+.IP 
+You might want to do this on files that you know will be heavily
+contended for by clients\&. A good example of this is in the NetBench
+SMB benchmark program, which causes heavy client contention for files
+ending in \f(CW"\&.SEM"\fP\&. To cause Samba not to grant oplocks on these
+files you would use the line (either in the \fB[global]\fP
+section or in the section for the particular NetBench share :
+.IP 
+\f(CW     veto oplock files = /*\&.SEM/\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBvolume (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This allows you to override the volume label returned for a
-share. Useful for CDROMs with installation programs that insist on a
-particular volume label.
-
-The default is the name of the share
-
-.SS wide links (S)
-This parameter controls whether or not links in the UNIX file system may be
-followed by the server. Links that point to areas within the directory tree
-exported by the server are always allowed; this parameter controls access 
-only to areas that are outside the directory tree being exported.
-
-.B Default:
-       wide links = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       wide links = no
-
-.SS wins proxy (G)
-
-This is a boolean that controls if nmbd will respond to broadcast name
-queries on behalf of other hosts. You may need to set this to no for
-some older clients.
-
-.B Default:
-       wins proxy = no
-.SS wins server (G)
-
-This specifies the DNS name (or IP address) of the WINS server that Samba 
-should register with. If you have a WINS server on your network then you
-should set this to the WINS servers name.
-
-You should point this at your WINS server if you have a multi-subnetted
-network.
-.B Default:
-       wins server = 
-
-.SS wins support (G)
-
-This boolean controls if the nmbd process in Samba will act as a WINS server. 
-You should not set this to true unless you have a multi-subnetted network and
-you wish a particular nmbd to be your WINS server. Note that you
-should *NEVER* set this to true on more than one machine in your
-network.
-
-.B Default:
-       wins support = no
-
-.SS workgroup (G)
-
+share\&. Useful for CDROMs with installation programs that insist on a
+particular volume label\&.
+.IP 
+The default is the name of the share\&.
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBwide links (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This parameter controls whether or not links in the UNIX file system
+may be followed by the server\&. Links that point to areas within the
+directory tree exported by the server are always allowed; this
+parameter controls access only to areas that are outside the directory
+tree being exported\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  wide links = yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  wide links = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBwins proxy (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This is a boolean that controls if \fBnmbd\fP will
+respond to broadcast name queries on behalf of other hosts\&. You may
+need to set this to \f(CW"yes"\fP for some older clients\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  wins proxy = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBwins server (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This specifies the DNS name (or IP address) of the WINS server that
+\fBnmbd\fP should register with\&. If you have a WINS
+server on your network then you should set this to the WINS servers
+name\&.
+.IP 
+You should point this at your WINS server if you have a
+multi-subnetted network\&.
+.IP 
+\fINOTE\fP\&. You need to set up Samba to point to a WINS server if you
+have multiple subnets and wish cross-subnet browsing to work correctly\&.
+.IP 
+See the documentation file BROWSING\&.txt in the docs/ directory of your
+Samba source distribution\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  wins server = \fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  wins server = 192\&.9\&.200\&.1\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBwins support (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
+This boolean controls if the \fBnmbd\fP process in
+Samba will act as a WINS server\&. You should not set this to true
+unless you have a multi-subnetted network and you wish a particular
+\fBnmbd\fP to be your WINS server\&. Note that you
+should \fI*NEVER*\fP set this to true on more than one machine in your
+network\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  wins support = no\fP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBworkgroup (G)\fP" 
+.IP 
 This controls what workgroup your server will appear to be in when
-queried by clients. 
-
-.B Default:
-       set in the Makefile
-
-.B Example:
-       workgroup = MYGROUP
-
-.SS writable (S)
-A synonym for this parameter is 'write ok'. An inverted synonym is 'read only'.
-
-If this parameter is 'no', then users of a service may not create or modify
-files in the service's directory.
-
-Note that a printable service ('printable = yes') will ALWAYS allow 
-writing to the directory (user privileges permitting), but only via
-spooling operations.
-
-.B Default:
-       writable = no
+queried by clients\&. Note that this parameter also controlls the Domain
+name used with the \fB"security=domain"\fP
+setting\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  set at compile time to WORKGROUP\fP
+.IP 
+\&.B Example:
+workgroup = MYGROUP
+.IP 
+.IP "\fBwritable (S)\fP" 
+.IP 
+An inverted synonym is \fB"read only"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+If this parameter is \f(CW"no"\fP, then users of a service may not create
+or modify files in the service\'s directory\&.
+.IP 
+Note that a printable service \fB("printable = yes")\fP
+will \fI*ALWAYS*\fP allow writing to the directory (user privileges
+permitting), but only via spooling operations\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  writable = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExamples:\fP
+
+.DS 
 
-.B Examples:
        read only = no
        writable = yes
        write ok = yes
-.SS write list (S)
-This is a list of users that are given read-write access to a
-service. If the connecting user is in this list then they will be
-given write access, no matter what the "read only" option is set
-to. The list can include group names using the @group syntax.
-
-Note that if a user is in both the read list and the write list then
-they will be given write access.
 
-See also the "read list" option
-
-.B Default:
-     write list =
-
-.B Example:
-     write list = admin, root, @staff
-
-.SS write ok (S)
-See
-.B writable
-and
-.B read only.
-.SS write raw (G)
-This parameter controls whether or not the server will support raw writes when
-transferring data from clients.
-
-.B Default:
-       write raw = yes
-
-.B Example:
-       write raw = no
-
-.SH NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD VALIDATION
-There are a number of ways in which a user can connect to a
-service. The server follows the following steps in determining if it
-will allow a connection to a specified service. If all the steps fail
-then the connection request is rejected. If one of the steps pass then
-the following steps are not checked.
-
-If the service is marked "guest only = yes" then steps 1 to 5 are skipped
-
-Step 1: If the client has passed a username/password pair and that
-username/password pair is validated by the UNIX system's password
-programs then the connection is made as that username. Note that this
-includes the \e\eserver\eservice%username method of passing a username.
-
-Step 2: If the client has previously registered a username with the
-system and now supplies a correct password for that username then the
-connection is allowed.
-
-Step 3: The client's netbios name and any previously used user names
-are checked against the supplied password, if they match then the
-connection is allowed as the corresponding user.
-
-Step 4: If the client has previously validated a username/password
-pair with the server and the client has passed the validation token
-then that username is used. This step is skipped if "revalidate = yes" 
-for this service.
-
-Step 5: If a "user = " field is given in the smb.conf file for the
-service and the client has supplied a password, and that password
-matches (according to the UNIX system's password checking) with one of
-the usernames from the user= field then the connection is made as the
-username in the "user=" line. If one of the username in the user= list
-begins with a @ then that name expands to a list of names in the group
-of the same name.
-
-Step 6: If the service is a guest service then a connection is made as
-the username given in the "guest account =" for the service,
-irrespective of the supplied password.
-.SH WARNINGS
-Although the configuration file permits service names to contain spaces, 
-your client software may not. Spaces will be ignored in comparisons anyway,
-so it shouldn't be a problem - but be aware of the possibility.
-
-On a similar note, many clients - especially DOS clients - limit service
-names to eight characters. Smbd has no such limitation, but attempts
-to connect from such clients will fail if they truncate the service names.
-For this reason you should probably keep your service names down to eight 
-characters in length.
-
-Use of the [homes] and [printers] special sections make life for an 
-administrator easy, but the various combinations of default attributes can be
-tricky. Take extreme care when designing these sections. In particular,
-ensure that the permissions on spool directories are correct.
-.SH VERSION
-This man page is (mostly) correct for version 1.9.18 of the Samba suite, plus some
-of the recent patches to it. These notes will necessarily lag behind 
-development of the software, so it is possible that your version of 
-the server has extensions or parameter semantics that differ from or are not 
-covered by this man page. Please notify these to the address below for 
-rectification.
-
-Prior to version 1.5.21 of the Samba suite, the configuration file was
-radically different (more primitive). If you are using a version earlier than
-1.8.05, it is STRONGLY recommended that you upgrade.
-.SH OPTIONS
-Not applicable.
-.SH FILES
-Not applicable.
-.SH ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
-Not applicable.
-.SH SEE ALSO
-.BR smbd (8),
-.BR smbclient (1),
-.BR nmbd (8),
-.BR testparm (1), 
-.BR testprns (1),
-.BR lpq (1),
-.BR hosts_access (5)
-.SH DIAGNOSTICS
-[This section under construction]
-
-Most diagnostics issued by the server are logged in a specified log file. The
-log file name is specified at compile time, but may be overridden on the
-smbd command line (see
-.BR smbd (8)).
-
-The number and nature of diagnostics available depends on the debug level used
-by the server. If you have problems, set the debug level to 3 and peruse the
-log files.
-
-Most messages are reasonably self-explanatory. Unfortunately, at time of
-creation of this man page the source code is still too fluid to warrant
-describing each and every diagnostic. At this stage your best bet is still
-to grep the source code and inspect the conditions that gave rise to the 
-diagnostics you are seeing.
-.SH BUGS
-None known.
-
-Please send bug reports, comments and so on to:
-
-.RS 3
-.B samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au (Andrew Tridgell)
-
-.RS 3
-or to the mailing list:
-.RE
-
-.B samba@listproc.anu.edu.au
-
-.RE
-You may also like to subscribe to the announcement channel:
-
-.RS 3
-.B samba-announce@listproc.anu.edu.au
-.RE
-
-To subscribe to these lists send a message to
-listproc@listproc.anu.edu.au with a body of "subscribe samba Your
-Name" or "subscribe samba-announce Your Name".
-
-Errors or suggestions for improvements to the Samba man pages should be 
-mailed to:
-
-.RS 3
-.B samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au (Andrew Tridgell)
-.RE
+.