Update for 2.0beta1.
authorJeremy Allison <jra@samba.org>
Sat, 14 Nov 1998 03:01:40 +0000 (03:01 +0000)
committerJeremy Allison <jra@samba.org>
Sat, 14 Nov 1998 03:01:40 +0000 (03:01 +0000)
Jeremy.
(This used to be commit 598d0255d40da29ebab3d1a3c9eb66ba654db7b5)

73 files changed:
docs/htmldocs/lmhosts.5.html
docs/htmldocs/make_smbcodepage.1.html
docs/htmldocs/nmbd.8.html
docs/htmldocs/nmblookup.1.html
docs/htmldocs/samba.7.html
docs/htmldocs/smb.conf.5.html
docs/htmldocs/smbclient.1.html
docs/htmldocs/smbd.8.html
docs/htmldocs/smbpasswd.5.html
docs/htmldocs/smbpasswd.8.html
docs/htmldocs/smbrun.1.html
docs/htmldocs/smbstatus.1.html
docs/htmldocs/smbtar.1.html
docs/htmldocs/swat.8.html
docs/htmldocs/testparm.1.html
docs/htmldocs/testprns.1.html
docs/manpages/lmhosts.5
docs/manpages/make_smbcodepage.1
docs/manpages/nmbd.8
docs/manpages/nmblookup.1
docs/manpages/samba.7
docs/manpages/smb.conf.5
docs/manpages/smbclient.1
docs/manpages/smbd.8
docs/manpages/smbmnt.8
docs/manpages/smbmount.8
docs/manpages/smbpasswd.5
docs/manpages/smbpasswd.8
docs/manpages/smbrun.1
docs/manpages/smbstatus.1
docs/manpages/smbtar.1
docs/manpages/smbumount.8
docs/manpages/swat.8
docs/manpages/testparm.1
docs/manpages/testprns.1
docs/textdocs/Application_Serving.txt
docs/textdocs/BROWSING-Config.txt
docs/textdocs/BROWSING.txt
docs/textdocs/BUGS.txt
docs/textdocs/CVS_ACCESS.txt
docs/textdocs/DHCP-Server-Configuration.txt
docs/textdocs/DIAGNOSIS.txt
docs/textdocs/DNIX.txt
docs/textdocs/DOMAIN.txt
docs/textdocs/DOMAIN_CONTROL.txt
docs/textdocs/ENCRYPTION.txt
docs/textdocs/Faxing.txt
docs/textdocs/GOTCHAS.txt
docs/textdocs/HINTS.txt
docs/textdocs/MIRRORS.txt
docs/textdocs/Macintosh_Clients.txt
docs/textdocs/NTDOMAIN.txt
docs/textdocs/NetBIOS.txt
docs/textdocs/OS2-Client-HOWTO.txt
docs/textdocs/PRINTER_DRIVER.txt
docs/textdocs/PROFILES.txt
docs/textdocs/Passwords.txt
docs/textdocs/Printing.txt
docs/textdocs/Recent-FAQs.txt
docs/textdocs/RoutedNetworks.txt
docs/textdocs/SCO.txt
docs/textdocs/SSLeay.txt
docs/textdocs/Speed.txt
docs/textdocs/Speed2.txt
docs/textdocs/Support.txt
docs/textdocs/Tracing.txt
docs/textdocs/UNIX-SMB.txt
docs/textdocs/UNIX_INSTALL.txt
docs/textdocs/UNIX_SECURITY.txt
docs/textdocs/Win95.txt
docs/textdocs/WinNT.txt
docs/textdocs/cifsntdomain.txt
docs/textdocs/security_level.txt

index f518c1871375ff4f09f07c201d41761b233fe735..d3ffedaff60cf936e177461392e098f0d1d709d9 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
 
 
 
-<html><head><title>lmhosts</title>
+<html><head><title>lmhosts (5)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>lmhosts</h1>
+<h1>lmhosts (5)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
 <h2>DESCRIPTION</h2>
     
 <p><br>This file is part of the <strong>Samba</strong> suite.
-<p><br>lmhosts is the <strong>Samba</strong> NetBIOS name to IP address mapping file.  It
+<p><br><strong>lmhosts</strong> is the <strong>Samba</strong> NetBIOS name to IP address mapping file.  It
 is very similar to the <strong>/etc/hosts</strong> file format, except that the
 hostname component must correspond to the NetBIOS naming format.
 <p><br><a name="FILEFORMAT"></a>
@@ -49,18 +49,12 @@ returned for all names that match the given name, whatever the NetBIOS
 name type in the lookup.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br>An example follows :
-<p><br><pre>
-
-
-#
-# Sample Samba lmhosts file.
-#
-192.9.200.1    TESTPC
-192.9.200.20   NTSERVER#20
-192.9.200.21   SAMBASERVER
-
-</pre>
-
+<p><br># <br>
+# Sample Samba lmhosts file. <br>
+# <br>
+192.9.200.1    TESTPC <br>
+192.9.200.20   NTSERVER#20 <br>
+192.9.200.21   SAMBASERVER <br>
 <p><br>Contains three IP to NetBIOS name mappings. The first and third will
 be returned for any queries for the names <code>"TESTPC"</code> and
 <code>"SAMBASERVER"</code> respectively, whatever the type component of the
@@ -84,7 +78,7 @@ as the <a href="smb.conf.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file.
 <h2>AUTHOR</h2>
     
 <p><br>The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed.
 <p><br>The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. The man page
index 34466d621605c60a4fb19ccd31292be4dfec18b2..10615deb864656cfe03ba768328af16467fd1008 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>make_smbcodepage</title>
+<html><head><title>make_smbcodepage (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>make_smbcodepage</h1>
+<h1>make_smbcodepage (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -36,15 +36,15 @@ with the internationalization features of Samba 2.0
     
 <p><br><ul>
 <p><br><a name="cord"></a>
-<li><strong>c|d</strong> This tells make_smbcodepage if it is compiling (c) a text
-format code page file to binary, or (d) de-compiling a binary codepage
+<li><strong>c|d</strong> This tells <strong>make_smbcodepage</strong> if it is compiling (<strong>c</strong>) a text
+format code page file to binary, or (<strong>d</strong>) de-compiling a binary codepage
 file to text.
 <p><br><a name="codepage"></a>
-<li><strong>codepage</strong> This is the codepage we are processing (a number, eg. 850).
+<li><strong>codepage</strong> This is the codepage we are processing (a number, e.g. 850).
 <p><br><a name="inputfile"></a>
-<li><strong>inputfile</strong> This is the input file to process. In the 'c' case this
+<li><strong>inputfile</strong> This is the input file to process. In the '<strong>c</strong>' case this
 will be a text codepage definition file such as the ones found in the
-Samba <em>source/codepages</em> directory. In the 'd' case this will be the
+Samba <em>source/codepages</em> directory. In the '<strong>d</strong>' case this will be the
 binary format codepage definition file normally found in the
 <em>lib/codepages</em> directory in the Samba install directory path.
 <p><br><a name="outputfile"></a>
@@ -57,9 +57,9 @@ binary format codepage definition file normally found in the
 Samba how to map from upper to lower case for characters greater than
 ascii 127 in the specified DOS code page.  Note that for certain DOS
 codepages (437 for example) mapping from lower to upper case may be
-asynchronous. For example, in code page 437 lower case a acute maps to
-a plain upper case A when going from lower to upper case, but maps
-from plain upper case A to plain lower case a when lower casing a
+non-symmetrical. For example, in code page 437 lower case a acute maps to
+a plain upper case A when going from lower to upper case, but
+plain upper case A maps to plain lower case a when lower casing a
 character.
 <p><br>A binary Samba codepage definition file is a binary representation of
 the same information, including a value that specifies what codepage
index 1408b6fd4ebf0296894da931f27efc4ffd0df9fe..dc8f5b0de3a9e6f5ddf0365037b416705cbadb66 100644 (file)
@@ -38,19 +38,19 @@ participates in the browsing protocols which make up the Windows
 <p><br>SMB/CIFS clients, when they start up, may wish to locate an SMB/CIFS
 server. That is, they wish to know what IP number a specified host is
 using.
-<p><br>Amongst other services, this program will listen for such requests,
+<p><br>Amongst other services, <strong>nmbd</strong> will listen for such requests,
 and if its own NetBIOS name is specified it will respond with the IP
 number of the host it is running on.  Its "own NetBIOS name" is by
 default the primary DNS name of the host it is running on, but this
-can be overriden with the <strong>-n</strong> option (see <em>OPTIONS</em> below). Thus
-nmbd will reply to broadcast queries for its own name(s). Additional
-names for nmbd to respond on can be set via parameters in the
-<strong>smb.conf (5)</strong> configuration file.
-<p><br>nmbd can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server)
+can be overridden with the <strong>-n</strong> option (see <a href="nmbd.8.html#OPTIONS">OPTIONS</a> below). Thus
+<strong>nmbd</strong> will reply to broadcast queries for its own name(s). Additional
+names for <strong>nmbd</strong> to respond on can be set via parameters in the
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf(5)</strong></a> configuration file.
+<p><br><strong>nmbd</strong> can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server)
 server. What this basically means is that it will act as a WINS
 database server, creating a database from name registration requests
 that it receives and replying to queries from clients for these names.
-<p><br>In addition, nmbd can act as a WINS proxy, relaying broadcast queries
+<p><br>In addition, <strong>nmbd</strong> can act as a WINS proxy, relaying broadcast queries
 from clients that do not understand how to talk the WINS protocol to a
 WIN server.
 <p><br><a name="OPTIONS"></a>
@@ -58,9 +58,9 @@ WIN server.
     
 <p><br><ul>
 <p><br><a name="minusD"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>-D</strong></strong> If specified, this parameter causes the server to operate
+<li><strong><strong>-D</strong></strong> If specified, this parameter causes <strong>nmbd</strong> to operate
 as a daemon. That is, it detaches itself and runs in the background,
-fielding requests on the appropriate port. By default, the server will
+fielding requests on the appropriate port. By default, <strong>nmbd</strong> will
 NOT operate as a daemon. nmbd can also be operated from the inetd
 meta-daemon, although this is not recommended.
 <p><br><a name="minusa"></a>
@@ -74,15 +74,16 @@ to.
 <li><strong><strong>-H filename</strong></strong> NetBIOS lmhosts file.
 <p><br>The lmhosts file is a list of NetBIOS names to IP addresses that is
 loaded by the nmbd server and used via the name resolution mechanism
-<em>name resolve order</em> described in <strong>smbd.conf (5)</strong> to resolve any
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html#nameresolveorder"><strong>name resolve order</strong></a> described in 
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf (5)</strong></a> to resolve any
 NetBIOS name queries needed by the server. Note that the contents of
-this file are <em>NOT</em> used by nmbd to answer any name queries, adding
+this file are <em>NOT</em> used by <strong>nmbd</strong> to answer any name queries. Adding
 a line to this file affects name NetBIOS resolution from this host
 <em>ONLY</em>.
 <p><br>The default path to this file is compiled into Samba as part of the
 build process. Common defaults are <em>/usr/local/samba/lib/lmhosts</em>,
-<em>/usr/samba/lib/lmhosts</em> or <em>/etc/lmhosts</em>. See the <strong>lmhosts
-(5)</strong> man page for details on the contents of this file.
+<em>/usr/samba/lib/lmhosts</em> or <em>/etc/lmhosts</em>. See the 
+<a href="lmhosts.5.html"><strong>lmhosts (5)</strong></a> man page for details on the contents of this file.
 <p><br><a name="minusd"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-d debuglevel</strong></strong> debuglevel is an integer from 0 to 10.
 <p><br>The default value if this parameter is not specified is zero.
@@ -105,7 +106,7 @@ be logged.  The actual log file name is generated by appending the
 extension ".nmb" to the specified base name.  For example, if the name
 specified was "log" then the file log.nmb would contain the debugging
 data.
-<p><br>The default log file path is is compiled into Samba as part of the
+<p><br>The default log file path is compiled into Samba as part of the
 build process. Common defaults are <em>/usr/local/samba/var/log.nmb</em>,
 <em>/usr/samba/var/log.nmb</em> or <em>/var/log/log.nmb</em>.
 <p><br><a name="minusn"></a>
@@ -117,7 +118,7 @@ but will override the setting in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf<
 <p><br><a name="minusp"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-p UDP port number</strong></strong> UDP port number is a positive integer value.
 <p><br>This option changes the default UDP port number (normally 137) that
-nmbd responds to name queries on. Don't use this option unless you are
+<strong>nmbd</strong> responds to name queries on. Don't use this option unless you are
 an expert, in which case you won't need help!
 <p><br><a name="minuss"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-s configuration file</strong></strong> The default configuration file name is
@@ -126,14 +127,14 @@ this may be changed when Samba is autoconfigured.
 <p><br>The file specified contains the configuration details required by the
 server. See <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf (5)</strong></a> for more information.
 <p><br><a name="minusi"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>-i scope</strong></strong> This specifies a NetBIOS scope that the server will use
+<li><strong><strong>-i scope</strong></strong> This specifies a NetBIOS scope that <strong>nmbd</strong> will use
 to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names. For details on the
 use of NetBIOS scopes, see rfc1001.txt and rfc1002.txt. NetBIOS scopes
 are <em>very</em> rarely used, only set this parameter if you are the
 system administrator in charge of all the NetBIOS systems you
 communicate with.
 <p><br><a name="minush"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>-h</strong></strong> Prints the help information (usage) for nmbd.
+<li><strong><strong>-h</strong></strong> Prints the help information (usage) for <strong>nmbd</strong>.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br><a name="FILES"></a>
 <h2>FILES</h2>
@@ -142,11 +143,12 @@ communicate with.
 <p><br>If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must
 contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon.
 <p><br><strong>/etc/rc</strong>
-<p><br>(or whatever initialisation script your system uses).
+<p><br>(or whatever initialization script your system uses).
 <p><br>If running the server as a daemon at startup, this file will need to
 contain an appropriate startup sequence for the server.
 <p><br><strong>/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</strong>
-<p><br>This is the default location of the <em>smb.conf</em> server configuration
+<p><br>This is the default location of the 
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> server configuration
 file. Other common places that systems install this file are
 <em>/usr/samba/lib/smb.conf</em> and <em>/etc/smb.conf</em>.
 <p><br>When run as a <strong>WINS</strong> server (see the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#winssupport"><strong>wins support</strong></a>
@@ -160,17 +162,17 @@ configured under wherever Samba was configured to install itself.
 <p><br><a name="SIGNALS"></a>
 <h2>SIGNALS</h2>
     
-<p><br>To shut down an nmbd process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
+<p><br>To shut down an <strong>nmbd</strong> process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
 <em>NOT</em> be used, except as a last resort, as this may leave the name
-database in an inconsistant state. The correct way to terminate
-nmbd is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
+database in an inconsistent state. The correct way to terminate
+<strong>nmbd</strong> is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
 its own.
-<p><br>nmbd will accept SIGHUP, which will cause it to dump out it's
-namelists into the file namelist.debug in the
+<p><br><strong>nmbd</strong> will accept SIGHUP, which will cause it to dump out it's
+namelists into the file <code>namelist.debug</code> in the
 <em>/usr/local/samba/var/locks</em> directory (or the <em>var/locks</em>
 directory configured under wherever Samba was configured to install
-itself). This will also cause nmbd to dump out it's server database in
-the log.nmb file. In addition, the the debug log level of nmbd may be raised
+itself). This will also cause <strong>nmbd</strong> to dump out it's server database in
+the log.nmb file. In addition, the debug log level of nmbd may be raised
 by sending it a SIGUSR1 (<code>kill -USR1 &lt;nmbd-pid&gt;</code>) and lowered by sending it a
 SIGUSR2 (<code>kill -USR2 &lt;nmbd-pid&gt;</code>). This is to allow transient
 problems to be diagnosed, whilst still running at a normally low log
@@ -193,7 +195,7 @@ available as a link from the Web page :
 <h2>AUTHOR</h2>
     
 <p><br>The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed.
 <p><br>The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. The man page
index 9fbab962a2938918b54909778df230f27158d6e1..217ddd79655ef5919ccb0cbbdd15368667314055 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>nmblookup</title>
+<html><head><title>nmblookup (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>nmblookup</h1>
+<h1>nmblookup (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@
 <p><br>This program is part of the <strong>Samba</strong> suite.
 <p><br><strong>nmblookup</strong> is used to query NetBIOS names and map them to IP
 addresses in a network using NetBIOS over TCP/IP queries. The options
-allow the name queries to be directed at a particlar IP broadcast area
+allow the name queries to be directed at a particular IP broadcast area
 or to a particular machine. All queries are done over UDP.
 <p><br><a name="OPTIONS"></a>
 <h2>OPTIONS</h2>
@@ -49,12 +49,13 @@ NetBIOS processing code on a machine is used instead. See rfc1001,
 rfc1002 for details.
 <p><br><a name="minusS"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-S</strong></strong> Once the name query has returned an IP address then do a
-node status query as well.
+node status query as well. A node status query returns the NetBIOS names 
+registered by a host.
 <p><br><a name="minusr"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-r</strong></strong> Try and bind to UDP port 137 to send and receive UDP
 datagrams. The reason for this option is a bug in Windows 95 where it
 ignores the source port of the requesting packet and only replies to
-UDP port 137. Unfortunately, on most UNIX systems root privillage is
+UDP port 137. Unfortunately, on most UNIX systems root privilage is
 needed to bind to this port, and in addition, if the
 <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> daemon is running on this machine it also
 binds to this port.
@@ -89,11 +90,11 @@ level</strong></a> parameter in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf
 (5)</strong></a> file.
 <p><br><a name="minuss"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-s smb.conf</strong></strong> This parameter specifies the pathname to the
-Samba configuration file, smb.conf. This file controls all aspects of
-the Samba setup on the machine and smbclient also needs to read this
-file.
+Samba configuration file, <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a>. 
+This file controls all aspects of
+the Samba setup on the machine.
 <p><br><a name="minusi"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>-i scope</strong></strong> This specifies a NetBIOS scope that smbclient will use
+<li><strong><strong>-i scope</strong></strong> This specifies a NetBIOS scope that <strong>nmblookup</strong> will use
 to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names. For details on the
 use of NetBIOS scopes, see rfc1001.txt and rfc1002.txt. NetBIOS scopes
 are <em>very</em> rarely used, only set this parameter if you are the
@@ -103,14 +104,15 @@ communicate with.
 <li><strong><strong>name</strong></strong> This is the NetBIOS name being queried. Depending upon
 the previous options this may be a NetBIOS name or IP address. If a
 NetBIOS name then the different name types may be specified by
-appending <code>#&lt;type&gt;</code> to the name.
+appending <code>#&lt;type&gt;</code> to the name. This name may also be <code>"*"</code>,
+which will return all registered names within a broadcast area.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br><a name="EXAMPLES"></a>
 <h2>EXAMPLES</h2>
     
-<p><br><strong>nmblookup</strong> can be used to query a WINS server (in the same way .B
-nslookup is used to query DNS servers). To query a WINS server,
-nmblookup must be called like this:
+<p><br><strong>nmblookup</strong> can be used to query a WINS server (in the same way
+<strong>nslookup</strong> is used to query DNS servers). To query a WINS server,
+<strong>nmblookup</strong> must be called like this:
 <p><br><code>nmblookup -U server -R 'name'</code>
 <p><br>For example, running :
 <p><br><code>nmblookup -U samba.anu.edu.au -R IRIX#1B'</code>
@@ -129,7 +131,7 @@ browser (1B name type) for the IRIX workgroup.
 <h2>AUTHOR</h2>
     
 <p><br>The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed.
 <p><br>The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. The man page
index 1408b2163dfbba036e9b5aa97c54c760a7626ec1..1f6b8a0ae51bdf70d63ce12929fde278e869d149 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 
 
 
-<html><head><title>Samba</title>
+<html><head><title>Samba (7)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>Samba</h1>
+<h1>Samba (7)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
 <h2>DESCRIPTION</h2>
     
 <p><br>The Samba software suite is a collection of programs that implements
-the Server Message Block(commenly abbreviated as SMB) protocol for
+the Server Message Block(commonly abbreviated as SMB) protocol for
 UNIX systems. This protocol is sometimes also referred to as the
 Common Internet File System (CIFS), LanManager or NetBIOS protocol.
 <p><br><a name="COMPONENTS"></a>
@@ -38,7 +38,8 @@ Common Internet File System (CIFS), LanManager or NetBIOS protocol.
 described in a separate manual page. It is strongly recommended that
 you read the documentation that comes with Samba and the manual pages
 of those components that you use. If the manual pages aren't clear
-enough then please send a patch to <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>.
+enough then please send a patch or bug report
+to <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>.
 <p><br><ul> 
 <p><br><li><strong><a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a></strong> <br> <br> The <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong>
 (8)</a> daemon provides the file and print services to SMB
@@ -62,8 +63,8 @@ Windows NT).
 (1)</strong></a> utility allows you to test the printers defined
 in your printcap file.
 <p><br><li><strong><a href="smbstatus.1.html"><strong>smbstatus</strong></a></strong> <br> <br> The <a href="smbstatus.1.html"><strong>smbstatus</strong>
-(1)</a> utility allows you to tell who is currently
-using the <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd (8)</strong></a> server.
+(1)</a> utility allows you list current connections to the 
+<a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd (8)</strong></a> server.
 <p><br><li><strong><a href="nmblookup.1.html"><strong>nmblookup</strong></a></strong> <br> <br> the
 <a href="nmblookup.1.html"><strong>nmblookup (1)</strong></a> utility allows NetBIOS name
 queries to be made from the UNIX machine.
@@ -81,7 +82,7 @@ passwords on Samba and Windows NT(tm) servers.
 <p><br>The Samba software suite is licensed under the GNU Public License
 (GPL). A copy of that license should have come with the package in the
 file COPYING. You are encouraged to distribute copies of the Samba
-suite, but please keep obey the terms of this license.
+suite, but please obey the terms of this license.
 <p><br>The latest version of the Samba suite can be obtained via anonymous
 ftp from samba.anu.edu.au in the directory pub/samba/. It is
 also available on several mirror sites worldwide.
@@ -107,7 +108,7 @@ for details on how to do this.
 <p><br>If you have patches to submit or bugs to report then you may mail them
 directly to <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>. Note, however, that due to
 the enormous popularity of this package the Samba Team may take some
-time to repond to mail. We prefer patches in <em>diff -u</em> format.
+time to respond to mail. We prefer patches in <em>diff -u</em> format.
 <p><br><a name="CREDITS"></a>
 <h2>CREDITS</h2>
     
@@ -119,7 +120,7 @@ for the pre-CVS changes and at
 for the contributors to Samba post-CVS. CVS is the Open Source source
 code control system used by the Samba Team to develop Samba. The
 project would have been unmanageable without it.
-<p><br>In addition, several commercial organisations now help fund the Samba
+<p><br>In addition, several commercial organizations now help fund the Samba
 Team with money and equipment. For details see the Samba Web pages at
 <a href="http://samba.anu.edu.au/samba/samba-thanks.html">http://samba.anu.edu.au/samba/samba-thanks.html</a>.
 <p><br><a name="AUTHOR"></a>
index b1ff9dd3f28ff613aa3ed5ce884a0214abe93281..a0c1eb82b361dfad1aca503164aadb4323063d2f 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smb.conf</title>
+<html><head><title>smb.conf (5)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smb.conf</h1>
+<h1>smb.conf (5)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ them. The client provides the username. As older clients only provide
 passwords and not usernames, you may specify a list of usernames to
 check against the password using the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#user"><strong>"user="</strong></a> option in
 the share definition. For modern clients such as Windows 95/98 and
-Windows NT, this should not be neccessary.
+Windows NT, this should not be necessary.
 <p><br>Note that the access rights granted by the server are masked by the
 access rights granted to the specified or guest UNIX user by the host
 system. The server does not grant more access than the host system
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ the share name "foo":
 
        [foo]
                path = /home/bar
-               writable = true
+               writeable = true
 
 
 </pre>
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ following is a typical and suitable [homes] section:
 <p><br><pre>
 
        [homes]
-               writable = yes
+               writeable = yes
 
 </pre>
 
@@ -197,14 +197,14 @@ given, the username is set to the located printer name.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br>Note that the [printers] service MUST be printable - if you specify
 otherwise, the server will refuse to load the configuration file.
-<p><br>Typically the path specified would be that of a world-writable spool
+<p><br>Typically the path specified would be that of a world-writeable spool
 directory with the sticky bit set on it. A typical [printers] entry
 would look like this:
 <p><br><pre>
 
        [printers]
                path = /usr/spool/public
-               writable = no
+               writeable = no
                guest ok = yes
                printable = yes 
 
@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ this:
 
 <p><br>Each alias should be an acceptable printer name for your printing
 subsystem. In the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#global"><strong>[global]</strong></a> section, specify the new
-file as your printcap.  The server will then only recognise names
+file as your printcap.  The server will then only recognize names
 found in your pseudo-printcap, which of course can contain whatever
 aliases you like. The same technique could be used simply to limit
 access to a subset of your local printers.
@@ -233,15 +233,15 @@ of a printcap record. Records are separated by newlines, components
 defined on the system you may be able to use <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printcapname"><strong>"printcap name =
 lpstat"</strong></a> to automatically obtain a list of
 printers. See the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printcapname"><strong>"printcap name"</strong></a> option for
-more detils.
+more details.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br><a name="PARAMETERS"></a>
 <h2>PARAMETERS</h2>
     
 <p><br>Parameters define the specific attributes of sections.
 <p><br>Some parameters are specific to the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#global"><strong>[global]</strong></a> section
-(eg., <a href="smb.conf.5.html#security"><strong>security</strong></a>).  Some parameters are usable in
-all sections (eg., <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmode"><strong>create mode</strong></a>). All others are
+(e.g., <a href="smb.conf.5.html#security"><strong>security</strong></a>).  Some parameters are usable in
+all sections (e.g., <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmode"><strong>create mode</strong></a>). All others are
 permissible only in normal sections. For the purposes of the following
 descriptions the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#homes"><strong>[homes]</strong></a> and
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printers"><strong>[printers]</strong></a> sections will be considered normal.
@@ -250,7 +250,7 @@ specific to the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#global"><strong>[global]</strong></a> s
 indicates that a parameter can be specified in a service specific
 section. Note that all <code>'S'</code> parameters can also be specified in the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#global"><strong>[global]</strong></a> section - in which case they will define
-the default behaviour for all services.
+the default behavior for all services.
 <p><br>Parameters are arranged here in alphabetical order - this may not
 create best bedfellows, but at least you can find them! Where there
 are synonyms, the preferred synonym is described, others refer to the
@@ -308,8 +308,8 @@ negotiation. It can be one of CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2 or NT1.
 <li > <strong>%d</strong> = The process id of the current server process.
 <p><br><a name="percenta"></a> 
 <li > <strong>%a</strong> = the architecture of the remote
-machine. Only some are recognised, and those may not be 100%
-reliable. It currently recognises Samba, WfWg, WinNT and
+machine. Only some are recognized, and those may not be 100%
+reliable. It currently recognizes Samba, WfWg, WinNT and
 Win95. Anything else will be known as "UNKNOWN". If it gets it wrong
 then sending a level 3 log to <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>
 should allow it to be fixed.
@@ -717,7 +717,7 @@ regardless if the owner of the file is the currently logged on user or not.
 <p><br>This specifies what type of server <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> will
 announce itself as, to a network neighborhood browse list. By default
 this is set to Windows NT. The valid options are : "NT", "Win95" or
-"WfW" meaining Windows NT, Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups
+"WfW" meaning Windows NT, Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups
 respectively. Do not change this parameter unless you have a specific
 need to stop Samba appearing as an NT server as this may prevent Samba
 servers from participating as browser servers correctly.
@@ -784,7 +784,7 @@ the interface list given in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#interfaces"><strong>'in
 parameter. This restricts the networks that <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a>
 will serve to packets coming in those interfaces.  Note that you
 should not use this parameter for machines that are serving PPP or
-other intermittant or non-broadcast network interfaces as it will not
+other intermittent or non-broadcast network interfaces as it will not
 cope with non-permanent interfaces.
 <p><br>In addition, to change a users SMB password, the
 <a href="smbpasswd.8.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> by default connects to the
@@ -820,13 +820,8 @@ request immediately if the lock range cannot be obtained.
 <p><br><strong>Example:</strong>
 <code> blocking locks = False</code>
 <p><br><a name="browsable"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>broweable (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This controls whether this share is seen in the list of available
-shares in a net view and in the browse list.
-<p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
-<code> browsable = Yes</code>
-<p><br><strong>Example:</strong>
-<code> browsable = No</code>
+<li><strong><strong>browseable (S)</strong></strong>
+<p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#browseable"><strong>browseable</strong></a>.
 <p><br><a name="browselist"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>browse list(G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This controls whether <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> will serve a browse
@@ -836,7 +831,12 @@ should never need to change this.
 <code> browse list = Yes</code>
 <p><br><a name="browseable"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>browseable</strong></strong>
-<p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#browsable"><strong>browsable</strong></a>.
+<p><br>This controls whether this share is seen in the list of available
+shares in a net view and in the browse list.
+<p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
+<code> browseable = Yes</code>
+<p><br><strong>Example:</strong>
+<code> browseable = No</code>
 <p><br><a name="casesensitive"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>case sensitive (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>See the discussion in the section <a href="smb.conf.5.html#NAMEMANGLING"><strong>NAME MANGLING</strong></a>.
@@ -907,7 +907,7 @@ described more fully in the manual page <a href="make_smbcodepage.1.html"><stron
 (1)</strong></a>, tell <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> how
 to map lower to upper case characters to provide the case insensitivity
 of filenames that Windows clients expect.
-<p><br>Samba currenly ships with the following code page files :
+<p><br>Samba currently ships with the following code page files :
 <p><br><ul>
 <p><br><li > <strong>Code Page 437 - MS-DOS Latin US</strong>
 <p><br><li > <strong>Code Page 737 - Windows '95 Greek</strong>
@@ -960,10 +960,10 @@ codes.
 Shift-JIS to JUNET code with different shift-in, shift out codes.
 <p><br><li > <strong>EUC</strong>  Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to EUC code.
 <p><br><li > <strong>HEX</strong> Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to a 3 byte hex
-representation, ie. <code>:AB</code>.
+representation, i.e. <code>:AB</code>.
 <p><br><li > <strong>CAP</strong> Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to the 3 byte hex
-representation used by the Columbia Appletalk Program (CAP),
-ie. <code>:AB</code>.  This is used for compatibility between Samba and CAP.
+representation used by the Columbia AppleTalk Program (CAP),
+i.e. <code>:AB</code>.  This is used for compatibility between Samba and CAP.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br><a name="comment"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>comment (S)</strong></strong>
@@ -1005,7 +1005,7 @@ in the configuration file than the service doing the copying.
 <p><br><a name="createmask"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>create mask (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>A synonym for this parameter is <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmode"><strong>'create mode'</strong></a>.
-<p><br>When a file is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
+<p><br>When a file is created, the necessary permissions are calculated
 according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and the
 resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise 'AND'ed with this parameter.
 This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX modes
@@ -1123,7 +1123,7 @@ you want.
 delete any files and directories within the vetoed directory. This can
 be useful for integration with file serving systems such as <strong>NetAtalk</strong>,
 which create meta-files within directories you might normally veto
-DOS/Windows users from seeing (eg. <code>.AppleDouble</code>)
+DOS/Windows users from seeing (e.g. <code>.AppleDouble</code>)
 <p><br>Setting <code>'delete veto files = True'</code> allows these directories to be 
 transparently deleted when the parent directory is deleted (so long
 as the user has permissions to do so).
@@ -1161,7 +1161,7 @@ second should be the number of available blocks. An optional third
 return value can give the block size in bytes. The default blocksize
 is 1024 bytes.
 <p><br>Note: Your script should <em>NOT</em> be setuid or setgid and should be
-owned by (and writable only by) root!
+owned by (and writeable only by) root!
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> By default internal routines for determining the disk capacity
 and remaining space will be used.</code>
@@ -1192,7 +1192,7 @@ path names on some systems.
 <li><strong><strong>directory mask (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This parameter is the octal modes which are used when converting DOS
 modes to UNIX modes when creating UNIX directories.
-<p><br>When a directory is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
+<p><br>When a directory is created, the necessary permissions are calculated
 according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and the
 resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise 'AND'ed with this parameter.
 This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX modes
@@ -1203,7 +1203,7 @@ write bits from the UNIX mode, allowing only the user who owns the
 directory to modify it.
 <p><br>Following this Samba will bit-wise 'OR' the UNIX mode created from
 this parameter with the value of the "force directory mode"
-parameter. This parameter is set to 000 by default (ie. no extra mode
+parameter. This parameter is set to 000 by default (i.e. no extra mode
 bits are added).
 <p><br>See the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#forcedirectorymode"><strong>"force directory mode"</strong></a> parameter
 to cause particular mode bits to always be set on created directories.
@@ -1236,7 +1236,7 @@ DNS name lookup requests, as doing a name lookup is a blocking action.
 <p><br>This is an <strong>EXPERIMENTAL</strong> parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code. It may be removed in a later release.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <a href="mailto:listproc@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>listproc@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>
 <p><br><a name="domainadminusers"></a> 
@@ -1244,7 +1244,7 @@ mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <p><br>This is an <strong>EXPERIMENTAL</strong> parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code. It may be removed in a later release.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <a href="mailto:listproc@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>listproc@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>
 <p><br><a name="domaincontroller"></a>
@@ -1257,7 +1257,7 @@ files. It is left behind for compatibility reasons.
 <p><br>This is an <strong>EXPERIMENTAL</strong> parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code. It may be removed in a later release.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <a href="mailto:listproc@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>listproc@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>
 <p><br><a name="domainguestgroup"></a>
@@ -1265,7 +1265,7 @@ mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <p><br>This is an <strong>EXPERIMENTAL</strong> parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code. It may be removed in a later release.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <a href="mailto:listproc@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>listproc@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>
 <p><br><a name="domainguestusers"></a>
@@ -1273,7 +1273,7 @@ mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <p><br>This is an <strong>EXPERIMENTAL</strong> parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code. It may be removed in a later release.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list <strong>Samba-ntdom</strong> available by sending email to
 <a href="mailto:listproc@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>listproc@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>
 <p><br><a name="domainlogons"></a>
@@ -1284,7 +1284,7 @@ details on setting up this feature see the file DOMAINS.txt in the
 Samba documentation directory <code>docs/</code> shipped with the source code.
 <p><br>Note that Win95/98 Domain logons are <em>NOT</em> the same as Windows
 NT Domain logons. NT Domain logons require a Primary Domain Controller
-(PDC) for the Domain. It is inteded that in a future release Samba
+(PDC) for the Domain. It is intended that in a future release Samba
 will be able to provide this functionality for Windows NT clients
 also.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
@@ -1292,7 +1292,7 @@ also.
 <p><br><a name="domainmaster"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>domain master (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>Tell <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> to enable WAN-wide browse list
-collation.Setting this option causes <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> to
+collation. Setting this option causes <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> to
 claim a special domain specific NetBIOS name that identifies it as a
 domain master browser for its given
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>workgroup</strong></a>. Local master browsers in the same
@@ -1305,7 +1305,7 @@ list, instead of just the list for their broadcast-isolated subnet.
 <p><br>Note that Windows NT Primary Domain Controllers expect to be able to
 claim this <a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>workgroup</strong></a> specific special NetBIOS
 name that identifies them as domain master browsers for that
-<a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>workgroup</strong></a> by default (ie. there is no way to
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>workgroup</strong></a> by default (i.e. there is no way to
 prevent a Windows NT PDC from attempting to do this). This means that
 if this parameter is set and <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> claims the
 special name for a <a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>workgroup</strong></a> before a Windows NT
@@ -1315,7 +1315,7 @@ and may fail.
 <code> domain master = no</code>
 <p><br><a name="dontdescend"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>dont descend (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>There are certain directories on some systems (eg., the <code>/proc</code> tree
+<p><br>There are certain directories on some systems (e.g., the <code>/proc</code> tree
 under Linux) that are either not of interest to clients or are
 infinitely deep (recursive). This parameter allows you to specify a
 comma-delimited list of directories that the server should always show
@@ -1329,7 +1329,7 @@ just <code>"/proc"</code>. Experimentation is the best policy :-)
 <code> dont descend = /proc,/dev</code>
 <p><br><a name="dosfiletimeresolution"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>dos filetime resolution (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>Under the DOS and Windows FAT filesystem, the finest granulatity on
+<p><br>Under the DOS and Windows FAT filesystem, the finest granularity on
 time resolution is two seconds. Setting this parameter for a share
 causes Samba to round the reported time down to the nearest two second
 boundary when a query call that requires one second resolution is made
@@ -1355,7 +1355,7 @@ the timestamp on it. Under POSIX semantics, only the owner of the file
 or root may change the timestamp. By default, Samba runs with POSIX
 semantics and refuses to change the timestamp on a file if the user
 smbd is acting on behalf of is not the file owner. Setting this option
-to True allows DOS semantics and smbd will change the file timstamp as
+to True allows DOS semantics and smbd will change the file timestamp as
 DOS requires.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> dos filetimes = False</code>
@@ -1435,16 +1435,16 @@ same time you can get data corruption. Use this option carefully!
 particular share. Setting this parameter to <em>"No"</em> prevents any file
 or directory that is a symbolic link from being followed (the user
 will get an error).  This option is very useful to stop users from
-adding a symbolic link to <code>/etc/pasword</code> in their home directory for
+adding a symbolic link to <code>/etc/passwd</code> in their home directory for
 instance.  However it will slow filename lookups down slightly.
-<p><br>This option is enabled (ie. <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> will follow
+<p><br>This option is enabled (i.e. <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> will follow
 symbolic links) by default.
 <p><br><a name="forcecreatemode"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>force create mode (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that will
 <em>*always*</em> be set on a file created by Samba. This is done by
 bitwise 'OR'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a file that is being
-created. The default for this parameter is (in octel) 000. The modes
+created. The default for this parameter is (in octal) 000. The modes
 in this parameter are bitwise 'OR'ed onto the file mode after the mask
 set in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a> parameter is applied.
 <p><br>See also the parameter <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a> for details
@@ -1461,7 +1461,7 @@ the 'user'.
 <p><br>This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that will
 <em>*always*</em> be set on a directory created by Samba. This is done by
 bitwise 'OR'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a directory that is
-being created. The default for this parameter is (in octel) 0000 which
+being created. The default for this parameter is (in octal) 0000 which
 will not add any extra permission bits to a created directory. This
 operation is done after the mode mask in the parameter
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#directorymask"><strong>"directory mask"</strong></a> is applied.
@@ -1516,7 +1516,7 @@ Windows NT but this can be changed to other strings such as "Samba" or
 <code> fstype = Samba</code>
 <p><br><a name="getwdcache"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>getwd cache (G)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This is a tuning option. When this is enabled a cacheing algorithm
+<p><br>This is a tuning option. When this is enabled a caching algorithm
 will be used to reduce the time taken for getwd() calls. This can have
 a significant impact on performance, especially when the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#widelinks"><strong>widelinks</strong></a> parameter is set to False.
@@ -1584,8 +1584,8 @@ directories that match.
 <p><br>Each entry in the list must be separated by a <code>'/'</code>, which allows
 spaces to be included in the entry.  <code>'*'</code> and <code>'?'</code> can be used
 to specify multiple files or directories as in DOS wildcards.
-<p><br>Each entry must be a unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
-unix directory separator <code>'/'</code>.
+<p><br>Each entry must be a Unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
+Unix directory separator <code>'/'</code>.
 <p><br>Note that the case sensitivity option is applicable in hiding files.
 <p><br>Setting this parameter will affect the performance of Samba, as it
 will be forced to check all files and directories for a match as they
@@ -1719,7 +1719,7 @@ parameter allows the use of them to be turned on or off.
 <p><br>Kernel oplocks support allows Samba <a href="smb.conf.5.html#oplocks"><strong>oplocks</strong></a> to be
 broken whenever a local UNIX process or NFS operation accesses a file
 that <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> has oplocked. This allows complete
-data consistancy between SMB/CIFS, NFS and local file access (and is a
+data consistency between SMB/CIFS, NFS and local file access (and is a
 <em>very</em> cool feature :-).
 <p><br>This parameter defaults to <em>"On"</em> on systems that have the support,
 and <em>"off"</em> on systems that don't. You should never need to touch
@@ -1832,7 +1832,7 @@ will be loaded for browsing by default. See the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printers"><strong>"printers"</strong></a> section for more details.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> load printers = yes</code>
-<p><br>bg(Example:)
+<p><br><strong>Example:</strong>
 <code> load printers = no</code>
 <p><br><a name="localmaster"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>local master (G)</strong></strong>
@@ -1926,14 +1926,14 @@ preferences and directories to be loaded onto the Windows 95/98
 client.  The share must be writeable when the logs in for the first
 time, in order that the Windows 95/98 client can create the user.dat
 and other directories.
-<p><br>Thereafter, the directories and any of contents can, if required, be
-made read-only.  It is not adviseable that the USER.DAT file be made
+<p><br>Thereafter, the directories and any of the contents can, if required, be
+made read-only.  It is not advisable that the USER.DAT file be made
 read-only - rename it to USER.MAN to achieve the desired effect (a
 <em>MAN</em>datory profile).
 <p><br>Windows clients can sometimes maintain a connection to the [homes]
 share, even though there is no user logged in.  Therefore, it is vital
 that the logon path does not include a reference to the homes share
-(i.e setting this parameter to <code>\\%N\HOMES\profile_path</code> will cause
+(i.e. setting this parameter to <code>\\%N\HOMES\profile_path</code> will cause
 problems).
 <p><br>This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
 separate logon scripts for each user or machine.
@@ -1956,7 +1956,7 @@ file that will be downloaded is:
 <p><br><code>/usr/local/samba/netlogon/STARTUP.BAT</code>
 <p><br>The contents of the batch file is entirely your choice.  A suggested
 command would be to add <code>NET TIME \\SERVER /SET /YES</code>, to force every
-machine to synchronise clocks with the same time server.  Another use
+machine to synchronize clocks with the same time server.  Another use
 would be to add <code>NET USE U: \\SERVER\UTILS</code> for commonly used
 utilities, or <code>NET USE Q: \\SERVER\ISO9001_QA</code> for example.
 <p><br>Note that it is particularly important not to allow write access to
@@ -2010,7 +2010,7 @@ the <strong>lpq</strong> command in use.
 previous identical <strong>lpq</strong> command will be used if the cached data is
 less than 10 seconds old. A large value may be advisable if your
 <strong>lpq</strong> command is very slow.
-<p><br>A value of 0 will disable cacheing completely.
+<p><br>A value of 0 will disable caching completely.
 <p><br>See also the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printing"><strong>"printing"</strong></a> parameter.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> lpq cache time = 10</code>
@@ -2135,8 +2135,8 @@ end.
 <p><br>See the section on <a href="smb.conf.5.html#NAMEMANGLING"><strong>"NAME MANGLING"</strong></a>.
 <p><br><a name="mangledmap"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>mangled map (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which are
-not representable on Windows/DOS.  The mangling of names is not always
+<p><br>This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which can
+not be represented on Windows/DOS.  The mangling of names is not always
 what is needed.  In particular you may have documents with file
 extensions that differ between DOS and UNIX. For example, under UNIX
 it is common to use <code>".html"</code> for HTML files, whereas under
@@ -2144,7 +2144,7 @@ Windows/DOS <code>".htm"</code> is more commonly used.
 <p><br>So to map <code>"html"</code> to <code>"htm"</code> you would use:
 <p><br><code>  mangled map = (*.html *.htm)</code>
 <p><br>One very useful case is to remove the annoying <code>";1"</code> off the ends
-of filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXes). To do
+of filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXs). To do
 this use a map of (*;1 *).
 <p><br><strong>default:</strong>
 <code> no mangled map</code>
@@ -2233,7 +2233,7 @@ becoming executable under UNIX.  This can be quite annoying for shared
 source code, documents, etc...
 <p><br>Note that this requires the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a>
 parameter to be set such that owner execute bit is not masked out
-(ie. it must include 100). See the parameter <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create
+(i.e. it must include 100). See the parameter <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create
 mask"</strong></a> for details.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code>      map archive = yes</code>
@@ -2244,7 +2244,7 @@ mask"</strong></a> for details.
 <p><br>This controls whether DOS style hidden files should be mapped to the
 UNIX world execute bit.
 <p><br>Note that this requires the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a> to be
-set such that the world execute bit is not masked out (ie. it must
+set such that the world execute bit is not masked out (i.e. it must
 include 001). See the parameter <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a>
 for details.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
@@ -2256,7 +2256,7 @@ for details.
 <p><br>This controls whether DOS style system files should be mapped to the
 UNIX group execute bit.
 <p><br>Note that this requires the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a> to be
-set such that the group execute bit is not masked out (ie. it must
+set such that the group execute bit is not masked out (i.e. it must
 include 010). See the parameter <a href="smb.conf.5.html#createmask"><strong>"create mask"</strong></a>
 for details.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
@@ -2266,7 +2266,7 @@ for details.
 <p><br><a name="maptoguest"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>map to guest (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This parameter is only useful in <a href="smb.conf.5.html#security"><strong>security</strong></a> modes
-other than <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequalshare"><strong>"security=share"</strong></a> - ie. user,
+other than <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequalshare"><strong>"security=share"</strong></a> - i.e. user,
 server, and domain.
 <p><br>This parameter can take three different values, which tell
 <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> what to do with user login requests that
@@ -2282,7 +2282,7 @@ account"</strong></a>.
 <p><br><li > <strong>"Bad Password"</strong> - Means user logins with an invalid
 password are treated as a guest login and mapped into the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#guestaccount"><strong>"guest account"</strong></a>. Note that this can
-cause problems as it means that any user mistyping their
+cause problems as it means that any user incorrectly typing their
 password will be silently logged on a <strong>"guest"</strong> - and 
 will not know the reason they cannot access files they think
 they should - there will have been no message given to them
@@ -2358,7 +2358,7 @@ never need to set this parameter.
 <p><br>This parameter limits the maximum number of open files that one
 <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> file serving process may have open for
 a client at any one time. The default for this parameter is set
-very high (10,000) as Samba uses only one bit per un-opened file.
+very high (10,000) as Samba uses only one bit per unopened file.
 <p><br>The limit of the number of open files is usually set by the
 UNIX per-process file descriptor limit rather than this parameter
 so you should never need to touch this parameter.
@@ -2542,7 +2542,7 @@ system and the Samba server with this option must also be a
 <code> nis homedir = true</code>
 <p><br><a name="ntpipesupport"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>nt pipe support (G)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This boolean parameter controlls whether <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a>
+<p><br>This boolean parameter controls whether <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a>
 will allow Windows NT clients to connect to the NT SMB specific
 <code>IPC$</code> pipes. This is a developer debugging option and can be left
 alone.
@@ -2550,7 +2550,7 @@ alone.
 <code> nt pipe support = yes</code>
 <p><br><a name="ntsmbsupport"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>nt smb support (G)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This boolean parameter controlls whether <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a>
+<p><br>This boolean parameter controls whether <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a>
 will negotiate NT specific SMB support with Windows NT
 clients. Although this is a developer debugging option and should be
 left alone, benchmarking has discovered that Windows NT clients give
@@ -2607,14 +2607,14 @@ of the user.
 <li><strong><strong>oplocks (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This boolean option tells smbd whether to issue oplocks (opportunistic
 locks) to file open requests on this share. The oplock code can
-dramatically (approx 30% or more) improve the speed of access to files
-on Samba servers. It allows the clients to agressively cache files
+dramatically (approx. 30% or more) improve the speed of access to files
+on Samba servers. It allows the clients to aggressively cache files
 locally and you may want to disable this option for unreliable network
 environments (it is turned on by default in Windows NT Servers).  For
 more information see the file Speed.txt in the Samba docs/ directory.
 <p><br>Oplocks may be selectively turned off on certain files on a per share basis.
-See the 'veto oplock files' parameter. On some systems oplocks are recognised
-by the underlying operating system. This allows data synchronisation between
+See the 'veto oplock files' parameter. On some systems oplocks are recognized
+by the underlying operating system. This allows data synchronization between
 all access to oplocked files, whether it be via Samba or NFS or a local
 UNIX process. See the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#kerneloplocks"><strong>kernel oplocks</strong></a> parameter
 for details.
@@ -2645,7 +2645,7 @@ old <strong>smb.conf</strong> files.
 <p><br>This is a Samba developer option that allows a system command to be
 called when either <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> or
 <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> crashes. This is usually used to draw
-attention to the fact that a problem occured.
+attention to the fact that a problem occurred.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> panic action = &lt;empty string&gt;</code>
 <p><br><a name="passwdchat"></a>
@@ -2710,7 +2710,7 @@ program"</strong></a>.
 <li><strong><strong>passwd program (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>The name of a program that can be used to set UNIX user passwords.
 Any occurrences of <a href="smb.conf.5.html#percentu"><strong>%u</strong></a> will be replaced with the
-user name. The user name is checked for existance before calling the
+user name. The user name is checked for existence before calling the
 password changing program.
 <p><br>Also note that many passwd programs insist in <em>"reasonable"</em>
 passwords, such as a minimum length, or the inclusion of mixed case
@@ -2719,7 +2719,7 @@ Windows for Workgroups) uppercase the password before sending it.
 <p><br><em>Note</em> that if the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#unixpasswordsync"><strong>"unix password sync"</strong></a>
 parameter is set to <code>"True"</code> then this program is called <em>*AS
 ROOT*</em> before the SMB password in the
-<a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpassswd</strong></a> file is changed. If this UNIX
+<a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> file is changed. If this UNIX
 password change fails, then <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> will fail to
 change the SMB password also (this is by design).
 <p><br>If the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#unixpasswordsync"><strong>"unix password sync"</strong></a> parameter is
@@ -2789,8 +2789,8 @@ better restrict them with hosts allow!
 <p><br>If the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#security"><strong>"security"</strong></a> parameter is set to
 <strong>"domain"</strong>, then the list of machines in this option must be a list
 of Primary or Backup Domain controllers for the
-<a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>Domain</strong></a>, as the Samba server is cryptographically
-in that domain, and will use crpytographically authenticated RPC calls
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html#workgroup"><strong>Domain</strong></a>, as the Samba server is cryptographicly
+in that domain, and will use cryptographicly authenticated RPC calls
 to authenticate the user logging on. The advantage of using
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequaldomain"><strong>"security=domain"</strong></a> is that if you list
 several hosts in the <strong>"password server"</strong> option then
@@ -2827,7 +2827,7 @@ is to be given access. In the case of printable services, this is
 where print data will spool prior to being submitted to the host for
 printing.
 <p><br>For a printable service offering guest access, the service should be
-readonly and the path should be world-writable and have the sticky bit
+readonly and the path should be world-writeable and have the sticky bit
 set. This is not mandatory of course, but you probably won't get the
 results you expect if you do otherwise.
 <p><br>Any occurrences of <a href="smb.conf.5.html#percentu"><strong>%u</strong></a> in the path will be replaced
@@ -2948,11 +2948,11 @@ have its own print command specified.
 <p><br>If there is neither a specified print command for a printable service
 nor a global print command, spool files will be created but not
 processed and (most importantly) not removed.
-<p><br>Note that printing may fail on some UNIXes from the <code>"nobody"</code>
+<p><br>Note that printing may fail on some UNIXs from the <code>"nobody"</code>
 account. If this happens then create an alternative guest account that
 can print and set the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#guestaccount"><strong>"guest account"</strong></a> in the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#global"><strong>"[global]"</strong></a> section.
-<p><br>You can form quite complex print commands by realising that they are
+<p><br>You can form quite complex print commands by realizing that they are
 just passed to a shell. For example the following will log a print
 job, print the file, then remove it. Note that <code>';'</code> is the usual
 separator for command in shell scripts.
@@ -3144,7 +3144,7 @@ command as the PATH may not be available to the server.
 <li><strong><strong>queueresume command (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
 in order to resume the printerqueue. It is the command to undo the
-behaviour that is caused by the previous parameter
+behavior that is caused by the previous parameter
 (<a href="smb.conf.5.html#queuepausecommand"><strong>"queuepause command</strong></a>).
 <p><br>This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
 as its only parameter and resumes the printerqueue, such that queued
@@ -3182,8 +3182,8 @@ the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#invalidusers"><strong>"invalid users"</strong></a>
 <p><br><a name="readonly"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>read only (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>Note that this is an inverted synonym for
-<a href="smb.conf.5.html#writable"><strong>"writable"</strong></a> and <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeok"><strong>"write ok"</strong></a>.
-<p><br>See also <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writable"><strong>"writable"</strong></a> and <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeok"><strong>"write
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeable"><strong>"writeable"</strong></a> and <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeok"><strong>"write ok"</strong></a>.
+<p><br>See also <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeable"><strong>"writeable"</strong></a> and <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeok"><strong>"write
 ok"</strong></a>.
 <p><br><a name="readprediction"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>read prediction (G)</strong></strong>
@@ -3256,7 +3256,7 @@ browse masters if your network config is that stable.
 <p><br><a name="remotebrowsesync"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>remote browse sync (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This option allows you to setup <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> to
-periodically request synchronisation of browse lists with the master
+periodically request synchronization of browse lists with the master
 browser of a samba server that is on a remote segment. This option
 will allow you to gain browse lists for multiple workgroups across
 routed networks. This is done in a manner that does not work with any
@@ -3268,7 +3268,7 @@ send IP packets to.
 <p><br>For example:
 <p><br><code>  remote browse sync = 192.168.2.255 192.168.4.255</code>
 <p><br>the above line would cause <a href="nmbd.8.html"><strong>nmbd</strong></a> to request the
-master browser on the specified subnets or addresses to synchronise
+master browser on the specified subnets or addresses to synchronize
 their browse lists with the local server.
 <p><br>The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
 of the remote networks, but can also be the IP addresses of known
@@ -3304,7 +3304,7 @@ automatic access as the same username.
 <p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#rootdirectory"><strong>"root directory"</strong></a>.
 <p><br><a name="rootdirectory"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>root directory (G)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>The server will <code>"chroot()"</code> (ie. Change it's root directory) to
+<p><br>The server will <code>"chroot()"</code> (i.e. Change it's root directory) to
 this directory on startup. This is not strictly necessary for secure
 operation. Even without it the server will deny access to files not in
 one of the service entries. It may also check for, and deny access to,
@@ -3335,7 +3335,7 @@ filesystems (such as cdroms) after a connection is closed.
 <li><strong><strong>root preexec (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This is the same as the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#preexec"><strong>"preexec"</strong></a> parameter except
 that the command is run as root. This is useful for mounting
-filesystems (such as cdroms) before a connection is finalised.
+filesystems (such as cdroms) before a connection is finalized.
 <p><br>See also <a href="smb.conf.5.html#preexec"><strong>"preexec"</strong></a>.
 <p><br><a name="security"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>security (G)</strong></strong>
@@ -3356,7 +3356,7 @@ PREVIOUS VERSIONS OF SAMBA *******</em>.
 <p><br>In previous versions of Samba the default was
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequalshare"><strong>"security=share"</strong></a> mainly because that was
 the only option at one stage.
-<p><br>There is a bug in WfWg that has relevence to this setting. When in
+<p><br>There is a bug in WfWg that has relevance to this setting. When in
 user or server level security a WfWg client will totally ignore the
 password you type in the "connect drive" dialog box. This makes it
 very difficult (if not impossible) to connect to a Samba service as
@@ -3371,7 +3371,7 @@ shares). This is commonly used for a shared printer server. It is more
 difficult to setup guest shares with
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequaluser"><strong>security=user</strong></a>, see the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#maptoguest"><strong>"map to
 guest"</strong></a>parameter for details.
-<p><br>It is possible to use <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> in a <em>"hybred
+<p><br>It is possible to use <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> in a <em>"hybrid
 mode"</em> where it is offers both user and share level security under
 different <a href="smb.conf.5.html#netbiosaliases"><strong>NetBIOS aliases</strong></a>. See the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#netbiosaliases"><strong>NetBIOS aliases</strong></a> and the
@@ -3436,7 +3436,7 @@ be used in this security mode. Parameters such as
 are then applied and may change the UNIX user to use on this
 connection, but only after the user has been successfully
 authenticated.
-<p><br><em>Note</em> that the the name of the resource being requested is
+<p><br><em>Note</em> that the name of the resource being requested is
 <em>*not*</em> sent to the server until after the server has successfully
 authenticated the client. This is why guest shares don't work in user
 level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
@@ -3458,7 +3458,7 @@ directory ENCRYPTION.txt for details on how to set this up.
 the same as <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequaluser"><strong>"security=user"</strong></a>. It only
 affects how the server deals with the authentication, it does not in
 any way affect what the client sees.
-<p><br><em>Note</em> that the the name of the resource being requested is
+<p><br><em>Note</em> that the name of the resource being requested is
 <em>*not*</em> sent to the server until after the server has successfully
 authenticated the client. This is why guest shares don't work in server
 level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
@@ -3485,7 +3485,7 @@ UNIX account to map file access to.
 the same as <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequaluser"><strong>"security=user"</strong></a>. It only
 affects how the server deals with the authentication, it does not in
 any way affect what the client sees.
-<p><br><em>Note</em> that the the name of the resource being requested is
+<p><br><em>Note</em> that the name of the resource being requested is
 <em>*not*</em> sent to the server until after the server has successfully
 authenticated the client. This is why guest shares don't work in domain
 level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
@@ -3497,7 +3497,7 @@ doing this.
 set usernames. The communication with a Domain Controller
 must be done in UNICODE and Samba currently does not widen
 multi-byte user names to UNICODE correctly, thus a multi-byte
-username will not be recognised correctly at the Domain Controller.
+username will not be recognized correctly at the Domain Controller.
 This issue will be addressed in a future release.
 <p><br>See also the section <a href="smb.conf.5.html#NOTEABOUTUSERNAMEPASSWORDVALIDATION"><strong>"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
 VALIDATION"</strong></a>.
@@ -3533,7 +3533,7 @@ client. See the Pathworks documentation for details.
 <code>         set directory = yes</code>
 <p><br><a name="sharemodes"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>share modes (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This enables or disables the honouring of the <code>"share modes"</code> during a
+<p><br>This enables or disables the honoring of the <code>"share modes"</code> during a
 file open. These modes are used by clients to gain exclusive read or
 write access to a file.
 <p><br>These open modes are not directly supported by UNIX, so they are
@@ -3611,9 +3611,9 @@ experiment and choose them yourself. We strongly suggest you read the
 appropriate documentation for your operating system first (perhaps
 <strong>"man setsockopt"</strong> will help).
 <p><br>You may find that on some systems Samba will say "Unknown socket
-option" when you supply an option. This means you either mis-typed it
-or you need to add an include file to includes.h for your OS. If the
-latter is the case please send the patch to
+option" when you supply an option. This means you either incorrectly 
+typed it or you need to add an include file to includes.h for your OS. 
+If the latter is the case please send the patch to
 <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>.
 <p><br>Any of the supported socket options may be combined in any way you
 like, as long as your OS allows it.
@@ -3673,7 +3673,7 @@ option <code>"--with-ssl"</code> was given at configure time.
 <p><br><em>Note</em> that for export control reasons this code is <em>**NOT**</em>
 enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba.
 <p><br>This variable defines where to look up the Certification
-Autorities. The given directory should contain one file for each CA
+Authorities. The given directory should contain one file for each CA
 that samba will trust.  The file name must be the hash value over the
 "Distinguished Name" of the CA. How this directory is set up is
 explained later in this document. All files within the directory that
@@ -3692,7 +3692,7 @@ enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba.
 certificates of the trusted CAs are collected in one big file and this
 variable points to the file. You will probably only use one of the two
 ways to define your CAs. The first choice is preferable if you have
-many CAs or want to be flexible, the second is perferable if you only
+many CAs or want to be flexible, the second is preferable if you only
 have one CA and want to keep things simple (you won't need to create
 the hashed file names). You don't need this variable if you don't
 verify client certificates.
@@ -3868,7 +3868,7 @@ change this parameter.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
        status = yes
 <p><br><a name="strictlocking"></a>
-dir(<strong>strict locking (S)</strong>)
+<li><strong><strong>strict locking (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This is a boolean that controls the handling of file locking in the
 server. When this is set to <code>"yes"</code> the server will check every read and
 write access for file locks, and deny access if locks exist. This can
@@ -3888,7 +3888,7 @@ preferable.
 seem to confuse flushing buffer contents to disk with doing a sync to
 disk. Under UNIX, a sync call forces the process to be suspended until
 the kernel has ensured that all outstanding data in kernel disk
-buffers has been safely stored onto stable storate. This is very slow
+buffers has been safely stored onto stable storage. This is very slow
 and should only be done rarely. Setting this parameter to "no" (the
 default) means that smbd ignores the Windows applications requests for
 a sync call. There is only a possibility of losing data if the
@@ -3923,16 +3923,16 @@ set to <code>"yes"</code> in order for this parameter to have any affect.
 <p><br>See also the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#strictsync"><strong>"strict sync"</strong></a> parameter.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> sync always = no</code>
-<p><br><strong>xample:</strong>
+<p><br><strong>Example:</strong>
 <code> sync always = yes</code>
 <p><br><a name="syslog"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>syslog (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This parameter maps how Samba debug messages are logged onto the
 system syslog logging levels. Samba debug level zero maps onto syslog
 LOG_ERR, debug level one maps onto LOG_WARNING, debug level two maps
-to LOG_NOTICE, debug level three maps onto LOG_INFO.  The paramter
+to LOG_NOTICE, debug level three maps onto LOG_INFO.  The parameter
 sets the threshold for doing the mapping, all Samba debug messages
-above this threashold are mapped to syslog LOG_DEBUG messages.
+above this threshold are mapped to syslog LOG_DEBUG messages.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code> syslog = 1</code>
 <p><br><a name="syslogonly"></a>
@@ -3969,7 +3969,7 @@ parameter allows the timestamping to be turned off.
 <code> timestamp logs = False</code>
 <p><br><a name="unixpasswordsync"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>unix password sync (G)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This boolean parameter controlls whether Samba attempts to synchronise
+<p><br>This boolean parameter controls whether Samba attempts to synchronize
 the UNIX password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB
 password in the smbpasswd file is changed. If this is set to true the
 program specified in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#passwdprogram"><strong>"passwd program"</strong></a>
@@ -4095,7 +4095,7 @@ as many DOS clients send an all-uppercase username. By default Samba
 tries all lowercase, followed by the username with the first letter
 capitalized, and fails if the username is not found on the UNIX
 machine.
-<p><br>If this parameter is set to non-zero the behaviour changes. This
+<p><br>If this parameter is set to non-zero the behavior changes. This
 parameter is a number that specifies the number of uppercase
 combinations to try whilst trying to determine the UNIX user name. The
 higher the number the more combinations will be tried, but the slower
@@ -4107,7 +4107,7 @@ strange usernames on your UNIX machine, such as <code>"AstrangeUser"</code>.
 <code> username level = 5</code>
 <p><br><a name="usernamemap"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>username map (G)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>This option allows you to to specify a file containing a mapping of
+<p><br>This option allows you to specify a file containing a mapping of
 usernames from the clients to the server. This can be used for several
 purposes. The most common is to map usernames that users use on DOS or
 Windows machines to those that the UNIX box uses. The other is to map
@@ -4206,13 +4206,13 @@ overwritten.
 <pre>
 
        Samba defaults to using a reasonable set of valid characters
-       for english systems
+       for English systems
 
 </pre>
 
 <p><br><strong>Example</strong>
 <code> valid chars = 0345:0305 0366:0326 0344:0304</code>
-<p><br>The above example allows filenames to have the swedish characters in
+<p><br>The above example allows filenames to have the Swedish characters in
 them.
 <p><br>NOTE: It is actually quite difficult to correctly produce a <strong>"valid
 chars"</strong> line for a particular system. To automate the process
@@ -4354,32 +4354,16 @@ network.
 <p><br><a name="workgroup"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>workgroup (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This controls what workgroup your server will appear to be in when
-queried by clients. Note that this parameter also controlls the Domain
+queried by clients. Note that this parameter also controls the Domain
 name used with the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#securityequaldomain"><strong>"security=domain"</strong></a>
 setting.
 <p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
 <code>         set at compile time to WORKGROUP</code>
-<p><br>.B Example:
+<p><br><strong>Example:</strong>
        workgroup = MYGROUP
 <p><br><a name="writable"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>writable (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>An inverted synonym is <a href="smb.conf.5.html#readonly"><strong>"read only"</strong></a>.
-<p><br>If this parameter is <code>"no"</code>, then users of a service may not create
-or modify files in the service's directory.
-<p><br>Note that a printable service <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printable"><strong>("printable = yes")</strong></a>
-will <em>*ALWAYS*</em> allow writing to the directory (user privileges
-permitting), but only via spooling operations.
-<p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
-<code>         writable = no</code>
-<p><br><strong>Examples:</strong>
-<pre>
-
-       read only = no
-       writable = yes
-       write ok = yes
-
-</pre>
-
+<p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeable"><strong>"writeable"</strong></a> for people who can't spell :-).
 <p><br><a name="writelist"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>write list (S)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This is a list of users that are given read-write access to a
@@ -4396,7 +4380,7 @@ they will be given write access.
 <code> write list = admin, root, @staff</code>
 <p><br><a name="writeok"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>write ok (S)</strong></strong>
-<p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writable"><strong>writable</strong></a>.
+<p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writeable"><strong>writeable</strong></a>.
 <p><br><a name="writeraw"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>write raw (G)</strong></strong>
 <p><br>This parameter controls whether or not the server will support raw
@@ -4406,7 +4390,23 @@ need to change this parameter.
 <code>         write raw = yes</code>
 <p><br><a name="writeable"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>writeable</strong></strong>
-<p><br>Synonym for <a href="smb.conf.5.html#writable"><strong>"writable"</strong></a> for people who can't spell :-).
+<p><br>An inverted synonym is <a href="smb.conf.5.html#readonly"><strong>"read only"</strong></a>.
+<p><br>If this parameter is <code>"no"</code>, then users of a service may not create
+or modify files in the service's directory.
+<p><br>Note that a printable service <a href="smb.conf.5.html#printable"><strong>("printable = yes")</strong></a>
+will <em>*ALWAYS*</em> allow writing to the directory (user privileges
+permitting), but only via spooling operations.
+<p><br><strong>Default:</strong>
+<code>         writeable = no</code>
+<p><br><strong>Examples:</strong>
+<pre>
+
+       read only = no
+       writeable = yes
+       write ok = yes
+
+</pre>
+
 <p><br><a name="WARNINGS"></a>
 <h2>WARNINGS</h2>
     
index 8e480a2beab7f0ec33b1af1e13ef1f4f598cf083..533066c500adff2f499b3479ae256a1deafc5fd8 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbclient</title>
+<html><head><title>smbclient (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbclient</h1>
+<h1>smbclient (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ methods as it depends on the target host being on a locally connected
 subnet. To specify a particular broadcast address the <a href="smbclient.1.html#minusB"><strong>-B</strong></a> option 
 may be used.
 <p><br></ul>
-<p><br>If this parameter is not set then the name resolver order defined
+<p><br>If this parameter is not set then the name resolve order defined
 in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file parameter 
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#nameresolveorder">(<strong>name resolve order</strong>)</a>
 will be used.
@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ that it must be a valid NetBIOS name.
 the environment variable <code>USER</code> or <code>LOGNAME</code> in that order.  If no
 username is supplied and neither environment variable exists the
 username "GUEST" will be used.
-<p><br>If the <code>USER</code> environment variable containts a '%' character,
+<p><br>If the <code>USER</code> environment variable contains a '%' character,
 everything after that will be treated as a password. This allows you
 to set the environment variable to be <code>USER=username%password</code> so
 that a password is not passed on the command line (where it may be
@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ tested and may have some problems.
 Samba source code for the complete list.
 <p><br><a name="minusm"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-m max protocol level</strong></strong> With the new code in Samba2.0,
-<strong>smbclient</strong> allways attempts to connect at the maximum
+<strong>smbclient</strong> always attempts to connect at the maximum
 protocols level the server supports. This parameter is
 preserved for backwards compatibility, but any string
 following the <strong>-m</strong> will be ignored.
@@ -291,11 +291,11 @@ share. The secondary tar flags that can be given to this option are :
        share. Unless the <a href="smbclient.1.html#minusD"><strong>-D</strong></a> option is given, the tar files will be
        restored from the top level of the share. Must be followed by the name
        of the tar file, device or <code>"-"</code> for standard input. Mutually exclusive
-       with the <strong>c</strong> flag. Restored files have theuir creation times (mtime)
+       with the <strong>c</strong> flag. Restored files have their creation times (mtime)
        set to the date saved in the tar file. Directories currently do not
        get their creation dates restored properly.
 <p><br><li><strong><strong>I</strong></strong> Include files and directories. Is the default
-       behaviour when filenames are specified above. Causes tar files to
+       behavior when filenames are specified above. Causes tar files to
        be included in an extract or create (and therefore everything else to
        be excluded). See example below.  Filename globbing does not work for
        included files for extractions (yet).
@@ -364,12 +364,12 @@ commands are case-insensitive.  Parameters to commands may or may not
 be case sensitive, depending on the command.
 <p><br>You can specify file names which have spaces in them by quoting the
 name with double quotes, for example "a long file name".
-<p><br>Parameters shown in square brackets (eg., "[parameter]") are
+<p><br>Parameters shown in square brackets (e.g., "[parameter]") are
 optional. If not given, the command will use suitable
-defaults. Parameters shown in angle brackets (eg., "&lt;parameter&gt;") are
+defaults. Parameters shown in angle brackets (e.g., "&lt;parameter&gt;") are
 required.
 <p><br>Note that all commands operating on the server are actually performed
-by issuing a request to the server. Thus the behaviour may vary from
+by issuing a request to the server. Thus the behavior may vary from
 server to server, depending on how the server was implemented.
 <p><br>The commands available are given here in alphabetical order.
 <p><br><ul>
@@ -459,7 +459,7 @@ from the local machine through a printable service on the server.
 mode to suit either binary data (such as graphical information) or
 text. Subsequent print commands will use the currently set print
 mode.
-<p><br><a name="prompt"></a> dir(<strong>prompt</strong>) Toggle prompting for filenames during
+<p><br><a name="prompt"></a> <li><strong><strong>prompt</strong></strong> Toggle prompting for filenames during
 operation of the <a href="smbclient.1.html#mget"><strong>mget</strong></a> and <a href="smbclient.1.html#mput"><strong>mput</strong></a>
 commands.
 <p><br>When toggled ON, the user will be prompted to confirm the transfer of
@@ -470,12 +470,12 @@ file called "local file name" from the machine running the client to
 the server. If specified, name the remote copy "remote file name".
 Note that all transfers in smbclient are binary. See also the
 <a href="smbclient.1.html#lowercase"><strong>lowercase</strong></a> command.
-<p><br><a name="queue"></a> dir(<strong>queue</strong>) Displays the print queue, showing the job
+<p><br><a name="queue"></a> <li><strong><strong>queue</strong></strong> Displays the print queue, showing the job
 id, name, size and current status.
 <p><br><a name="quit"></a> <li><strong><strong>quit</strong></strong> See the <a href="smbclient.1.html#exit"><strong>exit</strong></a> command.
-<p><br><a name="rd"></a> dir(<strong>rd &lt;directory name&gt;</strong>) See the <a href="smbclient.1.html#rmdir"><strong>rmdir</strong></a>
+<p><br><a name="rd"></a> <li><strong><strong>rd &lt;directory name&gt;</strong></strong> See the <a href="smbclient.1.html#rmdir"><strong>rmdir</strong></a>
 command.
-<p><br><a name="recurse"></a> dir(<strong>recurse</strong>) Toggle directory recursion for the
+<p><br><a name="recurse"></a> <li><strong><strong>recurse</strong></strong> Toggle directory recursion for the
 commands <a href="smbclient.1.html#mget"><strong>mget</strong></a> and <a href="smbclient.1.html#mput"><strong>mput</strong></a>.
 <p><br>When toggled ON, these commands will process all directories in the
 source directory (i.e., the directory they are copying .IR from ) and
@@ -488,12 +488,12 @@ directory on the source machine that match the mask specified to the
 <a href="smbclient.1.html#mget"><strong>mget</strong></a> or <a href="smbclient.1.html#mput"><strong>mput</strong></a> commands will be copied,
 and any mask specified using the <a href="smbclient.1.html#mask"><strong>mask</strong></a> command will be
 ignored.
-<p><br><a name="rm"></a> dir(<strong>rm &lt;mask&gt;</strong>) Remove all files matching mask from
+<p><br><a name="rm"></a> <li><strong><strong>rm &lt;mask&gt;</strong></strong> Remove all files matching mask from
 the current working directory on the server.
 <p><br><a name="rmdir"></a> <li><strong><strong>rmdir &lt;directory name&gt;</strong></strong> Remove the specified
 directory (user access privileges permitting) from the server.
 <p><br><a name="tar"></a> <li><strong><strong>tar &lt;c|x&gt;[IXbgNa]</strong></strong> Performs a tar operation - see
-the <a href="smbclient.1.html#minusT"><strong>-T</strong></a> command line option above. Behaviour may be
+the <a href="smbclient.1.html#minusT"><strong>-T</strong></a> command line option above. Behavior may be
 affected by the <a href="smbclient.1.html#tarmode"><strong>tarmode</strong></a> command (see below). Using
 g (incremental) and N (newer) will affect tarmode settings. Note that
 using the "-" option with tar x may not work - use the command line
@@ -501,8 +501,8 @@ option instead.
 <p><br><a name="blocksize"></a> <li><strong><strong>blocksize &lt;blocksize&gt;</strong></strong> Blocksize. Must be
 followed by a valid (greater than zero) blocksize. Causes tar file to
 be written out in blocksize*TBLOCK (usually 512 byte) blocks.
-<p><br><a name="tarmode"></a> dir(<strong>tarmode &lt;full|inc|reset|noreset&gt;</strong>) Changes tar's
-behaviour with regard to archive bits. In full mode, tar will back up
+<p><br><a name="tarmode"></a> <li><strong><strong>tarmode &lt;full|inc|reset|noreset&gt;</strong></strong> Changes tar's
+behavior with regard to archive bits. In full mode, tar will back up
 everything regardless of the archive bit setting (this is the default
 mode). In incremental mode, tar will only back up files with the
 archive bit set. In reset mode, tar will reset the archive bit on all
@@ -516,7 +516,7 @@ of the DOS attrib command to set file permissions. For example:
 <h2>NOTES</h2>
     
 <p><br>Some servers are fussy about the case of supplied usernames,
-passwords, share names (aka service names) and machine names. If you
+passwords, share names (AKA service names) and machine names. If you
 fail to connect try giving all parameters in uppercase.
 <p><br>It is often necessary to use the <a href="smbclient.1.html#minusn"><strong>-n</strong></a> option when connecting to some
 types of servers. For example OS/2 LanManager insists on a valid
@@ -544,7 +544,7 @@ readable by all, writeable only by root. The client program itself
 should be executable by all. The client should <em>NOT</em> be setuid or
 setgid!
 <p><br>The client log files should be put in a directory readable and
-writable only by the user.
+writeable only by the user.
 <p><br>To test the client, you will need to know the name of a running
 SMB/CIFS server. It is possible to run <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd (8)</strong></a>
 an ordinary user - running that server as a daemon on a
index cd00af3b27661261115b97131d0f93739ad8b19e..a6e0f32e1248812baffb325b604c9728e56026e4 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbd</title>
+<html><head><title>smbd (8)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbd</h1>
+<h1>smbd (8)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -29,7 +29,8 @@
 <h2>DESCRIPTION</h2>
     
 <p><br>This program is part of the <strong>Samba</strong> suite.
-<p><br><strong>smbd</strong> is the server daemon that provides filesharing services to
+<p><br><strong>smbd</strong> is the server daemon that provides filesharing and printing
+services to
 Windows clients. The server provides filespace and printer services to
 clients using the SMB (or CIFS) protocol. This is compatible with the
 LanManager protocol, and can service LanManager clients.  These
@@ -37,16 +38,18 @@ include MSCLIENT 3.0 for DOS, Windows for Workgroups, Windows 95,
 Windows NT, OS/2, DAVE for Macintosh, and smbfs for Linux.
 <p><br>An extensive description of the services that the server can provide
 is given in the man page for the configuration file controlling the
-attributes of those services (see <strong>smb.conf (5)</strong>).  This man page
+attributes of those services (see 
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf (5)</strong></a>.  This man page
 will not describe the services, but will concentrate on the
 administrative aspects of running the server.
 <p><br>Please note that there are significant security implications to
-running this server, and the <strong>smb.conf (5)</strong> manpage should be
+running this server, and the 
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf (5)</strong></a> manpage should be
 regarded as mandatory reading before proceeding with installation.
 <p><br>A session is created whenever a client requests one. Each client gets
 a copy of the server for each session. This copy then services all
 connections made by the client during that session. When all
-connections from its client are are closed, the copy of the server for
+connections from its client are closed, the copy of the server for
 that client terminates.
 <p><br>The configuration file, and any files that it includes, are
 automatically reloaded every minute, if they change.  You can force a
@@ -116,13 +119,13 @@ rfc1002.txt section 4.3.5.
 <p><br>This parameter is not normally specified except in the above
 situation.
 <p><br><a name="minuss"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>-s configuration file</strong></strong> The default configuration file name is
-determined at compile time.
-<p><br>The file specified contains the configuration details required by the
+<li><strong><strong>-s configuration file</strong></strong>
+The file specified contains the configuration details required by the
 server.  The information in this file includes server-specific
 information such as what printcap file to use, as well as descriptions
 of all the services that the server is to provide. See <strong>smb.conf
 (5)</strong> for more information.
+The default configuration file name is determined at compile time.
 <p><br><a name="minusi"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-i scope</strong></strong> This specifies a NetBIOS scope that the server will use
 to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names. For details on the
@@ -142,23 +145,23 @@ out. Used for debugging by the developers only.
 <p><br><strong>/etc/inetd.conf</strong>
 <p><br>If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must
 contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon. See the
-section <em>INSTALLATION</em> below.
+section <a href="smbd.8.html#INSTALLATION">INSTALLATION</a> below.
 <p><br><strong>/etc/rc</strong>
-<p><br>(or whatever initialisation script your system uses).
+<p><br>(or whatever initialization script your system uses).
 <p><br>If running the server as a daemon at startup, this file will need to
 contain an appropriate startup sequence for the server. See the
-section <em>INSTALLATION</em> below.
+section <a href="smbd.8.html#INSTALLATION">INSTALLATION</a> below.
 <p><br><strong>/etc/services</strong>
 <p><br>If running the server via the meta-daemon inetd, this file must
-contain a mapping of service name (eg., netbios-ssn) to service port
-(eg., 139) and protocol type (eg., tcp). See the section
-<em>INSTALLATION</em> below.
+contain a mapping of service name (e.g., netbios-ssn) to service port
+(e.g., 139) and protocol type (e.g., tcp). See the section
+<a href="smbd.8.html#INSTALLATION">INSTALLATION</a> below.
 <p><br><strong>/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</strong>
 <p><br>This is the default location of the <em>smb.conf</em> server configuration
 file. Other common places that systems install this file are
 <em>/usr/samba/lib/smb.conf</em> and <em>/etc/smb.conf</em>.
 <p><br>This file describes all the services the server is to make available
-to clients. See <strong>smb.conf (5)</strong> for more information.
+to clients. See <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf (5)</strong></a> for more information.
 <p><br><a name="LIMITATIONS"></a>
 <h2>LIMITATIONS</h2>
     
@@ -196,10 +199,10 @@ at the time this was written. It is possible that this hole only
 exists in Linux, as testing on other systems has thus far shown them
 to be immune.
 <p><br>The server log files should be put in a directory readable and
-writable only by root, as the log files may contain sensitive
+writeable only by root, as the log files may contain sensitive
 information.
 <p><br>The configuration file should be placed in a directory readable and
-writable only by root, as the configuration file controls security for
+writeable only by root, as the configuration file controls security for
 the services offered by the server. The configuration file can be made
 readable by all if desired, but this is not necessary for correct
 operation of the server and is not recommended. A sample configuration
@@ -218,8 +221,9 @@ faster. If run from a meta-daemon some memory will be saved and
 utilities such as the tcpd TCP-wrapper may be used for extra security.
 For serious use as file server it is recommended that <strong>smbd</strong> be run
 as a daemon.
-<p><br>When you've decided, continue with either <em>RUNNING THE SERVER AS A
-DAEMON</em> or <em>RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST</em>.
+<p><br>When you've decided, continue with either 
+<a href="smbd.8.html#RUNNINGTHESERVERASADAEMON">RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON</a> or 
+<a href="smbd.8.html#RUNNINGTHESERVERONREQUEST">RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST</a>.
 <p><br><a name="RUNNINGTHESERVERASADAEMON"></a>
 <h2>RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON</h2>
     
@@ -239,17 +243,17 @@ files. Wherever appropriate (for example, in /etc/rc), insert the
 following line, substituting port number, log file location,
 configuration file location and debug level as desired:
 <p><br><code>/usr/local/samba/bin/smbd -D -l /var/adm/smblogs/log -s /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</code>
-<p><br>(The above should appear in your initialisation script as a single line. 
+<p><br>(The above should appear in your initialization script as a single line. 
 Depending on your terminal characteristics, it may not appear that way in
 this man page. If the above appears as more than one line, please treat any 
 newlines or indentation as a single space or TAB character.)
 <p><br>If the options used at compile time are appropriate for your system,
-all parameters except the desired debug level and <a href="smbd.8.html#minusD"><strong>-D</strong></a> may be
-omitted. See the section <em>OPTIONS</em> above.
+all parameters except <a href="smbd.8.html#minusD"><strong>-D</strong></a> may be
+omitted. See the section <a href="smbd.8.html#OPTIONS">OPTIONS</a> above.
 <p><br><a name="RUNNINGTHESERVERONREQUEST"></a>
 <h2>RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST</h2>
     
-<p><br>If your system uses a meta-daemon such as inetd, you can arrange to
+<p><br>If your system uses a meta-daemon such as <strong>inetd</strong>, you can arrange to
 have the smbd server started whenever a process attempts to connect to
 it. This requires several changes to the startup files on the host
 machine. If you are experimenting as an ordinary user rather than as
@@ -284,10 +288,10 @@ start with, the following two services should be all you need:
 
 
 [homes]
-  writable = yes
+  writeable = yes
 
 [printers]
- writable = no
+ writeable = no
  printable = yes
  path = /tmp
  public = yes
@@ -307,7 +311,8 @@ tables if they receive a HUP signal.
 <p><br>If your machine's name is "fred" and your name is "mary", you should
 now be able to connect to the service <code>\\fred\mary</code>.
 <p><br>To properly test and experiment with the server, we recommend using
-the smbclient program (see <strong>smbclient (1)</strong>) and also going through
+the smbclient program (see 
+<a href="smbclient.1.html"><strong>smbclient (1)</strong></a>) and also going through
 the steps outlined in the file <em>DIAGNOSIS.txt</em> in the <em>docs/</em>
 directory of your Samba installation.
 <p><br><a name="VERSION"></a>
@@ -323,8 +328,8 @@ overridden on the command line.
 <p><br>The number and nature of diagnostics available depends on the debug
 level used by the server. If you have problems, set the debug level to
 3 and peruse the log files.
-<p><br>Most messages are reasonably self-explanatory. Unfortunately, at time
-of creation of this man page there are too many diagnostics available
+<p><br>Most messages are reasonably self-explanatory. Unfortunately, at the time
+this man page was created, there are too many diagnostics available
 in the source code to warrant describing each and every diagnostic. At
 this stage your best bet is still to grep the source code and inspect
 the conditions that gave rise to the diagnostics you are seeing.
@@ -335,7 +340,7 @@ the conditions that gave rise to the diagnostics you are seeing.
 configuration file within a short period of time.
 <p><br>To shut down a users smbd process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
 <em>NOT</em> be used, except as a last resort, as this may leave the shared
-memory area in an inconsistant state. The safe way to terminate an
+memory area in an inconsistent state. The safe way to terminate an
 smbd is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
 its own.
 <p><br>The debug log level of smbd may be raised
@@ -363,7 +368,7 @@ specification is available as a link from the Web page :
 <h2>AUTHOR</h2>
     
 <p><br>The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed.
 <p><br>The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. The man page
index 35649e689bca400cbf48c200dbcb9d17b005fc2d..6c4081fc4d7a3dd1544de77cc34ecc479a3a5eff 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbpasswd</title>
+<html><head><title>smbpasswd (5)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbpasswd</h1>
+<h1>smbpasswd (5)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@
     
 <p><br>This file is part of the <strong>Samba</strong> suite.
 <p><br>smbpasswd is the <strong>Samba</strong> encrypted password file. It contains
-the username, unix user id and the SMB hashed passwords of the
+the username, Unix user id and the SMB hashed passwords of the
 user, as well as account flag information and the time the password
 was last changed. This file format has been evolving with Samba
 and has had several different formats in the past.
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ and has had several different formats in the past.
 <h2>FILE FORMAT</h2>
     
 <p><br>The format of the smbpasswd file used by Samba 2.0 is very similar to
-the familiar unix <strong>passwd (5)</strong> file. It is an ASCII file containing
+the familiar Unix <strong>passwd (5)</strong> file. It is an ASCII file containing
 one line for each user. Each field within each line is separated from
 the next by a colon. Any entry beginning with # is ignored. The
 smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
@@ -50,7 +50,9 @@ smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
 <p><br><a name="uid"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>uid</strong></strong> <br> <br>
 <p><br>This is the UNIX uid. It must match the uid field for the same
-       user entry in the standard UNIX passwd file.
+       user entry in the standard UNIX passwd file. If this does not
+       match then Samba will refuse to recognize this <strong>smbpasswd</strong> file entry
+       as being valid for a user.
 <p><br><a name="LanmanPasswordHash"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>Lanman Password Hash</strong></strong> <br> <br>
 <p><br>This is the <em>LANMAN</em> hash of the users password, encoded as 32 hex
@@ -58,7 +60,7 @@ smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
        string with the users password as the DES key. This is the same
        password used by Windows 95/98 machines. Note that this password hash
        is regarded as weak as it is vulnerable to dictionary attacks and if
-       two users choose the same password this entry will be identical (ie.
+       two users choose the same password this entry will be identical (i.e.
        the password is not <em>"salted"</em> as the UNIX password is). If the
        user has a null password this field will contain the characters
        <code>"NO PASSWORD"</code> as the start of the hex string. If the hex string
@@ -67,7 +69,7 @@ smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
        server.
 <p><br><em>WARNING !!</em>. Note that, due to the challenge-response nature of the
        SMB/CIFS authentication protocol, anyone with a knowledge of this
-       password hash will be able to impersonate the user of the network.
+       password hash will be able to impersonate the user on the network.
        For this reason these hashes are known as <em>"plain text equivalent"</em>
        and must <em>NOT</em> be made available to anyone but the root user. To
        protect these passwords the <strong>smbpasswd</strong> file is placed in a
@@ -84,11 +86,11 @@ smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
        Password Hash</strong></a> as it preserves the case of the
        password and uses a much higher quality hashing algorithm. However, it
        is still the case that if two users choose the same password this
-       entry will be identical (ie. the password is not <em>"salted"</em> as the
+       entry will be identical (i.e. the password is not <em>"salted"</em> as the
        UNIX password is).
 <p><br><em>WARNING !!</em>. Note that, due to the challenge-response nature of the
        SMB/CIFS authentication protocol, anyone with a knowledge of this
-       password hash will be able to impersonate the user of the network.
+       password hash will be able to impersonate the user on the network.
        For this reason these hashes are known as <em>"plain text equivalent"</em>
        and must <em>NOT</em> be made available to anyone but the root user. To
        protect these passwords the <strong>smbpasswd</strong> file is placed in a
@@ -104,8 +106,8 @@ smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
        any of the characters.
 <p><br><ul>
 <p><br><a name="capU"></a>
-               <li > <strong>'U'</strong> This means this is a <em>"User"</em> account, ie. an ordinary
-               user. Only <strong>User</strong> and <a href="smbpasswd.5.html#capW"><strong>Worskstation Trust</strong></a> accounts are
+               <li > <strong>'U'</strong> This means this is a <em>"User"</em> account, i.e. an ordinary
+               user. Only <strong>User</strong> and <a href="smbpasswd.5.html#capW"><strong>Workstation Trust</strong></a> accounts are
                currently supported in the <strong>smbpasswd</strong> file.
 <p><br><a name="capN"></a>
                <li > <strong>'N'</strong> This means the account has <em>no</em> password (the passwords
@@ -115,7 +117,7 @@ smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
                <a href="smb.conf.5.html#nullpasswords"><strong>null passwords</strong></a> parameter is set
                in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf (5)</strong></a> config file.
 <p><br><a name="capD"></a>
-               <li > <strong>'D'</strong> This means the account is diabled and no SMB/CIFS logins 
+               <li > <strong>'D'</strong> This means the account is disabled and no SMB/CIFS logins 
                will be allowed for this user.
 <p><br><a name="capW"></a>
                <li > <strong>'W'</strong> This means this account is a <em>"Workstation Trust"</em> account.
@@ -177,12 +179,14 @@ algorithm.
 <h2>AUTHOR</h2>
     
 <p><br>The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au). Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed.
 <p><br>The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer. The man page
 sources were converted to YODL format (another excellent piece of Open
-Source software) and updated for the Samba2.0 release by Jeremy
+Source software, available at
+<a href="ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/"><strong>ftp://ftp.icce.rug.nl/pub/unix/</strong></a>) 
+and updated for the Samba2.0 release by Jeremy
 Allison, <a href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au"><em>samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au</em></a>.
 <p><br>See <a href="samba.7.html"><strong>samba (7)</strong></a> to find out how to get a full
 list of contributors and details on how to submit bug reports,
index 066004be212e5788a32fff34d5b2bd7812f7cc12..6bfd8cdb44026e09dcf6a37d7695c7f8654b7682 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbpasswd</title>
+<html><head><title>smbpasswd (8)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbpasswd</h1>
+<h1>smbpasswd (8)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ user it allows the user to change the password used for their SMB
 sessions on any machines that store SMB passwords.
 <p><br>By default (when run with no arguments) it will attempt to change the
 current users SMB password on the local machine. This is similar to
-the way the <strong>passwd (1)</strong> program works. <strong>smbpasswd</strong> differs from
+the way the <strong>passwd (1)</strong> program works. <strong>smbpasswd</strong> differs from how
 the <strong>passwd</strong> program works however in that it is not <em>setuid root</em>
 but works in a client-server mode and communicates with a locally
 running <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a>. As a consequence in order for this
@@ -49,13 +49,13 @@ correctly. No passwords will be echoed on the screen whilst being
 typed. If you have a blank smb password (specified by the string "NO
 PASSWORD" in the <a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> file) then just
 press the &lt;Enter&gt; key when asked for your old password.
-<p><br><strong>smbpasswd</strong> also can be used by a normal user to change their SMB
+<p><br><strong>smbpasswd</strong> can also be used by a normal user to change their SMB
 password on remote machines, such as Windows NT Primary Domain
 Controllers. See the <a href="smbpasswd.8.html#minusr">(<strong>-r</strong>)</a> and
 <a href="smbpasswd.8.html#minusU"><strong>-U</strong></a> options below.
 <p><br>When run by root, <strong>smbpasswd</strong> allows new users to be added and
 deleted in the <a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> file, as well as
-changes to the attributes of the user in this file to be made. When
+allows changes to the attributes of the user in this file to be made. When
 run by root, <strong>smbpasswd</strong> accesses the local
 <a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> file directly, thus enabling
 changes to be made even if <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> is not running.
@@ -69,8 +69,8 @@ be added to the local <a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a>
 the new password typed (type &lt;Enter&gt; for the old password). This
 option is ignored if the username following already exists in the
 <a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> file and it is treated like a
-regular change password command. Note that the user to be added .B
-must already exist in the system password file (usually /etc/passwd)
+regular change password command. Note that the user to be added
+<strong>must</strong> already exist in the system password file (usually /etc/passwd)
 else the request to add the user will fail.
 <p><br>This option is only available when running <strong>smbpasswd</strong> as
 root.
@@ -142,6 +142,9 @@ username.
 specified must be the Primary Domain Controller for the domain (Backup
 Domain Controllers only have a read-only copy of the user account
 database and will not allow the password change).
+<p><br><em>Note</em> that Windows 95/98 do not have a real password database
+so it is not possible to change passwords specifying a Win95/98 
+machine as remote machine target.
 <p><br><a name="minusR"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-R name resolve order</strong></strong> This option allows the user of
 smbclient to determine what name resolution services to use when
@@ -155,11 +158,12 @@ resolved as follows :
 <p><br><a name="host"></a>
 <li > <strong>host</strong> : Do a standard host name to IP address resolution,
 using the system /etc/hosts, NIS, or DNS lookups. This method of name
-resolution is operating system depended for instance on IRIX or
-Solaris this may be controlled by the <em>/etc/nsswitch.conf</em> file).
+resolution is operating system dependent. For instance on IRIX or
+Solaris, this may be controlled by the <em>/etc/nsswitch.conf</em> file).
 <p><br><a name="wins"></a>
-<li > <strong>wins</strong> : Query a name with the IP address listed in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#winsserver"><strong>wins
-server</strong></a> parameter in the smb.conf file. If 
+<li > <strong>wins</strong> : Query a name with the IP address listed in the 
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html#winsserver"><strong>wins server</strong></a> parameter in the 
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf file</strong></a>. If 
 no WINS server has been specified this method will be ignored.
 <p><br><a name="bcast"></a>
 <li > <strong>bcast</strong> : Do a broadcast on each of the known local interfaces
@@ -168,7 +172,7 @@ in the smb.conf file. This is the least reliable of the name resolution
 methods as it depends on the target host being on a locally connected
 subnet.
 <p><br></ul>
-<p><br>If this parameter is not set then the name resolver order defined
+<p><br>If this parameter is not set then the name resolve order defined
 in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file parameter 
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html#nameresolveorder"><strong>name resolve order</strong></a>
 will be used.
@@ -202,7 +206,7 @@ Controller for the Domain (found in the
 the machine account password used to create the secure Domain
 communication.  This password is then stored by <strong>smbpasswd</strong> in a
 file, read only by root, called <code>&lt;Domain&gt;.&lt;Machine&gt;.mac</code> where
-<code>&lt;Domain&gt;</code> is the name of the Domain we are joining and tt&lt;Machine&gt;
+<code>&lt;Domain&gt;</code> is the name of the Domain we are joining and <code>&lt;Machine&gt;</code>
 is the primary NetBIOS name of the machine we are running on.
 <p><br>Once this operation has been performed the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file may be updated to set the
@@ -224,19 +228,19 @@ different systems to change these passwords.
 <li><strong><strong>-h</strong></strong> This option prints the help string for <strong>smbpasswd</strong>, 
 selecting the correct one for running as root or as an ordinary user.
 <p><br><a name="minuss"></a>
-<li><strong><strong>-s</strong></strong> This option causes <strong>smbpasswd</strong> to be silent (ie. not
+<li><strong><strong>-s</strong></strong> This option causes <strong>smbpasswd</strong> to be silent (i.e. not
 issue prompts) and to read it's old and new passwords from standard 
 input, rather than from <code>/dev/tty</code> (like the <strong>passwd (1)</strong> program
 does). This option is to aid people writing scripts to drive <strong>smbpasswd</strong>
 <p><br><a name="username"></a>
-dir(<strong>username</strong>) This specifies the username for all of the <em>root
+<li><strong><strong>username</strong></strong> This specifies the username for all of the <em>root
 only</em> options to operate on. Only root can specify this parameter as
 only root has the permission needed to modify attributes directly
 in the local <a href="smbpasswd.5.html"><strong>smbpasswd</strong></a> file.
 <p><br><a name="NOTES"></a>
 <h2>NOTES</h2>
     
-<p><br>As <strong>smbpasswd</strong> works in client-server mode communicating with a
+<p><br>Since <strong>smbpasswd</strong> works in client-server mode communicating with a
 local <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> for a non-root user then the <strong>smbd</strong>
 daemon must be running for this to work. A common problem is to add a
 restriction to the hosts that may access the <strong>smbd</strong> running on the
index b8d1021d562677635a9844e320133f4508d9e783..9db9b7e78334e8858a811f4a3464766ff487fcc0 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbrun</title>
+<html><head><title>smbrun (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbrun</h1>
+<h1>smbrun (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
index 3c46e55fdf2d015e42b177fb2db01a94c6a2625b..cc48f29d883c599145c90cda0d6fe043c16384db 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbstatus</title>
+<html><head><title>smbstatus (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbstatus</h1>
+<h1>smbstatus (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
index 47a2d26b108314b3570c2bb22ad60955425341ac..610ead88df8aac0cbeb19edb56775890a3b15600 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>smbtar</title>
+<html><head><title>smbtar (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>smbtar</h1>
+<h1>smbtar (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
index 4a2eeec3d513b33dd5f89e2be430ab2d8e24a2ea..31afec1a89e106203d44a766b6e3e8d27d05e562 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>swat</title>
+<html><head><title>swat (8)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>swat</h1>
+<h1>swat (8)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -34,8 +34,7 @@
 addition, a swat configuration page has help links to all the
 configurable options in the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file
 allowing an administrator to easily look up the effects of any change.
-<p><br><strong>swat</strong> can be run as a stand-alone daemon, from <strong>inetd</strong>,
-or invoked via CGI from a Web server.
+<p><br><strong>swat</strong> is run from <strong>inetd</strong>
 <p><br><a name="OPTIONS"></a>
 <h2>OPTIONS</h2>
     
@@ -51,13 +50,10 @@ of all the services that the server is to provide. See <a href="smb.conf.5.html"
 (5)</a> for more information.
 <p><br><a name="minusa"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>-a</strong></strong> 
-<p><br>This option is only used if <strong>swat</strong> is running as it's own mini-web
-server (see the <a href="swat.8.html#INSTALLATION"><strong>INSTALLATION</strong></a> section below).
-<p><br>This option removes the need for authentication needed to modify the
-<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file. <em>**THIS IS ONLY MEANT FOR
-DEMOING SWAT AND MUST NOT BE SET IN NORMAL SYSTEMS**</em> as it would
-allow <em>*ANYONE*</em> to modify the <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a>
-file, thus giving them root access.
+<p><br>This option disables authentication and puts <strong>swat</strong> in demo mode. In
+that mode anyone will be able to modify the
+<a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file.
+<p><br>Do NOT enable this option on a production server.
 <p><br></ul>
 <p><br><a name="INSTALLATION"></a>
 <h2>INSTALLATION</h2>
@@ -73,14 +69,11 @@ would put these in:
 
 </pre>
 
-<p><br><a name="RUNNINGVIAINETD"></a>
-<h2>RUNNING VIA INETD</h2>
+<p><br><a name="INETD"></a>
+<h2>INETD INSTALLATION</h2>
     
 <p><br>You need to edit your <code>/etc/inetd.conf</code> and <code>/etc/services</code> to
-enable <strong>SWAT</strong> to be launched via inetd. Note that <strong>swat</strong> can also
-be launched via the cgi-bin mechanisms of a web server (such as
-apache) and that is described below in the section <a href="swat.8.html#RUNNINGVIACGIBIN"><strong>RUNNING VIA
-CGI-BIN</strong></a>.
+enable <strong>SWAT</strong> to be launched via inetd. 
 <p><br>In <code>/etc/services</code> you need to add a line like this:
 <p><br><code>swat            901/tcp</code>
 <p><br>Note for NIS/YP users - you may need to rebuild the NIS service maps
@@ -91,67 +84,26 @@ presents an obscure security hole depending on the implementation
 details of your <strong>inetd</strong> daemon).
 <p><br>In <code>/etc/inetd.conf</code> you should add a line like this:
 <p><br><code>swat    stream  tcp     nowait.400  root    /usr/local/samba/bin/swat swat</code>
-<p><br>If you just want to see a demo of how swat works and don't want to be
-able to actually change any Samba config via swat then you may chose
-to change <code>"root"</code> to some other user that does not have permission
-to write to <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a>.
 <p><br>One you have edited <code>/etc/services</code> and <code>/etc/inetd.conf</code> you need
 to send a HUP signal to inetd. To do this use <code>"kill -1 PID"</code> where
 PID is the process ID of the inetd daemon.
-<p><br><a name="RUNNINGVIACGIBIN"></a>
-<h2>RUNNING VIA CGI-BIN</h2>
-    
-<p><br>To run <strong>swat</strong> via your web servers cgi-bin capability you need to
-copy the <strong>swat</strong> binary to your cgi-bin directory. Note that you
-should run <strong>swat</strong> either via <a href="swat.8.html#RUNNINGVIAINETD"><strong>inetd</strong></a> or via
-cgi-bin but not both.
-<p><br>Then you need to create a <code>swat/</code> directory in your web servers root
-directory and copy the <code>images/*</code> and <code>help/*</code> files found in the
-<code>swat/</code> directory of your Samba source distribution into there so
-that they are visible via the URL <code>http://your.web.server/swat/</code>
-<p><br>Next you need to make sure you modify your web servers authentication
-to require a username/pssword for the URL
-<code>http://your.web.server/cgi-bin/swat</code>. <em>**Don't forget this
-step!**</em> If you do forget it then you will be allowing anyone to edit
-your Samba configuration which would allow them to easily gain root
-access on your machine.
-<p><br>After testing the authentication you need to change the ownership and
-permissions on the <strong>swat</strong> binary. It should be owned by root wth the
-setuid bit set. It should be ONLY executable by the user that the web
-server runs as. Make sure you do this carefully!
-<p><br>for example, the following would be correct if the web server ran as
-group <code>"nobody"</code>.
-<p><br><code>-rws--x---    1 root     nobody    </code>
-<p><br>You must also realise that this means that any user who can run
-programs as the <code>"nobody"</code> group can run <strong>swat</strong> and modify your
-Samba config. Be sure to think about this!
 <p><br><a name="LAUNCHING"></a>
 <h2>LAUNCHING</h2>
     
-<p><br>To launch <strong>swat</strong> just run your favourite web browser and point it at
-<code>http://localhost:901/</code> or <code>http://localhost/cgi-bin/swat/</code>
-depending on how you installed it.
-<p><br>Note that you can attach to <strong>swat</strong> from any IP connected machine but
+<p><br>To launch <strong>swat</strong> just run your favorite web browser and point it at
+<code>http://localhost:901/</code>.
+<p><br><strong>Note that you can attach to <strong>swat</strong> from any IP connected machine but
 connecting from a remote machine leaves your connection open to
 password sniffing as passwords will be sent in the clear over the
-wire.
-<p><br>If installed via <strong>inetd</strong> then you should be prompted for a
-username/password when you connect. You will need to provide the
-username <code>"root"</code> and the correct root password. More sophisticated
-authentication options are planned for future versions of <strong>swat</strong>.
-<p><br>If installed via cgi-bin then you should receive whatever
-authentication request you configured in your web server.
+wire.</strong>
 <p><br><h2>FILES</h2>
     
 <p><br><strong>/etc/inetd.conf</strong>
-<p><br>If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must
-contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon. See the
-section <a href="swat.8.html#RUNNINGVIAINETD"><strong>RUNNING VIA INETD</strong></a> above.
+<p><br>This file must contain suitable startup information for the
+meta-daemon. 
 <p><br><strong>/etc/services</strong>
-<p><br>If running the server via the meta-daemon inetd, this file must
-contain a mapping of service name (eg., swat) to service port
-(eg., 901) and protocol type (eg., tcp). See the section
-<a href="swat.8.html#RUNNINGVIAINETD"><strong>RUNNING VIA INETD</strong></a> above.
+<p><br>This file must contain a mapping of service name (e.g., swat) to
+service port (e.g., 901) and protocol type (e.g., tcp). 
 <p><br><strong>/usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf</strong>
 <p><br>This is the default location of the <em>smb.conf</em> server configuration
 file that <strong>swat</strong> edits. Other common places that systems install
index d969131b8f9a3443b74589ba6291b7cb25b31244..cd7b08232a78410ad1429538a617d02aae7c170a 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>testparm</title>
+<html><head><title>testparm (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>testparm</h1>
+<h1>testparm (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -53,9 +53,9 @@ then testparm will examine the <a href="smb.conf.5.html#hostsallow"><strong>"hos
 allow"</strong></a> and <a href="smb.conf.5.html#hostsdeny"><strong>"hosts
 deny"</strong></a> parameters in the
 <a href="smb.conf.5.html"><strong>smb.conf</strong></a> file to determine if the hostname
-with this IP address would be allowed acces to the
+with this IP address would be allowed access to the
 <a href="smbd.8.html"><strong>smbd</strong></a> server. If this parameter is supplied, the
-hostIP parameter must also be supplied.
+<a href="testparm.1.html#hostIP">hostIP</a> parameter must also be supplied.
 <p><br><a name="hostIP"></a>
 <li><strong><strong>hostIP</strong></strong> This is the IP address of the host specified in the
 previous parameter. This address must be supplied if the hostname
index ef027385f560b0100678be94f934898df82c67c1..62d71a29f2bf4f04654bbe2e3c2fcda9fa19140b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  
 
 
-<html><head><title>testparm</title>
+<html><head><title>testprns (1)</title>
 
 <link rev="made" href="mailto:samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au">
 </head>
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 
 <hr>
 
-<h1>testparm</h1>
+<h1>testprns (1)</h1>
 <h2>Samba</h2>
 <h2>23 Oct 1998</h2>
 
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
     
 <p><br><a name="NAME"></a>
 <h2>NAME</h2>
-    testparm - check printer name for validity with smbd 
+    testprns - check printer name for validity with smbd 
 <p><br><a name="SYNOPSIS"></a>
 <h2>SYNOPSIS</h2>
      
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ would be wisest to always specify the printcap file to use.
 <li><strong><strong>printername</strong></strong> The printer name to validate.
 <p><br>Printer names are taken from the first field in each record in the
 printcap file, single printer names and sets of aliases separated by
-vertical bars ("|") are recognised. Note that no validation or
+vertical bars ("|") are recognized. Note that no validation or
 checking of the printcap syntax is done beyond that required to
 extract the printer name. It may be that the print spooling system is
 more forgiving or less forgiving than <strong>testprns</strong>. However, if
index f9bc2b065980c346d2966d71192ba4db419ada82..b86624f848715ef272528fad9426cce7153b4d62 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "lmhosts" "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "lmhosts " "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 lmhosts \- The Samba NetBIOS hosts file
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ lmhosts is the \fBSamba\fP NetBIOS name to IP address mapping file\&.
 .PP 
 This file is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
 .PP 
-lmhosts is the \fBSamba\fP NetBIOS name to IP address mapping file\&.  It
+\fBlmhosts\fP is the \fBSamba\fP NetBIOS name to IP address mapping file\&.  It
 is very similar to the \fB/etc/hosts\fP file format, except that the
 hostname component must correspond to the NetBIOS naming format\&.
 .PP 
@@ -38,21 +38,18 @@ name type in the lookup\&.
 .PP 
 An example follows :
 .PP 
-
-.DS 
-
-
-#
-# Sample Samba lmhosts file\&.
-#
-192\&.9\&.200\&.1      TESTPC
-192\&.9\&.200\&.20     NTSERVER#20
-192\&.9\&.200\&.21     SAMBASERVER
-
-.DE 
-
+# 
+.br 
+# Sample Samba lmhosts file\&. 
+.br 
+# 
+.br 
+192\&.9\&.200\&.1      TESTPC 
+.br 
+192\&.9\&.200\&.20     NTSERVER#20 
+.br 
+192\&.9\&.200\&.21     SAMBASERVER 
+.br 
 .PP 
 Contains three IP to NetBIOS name mappings\&. The first and third will
 be returned for any queries for the names \f(CW"TESTPC"\fP and
@@ -79,7 +76,7 @@ This man page is correct for version 2\&.0 of the Samba suite\&.
 .SH "AUTHOR" 
 .PP 
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed\&.
 .PP 
index 9e79702761171e130ba8f9383c140a862f0b45a3..36268ffd0c29087a2685dfd169a1fa80d32cac62 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "make_smbcodepage" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "make_smbcodepage " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 make_codepage \- Construct a codepage file for Samba
@@ -18,17 +18,17 @@ with the internationalization features of Samba 2\&.0
 .PP 
 .IP 
 .IP "c|d" 
-This tells make_smbcodepage if it is compiling (c) a text
-format code page file to binary, or (d) de-compiling a binary codepage
+This tells \fBmake_smbcodepage\fP if it is compiling (\fBc\fP) a text
+format code page file to binary, or (\fBd\fP) de-compiling a binary codepage
 file to text\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "codepage" 
-This is the codepage we are processing (a number, eg\&. 850)\&.
+This is the codepage we are processing (a number, e\&.g\&. 850)\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "inputfile" 
-This is the input file to process\&. In the \'c\' case this
+This is the input file to process\&. In the \'\fBc\fP\' case this
 will be a text codepage definition file such as the ones found in the
-Samba \fIsource/codepages\fP directory\&. In the \'d\' case this will be the
+Samba \fIsource/codepages\fP directory\&. In the \'\fBd\fP\' case this will be the
 binary format codepage definition file normally found in the
 \fIlib/codepages\fP directory in the Samba install directory path\&.
 .IP 
@@ -42,9 +42,9 @@ A text Samba codepage definition file is a description that tells
 Samba how to map from upper to lower case for characters greater than
 ascii 127 in the specified DOS code page\&.  Note that for certain DOS
 codepages (437 for example) mapping from lower to upper case may be
-asynchronous\&. For example, in code page 437 lower case a acute maps to
-a plain upper case A when going from lower to upper case, but maps
-from plain upper case A to plain lower case a when lower casing a
+non-symmetrical\&. For example, in code page 437 lower case a acute maps to
+a plain upper case A when going from lower to upper case, but
+plain upper case A maps to plain lower case a when lower casing a
 character\&.
 .PP 
 A binary Samba codepage definition file is a binary representation of
index ec455741167a55db4040f795262865ec0e76f94c..507a31202999dd5336c14f569d0ea106107f5462 100644 (file)
@@ -22,21 +22,21 @@ SMB/CIFS clients, when they start up, may wish to locate an SMB/CIFS
 server\&. That is, they wish to know what IP number a specified host is
 using\&.
 .PP 
-Amongst other services, this program will listen for such requests,
+Amongst other services, \fBnmbd\fP will listen for such requests,
 and if its own NetBIOS name is specified it will respond with the IP
 number of the host it is running on\&.  Its "own NetBIOS name" is by
 default the primary DNS name of the host it is running on, but this
-can be overriden with the \fB-n\fP option (see \fIOPTIONS\fP below)\&. Thus
-nmbd will reply to broadcast queries for its own name(s)\&. Additional
-names for nmbd to respond on can be set via parameters in the
-\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP configuration file\&.
+can be overridden with the \fB-n\fP option (see OPTIONS below)\&. Thus
+\fBnmbd\fP will reply to broadcast queries for its own name(s)\&. Additional
+names for \fBnmbd\fP to respond on can be set via parameters in the
+\fBsmb\&.conf(5)\fP configuration file\&.
 .PP 
-nmbd can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server)
+\fBnmbd\fP can also be used as a WINS (Windows Internet Name Server)
 server\&. What this basically means is that it will act as a WINS
 database server, creating a database from name registration requests
 that it receives and replying to queries from clients for these names\&.
 .PP 
-In addition, nmbd can act as a WINS proxy, relaying broadcast queries
+In addition, \fBnmbd\fP can act as a WINS proxy, relaying broadcast queries
 from clients that do not understand how to talk the WINS protocol to a
 WIN server\&.
 .PP 
@@ -44,9 +44,9 @@ WIN server\&.
 .PP 
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-D\fP" 
-If specified, this parameter causes the server to operate
+If specified, this parameter causes \fBnmbd\fP to operate
 as a daemon\&. That is, it detaches itself and runs in the background,
-fielding requests on the appropriate port\&. By default, the server will
+fielding requests on the appropriate port\&. By default, \fBnmbd\fP will
 NOT operate as a daemon\&. nmbd can also be operated from the inetd
 meta-daemon, although this is not recommended\&.
 .IP 
@@ -64,16 +64,17 @@ NetBIOS lmhosts file\&.
 .IP 
 The lmhosts file is a list of NetBIOS names to IP addresses that is
 loaded by the nmbd server and used via the name resolution mechanism
-\fIname resolve order\fP described in \fBsmbd\&.conf (5)\fP to resolve any
+\fBname resolve order\fP described in 
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP to resolve any
 NetBIOS name queries needed by the server\&. Note that the contents of
-this file are \fINOT\fP used by nmbd to answer any name queries, adding
+this file are \fINOT\fP used by \fBnmbd\fP to answer any name queries\&. Adding
 a line to this file affects name NetBIOS resolution from this host
 \fIONLY\fP\&.
 .IP 
 The default path to this file is compiled into Samba as part of the
 build process\&. Common defaults are \fI/usr/local/samba/lib/lmhosts\fP,
-\fI/usr/samba/lib/lmhosts\fP or \fI/etc/lmhosts\fP\&. See the \fBlmhosts
-(5)\fP man page for details on the contents of this file\&.
+\fI/usr/samba/lib/lmhosts\fP or \fI/etc/lmhosts\fP\&. See the 
+\fBlmhosts (5)\fP man page for details on the contents of this file\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-d debuglevel\fP" 
 debuglevel is an integer from 0 to 10\&.
@@ -103,7 +104,7 @@ extension "\&.nmb" to the specified base name\&.  For example, if the name
 specified was "log" then the file log\&.nmb would contain the debugging
 data\&.
 .IP 
-The default log file path is is compiled into Samba as part of the
+The default log file path is compiled into Samba as part of the
 build process\&. Common defaults are \fI/usr/local/samba/var/log\&.nmb\fP,
 \fI/usr/samba/var/log\&.nmb\fP or \fI/var/log/log\&.nmb\fP\&.
 .IP 
@@ -118,7 +119,7 @@ but will override the setting in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&.
 UDP port number is a positive integer value\&.
 .IP 
 This option changes the default UDP port number (normally 137) that
-nmbd responds to name queries on\&. Don\'t use this option unless you are
+\fBnmbd\fP responds to name queries on\&. Don\'t use this option unless you are
 an expert, in which case you won\'t need help!
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-s configuration file\fP" 
@@ -130,7 +131,7 @@ The file specified contains the configuration details required by the
 server\&. See \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP for more information\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-i scope\fP" 
-This specifies a NetBIOS scope that the server will use
+This specifies a NetBIOS scope that \fBnmbd\fP will use
 to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names\&. For details on the
 use of NetBIOS scopes, see rfc1001\&.txt and rfc1002\&.txt\&. NetBIOS scopes
 are \fIvery\fP rarely used, only set this parameter if you are the
@@ -138,7 +139,7 @@ system administrator in charge of all the NetBIOS systems you
 communicate with\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-h\fP" 
-Prints the help information (usage) for nmbd\&.
+Prints the help information (usage) for \fBnmbd\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .PP 
 .SH "FILES" 
@@ -150,14 +151,15 @@ contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon\&.
 .PP 
 \fB/etc/rc\fP
 .PP 
-(or whatever initialisation script your system uses)\&.
+(or whatever initialization script your system uses)\&.
 .PP 
 If running the server as a daemon at startup, this file will need to
 contain an appropriate startup sequence for the server\&.
 .PP 
 \fB/usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP
 .PP 
-This is the default location of the \fIsmb\&.conf\fP server configuration
+This is the default location of the 
+\fBsmb\&.conf\fP server configuration
 file\&. Other common places that systems install this file are
 \fI/usr/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP and \fI/etc/smb\&.conf\fP\&.
 .PP 
@@ -173,18 +175,18 @@ configured under wherever Samba was configured to install itself\&.
 .PP 
 .SH "SIGNALS" 
 .PP 
-To shut down an nmbd process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
+To shut down an \fBnmbd\fP process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
 \fINOT\fP be used, except as a last resort, as this may leave the name
-database in an inconsistant state\&. The correct way to terminate
-nmbd is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
+database in an inconsistent state\&. The correct way to terminate
+\fBnmbd\fP is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
 its own\&.
 .PP 
-nmbd will accept SIGHUP, which will cause it to dump out it\'s
-namelists into the file namelist\&.debug in the
+\fBnmbd\fP will accept SIGHUP, which will cause it to dump out it\'s
+namelists into the file \f(CWnamelist\&.debug\fP in the
 \fI/usr/local/samba/var/locks\fP directory (or the \fIvar/locks\fP
 directory configured under wherever Samba was configured to install
-itself)\&. This will also cause nmbd to dump out it\'s server database in
-the log\&.nmb file\&. In addition, the the debug log level of nmbd may be raised
+itself)\&. This will also cause \fBnmbd\fP to dump out it\'s server database in
+the log\&.nmb file\&. In addition, the debug log level of nmbd may be raised
 by sending it a SIGUSR1 (\f(CWkill -USR1 <nmbd-pid>\fP) and lowered by sending it a
 SIGUSR2 (\f(CWkill -USR2 <nmbd-pid>\fP)\&. This is to allow transient
 problems to be diagnosed, whilst still running at a normally low log
@@ -207,7 +209,7 @@ http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/cifs/\&.
 .SH "AUTHOR" 
 .PP 
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed\&.
 .PP 
index 12367f9efda0dd1513bf177523576361f06e8334..90b1864409b03eaa8b7da15c01e84041a7b4b295 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "nmblookup" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "nmblookup " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 nmblookup \- NetBIOS over TCP/IP client used to lookup NetBIOS names
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ This program is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
 .PP 
 \fBnmblookup\fP is used to query NetBIOS names and map them to IP
 addresses in a network using NetBIOS over TCP/IP queries\&. The options
-allow the name queries to be directed at a particlar IP broadcast area
+allow the name queries to be directed at a particular IP broadcast area
 or to a particular machine\&. All queries are done over UDP\&.
 .PP 
 .SH "OPTIONS" 
@@ -33,13 +33,14 @@ rfc1002 for details\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-S\fP" 
 Once the name query has returned an IP address then do a
-node status query as well\&.
+node status query as well\&. A node status query returns the NetBIOS names 
+registered by a host\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-r\fP" 
 Try and bind to UDP port 137 to send and receive UDP
 datagrams\&. The reason for this option is a bug in Windows 95 where it
 ignores the source port of the requesting packet and only replies to
-UDP port 137\&. Unfortunately, on most UNIX systems root privillage is
+UDP port 137\&. Unfortunately, on most UNIX systems root privilage is
 needed to bind to this port, and in addition, if the
 \fBnmbd\fP daemon is running on this machine it also
 binds to this port\&.
@@ -84,12 +85,12 @@ level\fP parameter in the \fBsmb\&.conf
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-s smb\&.conf\fP" 
 This parameter specifies the pathname to the
-Samba configuration file, smb\&.conf\&. This file controls all aspects of
-the Samba setup on the machine and smbclient also needs to read this
-file\&.
+Samba configuration file, \fBsmb\&.conf\fP\&. 
+This file controls all aspects of
+the Samba setup on the machine\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-i scope\fP" 
-This specifies a NetBIOS scope that smbclient will use
+This specifies a NetBIOS scope that \fBnmblookup\fP will use
 to communicate with when generating NetBIOS names\&. For details on the
 use of NetBIOS scopes, see rfc1001\&.txt and rfc1002\&.txt\&. NetBIOS scopes
 are \fIvery\fP rarely used, only set this parameter if you are the
@@ -100,14 +101,15 @@ communicate with\&.
 This is the NetBIOS name being queried\&. Depending upon
 the previous options this may be a NetBIOS name or IP address\&. If a
 NetBIOS name then the different name types may be specified by
-appending \f(CW#<type>\fP to the name\&.
+appending \f(CW#<type>\fP to the name\&. This name may also be \f(CW"*"\fP,
+which will return all registered names within a broadcast area\&.
 .IP 
 .PP 
 .SH "EXAMPLES" 
 .PP 
-\fBnmblookup\fP can be used to query a WINS server (in the same way \&.B
-nslookup is used to query DNS servers)\&. To query a WINS server,
-nmblookup must be called like this:
+\fBnmblookup\fP can be used to query a WINS server (in the same way
+\fBnslookup\fP is used to query DNS servers)\&. To query a WINS server,
+\fBnmblookup\fP must be called like this:
 .PP 
 \f(CWnmblookup -U server -R \'name\'\fP
 .PP 
@@ -130,7 +132,7 @@ This man page is correct for version 2\&.0 of the Samba suite\&.
 .SH "AUTHOR" 
 .PP 
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed\&.
 .PP 
index 11c126fb8fd28183ea8e642e93216a0c95e1f6ee..f48d7aaf3f3c1bc96f2233549cc54c7b18c78ac2 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "Samba" "7" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "" 
+.TH "Samba " "7" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 Samba \- A Windows SMB/CIFS fileserver for UNIX
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Samba \- A Windows SMB/CIFS fileserver for UNIX
 .SH "DESCRIPTION" 
 .PP 
 The Samba software suite is a collection of programs that implements
-the Server Message Block(commenly abbreviated as SMB) protocol for
+the Server Message Block(commonly abbreviated as SMB) protocol for
 UNIX systems\&. This protocol is sometimes also referred to as the
 Common Internet File System (CIFS), LanManager or NetBIOS protocol\&.
 .PP 
@@ -19,7 +19,8 @@ The Samba suite is made up of several components\&. Each component is
 described in a separate manual page\&. It is strongly recommended that
 you read the documentation that comes with Samba and the manual pages
 of those components that you use\&. If the manual pages aren\'t clear
-enough then please send a patch to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
+enough then please send a patch or bug report
+to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
 .PP 
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBsmbd\fP" 
@@ -67,8 +68,8 @@ in your printcap file\&.
 .br 
 .br 
 The \fBsmbstatus\fP
-(1) utility allows you to tell who is currently
-using the \fBsmbd (8)\fP server\&.
+(1) utility allows you list current connections to the 
+\fBsmbd (8)\fP server\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBnmblookup\fP" 
 .br 
@@ -98,7 +99,7 @@ passwords on Samba and Windows NT(tm) servers\&.
 The Samba software suite is licensed under the GNU Public License
 (GPL)\&. A copy of that license should have come with the package in the
 file COPYING\&. You are encouraged to distribute copies of the Samba
-suite, but please keep obey the terms of this license\&.
+suite, but please obey the terms of this license\&.
 .PP 
 The latest version of the Samba suite can be obtained via anonymous
 ftp from samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au in the directory pub/samba/\&. It is
@@ -128,7 +129,7 @@ for details on how to do this\&.
 If you have patches to submit or bugs to report then you may mail them
 directly to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Note, however, that due to
 the enormous popularity of this package the Samba Team may take some
-time to repond to mail\&. We prefer patches in \fIdiff -u\fP format\&.
+time to respond to mail\&. We prefer patches in \fIdiff -u\fP format\&.
 .PP 
 .SH "CREDITS" 
 .PP 
@@ -141,7 +142,7 @@ for the contributors to Samba post-CVS\&. CVS is the Open Source source
 code control system used by the Samba Team to develop Samba\&. The
 project would have been unmanageable without it\&.
 .PP 
-In addition, several commercial organisations now help fund the Samba
+In addition, several commercial organizations now help fund the Samba
 Team with money and equipment\&. For details see the Samba Web pages at
 http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/samba/samba-thanks\&.html\&.
 .PP 
index 818b26814f5f37e2de653b344db085c412a5d032..0c7229ce2020e548640b7cfec4b99a065182a34e 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smb\&.conf" "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smb\&.conf " "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smb\&.conf \- The configuration file for the Samba suite
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ them\&. The client provides the username\&. As older clients only provide
 passwords and not usernames, you may specify a list of usernames to
 check against the password using the \fB"user="\fP option in
 the share definition\&. For modern clients such as Windows 95/98 and
-Windows NT, this should not be neccessary\&.
+Windows NT, this should not be necessary\&.
 .PP 
 Note that the access rights granted by the server are masked by the
 access rights granted to the specified or guest UNIX user by the host
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ the share name "foo":
 
        [foo]
                path = /home/bar
-               writable = true
+               writeable = true
 
 
 .DE 
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ following is a typical and suitable [homes] section:
  
 
        [homes]
-               writable = yes
+               writeable = yes
 
 .DE 
  
@@ -232,7 +232,7 @@ given, the username is set to the located printer name\&.
 Note that the [printers] service MUST be printable - if you specify
 otherwise, the server will refuse to load the configuration file\&.
 .IP 
-Typically the path specified would be that of a world-writable spool
+Typically the path specified would be that of a world-writeable spool
 directory with the sticky bit set on it\&. A typical [printers] entry
 would look like this:
 .IP 
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ would look like this:
 
        [printers]
                path = /usr/spool/public
-               writable = no
+               writeable = no
                guest ok = yes
                printable = yes 
 
@@ -266,7 +266,7 @@ this:
 .IP 
 Each alias should be an acceptable printer name for your printing
 subsystem\&. In the \fB[global]\fP section, specify the new
-file as your printcap\&.  The server will then only recognise names
+file as your printcap\&.  The server will then only recognize names
 found in your pseudo-printcap, which of course can contain whatever
 aliases you like\&. The same technique could be used simply to limit
 access to a subset of your local printers\&.
@@ -280,7 +280,7 @@ NOTE: On SYSV systems which use lpstat to determine what printers are
 defined on the system you may be able to use \fB"printcap name =
 lpstat"\fP to automatically obtain a list of
 printers\&. See the \fB"printcap name"\fP option for
-more detils\&.
+more details\&.
 .IP 
 .PP 
 .SH "PARAMETERS" 
@@ -288,8 +288,8 @@ more detils\&.
 Parameters define the specific attributes of sections\&.
 .PP 
 Some parameters are specific to the \fB[global]\fP section
-(eg\&., \fBsecurity\fP)\&.  Some parameters are usable in
-all sections (eg\&., \fBcreate mode\fP)\&. All others are
+(e\&.g\&., \fBsecurity\fP)\&.  Some parameters are usable in
+all sections (e\&.g\&., \fBcreate mode\fP)\&. All others are
 permissible only in normal sections\&. For the purposes of the following
 descriptions the \fB[homes]\fP and
 \fB[printers]\fP sections will be considered normal\&.
@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ specific to the \fB[global]\fP section\&. The letter \f(CW\'S\'\fP
 indicates that a parameter can be specified in a service specific
 section\&. Note that all \f(CW\'S\'\fP parameters can also be specified in the
 \fB[global]\fP section - in which case they will define
-the default behaviour for all services\&.
+the default behavior for all services\&.
 .PP 
 Parameters are arranged here in alphabetical order - this may not
 create best bedfellows, but at least you can find them! Where there
@@ -375,8 +375,8 @@ negotiation\&. It can be one of CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2 or NT1\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
 \fB%a\fP = the architecture of the remote
-machine\&. Only some are recognised, and those may not be 100%
-reliable\&. It currently recognises Samba, WfWg, WinNT and
+machine\&. Only some are recognized, and those may not be 100%
+reliable\&. It currently recognizes Samba, WfWg, WinNT and
 Win95\&. Anything else will be known as "UNKNOWN"\&. If it gets it wrong
 then sending a level 3 log to \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
 should allow it to be fixed\&.
@@ -1306,7 +1306,7 @@ regardless if the owner of the file is the currently logged on user or not\&.
 This specifies what type of server \fBnmbd\fP will
 announce itself as, to a network neighborhood browse list\&. By default
 this is set to Windows NT\&. The valid options are : "NT", "Win95" or
-"WfW" meaining Windows NT, Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups
+"WfW" meaning Windows NT, Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups
 respectively\&. Do not change this parameter unless you have a specific
 need to stop Samba appearing as an NT server as this may prevent Samba
 servers from participating as browser servers correctly\&.
@@ -1388,7 +1388,7 @@ the interface list given in the \fB\'interfaces\'\fP
 parameter\&. This restricts the networks that \fBsmbd\fP
 will serve to packets coming in those interfaces\&.  Note that you
 should not use this parameter for machines that are serving PPP or
-other intermittant or non-broadcast network interfaces as it will not
+other intermittent or non-broadcast network interfaces as it will not
 cope with non-permanent interfaces\&.
 .IP 
 In addition, to change a users SMB password, the
@@ -1433,16 +1433,9 @@ This parameter can be set per share\&.
 \fBExample:\fP
 \f(CW  blocking locks = False\fP
 .IP 
-.IP "\fBbroweable (S)\fP" 
+.IP "\fBbrowseable (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This controls whether this share is seen in the list of available
-shares in a net view and in the browse list\&.
-.IP 
-\fBDefault:\fP
-\f(CW  browsable = Yes\fP
-.IP 
-\fBExample:\fP
-\f(CW  browsable = No\fP
+Synonym for \fBbrowseable\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBbrowse list(G)\fP" 
 .IP 
@@ -1455,7 +1448,14 @@ should never need to change this\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBbrowseable\fP" 
 .IP 
-Synonym for \fBbrowsable\fP\&.
+This controls whether this share is seen in the list of available
+shares in a net view and in the browse list\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  browseable = Yes\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExample:\fP
+\f(CW  browseable = No\fP
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBcase sensitive (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
@@ -1549,7 +1549,7 @@ described more fully in the manual page \fBmake_smbcodepage
 to map lower to upper case characters to provide the case insensitivity
 of filenames that Windows clients expect\&.
 .IP 
-Samba currenly ships with the following code page files :
+Samba currently ships with the following code page files :
 .IP 
 .IP 
 .IP o 
@@ -1642,12 +1642,12 @@ Shift-JIS to JUNET code with different shift-in, shift out codes\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
 \fBHEX\fP Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to a 3 byte hex
-representation, ie\&. \f(CW:AB\fP\&.
+representation, i\&.e\&. \f(CW:AB\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
 \fBCAP\fP Convert an incoming Shift-JIS character to the 3 byte hex
-representation used by the Columbia Appletalk Program (CAP),
-ie\&. \f(CW:AB\fP\&.  This is used for compatibility between Samba and CAP\&.
+representation used by the Columbia AppleTalk Program (CAP),
+i\&.e\&. \f(CW:AB\fP\&.  This is used for compatibility between Samba and CAP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBcomment (S)\fP" 
@@ -1704,7 +1704,7 @@ in the configuration file than the service doing the copying\&.
 .IP 
 A synonym for this parameter is \fB\'create mode\'\fP\&.
 .IP 
-When a file is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
+When a file is created, the necessary permissions are calculated
 according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and the
 resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise \'AND\'ed with this parameter\&.
 This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX modes
@@ -1859,7 +1859,7 @@ If this option is set to True, then Samba will attempt to recursively
 delete any files and directories within the vetoed directory\&. This can
 be useful for integration with file serving systems such as \fBNetAtalk\fP,
 which create meta-files within directories you might normally veto
-DOS/Windows users from seeing (eg\&. \f(CW\&.AppleDouble\fP)
+DOS/Windows users from seeing (e\&.g\&. \f(CW\&.AppleDouble\fP)
 .IP 
 Setting \f(CW\'delete veto files = True\'\fP allows these directories to be 
 transparently deleted when the parent directory is deleted (so long
@@ -1908,7 +1908,7 @@ return value can give the block size in bytes\&. The default blocksize
 is 1024 bytes\&.
 .IP 
 Note: Your script should \fINOT\fP be setuid or setgid and should be
-owned by (and writable only by) root!
+owned by (and writeable only by) root!
 .IP 
 \fBDefault:\fP
 \f(CW  By default internal routines for determining the disk capacity
@@ -1955,7 +1955,7 @@ Synonym for \fBpath\fP\&.
 This parameter is the octal modes which are used when converting DOS
 modes to UNIX modes when creating UNIX directories\&.
 .IP 
-When a directory is created, the neccessary permissions are calculated
+When a directory is created, the necessary permissions are calculated
 according to the mapping from DOS modes to UNIX permissions, and the
 resulting UNIX mode is then bit-wise \'AND\'ed with this parameter\&.
 This parameter may be thought of as a bit-wise MASK for the UNIX modes
@@ -1968,7 +1968,7 @@ directory to modify it\&.
 .IP 
 Following this Samba will bit-wise \'OR\' the UNIX mode created from
 this parameter with the value of the "force directory mode"
-parameter\&. This parameter is set to 000 by default (ie\&. no extra mode
+parameter\&. This parameter is set to 000 by default (i\&.e\&. no extra mode
 bits are added)\&.
 .IP 
 See the \fB"force directory mode"\fP parameter
@@ -2012,7 +2012,7 @@ See also the parameter \fBwins support\fP\&.
 This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 \fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
 .IP 
@@ -2021,7 +2021,7 @@ mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 \fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
 .IP 
@@ -2036,7 +2036,7 @@ files\&. It is left behind for compatibility reasons\&.
 This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 \fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
 .IP 
@@ -2045,7 +2045,7 @@ mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 \fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
 .IP 
@@ -2054,7 +2054,7 @@ mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 This is an \fBEXPERIMENTAL\fP parameter that is part of the unfinished
 Samba NT Domain Controller Code\&. It may be removed in a later release\&.
 To work with the latest code builds that may have more support for
-Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscibe to the
+Samba NT Domain Controller functionality please subscribe to the
 mailing list \fBSamba-ntdom\fP available by sending email to
 \fIlistproc@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP
 .IP 
@@ -2067,7 +2067,7 @@ Samba documentation directory \f(CWdocs/\fP shipped with the source code\&.
 .IP 
 Note that Win95/98 Domain logons are \fINOT\fP the same as Windows
 NT Domain logons\&. NT Domain logons require a Primary Domain Controller
-(PDC) for the Domain\&. It is inteded that in a future release Samba
+(PDC) for the Domain\&. It is intended that in a future release Samba
 will be able to provide this functionality for Windows NT clients
 also\&.
 .IP 
@@ -2077,7 +2077,7 @@ also\&.
 .IP "\fBdomain master (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
 Tell \fBnmbd\fP to enable WAN-wide browse list
-collation\&.Setting this option causes \fBnmbd\fP to
+collation\&. Setting this option causes \fBnmbd\fP to
 claim a special domain specific NetBIOS name that identifies it as a
 domain master browser for its given
 \fBworkgroup\fP\&. Local master browsers in the same
@@ -2091,7 +2091,7 @@ list, instead of just the list for their broadcast-isolated subnet\&.
 Note that Windows NT Primary Domain Controllers expect to be able to
 claim this \fBworkgroup\fP specific special NetBIOS
 name that identifies them as domain master browsers for that
-\fBworkgroup\fP by default (ie\&. there is no way to
+\fBworkgroup\fP by default (i\&.e\&. there is no way to
 prevent a Windows NT PDC from attempting to do this)\&. This means that
 if this parameter is set and \fBnmbd\fP claims the
 special name for a \fBworkgroup\fP before a Windows NT
@@ -2103,7 +2103,7 @@ and may fail\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBdont descend (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-There are certain directories on some systems (eg\&., the \f(CW/proc\fP tree
+There are certain directories on some systems (e\&.g\&., the \f(CW/proc\fP tree
 under Linux) that are either not of interest to clients or are
 infinitely deep (recursive)\&. This parameter allows you to specify a
 comma-delimited list of directories that the server should always show
@@ -2121,7 +2121,7 @@ just \f(CW"/proc"\fP\&. Experimentation is the best policy :-)
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBdos filetime resolution (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-Under the DOS and Windows FAT filesystem, the finest granulatity on
+Under the DOS and Windows FAT filesystem, the finest granularity on
 time resolution is two seconds\&. Setting this parameter for a share
 causes Samba to round the reported time down to the nearest two second
 boundary when a query call that requires one second resolution is made
@@ -2151,7 +2151,7 @@ the timestamp on it\&. Under POSIX semantics, only the owner of the file
 or root may change the timestamp\&. By default, Samba runs with POSIX
 semantics and refuses to change the timestamp on a file if the user
 smbd is acting on behalf of is not the file owner\&. Setting this option
-to True allows DOS semantics and smbd will change the file timstamp as
+to True allows DOS semantics and smbd will change the file timestamp as
 DOS requires\&.
 .IP 
 \fBDefault:\fP
@@ -2247,10 +2247,10 @@ This parameter allows the Samba administrator to stop
 particular share\&. Setting this parameter to \fI"No"\fP prevents any file
 or directory that is a symbolic link from being followed (the user
 will get an error)\&.  This option is very useful to stop users from
-adding a symbolic link to \f(CW/etc/pasword\fP in their home directory for
+adding a symbolic link to \f(CW/etc/passwd\fP in their home directory for
 instance\&.  However it will slow filename lookups down slightly\&.
 .IP 
-This option is enabled (ie\&. \fBsmbd\fP will follow
+This option is enabled (i\&.e\&. \fBsmbd\fP will follow
 symbolic links) by default\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBforce create mode (S)\fP" 
@@ -2258,7 +2258,7 @@ symbolic links) by default\&.
 This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that will
 \fI*always*\fP be set on a file created by Samba\&. This is done by
 bitwise \'OR\'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a file that is being
-created\&. The default for this parameter is (in octel) 000\&. The modes
+created\&. The default for this parameter is (in octal) 000\&. The modes
 in this parameter are bitwise \'OR\'ed onto the file mode after the mask
 set in the \fB"create mask"\fP parameter is applied\&.
 .IP 
@@ -2280,7 +2280,7 @@ the \'user\'\&.
 This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that will
 \fI*always*\fP be set on a directory created by Samba\&. This is done by
 bitwise \'OR\'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a directory that is
-being created\&. The default for this parameter is (in octel) 0000 which
+being created\&. The default for this parameter is (in octal) 0000 which
 will not add any extra permission bits to a created directory\&. This
 operation is done after the mode mask in the parameter
 \fB"directory mask"\fP is applied\&.
@@ -2351,7 +2351,7 @@ Windows NT but this can be changed to other strings such as "Samba" or
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBgetwd cache (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This is a tuning option\&. When this is enabled a cacheing algorithm
+This is a tuning option\&. When this is enabled a caching algorithm
 will be used to reduce the time taken for getwd() calls\&. This can have
 a significant impact on performance, especially when the
 \fBwidelinks\fP parameter is set to False\&.
@@ -2440,8 +2440,8 @@ Each entry in the list must be separated by a \f(CW\'/\'\fP, which allows
 spaces to be included in the entry\&.  \f(CW\'*\'\fP and \f(CW\'?\'\fP can be used
 to specify multiple files or directories as in DOS wildcards\&.
 .IP 
-Each entry must be a unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
-unix directory separator \f(CW\'/\'\fP\&.
+Each entry must be a Unix path, not a DOS path and must not include the 
+Unix directory separator \f(CW\'/\'\fP\&.
 .IP 
 Note that the case sensitivity option is applicable in hiding files\&.
 .IP 
@@ -2623,7 +2623,7 @@ parameter allows the use of them to be turned on or off\&.
 Kernel oplocks support allows Samba \fBoplocks\fP to be
 broken whenever a local UNIX process or NFS operation accesses a file
 that \fBsmbd\fP has oplocked\&. This allows complete
-data consistancy between SMB/CIFS, NFS and local file access (and is a
+data consistency between SMB/CIFS, NFS and local file access (and is a
 \fIvery\fP cool feature :-)\&.
 .IP 
 This parameter defaults to \fI"On"\fP on systems that have the support,
@@ -2769,7 +2769,7 @@ will be loaded for browsing by default\&. See the
 \fBDefault:\fP
 \f(CW  load printers = yes\fP
 .IP 
-bg(Example:)
+\fBExample:\fP
 \f(CW  load printers = no\fP
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBlocal master (G)\fP" 
@@ -2895,15 +2895,15 @@ client\&.  The share must be writeable when the logs in for the first
 time, in order that the Windows 95/98 client can create the user\&.dat
 and other directories\&.
 .IP 
-Thereafter, the directories and any of contents can, if required, be
-made read-only\&.  It is not adviseable that the USER\&.DAT file be made
+Thereafter, the directories and any of the contents can, if required, be
+made read-only\&.  It is not advisable that the USER\&.DAT file be made
 read-only - rename it to USER\&.MAN to achieve the desired effect (a
 \fIMAN\fPdatory profile)\&.
 .IP 
 Windows clients can sometimes maintain a connection to the [homes]
 share, even though there is no user logged in\&.  Therefore, it is vital
 that the logon path does not include a reference to the homes share
-(i\&.e setting this parameter to \f(CW\e\e%N\eHOMES\eprofile_path\fP will cause
+(i\&.e\&. setting this parameter to \f(CW\e\e%N\eHOMES\eprofile_path\fP will cause
 problems)\&.
 .IP 
 This option takes the standard substitutions, allowing you to have
@@ -2934,7 +2934,7 @@ file that will be downloaded is:
 .IP 
 The contents of the batch file is entirely your choice\&.  A suggested
 command would be to add \f(CWNET TIME \e\eSERVER /SET /YES\fP, to force every
-machine to synchronise clocks with the same time server\&.  Another use
+machine to synchronize clocks with the same time server\&.  Another use
 would be to add \f(CWNET USE U: \e\eSERVER\eUTILS\fP for commonly used
 utilities, or \f(CWNET USE Q: \e\eSERVER\eISO9001_QA\fP for example\&.
 .IP 
@@ -3006,7 +3006,7 @@ previous identical \fBlpq\fP command will be used if the cached data is
 less than 10 seconds old\&. A large value may be advisable if your
 \fBlpq\fP command is very slow\&.
 .IP 
-A value of 0 will disable cacheing completely\&.
+A value of 0 will disable caching completely\&.
 .IP 
 See also the \fB"printing"\fP parameter\&.
 .IP 
@@ -3178,8 +3178,8 @@ See the section on \fB"NAME MANGLING"\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBmangled map (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which are
-not representable on Windows/DOS\&.  The mangling of names is not always
+This is for those who want to directly map UNIX file names which can
+not be represented on Windows/DOS\&.  The mangling of names is not always
 what is needed\&.  In particular you may have documents with file
 extensions that differ between DOS and UNIX\&. For example, under UNIX
 it is common to use \f(CW"\&.html"\fP for HTML files, whereas under
@@ -3190,7 +3190,7 @@ So to map \f(CW"html"\fP to \f(CW"htm"\fP you would use:
 \f(CW  mangled map = (*\&.html *\&.htm)\fP
 .IP 
 One very useful case is to remove the annoying \f(CW";1"\fP off the ends
-of filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXes)\&. To do
+of filenames on some CDROMS (only visible under some UNIXs)\&. To do
 this use a map of (*;1 *)\&.
 .IP 
 \fBdefault:\fP
@@ -3309,7 +3309,7 @@ source code, documents, etc\&.\&.\&.
 .IP 
 Note that this requires the \fB"create mask"\fP
 parameter to be set such that owner execute bit is not masked out
-(ie\&. it must include 100)\&. See the parameter \fB"create
+(i\&.e\&. it must include 100)\&. See the parameter \fB"create
 mask"\fP for details\&.
 .IP 
 \fBDefault:\fP
@@ -3324,7 +3324,7 @@ This controls whether DOS style hidden files should be mapped to the
 UNIX world execute bit\&.
 .IP 
 Note that this requires the \fB"create mask"\fP to be
-set such that the world execute bit is not masked out (ie\&. it must
+set such that the world execute bit is not masked out (i\&.e\&. it must
 include 001)\&. See the parameter \fB"create mask"\fP
 for details\&.
 .IP 
@@ -3340,7 +3340,7 @@ This controls whether DOS style system files should be mapped to the
 UNIX group execute bit\&.
 .IP 
 Note that this requires the \fB"create mask"\fP to be
-set such that the group execute bit is not masked out (ie\&. it must
+set such that the group execute bit is not masked out (i\&.e\&. it must
 include 010)\&. See the parameter \fB"create mask"\fP
 for details\&.
 .IP 
@@ -3353,7 +3353,7 @@ for details\&.
 .IP "\fBmap to guest (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
 This parameter is only useful in \fBsecurity\fP modes
-other than \fB"security=share"\fP - ie\&. user,
+other than \fB"security=share"\fP - i\&.e\&. user,
 server, and domain\&.
 .IP 
 This parameter can take three different values, which tell
@@ -3377,7 +3377,7 @@ account"\fP\&.
 \fB"Bad Password"\fP - Means user logins with an invalid
 password are treated as a guest login and mapped into the
 \fB"guest account"\fP\&. Note that this can
-cause problems as it means that any user mistyping their
+cause problems as it means that any user incorrectly typing their
 password will be silently logged on a \fB"guest"\fP - and 
 will not know the reason they cannot access files they think
 they should - there will have been no message given to them
@@ -3473,7 +3473,7 @@ never need to set this parameter\&.
 This parameter limits the maximum number of open files that one
 \fBsmbd\fP file serving process may have open for
 a client at any one time\&. The default for this parameter is set
-very high (10,000) as Samba uses only one bit per un-opened file\&.
+very high (10,000) as Samba uses only one bit per unopened file\&.
 .IP 
 The limit of the number of open files is usually set by the
 UNIX per-process file descriptor limit rather than this parameter
@@ -3726,7 +3726,7 @@ system and the Samba server with this option must also be a
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBnt pipe support (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This boolean parameter controlls whether \fBsmbd\fP
+This boolean parameter controls whether \fBsmbd\fP
 will allow Windows NT clients to connect to the NT SMB specific
 \f(CWIPC$\fP pipes\&. This is a developer debugging option and can be left
 alone\&.
@@ -3736,7 +3736,7 @@ alone\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBnt smb support (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This boolean parameter controlls whether \fBsmbd\fP
+This boolean parameter controls whether \fBsmbd\fP
 will negotiate NT specific SMB support with Windows NT
 clients\&. Although this is a developer debugging option and should be
 left alone, benchmarking has discovered that Windows NT clients give
@@ -3808,15 +3808,15 @@ See also the \fBuser\fP parameter\&.
 .IP 
 This boolean option tells smbd whether to issue oplocks (opportunistic
 locks) to file open requests on this share\&. The oplock code can
-dramatically (approx 30% or more) improve the speed of access to files
-on Samba servers\&. It allows the clients to agressively cache files
+dramatically (approx\&. 30% or more) improve the speed of access to files
+on Samba servers\&. It allows the clients to aggressively cache files
 locally and you may want to disable this option for unreliable network
 environments (it is turned on by default in Windows NT Servers)\&.  For
 more information see the file Speed\&.txt in the Samba docs/ directory\&.
 .IP 
 Oplocks may be selectively turned off on certain files on a per share basis\&.
-See the \'veto oplock files\' parameter\&. On some systems oplocks are recognised
-by the underlying operating system\&. This allows data synchronisation between
+See the \'veto oplock files\' parameter\&. On some systems oplocks are recognized
+by the underlying operating system\&. This allows data synchronization between
 all access to oplocked files, whether it be via Samba or NFS or a local
 UNIX process\&. See the \fBkernel oplocks\fP parameter
 for details\&.
@@ -3854,7 +3854,7 @@ old \fBsmb\&.conf\fP files\&.
 This is a Samba developer option that allows a system command to be
 called when either \fBsmbd\fP or
 \fBnmbd\fP crashes\&. This is usually used to draw
-attention to the fact that a problem occured\&.
+attention to the fact that a problem occurred\&.
 .IP 
 \fBDefault:\fP
 \f(CW  panic action = <empty string>\fP
@@ -3941,7 +3941,7 @@ program"\fP\&.
 .IP 
 The name of a program that can be used to set UNIX user passwords\&.
 Any occurrences of \fB%u\fP will be replaced with the
-user name\&. The user name is checked for existance before calling the
+user name\&. The user name is checked for existence before calling the
 password changing program\&.
 .IP 
 Also note that many passwd programs insist in \fI"reasonable"\fP
@@ -3952,7 +3952,7 @@ Windows for Workgroups) uppercase the password before sending it\&.
 \fINote\fP that if the \fB"unix password sync"\fP
 parameter is set to \f(CW"True"\fP then this program is called \fI*AS
 ROOT*\fP before the SMB password in the
-\fBsmbpassswd\fP file is changed\&. If this UNIX
+\fBsmbpasswd\fP file is changed\&. If this UNIX
 password change fails, then \fBsmbd\fP will fail to
 change the SMB password also (this is by design)\&.
 .IP 
@@ -4045,8 +4045,8 @@ better restrict them with hosts allow!
 If the \fB"security"\fP parameter is set to
 \fB"domain"\fP, then the list of machines in this option must be a list
 of Primary or Backup Domain controllers for the
-\fBDomain\fP, as the Samba server is cryptographically
-in that domain, and will use crpytographically authenticated RPC calls
+\fBDomain\fP, as the Samba server is cryptographicly
+in that domain, and will use cryptographicly authenticated RPC calls
 to authenticate the user logging on\&. The advantage of using
 \fB"security=domain"\fP is that if you list
 several hosts in the \fB"password server"\fP option then
@@ -4093,7 +4093,7 @@ where print data will spool prior to being submitted to the host for
 printing\&.
 .IP 
 For a printable service offering guest access, the service should be
-readonly and the path should be world-writable and have the sticky bit
+readonly and the path should be world-writeable and have the sticky bit
 set\&. This is not mandatory of course, but you probably won\'t get the
 results you expect if you do otherwise\&.
 .IP 
@@ -4255,12 +4255,12 @@ If there is neither a specified print command for a printable service
 nor a global print command, spool files will be created but not
 processed and (most importantly) not removed\&.
 .IP 
-Note that printing may fail on some UNIXes from the \f(CW"nobody"\fP
+Note that printing may fail on some UNIXs from the \f(CW"nobody"\fP
 account\&. If this happens then create an alternative guest account that
 can print and set the \fB"guest account"\fP in the
 \fB"[global]"\fP section\&.
 .IP 
-You can form quite complex print commands by realising that they are
+You can form quite complex print commands by realizing that they are
 just passed to a shell\&. For example the following will log a print
 job, print the file, then remove it\&. Note that \f(CW\';\'\fP is the usual
 separator for command in shell scripts\&.
@@ -4525,7 +4525,7 @@ command as the PATH may not be available to the server\&.
 .IP 
 This parameter specifies the command to be executed on the server host
 in order to resume the printerqueue\&. It is the command to undo the
-behaviour that is caused by the previous parameter
+behavior that is caused by the previous parameter
 (\fB"queuepause command\fP)\&.
 .IP 
 This command should be a program or script which takes a printer name
@@ -4576,9 +4576,9 @@ the \fB"invalid users"\fP parameter\&.
 .IP "\fBread only (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
 Note that this is an inverted synonym for
-\fB"writable"\fP and \fB"write ok"\fP\&.
+\fB"writeable"\fP and \fB"write ok"\fP\&.
 .IP 
-See also \fB"writable"\fP and \fB"write
+See also \fB"writeable"\fP and \fB"write
 ok"\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBread prediction (G)\fP" 
@@ -4674,7 +4674,7 @@ See the documentation file BROWSING\&.txt in the docs/ directory\&.
 .IP "\fBremote browse sync (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
 This option allows you to setup \fBnmbd\fP to
-periodically request synchronisation of browse lists with the master
+periodically request synchronization of browse lists with the master
 browser of a samba server that is on a remote segment\&. This option
 will allow you to gain browse lists for multiple workgroups across
 routed networks\&. This is done in a manner that does not work with any
@@ -4690,7 +4690,7 @@ For example:
 \f(CW  remote browse sync = 192\&.168\&.2\&.255 192\&.168\&.4\&.255\fP
 .IP 
 the above line would cause \fBnmbd\fP to request the
-master browser on the specified subnets or addresses to synchronise
+master browser on the specified subnets or addresses to synchronize
 their browse lists with the local server\&.
 .IP 
 The IP addresses you choose would normally be the broadcast addresses
@@ -4737,7 +4737,7 @@ Synonym for \fB"root directory"\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBroot directory (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
-The server will \f(CW"chroot()"\fP (ie\&. Change it\'s root directory) to
+The server will \f(CW"chroot()"\fP (i\&.e\&. Change it\'s root directory) to
 this directory on startup\&. This is not strictly necessary for secure
 operation\&. Even without it the server will deny access to files not in
 one of the service entries\&. It may also check for, and deny access to,
@@ -4774,7 +4774,7 @@ See also \fB"postexec"\fP\&.
 .IP 
 This is the same as the \fB"preexec"\fP parameter except
 that the command is run as root\&. This is useful for mounting
-filesystems (such as cdroms) before a connection is finalised\&.
+filesystems (such as cdroms) before a connection is finalized\&.
 .IP 
 See also \fB"preexec"\fP\&.
 .IP 
@@ -4803,7 +4803,7 @@ In previous versions of Samba the default was
 \fB"security=share"\fP mainly because that was
 the only option at one stage\&.
 .IP 
-There is a bug in WfWg that has relevence to this setting\&. When in
+There is a bug in WfWg that has relevance to this setting\&. When in
 user or server level security a WfWg client will totally ignore the
 password you type in the "connect drive" dialog box\&. This makes it
 very difficult (if not impossible) to connect to a Samba service as
@@ -4821,7 +4821,7 @@ difficult to setup guest shares with
 \fBsecurity=user\fP, see the \fB"map to
 guest"\fPparameter for details\&.
 .IP 
-It is possible to use \fBsmbd\fP in a \fI"hybred
+It is possible to use \fBsmbd\fP in a \fI"hybrid
 mode"\fP where it is offers both user and share level security under
 different \fBNetBIOS aliases\fP\&. See the
 \fBNetBIOS aliases\fP and the
@@ -4909,7 +4909,7 @@ are then applied and may change the UNIX user to use on this
 connection, but only after the user has been successfully
 authenticated\&.
 .IP 
-\fINote\fP that the the name of the resource being requested is
+\fINote\fP that the name of the resource being requested is
 \fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has successfully
 authenticated the client\&. This is why guest shares don\'t work in user
 level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
@@ -4935,7 +4935,7 @@ the same as \fB"security=user"\fP\&. It only
 affects how the server deals with the authentication, it does not in
 any way affect what the client sees\&.
 .IP 
-\fINote\fP that the the name of the resource being requested is
+\fINote\fP that the name of the resource being requested is
 \fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has successfully
 authenticated the client\&. This is why guest shares don\'t work in server
 level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
@@ -4968,7 +4968,7 @@ the same as \fB"security=user"\fP\&. It only
 affects how the server deals with the authentication, it does not in
 any way affect what the client sees\&.
 .IP 
-\fINote\fP that the the name of the resource being requested is
+\fINote\fP that the name of the resource being requested is
 \fI*not*\fP sent to the server until after the server has successfully
 authenticated the client\&. This is why guest shares don\'t work in domain
 level security without allowing the server to automatically map unknown
@@ -4981,7 +4981,7 @@ e,(BUG:) There is currently a bug in the implementation of
 set usernames\&. The communication with a Domain Controller
 must be done in UNICODE and Samba currently does not widen
 multi-byte user names to UNICODE correctly, thus a multi-byte
-username will not be recognised correctly at the Domain Controller\&.
+username will not be recognized correctly at the Domain Controller\&.
 This issue will be addressed in a future release\&.
 .IP 
 See also the section \fB"NOTE ABOUT USERNAME/PASSWORD
@@ -5032,7 +5032,7 @@ client\&. See the Pathworks documentation for details\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBshare modes (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This enables or disables the honouring of the \f(CW"share modes"\fP during a
+This enables or disables the honoring of the \f(CW"share modes"\fP during a
 file open\&. These modes are used by clients to gain exclusive read or
 write access to a file\&.
 .IP 
@@ -5136,9 +5136,9 @@ appropriate documentation for your operating system first (perhaps
 \fB"man setsockopt"\fP will help)\&.
 .IP 
 You may find that on some systems Samba will say "Unknown socket
-option" when you supply an option\&. This means you either mis-typed it
-or you need to add an include file to includes\&.h for your OS\&. If the
-latter is the case please send the patch to
+option" when you supply an option\&. This means you either incorrectly 
+typed it or you need to add an include file to includes\&.h for your OS\&. 
+If the latter is the case please send the patch to
 \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
 .IP 
 Any of the supported socket options may be combined in any way you
@@ -5237,7 +5237,7 @@ option \f(CW"--with-ssl"\fP was given at configure time\&.
 enabled by default in any current binary version of Samba\&.
 .IP 
 This variable defines where to look up the Certification
-Autorities\&. The given directory should contain one file for each CA
+Authorities\&. The given directory should contain one file for each CA
 that samba will trust\&.  The file name must be the hash value over the
 "Distinguished Name" of the CA\&. How this directory is set up is
 explained later in this document\&. All files within the directory that
@@ -5260,7 +5260,7 @@ This variable is a second way to define the trusted CAs\&. The
 certificates of the trusted CAs are collected in one big file and this
 variable points to the file\&. You will probably only use one of the two
 ways to define your CAs\&. The first choice is preferable if you have
-many CAs or want to be flexible, the second is perferable if you only
+many CAs or want to be flexible, the second is preferable if you only
 have one CA and want to keep things simple (you won\'t need to create
 the hashed file names)\&. You don\'t need this variable if you don\'t
 verify client certificates\&.
@@ -5485,7 +5485,7 @@ change this parameter\&.
 \fBDefault:\fP
 status = yes
 .IP 
-dir(\fBstrict locking (S)\fP)
+.IP "\fBstrict locking (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
 This is a boolean that controls the handling of file locking in the
 server\&. When this is set to \f(CW"yes"\fP the server will check every read and
@@ -5511,7 +5511,7 @@ Many Windows applications (including the Windows 98 explorer shell)
 seem to confuse flushing buffer contents to disk with doing a sync to
 disk\&. Under UNIX, a sync call forces the process to be suspended until
 the kernel has ensured that all outstanding data in kernel disk
-buffers has been safely stored onto stable storate\&. This is very slow
+buffers has been safely stored onto stable storage\&. This is very slow
 and should only be done rarely\&. Setting this parameter to "no" (the
 default) means that smbd ignores the Windows applications requests for
 a sync call\&. There is only a possibility of losing data if the
@@ -5556,7 +5556,7 @@ See also the \fB"strict sync"\fP parameter\&.
 \fBDefault:\fP
 \f(CW  sync always = no\fP
 .IP 
-\fBxample:\fP
+\fBExample:\fP
 \f(CW  sync always = yes\fP
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBsyslog (G)\fP" 
@@ -5564,9 +5564,9 @@ See also the \fB"strict sync"\fP parameter\&.
 This parameter maps how Samba debug messages are logged onto the
 system syslog logging levels\&. Samba debug level zero maps onto syslog
 LOG_ERR, debug level one maps onto LOG_WARNING, debug level two maps
-to LOG_NOTICE, debug level three maps onto LOG_INFO\&.  The paramter
+to LOG_NOTICE, debug level three maps onto LOG_INFO\&.  The parameter
 sets the threshold for doing the mapping, all Samba debug messages
-above this threashold are mapped to syslog LOG_DEBUG messages\&.
+above this threshold are mapped to syslog LOG_DEBUG messages\&.
 .IP 
 \fBDefault:\fP
 \f(CW  syslog = 1\fP
@@ -5617,7 +5617,7 @@ parameter allows the timestamping to be turned off\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBunix password sync (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This boolean parameter controlls whether Samba attempts to synchronise
+This boolean parameter controls whether Samba attempts to synchronize
 the UNIX password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB
 password in the smbpasswd file is changed\&. If this is set to true the
 program specified in the \fB"passwd program"\fP
@@ -5777,7 +5777,7 @@ tries all lowercase, followed by the username with the first letter
 capitalized, and fails if the username is not found on the UNIX
 machine\&.
 .IP 
-If this parameter is set to non-zero the behaviour changes\&. This
+If this parameter is set to non-zero the behavior changes\&. This
 parameter is a number that specifies the number of uppercase
 combinations to try whilst trying to determine the UNIX user name\&. The
 higher the number the more combinations will be tried, but the slower
@@ -5792,7 +5792,7 @@ strange usernames on your UNIX machine, such as \f(CW"AstrangeUser"\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBusername map (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
-This option allows you to to specify a file containing a mapping of
+This option allows you to specify a file containing a mapping of
 usernames from the clients to the server\&. This can be used for several
 purposes\&. The most common is to map usernames that users use on DOS or
 Windows machines to those that the UNIX box uses\&. The other is to map
@@ -5927,7 +5927,7 @@ See also the \fB"client code page"\fP parameter\&.
  
 
        Samba defaults to using a reasonable set of valid characters
-       for english systems
+       for English systems
 
 .DE 
  
@@ -5936,7 +5936,7 @@ See also the \fB"client code page"\fP parameter\&.
 \fBExample\fP
 \f(CW  valid chars = 0345:0305 0366:0326 0344:0304\fP
 .IP 
-The above example allows filenames to have the swedish characters in
+The above example allows filenames to have the Swedish characters in
 them\&.
 .IP 
 NOTE: It is actually quite difficult to correctly produce a \fB"valid
@@ -6124,42 +6124,19 @@ network\&.
 .IP "\fBworkgroup (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
 This controls what workgroup your server will appear to be in when
-queried by clients\&. Note that this parameter also controlls the Domain
+queried by clients\&. Note that this parameter also controls the Domain
 name used with the \fB"security=domain"\fP
 setting\&.
 .IP 
 \fBDefault:\fP
 \f(CW  set at compile time to WORKGROUP\fP
 .IP 
-\&.B Example:
+\fBExample:\fP
 workgroup = MYGROUP
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBwritable (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-An inverted synonym is \fB"read only"\fP\&.
-.IP 
-If this parameter is \f(CW"no"\fP, then users of a service may not create
-or modify files in the service\'s directory\&.
-.IP 
-Note that a printable service \fB("printable = yes")\fP
-will \fI*ALWAYS*\fP allow writing to the directory (user privileges
-permitting), but only via spooling operations\&.
-.IP 
-\fBDefault:\fP
-\f(CW  writable = no\fP
-.IP 
-\fBExamples:\fP
-
-.DS 
-
-       read only = no
-       writable = yes
-       write ok = yes
-
-.DE 
-
+Synonym for \fB"writeable"\fP for people who can\'t spell :-)\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBwrite list (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
@@ -6182,7 +6159,7 @@ See also the \fB"read list"\fP option\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBwrite ok (S)\fP" 
 .IP 
-Synonym for \fBwritable\fP\&.
+Synonym for \fBwriteable\fP\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBwrite raw (G)\fP" 
 .IP 
@@ -6195,7 +6172,30 @@ need to change this parameter\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBwriteable\fP" 
 .IP 
-Synonym for \fB"writable"\fP for people who can\'t spell :-)\&.
+An inverted synonym is \fB"read only"\fP\&.
+.IP 
+If this parameter is \f(CW"no"\fP, then users of a service may not create
+or modify files in the service\'s directory\&.
+.IP 
+Note that a printable service \fB("printable = yes")\fP
+will \fI*ALWAYS*\fP allow writing to the directory (user privileges
+permitting), but only via spooling operations\&.
+.IP 
+\fBDefault:\fP
+\f(CW  writeable = no\fP
+.IP 
+\fBExamples:\fP
+
+.DS 
+
+       read only = no
+       writeable = yes
+       write ok = yes
+
+.DE 
+
 .IP 
 .SH "WARNINGS" 
 .IP 
index 46bc292f4d878c469d1624f77cdf2da258546dea..6c756ec77dcc50ac3143addfe9eca2f6947fafc2 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbclient" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbclient " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbclient \- ftp-like client to access SMB/CIFS resources on servers
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ subnet\&. To specify a particular broadcast address the \fB-B\fP option
 may be used\&.
 .IP 
 .IP 
-If this parameter is not set then the name resolver order defined
+If this parameter is not set then the name resolve order defined
 in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file parameter 
 (\fBname resolve order\fP)
 will be used\&.
@@ -257,7 +257,7 @@ the environment variable \f(CWUSER\fP or \f(CWLOGNAME\fP in that order\&.  If no
 username is supplied and neither environment variable exists the
 username "GUEST" will be used\&.
 .IP 
-If the \f(CWUSER\fP environment variable containts a \'%\' character,
+If the \f(CWUSER\fP environment variable contains a \'%\' character,
 everything after that will be treated as a password\&. This allows you
 to set the environment variable to be \f(CWUSER=username%password\fP so
 that a password is not passed on the command line (where it may be
@@ -321,7 +321,7 @@ Samba source code for the complete list\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-m max protocol level\fP" 
 With the new code in Samba2\&.0,
-\fBsmbclient\fP allways attempts to connect at the maximum
+\fBsmbclient\fP always attempts to connect at the maximum
 protocols level the server supports\&. This parameter is
 preserved for backwards compatibility, but any string
 following the \fB-m\fP will be ignored\&.
@@ -350,13 +350,13 @@ Extract (restore) a local tar file back to a
 share\&. Unless the \fB-D\fP option is given, the tar files will be
 restored from the top level of the share\&. Must be followed by the name
 of the tar file, device or \f(CW"-"\fP for standard input\&. Mutually exclusive
-with the \fBc\fP flag\&. Restored files have theuir creation times (mtime)
+with the \fBc\fP flag\&. Restored files have their creation times (mtime)
 set to the date saved in the tar file\&. Directories currently do not
 get their creation dates restored properly\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBI\fP" 
 Include files and directories\&. Is the default
-behaviour when filenames are specified above\&. Causes tar files to
+behavior when filenames are specified above\&. Causes tar files to
 be included in an extract or create (and therefore everything else to
 be excluded)\&. See example below\&.  Filename globbing does not work for
 included files for extractions (yet)\&.
@@ -465,13 +465,13 @@ be case sensitive, depending on the command\&.
 You can specify file names which have spaces in them by quoting the
 name with double quotes, for example "a long file name"\&.
 .PP 
-Parameters shown in square brackets (eg\&., "[parameter]") are
+Parameters shown in square brackets (e\&.g\&., "[parameter]") are
 optional\&. If not given, the command will use suitable
-defaults\&. Parameters shown in angle brackets (eg\&., "<parameter>") are
+defaults\&. Parameters shown in angle brackets (e\&.g\&., "<parameter>") are
 required\&.
 .PP 
 Note that all commands operating on the server are actually performed
-by issuing a request to the server\&. Thus the behaviour may vary from
+by issuing a request to the server\&. Thus the behavior may vary from
 server to server, depending on how the server was implemented\&.
 .PP 
 The commands available are given here in alphabetical order\&.
@@ -608,7 +608,8 @@ mode to suit either binary data (such as graphical information) or
 text\&. Subsequent print commands will use the currently set print
 mode\&.
 .IP 
-dir(\fBprompt\fP) Toggle prompting for filenames during
+.IP "\fBprompt\fP" 
+Toggle prompting for filenames during
 operation of the \fBmget\fP and \fBmput\fP
 commands\&.
 .IP 
@@ -623,16 +624,19 @@ the server\&. If specified, name the remote copy "remote file name"\&.
 Note that all transfers in smbclient are binary\&. See also the
 \fBlowercase\fP command\&.
 .IP 
-dir(\fBqueue\fP) Displays the print queue, showing the job
+.IP "\fBqueue\fP" 
+Displays the print queue, showing the job
 id, name, size and current status\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBquit\fP" 
 See the \fBexit\fP command\&.
 .IP 
-dir(\fBrd <directory name>\fP) See the \fBrmdir\fP
+.IP "\fBrd <directory name>\fP" 
+See the \fBrmdir\fP
 command\&.
 .IP 
-dir(\fBrecurse\fP) Toggle directory recursion for the
+.IP "\fBrecurse\fP" 
+Toggle directory recursion for the
 commands \fBmget\fP and \fBmput\fP\&.
 .IP 
 When toggled ON, these commands will process all directories in the
@@ -648,7 +652,8 @@ directory on the source machine that match the mask specified to the
 and any mask specified using the \fBmask\fP command will be
 ignored\&.
 .IP 
-dir(\fBrm <mask>\fP) Remove all files matching mask from
+.IP "\fBrm <mask>\fP" 
+Remove all files matching mask from
 the current working directory on the server\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBrmdir <directory name>\fP" 
@@ -657,7 +662,7 @@ directory (user access privileges permitting) from the server\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBtar <c|x>[IXbgNa]\fP" 
 Performs a tar operation - see
-the \fB-T\fP command line option above\&. Behaviour may be
+the \fB-T\fP command line option above\&. Behavior may be
 affected by the \fBtarmode\fP command (see below)\&. Using
 g (incremental) and N (newer) will affect tarmode settings\&. Note that
 using the "-" option with tar x may not work - use the command line
@@ -668,8 +673,9 @@ Blocksize\&. Must be
 followed by a valid (greater than zero) blocksize\&. Causes tar file to
 be written out in blocksize*TBLOCK (usually 512 byte) blocks\&.
 .IP 
-dir(\fBtarmode <full|inc|reset|noreset>\fP) Changes tar\'s
-behaviour with regard to archive bits\&. In full mode, tar will back up
+.IP "\fBtarmode <full|inc|reset|noreset>\fP" 
+Changes tar\'s
+behavior with regard to archive bits\&. In full mode, tar will back up
 everything regardless of the archive bit setting (this is the default
 mode)\&. In incremental mode, tar will only back up files with the
 archive bit set\&. In reset mode, tar will reset the archive bit on all
@@ -687,7 +693,7 @@ would make myfile read only\&.
 .SH "NOTES" 
 .PP 
 Some servers are fussy about the case of supplied usernames,
-passwords, share names (aka service names) and machine names\&. If you
+passwords, share names (AKA service names) and machine names\&. If you
 fail to connect try giving all parameters in uppercase\&.
 .PP 
 It is often necessary to use the \fB-n\fP option when connecting to some
@@ -720,7 +726,7 @@ should be executable by all\&. The client should \fINOT\fP be setuid or
 setgid!
 .PP 
 The client log files should be put in a directory readable and
-writable only by the user\&.
+writeable only by the user\&.
 .PP 
 To test the client, you will need to know the name of a running
 SMB/CIFS server\&. It is possible to run \fBsmbd (8)\fP
index c389b8ecd2b57ec305c1014d2a52a907026d4690..e2f68fb0d29457015f3911c419e70614447a6ee4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbd" "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbd " "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbd \- server to provide SMB/CIFS services to clients
@@ -11,7 +11,8 @@ smbd \- server to provide SMB/CIFS services to clients
 .PP 
 This program is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
 .PP 
-\fBsmbd\fP is the server daemon that provides filesharing services to
+\fBsmbd\fP is the server daemon that provides filesharing and printing
+services to
 Windows clients\&. The server provides filespace and printer services to
 clients using the SMB (or CIFS) protocol\&. This is compatible with the
 LanManager protocol, and can service LanManager clients\&.  These
@@ -20,18 +21,20 @@ Windows NT, OS/2, DAVE for Macintosh, and smbfs for Linux\&.
 .PP 
 An extensive description of the services that the server can provide
 is given in the man page for the configuration file controlling the
-attributes of those services (see \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP)\&.  This man page
+attributes of those services (see 
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP\&.  This man page
 will not describe the services, but will concentrate on the
 administrative aspects of running the server\&.
 .PP 
 Please note that there are significant security implications to
-running this server, and the \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP manpage should be
+running this server, and the 
+\fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP manpage should be
 regarded as mandatory reading before proceeding with installation\&.
 .PP 
 A session is created whenever a client requests one\&. Each client gets
 a copy of the server for each session\&. This copy then services all
 connections made by the client during that session\&. When all
-connections from its client are are closed, the copy of the server for
+connections from its client are closed, the copy of the server for
 that client terminates\&.
 .PP 
 The configuration file, and any files that it includes, are
@@ -117,14 +120,12 @@ This parameter is not normally specified except in the above
 situation\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-s configuration file\fP" 
-The default configuration file name is
-determined at compile time\&.
-.IP 
 The file specified contains the configuration details required by the
 server\&.  The information in this file includes server-specific
 information such as what printcap file to use, as well as descriptions
 of all the services that the server is to provide\&. See \fBsmb\&.conf
 (5)\fP for more information\&.
+The default configuration file name is determined at compile time\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-i scope\fP" 
 This specifies a NetBIOS scope that the server will use
@@ -148,22 +149,22 @@ out\&. Used for debugging by the developers only\&.
 .PP 
 If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must
 contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon\&. See the
-section \fIINSTALLATION\fP below\&.
+section INSTALLATION below\&.
 .PP 
 \fB/etc/rc\fP
 .PP 
-(or whatever initialisation script your system uses)\&.
+(or whatever initialization script your system uses)\&.
 .PP 
 If running the server as a daemon at startup, this file will need to
 contain an appropriate startup sequence for the server\&. See the
-section \fIINSTALLATION\fP below\&.
+section INSTALLATION below\&.
 .PP 
 \fB/etc/services\fP
 .PP 
 If running the server via the meta-daemon inetd, this file must
-contain a mapping of service name (eg\&., netbios-ssn) to service port
-(eg\&., 139) and protocol type (eg\&., tcp)\&. See the section
-\fIINSTALLATION\fP below\&.
+contain a mapping of service name (e\&.g\&., netbios-ssn) to service port
+(e\&.g\&., 139) and protocol type (e\&.g\&., tcp)\&. See the section
+INSTALLATION below\&.
 .PP 
 \fB/usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP
 .PP 
@@ -213,11 +214,11 @@ exists in Linux, as testing on other systems has thus far shown them
 to be immune\&.
 .PP 
 The server log files should be put in a directory readable and
-writable only by root, as the log files may contain sensitive
+writeable only by root, as the log files may contain sensitive
 information\&.
 .PP 
 The configuration file should be placed in a directory readable and
-writable only by root, as the configuration file controls security for
+writeable only by root, as the configuration file controls security for
 the services offered by the server\&. The configuration file can be made
 readable by all if desired, but this is not necessary for correct
 operation of the server and is not recommended\&. A sample configuration
@@ -245,8 +246,9 @@ utilities such as the tcpd TCP-wrapper may be used for extra security\&.
 For serious use as file server it is recommended that \fBsmbd\fP be run
 as a daemon\&.
 .PP 
-When you\'ve decided, continue with either \fIRUNNING THE SERVER AS A
-DAEMON\fP or \fIRUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST\fP\&.
+When you\'ve decided, continue with either 
+RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON or 
+RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST\&.
 .PP 
 .SH "RUNNING THE SERVER AS A DAEMON" 
 .PP 
@@ -270,18 +272,18 @@ configuration file location and debug level as desired:
 .PP 
 \f(CW/usr/local/samba/bin/smbd -D -l /var/adm/smblogs/log -s /usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP
 .PP 
-(The above should appear in your initialisation script as a single line\&. 
+(The above should appear in your initialization script as a single line\&. 
 Depending on your terminal characteristics, it may not appear that way in
 this man page\&. If the above appears as more than one line, please treat any 
 newlines or indentation as a single space or TAB character\&.)
 .PP 
 If the options used at compile time are appropriate for your system,
-all parameters except the desired debug level and \fB-D\fP may be
-omitted\&. See the section \fIOPTIONS\fP above\&.
+all parameters except \fB-D\fP may be
+omitted\&. See the section OPTIONS above\&.
 .PP 
 .SH "RUNNING THE SERVER ON REQUEST" 
 .PP 
-If your system uses a meta-daemon such as inetd, you can arrange to
+If your system uses a meta-daemon such as \fBinetd\fP, you can arrange to
 have the smbd server started whenever a process attempts to connect to
 it\&. This requires several changes to the startup files on the host
 machine\&. If you are experimenting as an ordinary user rather than as
@@ -329,10 +331,10 @@ start with, the following two services should be all you need:
 
 
 [homes]
-  writable = yes
+  writeable = yes
 
 [printers]
- writable = no
+ writeable = no
  printable = yes
  path = /tmp
  public = yes
@@ -356,7 +358,8 @@ If your machine\'s name is "fred" and your name is "mary", you should
 now be able to connect to the service \f(CW\e\efred\emary\fP\&.
 .PP 
 To properly test and experiment with the server, we recommend using
-the smbclient program (see \fBsmbclient (1)\fP) and also going through
+the smbclient program (see 
+\fBsmbclient (1)\fP) and also going through
 the steps outlined in the file \fIDIAGNOSIS\&.txt\fP in the \fIdocs/\fP
 directory of your Samba installation\&.
 .PP 
@@ -374,8 +377,8 @@ The number and nature of diagnostics available depends on the debug
 level used by the server\&. If you have problems, set the debug level to
 3 and peruse the log files\&.
 .PP 
-Most messages are reasonably self-explanatory\&. Unfortunately, at time
-of creation of this man page there are too many diagnostics available
+Most messages are reasonably self-explanatory\&. Unfortunately, at the time
+this man page was created, there are too many diagnostics available
 in the source code to warrant describing each and every diagnostic\&. At
 this stage your best bet is still to grep the source code and inspect
 the conditions that gave rise to the diagnostics you are seeing\&.
@@ -387,7 +390,7 @@ configuration file within a short period of time\&.
 .PP 
 To shut down a users smbd process it is recommended that SIGKILL (-9)
 \fINOT\fP be used, except as a last resort, as this may leave the shared
-memory area in an inconsistant state\&. The safe way to terminate an
+memory area in an inconsistent state\&. The safe way to terminate an
 smbd is to send it a SIGTERM (-15) signal and wait for it to die on
 its own\&.
 .PP 
@@ -417,7 +420,7 @@ http://samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au/cifs/\&.
 .SH "AUTHOR" 
 .PP 
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed\&.
 .PP 
index c980ce635a1fa117a3264d287931f840b3b6f72f..e0db6edae3d7916ea020b76a0097649121f82f6a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH SMBMNT 8 "09 Oct 1998" "smbmnt 2.0.0-alpha11"
+.TH SMBMNT 8 "13 Nov 1998" "smbmnt 2.0.0-beta1"
 .SH NAME
 smbmnt \- mount smb file system
 .SH SYNOPSIS
index 90cc697a39e8831509573da285272b77171a7c3c..b887ae6060241f1156e977097894909d8dc9ccef 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH SMBMOUNT 8 "09 Oct 1998" "smbmount 2.0.0-alpha11"
+.TH SMBMOUNT 8 "13 Nov 1998" "smbmount 2.0.0-beta1"
 .SH NAME
 smbmount \- mount smb file system
 .SH SYNOPSIS
index 88e3745711961fb5116f86a92d95abeef4f18fac..5d49d34e4a13c7063d779b770821e9648bcbbb7d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbpasswd" "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbpasswd " "5" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbpasswd \- The Samba encrypted password file
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ smbpasswd is the \fBSamba\fP encrypted password file\&.
 This file is part of the \fBSamba\fP suite\&.
 .PP 
 smbpasswd is the \fBSamba\fP encrypted password file\&. It contains
-the username, unix user id and the SMB hashed passwords of the
+the username, Unix user id and the SMB hashed passwords of the
 user, as well as account flag information and the time the password
 was last changed\&. This file format has been evolving with Samba
 and has had several different formats in the past\&.
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ and has had several different formats in the past\&.
 .SH "FILE FORMAT" 
 .PP 
 The format of the smbpasswd file used by Samba 2\&.0 is very similar to
-the familiar unix \fBpasswd (5)\fP file\&. It is an ASCII file containing
+the familiar Unix \fBpasswd (5)\fP file\&. It is an ASCII file containing
 one line for each user\&. Each field within each line is separated from
 the next by a colon\&. Any entry beginning with # is ignored\&. The
 smbpasswd file contains the following information for each user:
@@ -38,7 +38,9 @@ in the standard UNIX passwd file\&.
 .br 
 .IP 
 This is the UNIX uid\&. It must match the uid field for the same
-user entry in the standard UNIX passwd file\&.
+user entry in the standard UNIX passwd file\&. If this does not
+match then Samba will refuse to recognize this \fBsmbpasswd\fP file entry
+as being valid for a user\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fBLanman Password Hash\fP" 
 .br 
@@ -49,7 +51,7 @@ digits\&. The \fILANMAN\fP hash is created by DES encrypting a well known
 string with the users password as the DES key\&. This is the same
 password used by Windows 95/98 machines\&. Note that this password hash
 is regarded as weak as it is vulnerable to dictionary attacks and if
-two users choose the same password this entry will be identical (ie\&.
+two users choose the same password this entry will be identical (i\&.e\&.
 the password is not \fI"salted"\fP as the UNIX password is)\&. If the
 user has a null password this field will contain the characters
 \f(CW"NO PASSWORD"\fP as the start of the hex string\&. If the hex string
@@ -59,7 +61,7 @@ server\&.
 .IP 
 \fIWARNING !!\fP\&. Note that, due to the challenge-response nature of the
 SMB/CIFS authentication protocol, anyone with a knowledge of this
-password hash will be able to impersonate the user of the network\&.
+password hash will be able to impersonate the user on the network\&.
 For this reason these hashes are known as \fI"plain text equivalent"\fP
 and must \fINOT\fP be made available to anyone but the root user\&. To
 protect these passwords the \fBsmbpasswd\fP file is placed in a
@@ -80,12 +82,12 @@ This password hash is considered more secure than the \fBLanman
 Password Hash\fP as it preserves the case of the
 password and uses a much higher quality hashing algorithm\&. However, it
 is still the case that if two users choose the same password this
-entry will be identical (ie\&. the password is not \fI"salted"\fP as the
+entry will be identical (i\&.e\&. the password is not \fI"salted"\fP as the
 UNIX password is)\&.
 .IP 
 \fIWARNING !!\fP\&. Note that, due to the challenge-response nature of the
 SMB/CIFS authentication protocol, anyone with a knowledge of this
-password hash will be able to impersonate the user of the network\&.
+password hash will be able to impersonate the user on the network\&.
 For this reason these hashes are known as \fI"plain text equivalent"\fP
 and must \fINOT\fP be made available to anyone but the root user\&. To
 protect these passwords the \fBsmbpasswd\fP file is placed in a
@@ -105,8 +107,8 @@ any of the characters\&.
 .IP 
 .IP 
 .IP o 
-\fB\'U\'\fP This means this is a \fI"User"\fP account, ie\&. an ordinary
-user\&. Only \fBUser\fP and \fBWorskstation Trust\fP accounts are
+\fB\'U\'\fP This means this is a \fI"User"\fP account, i\&.e\&. an ordinary
+user\&. Only \fBUser\fP and \fBWorkstation Trust\fP accounts are
 currently supported in the \fBsmbpasswd\fP file\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
@@ -118,7 +120,7 @@ will only allow users to log on with no password if the
 in the \fBsmb\&.conf (5)\fP config file\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
-\fB\'D\'\fP This means the account is diabled and no SMB/CIFS logins 
+\fB\'D\'\fP This means the account is disabled and no SMB/CIFS logins 
 will be        allowed for this user\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
@@ -196,13 +198,15 @@ algorithm\&.
 .SH "AUTHOR" 
 .PP 
 The original Samba software and related utilities were created by
-Andrew Tridgell (samba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au)\&. Samba is now developed
+Andrew Tridgell \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&. Samba is now developed
 by the Samba Team as an Open Source project similar to the way the
 Linux kernel is developed\&.
 .PP 
 The original Samba man pages were written by Karl Auer\&. The man page
 sources were converted to YODL format (another excellent piece of Open
-Source software) and updated for the Samba2\&.0 release by Jeremy
+Source software, available at
+\fBftp://ftp\&.icce\&.rug\&.nl/pub/unix/\fP) 
+and updated for the Samba2\&.0 release by Jeremy
 Allison, \fIsamba-bugs@samba\&.anu\&.edu\&.au\fP\&.
 .PP 
 See \fBsamba (7)\fP to find out how to get a full
index d06ea7d76879f23a467f6e7ae109b427fdf1a388..22237b4210efb1a8f31be2e8d219478f1b16ea0f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbpasswd" "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbpasswd " "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbpasswd \- change a users SMB password
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ sessions on any machines that store SMB passwords\&.
 .PP 
 By default (when run with no arguments) it will attempt to change the
 current users SMB password on the local machine\&. This is similar to
-the way the \fBpasswd (1)\fP program works\&. \fBsmbpasswd\fP differs from
+the way the \fBpasswd (1)\fP program works\&. \fBsmbpasswd\fP differs from how
 the \fBpasswd\fP program works however in that it is not \fIsetuid root\fP
 but works in a client-server mode and communicates with a locally
 running \fBsmbd\fP\&. As a consequence in order for this
@@ -34,14 +34,14 @@ typed\&. If you have a blank smb password (specified by the string "NO
 PASSWORD" in the \fBsmbpasswd\fP file) then just
 press the <Enter> key when asked for your old password\&.
 .PP 
-\fBsmbpasswd\fP also can be used by a normal user to change their SMB
+\fBsmbpasswd\fP can also be used by a normal user to change their SMB
 password on remote machines, such as Windows NT Primary Domain
 Controllers\&. See the (\fB-r\fP) and
 \fB-U\fP options below\&.
 .PP 
 When run by root, \fBsmbpasswd\fP allows new users to be added and
 deleted in the \fBsmbpasswd\fP file, as well as
-changes to the attributes of the user in this file to be made\&. When
+allows changes to the attributes of the user in this file to be made\&. When
 run by root, \fBsmbpasswd\fP accesses the local
 \fBsmbpasswd\fP file directly, thus enabling
 changes to be made even if \fBsmbd\fP is not running\&.
@@ -55,8 +55,8 @@ be added to the local \fBsmbpasswd\fP file, with
 the new password typed (type <Enter> for the old password)\&. This
 option is ignored if the username following already exists in the
 \fBsmbpasswd\fP file and it is treated like a
-regular change password command\&. Note that the user to be added \&.B
-must already exist in the system password file (usually /etc/passwd)
+regular change password command\&. Note that the user to be added
+\fBmust\fP already exist in the system password file (usually /etc/passwd)
 else the request to add the user will fail\&.
 .IP 
 This option is only available when running \fBsmbpasswd\fP as
@@ -146,6 +146,10 @@ specified must be the Primary Domain Controller for the domain (Backup
 Domain Controllers only have a read-only copy of the user account
 database and will not allow the password change)\&.
 .IP 
+\fINote\fP that Windows 95/98 do not have a real password database
+so it is not possible to change passwords specifying a Win95/98 
+machine as remote machine target\&.
+.IP 
 .IP "\fB-R name resolve order\fP" 
 This option allows the user of
 smbclient to determine what name resolution services to use when
@@ -162,12 +166,13 @@ resolved as follows :
 .IP o 
 \fBhost\fP : Do a standard host name to IP address resolution,
 using the system /etc/hosts, NIS, or DNS lookups\&. This method of name
-resolution is operating system depended for instance on IRIX or
-Solaris this may be controlled by the \fI/etc/nsswitch\&.conf\fP file)\&.
+resolution is operating system dependent\&. For instance on IRIX or
+Solaris, this may be controlled by the \fI/etc/nsswitch\&.conf\fP file)\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
-\fBwins\fP : Query a name with the IP address listed in the \fBwins
-server\fP parameter in the smb\&.conf file\&. If 
+\fBwins\fP : Query a name with the IP address listed in the 
+\fBwins server\fP parameter in the 
+\fBsmb\&.conf file\fP\&. If 
 no WINS server has been specified this method will be ignored\&.
 .IP 
 .IP o 
@@ -178,7 +183,7 @@ methods as it depends on the target host being on a locally connected
 subnet\&.
 .IP 
 .IP 
-If this parameter is not set then the name resolver order defined
+If this parameter is not set then the name resolve order defined
 in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file parameter 
 \fBname resolve order\fP
 will be used\&.
@@ -218,7 +223,7 @@ Controller for the Domain (found in the
 the machine account password used to create the secure Domain
 communication\&.  This password is then stored by \fBsmbpasswd\fP in a
 file, read only by root, called \f(CW<Domain>\&.<Machine>\&.mac\fP where
-\f(CW<Domain>\fP is the name of the Domain we are joining and tt<Machine>
+\f(CW<Domain>\fP is the name of the Domain we are joining and \f(CW<Machine>\fP
 is the primary NetBIOS name of the machine we are running on\&.
 .IP 
 Once this operation has been performed the
@@ -246,19 +251,20 @@ This option prints the help string for \fBsmbpasswd\fP,
 selecting the correct one for running as root or as an ordinary user\&.
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-s\fP" 
-This option causes \fBsmbpasswd\fP to be silent (ie\&. not
+This option causes \fBsmbpasswd\fP to be silent (i\&.e\&. not
 issue prompts) and to read it\'s old and new passwords from standard 
 input, rather than from \f(CW/dev/tty\fP (like the \fBpasswd (1)\fP program
 does)\&. This option is to aid people writing scripts to drive \fBsmbpasswd\fP
 .IP 
-dir(\fBusername\fP) This specifies the username for all of the \fIroot
+.IP "\fBusername\fP" 
+This specifies the username for all of the \fIroot
 only\fP options to operate on\&. Only root can specify this parameter as
 only root has the permission needed to modify attributes directly
 in the local \fBsmbpasswd\fP file\&.
 .IP 
 .SH "NOTES" 
 .IP 
-As \fBsmbpasswd\fP works in client-server mode communicating with a
+Since \fBsmbpasswd\fP works in client-server mode communicating with a
 local \fBsmbd\fP for a non-root user then the \fBsmbd\fP
 daemon must be running for this to work\&. A common problem is to add a
 restriction to the hosts that may access the \fBsmbd\fP running on the
index 17d4026730306388d016db5e6ad108788eabf264..78e2213cc612fa91ea235dd12fba03acef3d9cdf 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbrun" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbrun " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbrun \- interface program between smbd and external programs
index 350488d790716903b414bbe8793acb70c7f7fead..eae5f594b327ebdcfbc276bd47da070d9a332616 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbstatus" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbstatus " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbstatus \- report on current Samba connections
index f1211b376d1a120e00de56d630d13ba627fa439a..88bc88d08a173e9d593cf827a90f346566e8cfb8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "smbtar" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "smbtar " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 smbtar \- shell script for backing up SMB/CIFS shares directly to UNIX tape drives
index 2e950b8f19e148cc2803c56e73a5dace94bb7db0..4f9c6cbedbb222d1a8082f8b5306121e32977a65 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH SMBUMOUNT 8 "09 Oct 1998" "smbumount 2.0.0-alpha11"
+.TH SMBUMOUNT 8 "13 Nov 1998" "smbumount 2.0.0-beta1"
 .SH NAME
 smbumount \- umount for normal users
 .SH SYNOPSIS
index 36b4de140a1e339332cdd9aace1a1b31d9a7962e..5ab76fa5045dd131fa2c5e87bacd86cd407edf07 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "swat" "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "swat " "8" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 swat \- swat - Samba Web Administration Tool
@@ -17,8 +17,7 @@ addition, a swat configuration page has help links to all the
 configurable options in the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file
 allowing an administrator to easily look up the effects of any change\&.
 .PP 
-\fBswat\fP can be run as a stand-alone daemon, from \fBinetd\fP,
-or invoked via CGI from a Web server\&.
+\fBswat\fP is run from \fBinetd\fP
 .PP 
 .SH "OPTIONS" 
 .PP 
@@ -36,14 +35,11 @@ of all the services that the server is to provide\&. See smb\&.conf
 .IP 
 .IP "\fB-a\fP" 
 .IP 
-This option is only used if \fBswat\fP is running as it\'s own mini-web
-server (see the \fBINSTALLATION\fP section below)\&.
+This option disables authentication and puts \fBswat\fP in demo mode\&. In
+that mode anyone will be able to modify the
+\fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&.
 .IP 
-This option removes the need for authentication needed to modify the
-\fBsmb\&.conf\fP file\&. \fI**THIS IS ONLY MEANT FOR
-DEMOING SWAT AND MUST NOT BE SET IN NORMAL SYSTEMS**\fP as it would
-allow \fI*ANYONE*\fP to modify the \fBsmb\&.conf\fP
-file, thus giving them root access\&.
+Do NOT enable this option on a production server\&.
 .IP 
 .PP 
 .SH "INSTALLATION" 
@@ -64,13 +60,10 @@ would put these in:
  
 
 .PP 
-.SH "RUNNING VIA INETD
+.SH "INETD INSTALLATION
 .PP 
 You need to edit your \f(CW/etc/inetd\&.conf\fP and \f(CW/etc/services\fP to
-enable \fBSWAT\fP to be launched via inetd\&. Note that \fBswat\fP can also
-be launched via the cgi-bin mechanisms of a web server (such as
-apache) and that is described below in the section \fBRUNNING VIA
-CGI-BIN\fP\&.
+enable \fBSWAT\fP to be launched via inetd\&. 
 .PP 
 In \f(CW/etc/services\fP you need to add a line like this:
 .PP 
@@ -88,81 +81,31 @@ In \f(CW/etc/inetd\&.conf\fP you should add a line like this:
 .PP 
 \f(CWswat    stream  tcp     nowait\&.400  root    /usr/local/samba/bin/swat swat\fP
 .PP 
-If you just want to see a demo of how swat works and don\'t want to be
-able to actually change any Samba config via swat then you may chose
-to change \f(CW"root"\fP to some other user that does not have permission
-to write to \fBsmb\&.conf\fP\&.
-.PP 
 One you have edited \f(CW/etc/services\fP and \f(CW/etc/inetd\&.conf\fP you need
 to send a HUP signal to inetd\&. To do this use \f(CW"kill -1 PID"\fP where
 PID is the process ID of the inetd daemon\&.
 .PP 
-.SH "RUNNING VIA CGI-BIN" 
-.PP 
-To run \fBswat\fP via your web servers cgi-bin capability you need to
-copy the \fBswat\fP binary to your cgi-bin directory\&. Note that you
-should run \fBswat\fP either via \fBinetd\fP or via
-cgi-bin but not both\&.
-.PP 
-Then you need to create a \f(CWswat/\fP directory in your web servers root
-directory and copy the \f(CWimages/*\fP and \f(CWhelp/*\fP files found in the
-\f(CWswat/\fP directory of your Samba source distribution into there so
-that they are visible via the URL \f(CWhttp://your\&.web\&.server/swat/\fP
-.PP 
-Next you need to make sure you modify your web servers authentication
-to require a username/pssword for the URL
-\f(CWhttp://your\&.web\&.server/cgi-bin/swat\fP\&. \fI**Don\'t forget this
-step!**\fP If you do forget it then you will be allowing anyone to edit
-your Samba configuration which would allow them to easily gain root
-access on your machine\&.
-.PP 
-After testing the authentication you need to change the ownership and
-permissions on the \fBswat\fP binary\&. It should be owned by root wth the
-setuid bit set\&. It should be ONLY executable by the user that the web
-server runs as\&. Make sure you do this carefully!
-.PP 
-for example, the following would be correct if the web server ran as
-group \f(CW"nobody"\fP\&.
-.PP 
-\f(CW-rws--x---    1 root     nobody    \fP
-.PP 
-You must also realise that this means that any user who can run
-programs as the \f(CW"nobody"\fP group can run \fBswat\fP and modify your
-Samba config\&. Be sure to think about this!
-.PP 
 .SH "LAUNCHING" 
 .PP 
-To launch \fBswat\fP just run your favourite web browser and point it at
-\f(CWhttp://localhost:901/\fP or \f(CWhttp://localhost/cgi-bin/swat/\fP
-depending on how you installed it\&.
+To launch \fBswat\fP just run your favorite web browser and point it at
+\f(CWhttp://localhost:901/\fP\&.
 .PP 
-Note that you can attach to \fBswat\fP from any IP connected machine but
+\fBNote that you can attach to \fBswat\fP from any IP connected machine but
 connecting from a remote machine leaves your connection open to
 password sniffing as passwords will be sent in the clear over the
-wire\&.
-.PP 
-If installed via \fBinetd\fP then you should be prompted for a
-username/password when you connect\&. You will need to provide the
-username \f(CW"root"\fP and the correct root password\&. More sophisticated
-authentication options are planned for future versions of \fBswat\fP\&.
-.PP 
-If installed via cgi-bin then you should receive whatever
-authentication request you configured in your web server\&.
+wire\&.\fP
 .PP 
 .SH "FILES" 
 .PP 
 \fB/etc/inetd\&.conf\fP
 .PP 
-If the server is to be run by the inetd meta-daemon, this file must
-contain suitable startup information for the meta-daemon\&. See the
-section \fBRUNNING VIA INETD\fP above\&.
+This file must contain suitable startup information for the
+meta-daemon\&. 
 .PP 
 \fB/etc/services\fP
 .PP 
-If running the server via the meta-daemon inetd, this file must
-contain a mapping of service name (eg\&., swat) to service port
-(eg\&., 901) and protocol type (eg\&., tcp)\&. See the section
-\fBRUNNING VIA INETD\fP above\&.
+This file must contain a mapping of service name (e\&.g\&., swat) to
+service port (e\&.g\&., 901) and protocol type (e\&.g\&., tcp)\&. 
 .PP 
 \fB/usr/local/samba/lib/smb\&.conf\fP
 .PP 
index 358bb63d967bac7bac8e2c8cc0e6d3221f67968f..92ba093dedd3128ab916fb8e1ce9b2b81f13855b 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH "testparm" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "testparm " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
 testparm \- check an smb\&.conf configuration file for internal correctness
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ then testparm will examine the \fB"hosts
 allow"\fP and \fB"hosts
 deny"\fP parameters in the
 \fBsmb\&.conf\fP file to determine if the hostname
-with this IP address would be allowed acces to the
+with this IP address would be allowed access to the
 \fBsmbd\fP server\&. If this parameter is supplied, the
 hostIP parameter must also be supplied\&.
 .IP 
index efe5e96d9cad66398642144ef6a2093c9ad8d4e4..9be04433440095097a499c7bf955b3c36433d035 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
-.TH "testparm" "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
+.TH "testprns " "1" "23 Oct 1998" "Samba" "SAMBA" 
 .PP 
 .SH "NAME" 
-testparm \- check printer name for validity with smbd 
+testprns \- check printer name for validity with smbd 
 .PP 
 .SH "SYNOPSIS" 
 .PP 
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ The printer name to validate\&.
 .IP 
 Printer names are taken from the first field in each record in the
 printcap file, single printer names and sets of aliases separated by
-vertical bars ("|") are recognised\&. Note that no validation or
+vertical bars ("|") are recognized\&. Note that no validation or
 checking of the printcap syntax is done beyond that required to
 extract the printer name\&. It may be that the print spooling system is
 more forgiving or less forgiving than \fBtestprns\fP\&. However, if
index 16d3f03ac1b47598b3bed8987535906df9e82a18..4b20472e9aa9d3f0f7b2659d4332e017bd818684 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Application_Serving.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Application_Serving.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributed:   January 7, 1997
 Updated:       March 24, 1998
index f16f5944c85753f2cf8ce8fc486d1bfad7672d72..0dfd716d9ef0dba66b95a547d11d355e916cd493 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== BROWSING-Config.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== BROWSING-Config.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Date:          July 5, 1998
 Contributor:   John H Terpstra <jht@samba.anu.edu.au>
index 2095830add6c8424eb42d5099386a063636727f6..6facc4a552d8801dec62f298e33cf8ba3f317be1 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== BROWSING.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== BROWSING.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Author/s:      Many (Thanks to Luke, Jeremy, Andrew, etc.)
 Updated:       July 5, 1998
index 2c0b4f0613f440092625d96a61a51405b513877e..0a242d4aa42278b42196be644f71bcc8fb9a8130 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== BUGS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== BUGS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Samba Team
 Updated:       June 27, 1997
index cee7af02b78885539fba34c6b4f892ce75c88ae9..a1ab42e70c924b98589c5b174d01249547ea59a8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== CVS_ACCESS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== CVS_ACCESS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:    Modified from the Web pages by Jeremy Allison.
 Date:           23 Dec 1997
index d4047d8bf738e9282184449f8651a74e915690e4..6e2e76c64fc7e9526056ffd3e9cc42cd11d74aa8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== DHCP-Server-Configuration.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== DHCP-Server-Configuration.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Subject:       DHCP Server Configuration for SMB Clients
 Date:          March 1, 1998
index 35e0660a1c76ac1d05ed5e9df25f8dbf63e0e92f..2d8e50fcecf6e70af323cf9eb43ec2f7bf80c3c5 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== DIAGNOSIS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== DIAGNOSIS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell
 Updated:       October 14, 1997
index 0b52e22de48e001404dbb8b396bafa152833078c..51c3b32bc4674b0106d6c48313ee0a43da51246a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== DNIX.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== DNIX.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 DNIX has a problem with seteuid() and setegid(). These routines are
 needed for Samba to work correctly, but they were left out of the DNIX
index 60f47ff882b78e0a709071bee2e9a2fbc66c1acc..d0c56fcf173d9e8e8393f82d758f5acd4413f9be 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== DOMAIN.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== DOMAIN.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Samba Team
 Updated:       June 27, 1997
index 05dd99d3fe023244f92b5e981901dcb00072007b..332c70caf563c0440dc84a6db9acbbdfe2e84c4b 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== DOMAIN_CONTROL.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== DOMAIN_CONTROL.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Initial Release:       August 22, 1996
 Contributor:           John H Terpstra <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
index c5fa2b74677f3f6fddb6e248b3a0241dc183f989..ecf0a2e392a8ee62d7ee983b1dc9d217ce17d22f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== ENCRYPTION.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== ENCRYPTION.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Jeremy Allison <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
 Updated:       March 19, 1998
index a91bf7e405909d9c8b147e30dfdc20c95a2591a7..e8c839818eadfd1715c4762aa1bdef09db3434ca 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Faxing.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Faxing.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:    Gerhard Zuber <zuber@berlin.snafu.de>
 Date:                  August 5th 1997.
index 3cf699732b5c7bf2a472831bfccaeb1bd50ad4d2..f70af0008826c4cfcbf1aaf6683d12172a49f6e4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== GOTCHAS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== GOTCHAS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 This file lists Gotchas to watch out for:
 =========================================================================
index a0ebe5a2ff752a66838bd02fcde63a2375231d28..8cdd1107eb3879a1c178398ca95e1b1b15f24dda 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== HINTS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== HINTS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Many
 Updated:       Not for a long time!
index d03c676cc08d48ca9df8a1f07c6c878f876f27b3..41e89ed8c3b0aaf0060bb9bc9fe44588182a9fb4 100755 (executable)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== MIRRORS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== MIRRORS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 
 For a list of web and ftp mirrors please see 
index 3ce6b65a3fccf4f7cbf35a556f09483b1dd796d4..d91fd015c823084f9abb1843cc86863aafa59f3c 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Macintosh_Clients.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Macintosh_Clients.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 > Are there any Macintosh clients for Samba?
 
index f6bd238bba323cde70cadff9f472319bcc68e9bf..91417186ba07990d0f1490ceb2a52b8dcd6b7a36 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== NTDOMAIN.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== NTDOMAIN.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton (samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au)
                Copyright (C) 1997 Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton
index 4384a5f42fe4bc29eee44f71dc2d11a458531015..8ee5579a245b2bb25c4559e1df244bdb1946911d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== NetBIOS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== NetBIOS.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:    lkcl - samba-bugs@arvidsjaur.anu.edu.au
                 Copyright 1997  Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton 
index ef7c5e4899ce2aa8a2ab0f6a25093626ce7130c4..2246f1f7883229b0eba25207ec63f41a7ad2fcdf 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== OS2-Client-HOWTO.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== OS2-Client-HOWTO.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 
 
index 5f7caa83fb113ec2b7bf999180aa6c359ef6dd97..394e854e03fd7dc2ab644fdc01976824ae570c3b 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== PRINTER_DRIVER.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== PRINTER_DRIVER.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 ==========================================================================
        Supporting the famous PRINTER$ share
index a52e13660416828e22032f0410966cc59643933f..a6e524036ed6c9306108c79e92f2ced23659fd08 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== PROFILES.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== PROFILES.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributors:  Bruce Cook <BC3-AU@bigfoot.com>
                Copyright (C) 1998 Bruce Cook
index 21e39d4a657563bb536a6d7bb3fed53bf581a0e8..b3f5c8bfc18614bc6e9855008e981b1205af41de 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Passwords.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Passwords.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Unknown
 Date:          Unknown
index aadbe41ff434e3e3645fb8887001b31425a49361..bced85f17ed5b12459450884c6d4f257081c68e4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Printing.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Printing.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Unknown <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
 Date:          Unknown
index 6e7899a34f0a13ef9c78bc962c934af248737b80..26bfb0653f0e36dc8d986d135824e6150fa96e97 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Recent-FAQs.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Recent-FAQs.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au
 Date:          July 5, 1998
index ece9d1cc64ddce90014ca7f73e780f67fb584231..8ee63df752ea7a2352e72c3c696fb3e3b8dd4c24 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== RoutedNetworks.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== RoutedNetworks.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 #NOFNR Flag in LMHosts to Communicate Across Routers\r
 \r
@@ -64,4 +64,3 @@ HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Nbt\Parameters:
 \r
 \r
   This will cause the directed Name Queries to not go out for any\r
-remote machines. 
\ No newline at end of file
index 44debb3d482d364a53561c1b3b90f624bfa4b002..cf4fc34534437af57be79d1b8daa87c3e3a9cf27 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== SCO.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== SCO.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Geza Makay <makayg@math.u-szeged.hu>
 Date:          Unknown
index ca46ba0e40080c1f2873bb7e0a78d2e851ecf962..0c5263e93b70f3590b9693112b821ce36bed2406 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== SSLeay.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== SSLeay.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor: Christian Starkjohann <cs@obdev.at>
 Date:        May 29, 1998
index fee111b6ec211889c38ed651b5c9f118a755dbc9..d24de62a0001d28b0c2617514aa9d4afb18b65b2 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Speed.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Speed.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell
 Date:          January 1995
index 30dcd8405b76b065de094b8c6ff434820e0977f6..ee8d4221403fde03b3ef13919cadf0d54aca2b82 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Speed2.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Speed2.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Paul Cochrane <paulc@dth.scot.nhs.uk>
 Organization:  Dundee Limb Fitting Centre
index 932d04145185f474fa041f528ae651f582fb1916..608406ad17f338e93d0f6647750c43dd181e0ffb 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Support.txt for Samba release 2.0
+!== Support.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 The Samba Consultants List
 ==========================
index f3038799340ced0abcfe171700031d7ffcf1f56d..69081a4e24a565afaa5782675cc26e0362fbd9dd 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Tracing.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Tracing.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
 Date:          Old
index 41c6696058880efef0f9e209b9cf9c9396445b92..41210ab9eaa3f47aeb12398368a1bacde2457d9a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== UNIX-SMB.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== UNIX-SMB.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
 Date:          April 1995
index 074693acc84c59a6d54c36356bacc8efe9f6258d..abcd335b42a5e2618739c69520547c866f3ebb6f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== UNIX_INSTALL.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== UNIX_INSTALL.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell <samba-bugs@samba.anu.edu.au>
 Date:          Unknown
index e8603b13e7ab90b3edff1902034792622e78f6a4..e3f31a7162ae233cd4ff5b07e4da4f0a462b71e5 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== UNIX_SECURITY.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== UNIX_SECURITY.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   John H Terpstra <jht@samba.anu.edu.au>
 Date:          July 5, 1998
index d6f533628385692af6cb6ff5f88474c3312683e2..097fab62779cf265796712666d2dd6f01c82c22a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== Win95.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== Win95.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Copyright (C) 1997 - Samba-Team
 Contributed Date:      August 20, 1997
index 701d3cdf1bcd17a858e91bc4279e6c34577493b8..eb3ee88723d92a0f771570cc7e37ea7de7c835c0 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== WinNT.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== WinNT.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributors:  Various
                Password Section - Copyright (C) 1997 - John H Terpstra
index 20ec64eda6f0adad0851a30f98c3a8f376d3c3cc..ba6b9d6bafd62bd379c67cf1942ad98567bfd75d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== cifsntdomain.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== cifsntdomain.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 NT Domain Authentication
 ------------------------
index 59e91b3c5a8b2f68361299a37e78f7bc8ff2c4e0..2c632af1aabe273e1d75fea7b58bf6d842d62245 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 !==
-!== security_level.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-alpha11 09 Oct 1998
+!== security_level.txt for Samba release 2.0.0-beta1 13 Nov 1998
 !==
 Contributor:   Andrew Tridgell
 Updated:       June 27, 1997