58a4159a7e83ae428725a775d694ae2a1dba3f73
[samba.git] / source / auth / kerberos / kerberos-notes.txt
1 AllowedWorkstationNames and Krb5
2 --------------------------------
3
4 Microsoft uses the clientAddresses *multiple value* field in the krb5
5 protocol (particularly the AS_REQ) to communicate it's netbios name.
6 This is (my guess) to permit the userWorkstations field to work.
7
8 The KDC I imagine checks the netbios address against this value, in
9 the same way that the Samba server does this.
10
11 The checking of this implies a little of the next question:
12
13 Is a DAL the layer we need?
14 ---------------------------
15
16 Looking at what we need to pass around, I start to seriously wonder if
17 the DAL is even the right layer - we seem to want to create an account
18 authorization abstraction layer - is this account permitted to login to
19 this computer, at this time?
20
21 This information in AD is much richer than the Heimdal HDB, and it
22 seems to make sense to do AD-specific access control checks in an
23 AD-specific layer, not in the back-end agnostic server.
24
25 Because the DAL only reads in the principalName as the key, it has
26 trouble performing access control decisions on things other than the
27 name.
28
29 I'll be very interested if the DAL really works for eDirectory too.
30 Perhaps all we need to do is add in the same kludges as we have in
31 Samba 3.0 for eDirectory.  Hmm...
32
33 That said, the current layer provides us with a very good start, and
34 any redefinition would occour from that basis.
35
36
37 GSSAPI layer requirements
38 -------------------------
39
40 Welcome to the wonderful world of canonicalisation
41
42 The MIT GSSAPI libs do not support kinit returning a different
43 realm to what the client asked for, even just in case differences.
44
45 Heimdal has the same problem, and this applies to the krb5 layer, not
46 just gssapi.
47
48 We need to test if the canonicalisation is controlled by the KDCOption
49 flags, windows always sends the Canonicalize flags
50
51 Old Clients (samba3 and HPUX clients) uses 'selfmade' gssapi/krb5
52 for using it in the CIFS session setup. Because they use krb5_mk_req()
53 they get a chksum field depending on the encryption type, but that's wrong
54 for GSSAPI (see rfc 1964 section 1.1.1). The Cheksum type 8003
55 should be used in the Authenticator of the AP-REQ! That allows the channel bindings,
56 the GCC_C_* req_flags and optional delegation tickets to be passed from the client to the server.
57 Hower windows doesn't seems to care about if the checksum is of the wrong type,
58 for CIFS SessionSetups, it seems that the req_flags are just set to 0.
59 So this can't work for LDAP connections with sign or seal, or for any DCERPC
60 connection.
61
62 So we need to also support old clients!
63
64 Principal Names, long and short names
65 -------------------------------------
66
67 As far as servicePrincipalNames are concerned, these are not
68 canonicalised, except as regards the realm in the reply.  That is, the
69 client gets back the principal it asked for, with the realm portion
70 'fixed' to uppercase, long form.  
71
72 The short name of the realm seems to be accepted for at least AS_REQ
73 operations, but because the server performs canonicalisation, this
74 causes pain for current client libraries. 
75
76 The canonicalisation of names matters not only for the KDC, but also
77 for code that has to deal with keytabs.
78
79 We also need to handle type 10 names (NT-ENTERPRISE), which are a full
80 principal name in the principal field, unrelated to the realm.
81
82 HOST/ Aliases
83 -------------
84
85 There is another post somewhere (ref lost for the moment) that details
86 where in active directory the list of stored aliases for HOST/ is.
87 This should be read, parsed and used to allow any of these requests to
88 use the HOST/ key.
89
90 For example, this is how HTTP/, DNS/ and CIFS/ can use HOST/ without
91 any explicit entry.
92
93
94 Jean-Baptiste.Marchand@hsc.fr reminds me:
95
96 > This is the SPNMappings attribute in Active Directory:
97
98 > http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/adschema/adschema/a_spnmappings.asp
99
100 We implement this in hdb-ldb.
101
102
103 Returned Salt for PreAuthentication
104 -----------------------------------
105
106 When the server replies for pre-authentication, it returns the Salt,
107 which may be in the form of a principalName that is in no way
108 connected with the current names.  (ie, even if the userPrincipalName
109 and samAccountName are renamed, the old salt is returned).
110
111 This is probably the kerberos standard salt, kept in the 'Key'.  The
112 standard generation rules are found in a Mail from Luke Howard dated
113 10 Nov 2004:
114
115
116 From: Luke Howard <lukeh@padl.com>
117 Message-Id: <200411100231.iAA2VLUW006101@au.padl.com>
118 MIME-Version: 1.0
119 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
120 Organization: PADL Software Pty Ltd
121 To: lukeh@padl.com
122 Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 13:31:21 +1100
123 Versions: dmail (bsd44) 2.6d/makemail 2.10
124 Cc: huaraz@moeller.plus.com, samba-technical@lists.samba.org
125 Subject: Re: Samba-3.0.7-1.3E Active Directory Issues
126 X-BeenThere: samba-technical@lists.samba.org
127 X-Mailman-Version: 2.1.4
128 Precedence: list
129 Reply-To: lukeh@padl.com
130
131 Did some more testing, it appears the behaviour has another
132 explanation. It appears that the standard Kerberos password salt
133 algorithm is applied in Windows 2003, just that the source principal
134 name is different.
135
136 Here is what I've been able to deduce from creating a bunch of
137 different accounts:
138
139 Type of account         Principal for Salting
140 ========================================================================
141 Computer Account                host/<SAM-Name-Without-$>.realm@REALM
142 User Account Without UPN        <SAM-Name>@REALM
143 User Account With UPN           <LHS-Of-UPN>@REALM
144
145 Note that if the computer account's SAM account name does not include
146 the trailing '$', then the entire SAM account name is used as input to
147 the salting principal. Setting a UPN for a computer account has no
148 effect.
149
150 It seems to me odd that the RHS of the UPN is not used in the salting
151 principal. For example, a user with UPN foo@mydomain.com in the realm
152 MYREALM.COM would have a salt of MYREALM.COMfoo. Perhaps this is to
153 allow a user's UPN suffix to be changed without changing the salt. And
154 perhaps using the UPN for salting signifies a move away SAM names and
155 their associated constraints.
156
157 For more information on how UPNs relate to the Kerberos protocol,
158 see:
159
160 http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/01dec/I-D/draft-ietf-krb-wg-kerberos-referrals-02.txt
161
162 -- Luke
163
164 --
165
166
167
168
169 Heimdal oddities
170 ----------------
171
172 Heimdal is built such that it should be able to serve multiple realms
173 at the same time.  This isn't relevant for Samba's use, but it shows
174 up in a lot of generalisations throughout the code.
175
176 Other odd things:
177  - Support for multiple passwords on a client account:  we seem to
178    call hdb_next_enctype2key() in the pre-authentication routines to
179    allow multiple passwords per account in krb5.  (I think this was
180    intened to allow multiple salts)
181
182 State Machine safety
183 --------------------
184
185 Samba is a giant state machine, and as such have very different
186 requirements to those traditionally expressed for kerberos and GSSAPI
187 libraries. 
188
189 Samba requires all of the libraries it uses to be state machine safe in
190 their use of internal data.  This does not mean thread safe, and an
191 application could be thread safe, but not state machine safe (if it
192 instead used thread-local variables).
193
194 So, what does it mean for a library to be state machine safe?  This is
195 mostly a question of context, and how the library manages whatever
196 internal state machines it has.  If the library uses a context
197 variable, passed in by the caller, which contains all the information
198 about the current state of the library, then it is safe.  An example
199 of this state is the sequence number and session keys for an ongoing
200 encrypted session).
201
202 The other issue affecting state machines is 'blocking' (waiting for a
203 read on a network socket).  
204
205 Heimdal has this 'state machine safety' in parts, and we have modified
206 the lorikeet branch to improve this behviour, when using a new,
207 non-standard API.  
208
209 Heimdal uses a per-context variable for the 'krb5_auth_context', which
210 controls the ongoing encrypted connection, but does use global
211 variables for the ubiquitous krb5_context parameter.  
212
213 The modification that has added most to 'state machine safety' of
214 GSSAPI is the addition of the gsskrb5_acquire_creds function.  This
215 allows the caller to specify a keytab and ccache, for use by the
216 GSSAPI code.  Therefore there is no need to use global variables to
217 communicate this information. 
218
219 At a more theoritical level (simply counting static and global
220 variables) Heimdal is not state machine safe for the GSSAPI layer.
221 The Krb5 layer alone is much closer, as far as I can tell, blocking
222 excepted. .
223
224 To deal with blocking, we could have a fork()ed child per context,
225 using the 'GSSAPI export context' function to transfer
226 the GSSAPI state back into the main code for the wrap()/unwrap() part
227 of the operation.  This will still hit issues of static storage (one
228 gss_krb5_context per process, and multiple GSSAPI encrypted sessions
229 at a time) but these may not matter in practice.
230
231 In the short-term, we deal with blocking by taking over the network
232 send() and recv() functions, therefore making them 'semi-async'.  This
233 doens't apply to DNS yet.
234
235 GSSAPI and Kerberos extensions
236 ------------------------------
237
238 This is a general list of the other extensions we have made to / need from
239 the kerberos libraries
240
241  - DCE_STYLE
242
243  - gsskrb5_get_initiator_subkey() (return the exact key that Samba3
244    has always asked for.  gsskrb5_get_subkey() might do what we need
245    anyway)
246
247  - gsskrb5_acquire_creds() (takes keytab and/or ccache as input
248    parameters, see keytab and state machine discussion)
249
250  - gss_krb5_copy_service_keyblock() (get the key used to actually
251    encrypt the ticket to the server, because the same key is used for
252    the PAC validation).
253  - gsskrb5_extract_authtime_from_sec_context (get authtime from
254    kerberos ticket)
255  - gsskrb5_extract_authz_data_from_sec_context (get authdata from
256    ticket, ie the PAC.  Must unwrap the data if in an AD-IFRELEVENT)
257  - gsskrb5_wrap_size (find out how big the wrapped packet will be,
258    given input length).
259
260 Keytab requirements
261 -------------------
262
263 Because windows machine account handling is very different to the
264 tranditional 'MIT' keytab operation.  This starts when we look at the
265 basis of the secrets handling:
266
267 Traditional 'MIT' behaviour is to use a keytab, continaing salted key
268 data, extracted from the KDC.  (In this modal, there is no 'service
269 password', instead the keys are often simply application of random
270 bytes).  Heimdal also implements this behaviour.
271
272 The windows modal is very different - instead of sharing a keytab with
273 each member server, a password is stored for the whole machine.  The
274 password is set with non-kerberos mechanisms (particularly SAMR, a
275 DCE-RPC service) and when interacting on a kerberos basis, the
276 password is salted by the client.  (That is, no salt infromation
277 appears to be convayed from the KDC to the member).
278
279 In dealing with this modal, the traditional file keytab seems
280 outmoded, because it is not the primary source of the keys, and as
281 such we have replaced it with an IN-MEMORY keytab.  This avoids Samba4
282 needing to deal with system files for it's internal operation.  (We
283 will however forward-port parts of Samba3's net ads keytab, for the
284 benifit of other applications).
285
286 When dealing with a windows KDC, the behaviour regarding case
287 sensitivity and canonacolisation must be accomidated.  This means that
288 an incoming request to a member server may have a wide variety of
289 service principal names.  These include:
290
291 machine$@REALM (samba clients)
292 HOST/foo.bar@realm (win2k clients)
293 HOST/foo@realm (win2k clients, using netbios)
294 cifs/foo.bar@realm (winxp clients)
295 cifs/foo@realm (winxp clients, using netbios)
296
297 as well as all case variations on the above.  
298
299 Because that all got 'too hard' to put into a real keytab (and because we
300 still wanted to supply a keytab to the GSSAPI code), we use in-memory
301 keytabs, and specify the target name.
302
303 Extra Heimdal functions used
304 ----------------------------
305 (an attempt to list some of the Heimdal-specific functions I know we use)
306
307 krb5_free_keyblock_contents()
308
309 also a raft of prinicpal manipulation functions:
310
311 Prncipal Manipulation
312 ---------------------
313
314 Samba makes extensive use of the principal manipulation functions in
315 Heimdal, including the known structure behind krb_principal and
316 krb5_realm (a char *).
317
318 Authz data extraction
319 ---------------------
320
321 We use krb5_ticket_get_authorization_data_type(), and expect it to
322 return the correct authz data, even if wrapped in an AD-IFRELEVENT container.
323
324
325 KDC/hdb Extensions
326 --------------
327
328 We have modified Heimdal's 'hdb' interface to specify the 'type' of
329 Principal being requested.  This allows us to correctly behave with
330 the different 'classes' of Principal name. 
331
332 We currently define 2 classes:
333  - client (kinit)
334  - server (tgt)
335
336 I also now specify the kerberos principal as an explict parameter, not
337 an in/out value on the entry itself.
338
339 Inside hdb-ldb, we add krbtgt as a special class of principal, because
340 of particular special-case backend requirements.
341
342 Callbacks:
343  In addition, I have added a new interface hdb_fetch_ex(), which
344  returns a structure including callbacks, which provide the hook for
345  the PAC, as well as a callback into the main access control routines.
346
347  A new callback should be added to increment the bad password counter
348  on failure.
349
350  Another possability for a callback is to obtain the keys.  This would
351  allow the plaintext password to only be hashed into the encryption
352  types we need.  This idea from the eDirectory/MIT DAL work.
353
354  This probably should be combined with storing the hashed passwords in
355  the supplementalCredentials attribute. If combined with a kvno
356  parameter, this could also allow changing of the krbtgt password
357  (valuable for security).
358
359 libkdc
360 ------
361
362 Samba4 needs to be built as a single binary (design requirement), and
363 this should include the KDC.  Samba also (and perhaps more
364 importantly) needs to control the configuration environment of the
365 KDC.  
366
367 The interface we have defined for libkdc allow for packet injection
368 into the post-socket layer, with a defined krb5_context and
369 kdb5_kdc_configuration structure.  These effectively redirect the
370 kerberos warnings, logging and database calls as we require.
371
372 Using our socket lib
373 --------------------
374
375 An important detail in the use of libkdc is that we use our own socket
376 lib.  This allows the KDC code to be as portable as the rest of samba
377 (this cuts both ways), but far more importantly it ensures a
378 consistancy in the handling of requests, binding to sockets etc.
379
380 To handle TCP, we use of our socket layer in much the same way as
381 we deal with TCP for CIFS.  Tridge created a generic packet handling
382 layer for this.
383
384 For the client, we likewise must take over the socket functions, so
385 that our single thread smbd will not lock up talking to itself.  (We
386 allow processing while waiting for packets in our socket routines).
387
388 Kerberos logging support
389 ------------------------
390
391 Samba now (optionally in the main code, required for the KDC) uses the
392 krb5_log_facility from Heimdal.  This allows us to redirect the
393 warnings and status from the KDC (and client/server kerberos code) to
394 Samba's DEBUG() system.
395
396 Similarly important is the Heimdal-specific krb5_get_error_string()
397 function, which does a lot to reduce the 'administrator pain' level,
398 by providing specific, english text-string error messages instead of
399 just error code translations.
400
401
402 Short name rules
403 ----------------
404
405 Samba is highly likely to be misconfigured, in many weird and
406 interesting ways.  As such, we have a patch for Heimdal that avoids
407 DNS lookups on names without a . in them.  This should avoid some
408 delay and root server load.
409
410 PAC Correctness
411 ---------------
412
413 We now put the PAC into the TGT, not just the service ticket.  
414
415 Forwarded tickets
416 -----------------
417
418 We extract forwarded tickets from the GSSAPI layer, and put
419 them into the credentials.  We can then use them for proxy work.
420
421
422 Kerberos TODO
423 =============
424
425 (Feel free to contribute to any of these tasks, or ask
426 abartlet@samba.org about them).
427
428 Lockout Control
429 --------------
430
431 We need to get (either if PADL publishes their patch, or write our
432 own) access control hooks in the Heimdal KDC.  We need to lockout
433 accounts, and perform other controls.
434
435 Gssmonger
436 ---------
437
438 Microsoft has released a testsuite called gssmonger, which tests
439 interop.  We should compile it against lorikeet-heimdal, MIT and see
440 if we can build a 'Samba4' server for it.
441
442 Kpasswd server
443 --------------
444
445 I have a partial kpasswd server which needs finishing, and a we need a
446 client testsuite written, either via the krb5 API or directly against
447 GENSEC and the ASN.1 routines.
448
449 Currently it only works for Heimdal, not MIT clients.  This may be due
450 to call ordering constraints.
451
452
453 Correct TCP support
454 -------------------
455
456 Our current TCP support does not send back 'too large' error messages
457 if the high bit is set.  This is needed for a proposed extension
458 mechanism, but is likewise unsupported in both current Heimdal and MIT.