s3/vfs: rename SMB_VFS_STRICT_LOCK to SMB_VFS_STRICT_LOCK_CHECK
[samba.git] / examples / smb.conf.default
1 # This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the
2 # smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed
3 # here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options (perhaps too
4 # many!) most of which are not shown in this example
5 #
6 # For a step to step guide on installing, configuring and using samba, 
7 # read the Samba-HOWTO-Collection. This may be obtained from:
8 #  http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/Samba-HOWTO-Collection.pdf
9 #
10 # Many working examples of smb.conf files can be found in the 
11 # Samba-Guide which is generated daily and can be downloaded from: 
12 #  http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/Samba-Guide.pdf
13 #
14 # Any line which starts with a ; (semi-colon) or a # (hash) 
15 # is a comment and is ignored. In this example we will use a #
16 # for commentry and a ; for parts of the config file that you
17 # may wish to enable
18 #
19 # NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command "testparm"
20 # to check that you have not made any basic syntactic errors. 
21 #
22 #======================= Global Settings =====================================
23 [global]
24
25 # workgroup = NT-Domain-Name or Workgroup-Name, eg: MIDEARTH
26    workgroup = MYGROUP
27
28 # server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field
29    server string = Samba Server
30
31 # Server role. Defines in which mode Samba will operate. Possible
32 # values are "standalone server", "member server", "classic primary
33 # domain controller", "classic backup domain controller", "active
34 # directory domain controller".
35 #
36 # Most people will want "standalone server" or "member server".
37 # Running as "active directory domain controller" will require first
38 # running "samba-tool domain provision" to wipe databases and create a
39 # new domain.
40    server role = standalone server
41
42 # This option is important for security. It allows you to restrict
43 # connections to machines which are on your local network. The
44 # following example restricts access to two C class networks and
45 # the "loopback" interface. For more examples of the syntax see
46 # the smb.conf man page
47 ;   hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127.
48
49 # Uncomment this if you want a guest account, you must add this to /etc/passwd
50 # otherwise the user "nobody" is used
51 ;  guest account = pcguest
52
53 # this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
54 # that connects
55    log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
56
57 # Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb).
58    max log size = 50
59
60 # Specifies the Kerberos or Active Directory realm the host is part of
61 ;   realm = MY_REALM
62
63 # Backend to store user information in. New installations should 
64 # use either tdbsam or ldapsam. smbpasswd is available for backwards 
65 # compatibility. tdbsam requires no further configuration.
66 ;   passdb backend = tdbsam
67
68 # Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration
69 # on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name
70 # of the machine that is connecting.
71 # Note: Consider carefully the location in the configuration file of
72 #       this line.  The included file is read at that point.
73 ;   include = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf.%m
74
75 # Configure Samba to use multiple interfaces
76 # If you have multiple network interfaces then you must list them
77 # here. See the man page for details.
78 ;   interfaces = 192.168.12.2/24 192.168.13.2/24 
79
80 # Where to store roving profiles (only for Win95 and WinNT)
81 #        %L substitutes for this servers netbios name, %U is username
82 #        You must uncomment the [Profiles] share below
83 ;   logon path = \\%L\Profiles\%U
84
85 # Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:
86 # WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable it's WINS Server
87 ;   wins support = yes
88
89 # WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client
90 #       Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both
91 ;   wins server = w.x.y.z
92
93 # WINS Proxy - Tells Samba to answer name resolution queries on
94 # behalf of a non WINS capable client, for this to work there must be
95 # at least one  WINS Server on the network. The default is NO.
96 ;   wins proxy = yes
97
98 # DNS Proxy - tells Samba whether or not to try to resolve NetBIOS names
99 # via DNS nslookups. The default is NO.
100    dns proxy = no 
101
102 # These scripts are used on a domain controller or stand-alone 
103 # machine to add or delete corresponding unix accounts
104 ;  add user script = /usr/sbin/useradd %u
105 ;  add group script = /usr/sbin/groupadd %g
106 ;  add machine script = /usr/sbin/adduser -n -g machines -c Machine -d /dev/null -s /bin/false %u
107 ;  delete user script = /usr/sbin/userdel %u
108 ;  delete user from group script = /usr/sbin/deluser %u %g
109 ;  delete group script = /usr/sbin/groupdel %g
110
111
112 #============================ Share Definitions ==============================
113 [homes]
114    comment = Home Directories
115    browseable = no
116    writable = yes
117
118 # Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons
119 ; [netlogon]
120 ;   comment = Network Logon Service
121 ;   path = /usr/local/samba/lib/netlogon
122 ;   guest ok = yes
123 ;   writable = no
124 ;   share modes = no
125
126
127 # Un-comment the following to provide a specific roving profile share
128 # the default is to use the user's home directory
129 ;[Profiles]
130 ;    path = /usr/local/samba/profiles
131 ;    browseable = no
132 ;    guest ok = yes
133
134
135 # NOTE: If you have a BSD-style print system there is no need to 
136 # specifically define each individual printer
137 [printers]
138    comment = All Printers
139    path = /usr/spool/samba
140    browseable = no
141 # Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print
142    guest ok = no
143    writable = no
144    printable = yes
145
146 # This one is useful for people to share files
147 ;[tmp]
148 ;   comment = Temporary file space
149 ;   path = /tmp
150 ;   read only = no
151 ;   public = yes
152
153 # A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for people in
154 # the "staff" group
155 ;[public]
156 ;   comment = Public Stuff
157 ;   path = /home/samba
158 ;   public = yes
159 ;   writable = no
160 ;   printable = no
161 ;   write list = @staff
162
163 # Other examples. 
164 #
165 # A private printer, usable only by fred. Spool data will be placed in fred's
166 # home directory. Note that fred must have write access to the spool directory,
167 # wherever it is.
168 ;[fredsprn]
169 ;   comment = Fred's Printer
170 ;   valid users = fred
171 ;   path = /homes/fred
172 ;   printer = freds_printer
173 ;   public = no
174 ;   writable = no
175 ;   printable = yes
176
177 # A private directory, usable only by fred. Note that fred requires write
178 # access to the directory.
179 ;[fredsdir]
180 ;   comment = Fred's Service
181 ;   path = /usr/somewhere/private
182 ;   valid users = fred
183 ;   public = no
184 ;   writable = yes
185 ;   printable = no
186
187 # a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects
188 # this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could
189 # also use the %U option to tailor it by user name.
190 # The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting.
191 ;[pchome]
192 ;  comment = PC Directories
193 ;  path = /usr/pc/%m
194 ;  public = no
195 ;  writable = yes
196
197 # A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files
198 # created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so
199 # any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this
200 # directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course
201 # be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead.
202 ;[public]
203 ;   path = /usr/somewhere/else/public
204 ;   public = yes
205 ;   only guest = yes
206 ;   writable = yes
207 ;   printable = no
208
209 # The following two entries demonstrate how to share a directory so that two
210 # users can place files there that will be owned by the specific users. In this
211 # setup, the directory should be writable by both users and should have the
212 # sticky bit set on it to prevent abuse. Obviously this could be extended to
213 # as many users as required.
214 ;[myshare]
215 ;   comment = Mary's and Fred's stuff
216 ;   path = /usr/somewhere/shared
217 ;   valid users = mary fred
218 ;   public = no
219 ;   writable = yes
220 ;   printable = no
221 ;   create mask = 0765
222
223