Very large number of markup fixes, layout updates, etc.
[samba.git] / docs / docbook / projdoc / passdb.xml
1 <chapter id="passdb">
2 <chapterinfo>
3         &author.jelmer;
4         &author.jerry;
5         &author.jeremy;
6         &author.jht;
7         <author>
8                 <firstname>Olivier (lem)</firstname><surname>Lemaire</surname>
9                 <affiliation>
10                         <orgname>IDEALX</orgname>
11                         <address><email>olem@IDEALX.org</email></address>
12                 </affiliation>
13         </author>
14         
15         <pubdate>May 24, 2003</pubdate>
16 </chapterinfo>
17 <title>Account Information Databases</title>
18
19 <para>
20 Samba-3 implements a new capability to work concurrently with mulitple account backends.
21 The possible new combinations of password backends allows Samba-3 a degree of flexibility
22 and scalability that previously could be achieved only with MS Windows Active Directory.
23 This chapter describes the new functionality and how to get the most out of it.
24 </para>
25
26 <para>
27 In the course of development of Samba-3 a number of requests were received to provide the
28 ability to migrate MS Windows NT4 SAM accounts to Samba-3 without the need to provide
29 matching Unix/Linux accounts. We called this the <emphasis>Non Unix Accounts (NUA)</emphasis>
30 capability. The intent was that an administrator could decide to use the <emphasis>tdbsam</emphasis>
31 backend and by simply specifying <emphasis>"passdb backedn = tdbsam_nua, guest"</emphasis>
32 this would allow Samba-3 to implement a solution that did not use Unix accounts per se. Late
33 in the development cycle the team doing this work hit upon some obstacles that prevents this
34 solution from being used. Given the delays with Samba-3 release a decision was made to NOT
35 deliver this functionality until a better method of recognising NT Group SIDs from NT User
36 SIDs could be found. This feature may thus return during the life cycle for the Samba-3 series.
37 </para>
38
39 <note><para>
40 Samba-3.0.0 does NOT support Non-Unix Account (NUA) operation.
41 </para></note>
42
43 <sect1>
44 <title>Features and Benefits</title>
45
46 <para>
47 Samba-3 provides for complete backwards compatibility with Samba-2.2.x functionality
48 as follows:
49 </para>
50
51 <variablelist>
52 <title>Backwards Compatibility Backends</title>
53         <varlistentry><term>Plain Text:</term>
54                 <listitem>
55                         <para>
56                         This option uses nothing but the Unix/Linux <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>
57                         style back end. On systems that have PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules)
58                         support all PAM modules are supported. The behaviour is just as it was with
59                         Samba-2.2.x, and the protocol limitations imposed by MS Windows clients
60                         apply likewise.
61                         </para>
62                 </listitem>
63         </varlistentry>
64
65         <varlistentry><term>smbpasswd:</term>
66                 <listitem>
67                         <para>
68                         This option allows continues use of the <filename>smbpasswd</filename>
69                         file that maintains a plain ASCII (text) layout that includes the MS Windows
70                         LanMan and NT encrypted passwords as well as a field that stores some
71                         account information. This form of password backend does NOT store any of
72                         the MS Windows NT/200x SAM (Security Account Manager) information needed to
73                         provide the extended controls that are needed for more comprehensive 
74                         interoperation with MS Windows NT4 / 200x servers.
75                         </para>
76                 </listitem>
77         </varlistentry>
78
79         <varlistentry><term>ldapsam_compat (Samba-2.2 LDAP Compatibilty):</term>
80                 <listitem>
81                         <para>
82                         There is a password backend option that allows continued operation with
83                         a existing OpenLDAP backend that uses the Samba-2.2.x LDAP schema extension.
84                         This option is provided primarily as a migration tool, although there is
85                         no reason to force migration at this time.
86                         </para>
87                 </listitem>
88         </varlistentry>
89 </variablelist>
90
91 <para>
92 Samba-3 introduces the following new password backend capabilities:
93 </para>
94
95 <variablelist>
96 <title>New Backends</title>
97         <varlistentry><term>tdbsam:</term>
98                 <listitem>
99                         <para>
100                         The <emphasis>tdbsam</emphasis> password backend stores the old <emphasis>
101                         smbpasswd</emphasis> information PLUS the extended MS Windows NT / 200x
102                         SAM information into a binary format TDB (trivial database) file.
103                         The inclusion of the extended information makes it possible for Samba-3
104                         to implement the same account and system access controls that are possible
105                         with MS Windows NT4 and MS Windows 200x based systems.
106                         </para>
107
108                         <para>
109                         The inclusion of the <emphasis>tdbssam</emphasis> capability is a direct
110                         response to user requests to allow simple site operation without the overhead
111                         of the complexities of running OpenLDAP. It is recommended to use this only
112                         for sites that have fewer than 250 users. For larger sites or implementations
113                         the use of OpenLDAP or of Active Directory integration is strongly recommended.
114                         </para>
115                 </listitem>
116         </varlistentry>
117
118         <varlistentry><term>ldapsam:</term>
119                 <listitem>
120                         <para>
121                         Samba-3 has a new and extended LDAP implementation that requires configuration
122                         of OpenLDAP with a new format samba schema. The new format schema file is
123                         included in the <filename>~samba/examples/LDAP</filename> directory.
124                         </para>
125
126                         <para>
127                         The new LDAP implmentation significantly expands the control abilities that
128                         were possible with prior versions of Samba. It is not possible to specify
129                         "per user" profile settings, home directories, account access controls, and
130                         much more. Corporate sites will see that the Samba-Team has listened to their
131                         requests both for capability and to allow greater scalability.
132                         </para>
133                 </listitem>
134         </varlistentry>
135
136         <varlistentry><term>mysqlsam (MySQL based backend):</term>
137                 <listitem>
138                         <para>
139                         It is expected that the MySQL based SAM will be very popular in some corners.
140                         This database backend will be on considerable interest to sites that want to
141                         leverage existing MySQL technology.
142                         </para>
143                 </listitem>
144         </varlistentry>
145
146         <varlistentry><term>xmlsam (XML based datafile):</term>
147                 <listitem>
148                         <para>
149                         Allows the account and password data to be stored in an XML format
150                         data file. This backend is NOT recommended for normal operation, it is
151                         provided for developmental and for experimental use only. We recognise
152                         that this will not stop some people from using it anyhow, it should work
153                         but is NOT officially supported at this time (and likely will not be
154                         at any time).
155                         </para>
156
157                         <para>
158                         The xmlsam option can be useful for account migration between database
159                         backends. Use of this tool will allow the data to be edited before migration
160                         into another backend format.
161                         </para>
162                 </listitem>
163         </varlistentry>
164
165         <varlistentry><term>nisplussam:</term>
166                 <listitem>
167                         <para>
168                         The  NIS+ based passdb backend. Takes name NIS domain as an
169                         optional argument. Only works with Sun NIS+ servers.
170                         </para>
171                 </listitem>
172         </varlistentry>
173
174         <varlistentry><term>plugin:</term>
175                 <listitem>
176                         <para>
177                         This option allows any external non-Samba backend to interface directly
178                         to the samba code. This facility will allow third part vendors to provide
179                         a proprietary backend to Samba-3.
180                         </para>
181                 </listitem>
182         </varlistentry>
183 </variablelist>
184
185 </sect1>
186
187 <sect1>
188         <title>Technical Information</title>
189
190         <para>
191         Old windows clients send plain text passwords over the wire. Samba can check these
192         passwords by crypting them and comparing them to the hash stored in the unix user database.
193         </para>
194         
195         <para>
196         Newer windows clients send encrypted passwords (so-called Lanman and NT hashes) over 
197         the wire, instead of plain text passwords. The newest clients will send only encrypted
198         passwords and refuse to send plain text passwords, unless their registry is tweaked.
199         </para>
200
201         <para>
202         These passwords can't be converted to unix style encrypted passwords. Because of that
203         you can't use the standard unix user database, and you have to store the Lanman and NT
204         hashes somewhere else.
205         </para>
206         
207         <para>
208         In addition to differently encrypted passwords, windows also stores certain data for each
209         user that is not stored in a unix user database. e.g: workstations the user may logon from,
210         the location where the users' profile is stored, and so on. Samba retrieves and stores this
211         information using a <parameter>passdb backend</parameter>.  Commonly available backends are LDAP, plain text
212         file, MySQL and nisplus.  For more information, see the man page for &smb.conf; regarding the 
213         <parameter>passdb backend</parameter> parameter.
214         </para>
215
216         <sect2>
217         <title>Important Notes About Security</title>
218                 
219                 <para>
220                 The unix and SMB password encryption techniques seem similar on the surface. This
221                 similarity is, however, only skin deep. The unix scheme typically sends clear text
222                 passwords over the network when logging in. This is bad. The SMB encryption scheme
223                 never sends the cleartext password over the network but it does store the 16 byte 
224                 hashed values on disk. This is also bad. Why? Because the 16 byte hashed values
225                 are a "password equivalent". You cannot derive the user's password from them, but
226                 they could potentially be used in a modified client to gain access to a server.
227                 This would require considerable technical knowledge on behalf of the attacker but
228                 is perfectly possible. You should thus treat the data stored in whatever passdb
229                 backend you use (smbpasswd file, ldap, mysql) as though it contained the cleartext
230                 passwords of all your users. Its contents must be kept secret, and the file should
231                 be protected accordingly.
232                 </para>
233                 
234                 <para>
235                 Ideally we would like a password scheme that involves neither plain text passwords
236                 on the net nor on disk. Unfortunately this is not available as Samba is stuck with
237                 having to be compatible with other SMB systems (WinNT, WfWg, Win95 etc).
238                 </para>
239
240                 <para>
241                 Windows NT 4.0 Service pack 3 changed the default setting so that plaintext passwords
242                 are disabled from being sent over the wire. This mandates either the use of encrypted
243                 password support or edit the Windows NT registry to re-enable plaintext passwords.
244                 </para>
245                 
246                 <para>
247                 The following versions of MS Windows do not support full domain security protocols,
248                 although they may log onto a domain environment:
249                 </para>
250
251                 <simplelist>
252                         <member>MS DOS Network client 3.0 with the basic network redirector installed</member>
253                         <member>Windows 95 with the network redirector update installed</member>
254                         <member>Windows 98 [se]</member>
255                         <member>Windows Me</member>
256                 </simplelist>
257
258                 <note>
259                 <para>
260                 MS Windows XP Home does not have facilities to become a domain member and it can
261                 not participate in domain logons.
262                 </para>
263                 </note>
264
265                 <para>
266                 The following versions of MS Windows fully support domain security protocols.
267                 </para>
268
269                 <simplelist>
270                         <member>Windows NT 3.5x</member>
271                         <member>Windows NT 4.0</member>
272                         <member>Windows 2000 Professional</member>
273                         <member>Windows 200x Server/Advanced Server</member>
274                         <member>Windows XP Professional</member>
275                 </simplelist>
276                         
277                 <para>
278                 All current release of Microsoft SMB/CIFS clients support authentication via the
279                 SMB Challenge/Response mechanism described here. Enabling clear text authentication
280                 does not disable the ability of the client to participate in encrypted authentication.
281                 Instead, it allows the client to negotiate either plain text _or_ encrypted password
282                 handling.
283                 </para>
284
285                 <para>
286                 MS Windows clients will cache the encrypted password alone. Where plain text passwords
287                 are re-enabled, through the appropriate registry change, the plain text password is NEVER
288                 cached. This means that in the event that a network connections should become disconnected
289                 (broken) only the cached (encrypted) password will be sent to the resource server to
290                 affect a auto-reconnect. If the resource server does not support encrypted passwords the
291                 auto-reconnect will fail. <emphasis>USE OF ENCRYPTED PASSWORDS IS STRONGLY ADVISED.</emphasis>
292                 </para>
293
294                 <sect3>
295                 <title>Advantages of Encrypted Passwords</title>
296
297                         <itemizedlist>
298                                 <listitem><para>Plain text passwords are not passed across 
299                                 the network. Someone using a network sniffer cannot just 
300                                 record passwords going to the SMB server.</para></listitem>
301
302                                 <listitem><para>Plain text passwords are not stored anywhere in
303                                 memory or on disk.</para></listitem>
304                          
305                                 <listitem><para>WinNT doesn't like talking to a server 
306                                 that does not support encrypted passwords. It will refuse 
307                                 to browse the server if the server is also in user level 
308                                 security mode. It will insist on prompting the user for the 
309                                 password on each connection, which is very annoying. The
310                                 only things you can do to stop this is to use SMB encryption.
311                                 </para></listitem>
312
313                                 <listitem><para>Encrypted password support allows automatic share
314                                 (resource) reconnects.</para></listitem>
315
316                                 <listitem><para>Encrypted passwords are essential for PDC/BDC
317                                 operation.</para></listitem>
318                         </itemizedlist>
319                 </sect3>
320
321
322                 <sect3>
323                 <title>Advantages of non-encrypted passwords</title>
324
325                         <itemizedlist>
326                                 <listitem><para>Plain text passwords are not kept 
327                                 on disk, and are NOT cached in memory. </para></listitem>
328                                 
329                                 <listitem><para>Uses same password file as other unix 
330                                 services such as login and ftp</para></listitem>
331                                 
332                                 <listitem><para>Use of other services (such as telnet and ftp) which
333                                 send plain text passwords over the net, so sending them for SMB
334                                 isn't such a big deal.</para></listitem>
335                         </itemizedlist>
336                 </sect3>
337         </sect2>
338
339         <sect2>
340         <title>Mapping User Identifiers between MS Windows and Unix</title>
341
342         <para>
343         Every operation in Unix/Linux requires a user identifier (UID), just as in
344         MS Windows NT4 / 200x this requires a Security Identifier (SID). Samba provides
345         two means for mapping an MS Windows user to a Unix/Linux UID.
346         </para>
347
348         <para>
349         Firstly, all Samba SAM (Security Account Management database) accounts require
350         a Unix/Linux UID that the account will map to. As users are added to the account
351         information database samba-3 will call the <parameter>add user script</parameter>
352         interface to add the account to the Samba host OS. In essence all accounts in
353         the local SAM require a local user account.
354         </para>
355
356         <para>
357         The second way to affect Windows SID to Unix UID mapping is via the
358         <emphasis>idmap uid, idmap gid</emphasis> parameters in &smb.conf;.
359         Please refer to the man page for information about these parameters.
360         These parameters are essential when mapping users from a remote SAM server.
361         </para>
362
363         </sect2>
364 </sect1>
365
366 <sect1>
367 <title>Account Management Tools</title>
368
369 <para>
370 Samba-3 provides two (2) tools for management of User and machine accounts. These tools are
371 called <filename>smbpasswd</filename> and <command>pdbedit</command>. A third tool is under
372 development but is NOT expected to ship in time for Samba-3.0.0. The new tool will be a TCL/TK
373 GUI tool that looks much like the MS Windows NT4 Domain User Manager - hopefully this will
374 be announced in time for samba-3.0.1 release timing.
375 </para>
376         <sect2>
377         <title>The <emphasis>smbpasswd</emphasis> Command</title>
378         
379                 <para>
380                 The smbpasswd utility is a utility similar to the <command>passwd</command>
381                 or <command>yppasswd</command> programs.  It maintains the two 32 byte password
382                 fields in the passdb backend.
383                 </para>
384
385                 <para>
386                 <command>smbpasswd</command> works in a client-server mode where it contacts the
387                 local smbd to change the user's password on its behalf.This has enormous benefits
388                 as follows:
389                 </para>
390
391                 <para>
392                 <command>smbpasswd</command> has the capability to change passwords on Windows NT
393                 servers (this only works when the request is sent to the NT Primary Domain Controller
394                 if changing an NT Domain user's password).
395                 </para>
396
397                 <para>
398                 <command>smbpasswd</command> can be used to:
399                 </para>
400                 
401                 <simplelist>
402                         <member><emphasis>add</emphasis> user or machine accounts</member>
403                         <member><emphasis>delete</emphasis> user or machine accounts</member>
404                         <member><emphasis>enable</emphasis> user or machine accounts</member>
405                         <member><emphasis>disable</emphasis> user or machine accounts</member>
406                         <member><emphasis>set to NULL</emphasis> user passwords</member>
407                         <member><emphasis>manage interdomain trust accounts</emphasis></member>
408                 </simplelist>
409                 
410                 <para>
411                 To run smbpasswd as a normal user just type:
412                 </para>
413                 
414                 <para>
415                 <screen>
416                 <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>smbpasswd</userinput>
417                 <prompt>Old SMB password: </prompt><userinput><replaceable>secret</replaceable></userinput>
418                 </screen>
419                 For <replaceable>secret</replaceable> type old value here - or hit return if
420                 there was no old password
421                 <screen>
422                 <prompt>New SMB Password: </prompt><userinput><replaceable>new secret</replaceable></userinput>
423                 <prompt>Repeat New SMB Password: </prompt><userinput><replaceable>new secret</replaceable></userinput>
424                 </screen>
425                 </para>
426                 
427                 <para>
428                 If the old value does not match the current value stored for that user, or the two
429                 new values do not match each other, then the password will not be changed.
430                 </para>
431                 
432                 <para>
433                 When invoked by an ordinary user it will only allow change of their own
434                 SMB password.
435                 </para>
436                 
437                 <para>
438                 When run by root smbpasswd may take an optional argument, specifying
439                 the user name whose SMB password you wish to change. When run as root, smbpasswd
440                 does not prompt for or check the old password value, thus allowing root to set passwords 
441                 for users who have forgotten their passwords.
442                 </para>
443                 
444                 <para>
445                 <command>smbpasswd</command> is designed to work in the way familiar to UNIX
446                 users who use the <command>passwd</command> or <command>yppasswd</command> commands.
447                 While designed for administrative use, this tool provides essential user level
448                 password change capabilities.
449                 </para>
450
451                 <para>
452                 For more details on using <command>smbpasswd</command> refer to the man page (the
453                 definitive reference).
454                 </para>
455         </sect2>
456
457         <sect2>
458         <title>The <emphasis>pdbedit</emphasis> Command</title>
459
460                 <para>
461                 <command>pdbedit</command> is a tool that can be used only by root. It is used to
462                 manage the passdb backend. <command>pdbedit</command> can be used to:
463                 </para>
464
465                 <simplelist>
466                         <member>add, remove or modify user accounts</member>
467                         <member>listing user accounts</member>
468                         <member>migrate user accounts</member>
469                 </simplelist>
470
471                 <para>
472                 The <command>pdbedit</command> tool is the only one that can manage the account
473                 security and policy settings. It is capable of all operations that smbpasswd can
474                 do as well as a super set of them.
475                 </para>
476
477                 <para>
478                 One particularly important purpose of the <command>pdbedit</command> is to allow
479                 the migration of account information from one passdb backend to another. See the
480                 <link linkend="XMLpassdb">XML</link> password backend section of this chapter.
481                 </para>
482
483                 <para>
484                 The following is an example of the user account information that is stored in
485                 a tdbsam password backend. This listing was produced by running:
486                 </para>
487
488                 <screen>
489                 <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>pdbedit -Lv met</userinput>
490                 Unix username:        met
491                 NT username:
492                 Account Flags:        [UX         ]
493                 User SID:             S-1-5-21-1449123459-1407424037-3116680435-2004
494                 Primary Group SID:    S-1-5-21-1449123459-1407424037-3116680435-1201
495                 Full Name:            Melissa E Terpstra
496                 Home Directory:       \\frodo\met\Win9Profile
497                 HomeDir Drive:        H:
498                 Logon Script:         scripts\logon.bat
499                 Profile Path:         \\frodo\Profiles\met
500                 Domain:               MIDEARTH
501                 Account desc:
502                 Workstations:         melbelle
503                 Munged dial:
504                 Logon time:           0
505                 Logoff time:          Mon, 18 Jan 2038 20:14:07 GMT
506                 Kickoff time:         Mon, 18 Jan 2038 20:14:07 GMT
507                 Password last set:    Sat, 14 Dec 2002 14:37:03 GMT
508                 Password can change:  Sat, 14 Dec 2002 14:37:03 GMT
509                 Password must change: Mon, 18 Jan 2038 20:14:07 GMT
510                 </screen>
511
512                 <!-- FIXME: Add note about migrating user accounts -->
513
514         </sect2>
515 </sect1>
516
517 <sect1>
518 <title>Password Backends</title>
519
520 <para>
521 Samba-3 offers the greatest flexibility in backend account database design of any SMB/CIFS server
522 technology available today. The flexibility is immediately obvious as one begins to explore this
523 capability.
524 </para>
525
526 <para>
527 It is possible to specify not only multiple different password backends, but even multiple
528 backends of the same type. For example, to use two different tdbsam databases:
529 </para>
530
531 <para>
532 <programlisting>
533 [globals]
534                 passdb backend = tdbsam:/etc/samba/passdb.tdb, \
535                 tdbsam:/etc/samba/old-passdb.tdb, guest
536 </programlisting>
537 </para>
538
539
540         <sect2>
541         <title>Plain Text</title>
542
543                 <para>
544                 Older versions of samba retrieved user information from the unix user database 
545                 and eventually some other fields from the file <filename>/etc/samba/smbpasswd</filename>
546                 or <filename>/etc/smbpasswd</filename>. When password encryption is disabled, no 
547                 SMB specific data is stored at all. Instead all operations are conduected via the way
548                 that the samba host OS will access it's <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> database.
549                 eg: On Linux systems that is done via PAM.
550                 </para>
551
552         </sect2>
553
554         <sect2>
555         <title>smbpasswd - Encrypted Password Database</title>
556
557                 <para>
558                 Traditionally, when configuring <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#ENCRYPTPASSWORDS">"encrypt
559                 passwords = yes"</ulink> in Samba's <filename>smb.conf</filename> file, user account
560                 information such as username, LM/NT password hashes, password change times, and account
561                 flags have been stored in the <filename>smbpasswd(5)</filename> file.  There are several
562                 disadvantages to this approach for sites with very large numbers of users (counted
563                 in the thousands).
564                 </para>
565
566                 <itemizedlist>
567                 <listitem><para>
568                 The first is that all lookups must be performed sequentially.  Given that
569                 there are approximately two lookups per domain logon (one for a normal
570                 session connection such as when mapping a network drive or printer), this
571                 is a performance bottleneck for large sites.  What is needed is an indexed approach
572                 such as is used in databases.
573                 </para></listitem>
574
575                 <listitem><para>
576                 The second problem is that administrators who desire to replicate a smbpasswd file
577                 to more than one Samba server were left to use external tools such as
578                 <command>rsync(1)</command> and <command>ssh(1)</command> and wrote custom,
579                 in-house scripts.
580                 </para></listitem>
581
582                 <listitem><para>
583                 And finally, the amount of information which is stored in an smbpasswd entry leaves
584                 no room for additional attributes such as a home directory, password expiration time,
585                 or even a Relative Identified (RID).
586                 </para></listitem>
587                 </itemizedlist>
588
589                 <para>
590                 As a result of these defeciencies, a more robust means of storing user attributes
591                 used by smbd was developed.  The API which defines access to user accounts
592                 is commonly referred to as the samdb interface (previously this was called the passdb
593                 API, and is still so named in the Samba CVS trees). 
594                 </para>
595
596                 <para>
597                 Samba-3 provides an enhanced set of passdb backends that overcome the deficiencies
598                 of the smbpasswd plain text database. These are tdbsam, ldapsam, and xmlsam.
599                 Of these ldapsam will be of most interest to large corporate or enterprise sites.
600                 </para>
601
602         </sect2>
603
604         <sect2>
605         <title>tdbsam</title>
606
607                 <para>Samba can store user and machine account data in a "TDB" (Trivial Database).
608                 Using this backend doesn't require any additional configuration. This backend is
609                 recommended for new installations that do not require LDAP.
610                 </para>
611
612                 <para>
613                 As a general guide the Samba-Team do NOT recommend using the tdbsam backend for sites
614                 that have 250 or more users. Additionally, tdbsam is not capable of scaling for use
615                 in sites that require PDB/BDC implmentations that requires replication of the account
616                 database. Clearly, for reason of scalability the use of ldapsam should be encouraged.
617                 </para>
618
619         </sect2>
620
621         <sect2>
622         <title>ldapsam</title>
623
624                 <para>
625                 There are a few points to stress that the ldapsam does not provide. The LDAP
626                 support referred to in the this documentation does not include:
627                 </para>
628
629                 <itemizedlist>
630                         <listitem><para>A means of retrieving user account information from
631                         an Windows 200x Active Directory server.</para></listitem>
632                         <listitem><para>A means of replacing /etc/passwd.</para></listitem>
633                 </itemizedlist>
634
635                 <para>
636                 The second item can be accomplished by using LDAP NSS and PAM modules.  LGPL
637                 versions of these libraries can be obtained from PADL Software
638                 (<ulink url="http://www.padl.com/">http://www.padl.com/</ulink>). More
639                 information about the configuration of these packages may be found at "LDAP,
640                 System Administration; Gerald Carter, O'Reilly; Chapter 6: Replacing NIS".
641                 Refer to <ulink url="http://safari.oreilly.com/?XmlId=1-56592-491-6">
642                 http://safari.oreilly.com/?XmlId=1-56592-491-6</ulink> for those who might wish to know
643                 more about configuration and adminstration of an OpenLDAP server.
644                 </para>
645
646                 <para>
647                 This document describes how to use an LDAP directory for storing Samba user
648                 account information traditionally stored in the smbpasswd(5) file.  It is
649                 assumed that the reader already has a basic understanding of LDAP concepts
650                 and has a working directory server already installed.  For more information
651                 on LDAP architectures and Directories, please refer to the following sites.
652                 </para>
653
654                 <itemizedlist>
655                         <listitem><para>OpenLDAP - <ulink url="http://www.openldap.org/">http://www.openldap.org/</ulink></para></listitem>
656                         <listitem><para>iPlanet Directory Server -
657                          <ulink url="http://iplanet.netscape.com/directory">http://iplanet.netscape.com/directory</ulink></para></listitem>
658                 </itemizedlist>
659
660                 <para>
661                 Two additional Samba resources which may prove to be helpful are
662                 </para>
663
664                 <itemizedlist>
665                         <listitem><para>The <ulink url="http://www.unav.es/cti/ldap-smb/ldap-smb-3-howto.html">Samba-PDC-LDAP-HOWTO</ulink>
666                         maintained by Ignacio Coupeau.</para></listitem>
667
668                         <listitem><para>The NT migration scripts from <ulink url="http://samba.idealx.org/">IDEALX</ulink> that are
669                         geared to manage users and group in such a Samba-LDAP Domain Controller configuration.
670                         </para></listitem>
671                 </itemizedlist>
672
673                 <sect3>
674                 <title>Supported LDAP Servers</title>
675
676                         <para>
677                         The LDAP ldapsam code has been developed and tested using the OpenLDAP 2.0 and 2.1 server and
678                         client libraries.  The same code should work with Netscape's Directory Server and client SDK.
679                         However, there are bound to be compile errors and bugs. These should not be hard to fix.
680                         Please submit fixes via <link linkend="bugreport">Bug reporting facility</link>.
681                         </para>
682
683                 </sect3>
684
685                 <sect3>
686                 <title>Schema and Relationship to the RFC 2307 posixAccount</title>
687
688
689                         <para>
690                         Samba 3.0 includes the necessary schema file for OpenLDAP 2.0 in
691                         <filename>examples/LDAP/samba.schema</filename>.  The sambaAccount objectclass is given here:
692                         </para>
693
694 <para>
695 <programlisting>
696 objectclass ( 1.3.6.1.4.1.7165.2.2.3 NAME 'sambaAccount' SUP top AUXILIARY
697     DESC 'Samba Auxilary Account'
698     MUST ( uid $ rid )
699     MAY  ( cn $ lmPassword $ ntPassword $ pwdLastSet $ logonTime $
700            logoffTime $ kickoffTime $ pwdCanChange $ pwdMustChange $ acctFlags $
701            displayName $ smbHome $ homeDrive $ scriptPath $ profilePath $
702            description $ userWorkstations $ primaryGroupID $ domain ))
703 </programlisting>
704 </para>
705
706                         <para>
707                         The <filename>samba.schema</filename> file has been formatted for OpenLDAP 2.0/2.1.
708                         The OID's are owned by the Samba Team and as such is legal to be openly published.
709                         If you translate the schema to be used with Netscape DS, please
710                         submit the modified schema file as a patch to
711                         <ulink url="mailto:jerry@samba.org">jerry@samba.org</ulink>.
712                         </para>
713
714                         <para>
715                         Just as the smbpasswd file is meant to store information which supplements a
716                         user's <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> entry, so is the sambaAccount object
717                         meant to supplement the UNIX user account information.  A sambaAccount is a
718                         <constant>STRUCTURAL</constant> objectclass so it can be stored individually
719                         in the directory.  However, there are several fields (e.g. uid) which overlap
720                         with the posixAccount objectclass outlined in RFC2307.  This is by design.
721                         </para>
722
723                         <!--olem: we should perhaps have a note about shadowAccounts too as many
724                         systems use them, isn'it ? -->
725
726                         <para>
727                         In order to store all user account information (UNIX and Samba) in the directory,
728                         it is necessary to use the sambaAccount and posixAccount objectclasses in
729                         combination.  However, smbd will still obtain the user's UNIX account
730                         information via the standard C library calls (e.g. getpwnam(), et. al.).
731                         This means that the Samba server must also have the LDAP NSS library installed
732                         and functioning correctly.  This division of information makes it possible to
733                         store all Samba account information in LDAP, but still maintain UNIX account
734                         information in NIS while the network is transitioning to a full LDAP infrastructure.
735                         </para>
736                 </sect3>
737
738                 <sect3>
739                 <title>OpenLDAP configuration</title>
740
741                         <para>
742                         To include support for the sambaAccount object in an OpenLDAP directory
743                         server, first copy the samba.schema file to slapd's configuration directory.
744                         The samba.schema file can be found in the directory <filename>examples/LDAP</filename>
745                         in the samba source distribution.
746                         </para>
747
748 <para>
749 <screen>
750 &rootprompt;<userinput>cp samba.schema /etc/openldap/schema/</userinput>
751 </screen>
752 </para>
753
754                         <para>
755                         Next, include the <filename>samba.schema</filename> file in <filename>slapd.conf</filename>.
756                         The sambaAccount object contains two attributes which depend upon other schema
757                         files.  The 'uid' attribute is defined in <filename>cosine.schema</filename> and
758                         the 'displayName' attribute is defined in the <filename>inetorgperson.schema</filename>
759                         file.  Both of these must be included before the <filename>samba.schema</filename> file.
760                         </para>
761
762 <para>
763 <programlisting>
764 ## /etc/openldap/slapd.conf
765
766 ## schema files (core.schema is required by default)
767 include            /etc/openldap/schema/core.schema
768
769 ## needed for sambaAccount
770 include            /etc/openldap/schema/cosine.schema
771 include            /etc/openldap/schema/inetorgperson.schema
772 include            /etc/openldap/schema/samba.schema
773 include            /etc/openldap/schema/nis.schema
774 ....
775 </programlisting>
776 </para>
777
778                 <para>
779                 It is recommended that you maintain some indices on some of the most usefull attributes,
780                 like in the following example, to speed up searches made on sambaAccount objectclasses
781                 (and possibly posixAccount and posixGroup as well).
782                 </para>
783
784 <para>
785 <screen>
786 # Indices to maintain
787 ## required by OpenLDAP
788 index objectclass             eq
789
790 index cn                      pres,sub,eq
791 index sn                      pres,sub,eq
792 ## required to support pdb_getsampwnam
793 index uid                     pres,sub,eq
794 ## required to support pdb_getsambapwrid()
795 index displayName             pres,sub,eq
796
797 ## uncomment these if you are storing posixAccount and
798 ## posixGroup entries in the directory as well
799 ##index uidNumber               eq
800 ##index gidNumber               eq
801 ##index memberUid               eq
802
803 index   sambaSID              eq
804 index   sambaPrimaryGroupSID  eq
805 index   sambaDomainName       eq
806 index   default               sub
807 </screen>
808 </para>
809
810                 <para>
811                 Create the new index by executing:
812                 </para>
813
814 <para>
815 <screen>
816 ./sbin/slapindex -f slapd.conf
817 </screen>
818 </para>
819
820                 <para>
821                 Remember to restart slapd after making these changes:
822                 </para>
823
824 <para>
825 <screen>
826 &rootprompt;<userinput>/etc/init.d/slapd restart</userinput>
827 </screen>
828 </para>
829
830                 </sect3>
831
832                 <sect3>
833                 <title>Initialise the LDAP database</title>
834
835                 <para>
836                 Before you can add accounts to the LDAP database you must create the account containers
837                 that they will be stored in. The following LDIF file should be modified to match your
838                 needs (ie: Your DNS entries, etc.).
839                 </para>
840                 
841 <para>
842 <screen>
843 # Organization for Samba Base
844 dn: dc=plainjoe,dc=org
845 objectclass: dbObject
846 objectclass: organization
847 dc: plainjoe
848 o: Terpstra Org Network
849 description: The Samba-3 Network LDAP Example
850
851 # Organizational Role for Directory Management
852 db: cn=Manager,dc=plainjoe,dc=org
853 objectclass: organizationalRole
854 cn: Manager
855 description: Directory Manager
856
857 # Setting up container for users
858 dn: ou=People,dc=plainjoe,dc=org
859 objectclass: top
860 objectclass: organizationalUnit
861 ou: People
862
863 # Setting up admin handle for People OU
864 dn: cn=admin,ou=People,dc=plainjoe,dc=org
865 cn: admin
866 objectclass: top
867 objectclass: organizationalRole
868 objectclass: simpleSecurityObject
869 userPassword: {SSHA}c3ZM9tBaBo9autm1dL3waDS21+JSfQVz
870 </screen>
871 </para>
872
873                 <para>
874                 The userPassword shown above should be generated using <command>slappasswd</command>.
875                 </para>
876
877                 <para>
878                 The following command will then load the contents of the LDIF file into the LDAP
879                 database.
880                 </para>
881
882 <para>
883 <screen>
884 <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>slapadd -v -l initldap.dif</userinput>
885 </screen>
886 </para>
887
888                 <para>
889                 Do not forget to secure your LDAP server with an adequate access control list,
890                 as well as an admin password.
891                 </para>
892
893                 <note>
894                 <para>
895                 Before Samba can access the LDAP server you need to stoe the LDAP admin password
896                 into the Samba-3 <filename>secrets.tdb</filename> database by:
897                 <screen>
898 &rootprompt; <userinput>smbpasswd -w <replaceable>secret</replaceable></userinput>
899                 </screen>
900                 </para>
901                 </note>
902
903                 </sect3>
904
905                 <sect3>
906                 <title>Configuring Samba</title>
907
908                         <para>
909                         The following parameters are available in smb.conf only if your
910                         version of samba was built with LDAP support. Samba automatically builds with LDAP support if the
911                         LDAP libraries are found.
912                         </para>
913
914                 <itemizedlist>
915                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#PASSDBBACKEND">passdb backend = ldapsam:url</ulink></para></listitem>
916                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPSSL">ldap ssl</ulink></para></listitem>
917                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPADMINDN">ldap admin dn</ulink></para></listitem>
918                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPSUFFIX">ldap suffix</ulink></para></listitem>
919                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPFILTER">ldap filter</ulink></para></listitem>
920                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPMACHINSUFFIX">ldap machine suffix</ulink></para></listitem>
921                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPUSERSUFFIX">ldap user suffix</ulink></para></listitem>
922                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPDELETEDN">ldap delete dn</ulink></para></listitem>
923                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPPASSWDSYNC">ldap passwd sync</ulink></para></listitem>
924                         <listitem><para><ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPTRUSTIDS">ldap trust ids</ulink></para></listitem>
925
926                 </itemizedlist>
927
928                         <para>
929                         These are described in the &smb.conf; man
930                         page and so will not be repeated here.  However, a sample smb.conf file for
931                         use with an LDAP directory could appear as
932                         </para>
933
934 <para>
935 <programlisting>
936 ## /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf
937 [global]
938      security = user
939      encrypt passwords = yes
940
941      netbios name = TASHTEGO
942      workgroup = NARNIA
943
944      # ldap related parameters
945
946      # define the DN to use when binding to the directory servers
947      # The password for this DN is not stored in smb.conf.  Rather it
948      # must be set by using 'smbpasswd -w <replaceable>secretpw</replaceable>' to store the
949      # passphrase in the secrets.tdb file.  If the "ldap admin dn" values
950      # change, this password will need to be reset.
951      ldap admin dn = "cn=Samba Manager,ou=people,dc=samba,dc=org"
952
953      # Define the SSL option when connecting to the directory
954      # ('off', 'start tls', or 'on' (default))
955      ldap ssl = start tls
956
957      # syntax: passdb backend = ldapsam:ldap://server-name[:port]
958      passdb backend = ldapsam:ldap://funball.samba.org, guest
959
960      # smbpasswd -x delete the entire dn-entry
961      ldap delete dn = no
962
963      # the machine and user suffix added to the base suffix
964      # wrote WITHOUT quotes. NULL siffixes by default
965      ldap user suffix = ou=People
966      ldap machine suffix = ou=Systems
967
968      # Trust unix account information in LDAP
969      #  (see the smb.conf manpage for details)
970      ldap trust ids = Yes
971
972      # specify the base DN to use when searching the directory
973      ldap suffix = "ou=people,dc=samba,dc=org"
974
975      # generally the default ldap search filter is ok
976      # ldap filter = "(&amp;(uid=%u)(objectclass=sambaAccount))"
977 </programlisting>
978 </para>
979
980                 </sect3>
981
982                 <sect3>
983                 <title>Accounts and Groups management</title>
984
985                         <para>
986                         As users accounts are managed thru the sambaAccount objectclass, you should
987                         modify your existing administration tools to deal with sambaAccount attributes.
988                         </para>
989
990                         <para>
991                         Machines accounts are managed with the sambaAccount objectclass, just
992                         like users accounts. However, it's up to you to store thoses accounts
993                         in a different tree of your LDAP namespace: you should use
994                         "ou=Groups,dc=plainjoe,dc=org" to store groups and
995                         "ou=People,dc=plainjoe,dc=org" to store users. Just configure your
996                         NSS and PAM accordingly (usually, in the /etc/ldap.conf configuration
997                         file).
998                         </para>
999
1000                         <para>
1001                         In Samba release 3.0, the group management system is based on posix
1002                         groups. This means that Samba makes usage of the posixGroup objectclass.
1003                         For now, there is no NT-like group system management (global and local
1004                         groups).
1005                         </para>
1006
1007                 </sect3>
1008
1009                 <sect3>
1010                 <title>Security and sambaAccount</title>
1011
1012
1013                         <para>
1014                         There are two important points to remember when discussing the security
1015                         of sambaAccount entries in the directory.
1016                         </para>
1017
1018                         <itemizedlist>
1019                                 <listitem><para><emphasis>Never</emphasis> retrieve the lmPassword or
1020                                 ntPassword attribute values over an unencrypted LDAP session.</para></listitem>
1021                                 <listitem><para><emphasis>Never</emphasis> allow non-admin users to
1022                                 view the lmPassword or ntPassword attribute values.</para></listitem>
1023                         </itemizedlist>
1024
1025                         <para>
1026                         These password hashes are clear text equivalents and can be used to impersonate
1027                         the user without deriving the original clear text strings.  For more information
1028                         on the details of LM/NT password hashes, refer to the
1029                         <link linkend="passdb">Account Information Database</link> section of this chapter.
1030                         </para>
1031
1032                         <para>
1033                         To remedy the first security issue, the "ldap ssl" smb.conf parameter defaults
1034                         to require an encrypted session (<parameter>ldap ssl = on</parameter>) using
1035                         the default port of <constant>636</constant>
1036                         when contacting the directory server.  When using an OpenLDAP server, it
1037                         is possible to use the use the StartTLS LDAP extended  operation in the place of
1038                         LDAPS.  In either case, you are strongly discouraged to disable this security
1039                         (<parameter>ldap ssl = off</parameter>).
1040                         </para>
1041
1042                         <para>
1043                         Note that the LDAPS protocol is deprecated in favor of the LDAPv3 StartTLS
1044                         extended operation.  However, the OpenLDAP library still provides support for
1045                         the older method of securing communication between clients and servers.
1046                         </para>
1047
1048                         <para>
1049                         The second security precaution is to prevent non-administrative users from
1050                         harvesting password hashes from the directory.  This can be done using the
1051                         following ACL in <filename>slapd.conf</filename>:
1052                         </para>
1053
1054 <para>
1055 <programlisting>
1056 ## allow the "ldap admin dn" access, but deny everyone else
1057 access to attrs=lmPassword,ntPassword
1058      by dn="cn=Samba Admin,ou=people,dc=plainjoe,dc=org" write
1059      by * none
1060 </programlisting>
1061 </para>
1062
1063                 </sect3>
1064
1065                 <sect3>
1066                 <title>LDAP special attributes for sambaAccounts</title>
1067
1068                         <para>
1069                         The sambaAccount objectclass is composed of the following attributes:
1070                         </para>
1071
1072                         <table>
1073                         <tgroup cols="2" align="left">
1074                         <tbody>
1075                                 <row><entry><constant>lmPassword</constant></entry><entry>the LANMAN password 16-byte hash stored as a character
1076                                                 representation of a hexidecimal string.</entry></row>
1077                                 <row><entry><constant>ntPassword</constant></entry><entry>the NT password hash 16-byte stored as a character
1078                                                 representation of a hexidecimal string.</entry></row>
1079                                 <row><entry><constant>pwdLastSet</constant></entry><entry>The integer time in seconds since 1970 when the
1080                                 <constant>lmPassword</constant> and <constant>ntPassword</constant> attributes were last set.
1081                                 </entry></row>
1082
1083                                 <row><entry><constant>acctFlags</constant></entry><entry>string of 11 characters surrounded by square brackets []
1084                                                 representing account flags such as U (user), W(workstation), X(no password expiration),
1085                                                 I(Domain trust account), H(Home dir required), S(Server trust account),
1086                                                 and D(disabled).</entry></row>
1087
1088                                 <row><entry><constant>logonTime</constant></entry><entry>Integer value currently unused</entry></row>
1089
1090                                 <row><entry><constant>logoffTime</constant></entry><entry>Integer value currently unused</entry></row>
1091
1092                                 <row><entry><constant>kickoffTime</constant></entry><entry>Integer value currently unused</entry></row>
1093
1094                                 <row><entry><constant>pwdCanChange</constant></entry><entry>Integer value currently unused</entry></row>
1095
1096                                 <row><entry><constant>pwdMustChange</constant></entry><entry>Integer value currently unused</entry></row>
1097
1098                                 <row><entry><constant>homeDrive</constant></entry><entry>specifies the drive letter to which to map the
1099                                 UNC path specified by homeDirectory. The drive letter must be specified in the form "X:"
1100                                 where X is the letter of the drive to map. Refer to the "logon drive" parameter in the
1101                                 smb.conf(5) man page for more information.</entry></row>
1102
1103                                 <row><entry><constant>scriptPath</constant></entry><entry>The scriptPath property specifies the path of
1104                                 the user's logon script, .CMD, .EXE, or .BAT file. The string can be null. The path
1105                                 is relative to the netlogon share.  Refer to the "logon script" parameter in the
1106                                 smb.conf(5) man page for more information.</entry></row>
1107
1108                                 <row><entry><constant>profilePath</constant></entry><entry>specifies a path to the user's profile.
1109                                 This value can be a null string, a local absolute path, or a UNC path.  Refer to the
1110                                 "logon path" parameter in the smb.conf(5) man page for more information.</entry></row>
1111
1112                                 <row><entry><constant>smbHome</constant></entry><entry>The homeDirectory property specifies the path of
1113                                 the home directory for the user. The string can be null. If homeDrive is set and specifies
1114                                 a drive letter, homeDirectory should be a UNC path. The path must be a network
1115                                 UNC path of the form <filename>\\server\share\directory</filename>. This value can be a null string.
1116                                 Refer to the <command>logon home</command> parameter in the &smb.conf; man page for more information.
1117                                 </entry></row>
1118
1119                                 <row><entry><constant>userWorkstation</constant></entry><entry>character string value currently unused.
1120                                 </entry></row>
1121
1122                                 <row><entry><constant>rid</constant></entry><entry>the integer representation of the user's relative identifier
1123                                 (RID).</entry></row>
1124
1125                                 <row><entry><constant>primaryGroupID</constant></entry><entry>the relative identifier (RID) of the primary group
1126                                 of the user.</entry></row>
1127
1128                                 <row><entry><constant>domain</constant></entry><entry>domain the user is part of.</entry></row>
1129                         </tbody>
1130                         </tgroup></table>
1131
1132                         <para>
1133                         The majority of these parameters are only used when Samba is acting as a PDC of
1134                         a domain (refer to the <link linkend="samba-pdc">Samba as a primary domain controller</link> chapter for details on
1135                         how to configure Samba as a Primary Domain Controller). The following four attributes
1136                         are only stored with the sambaAccount entry if the values are non-default values:
1137                         </para>
1138
1139                         <simplelist>
1140                                 <member>smbHome</member>
1141                                 <member>scriptPath</member>
1142                                 <member>logonPath</member>
1143                                 <member>homeDrive</member>
1144                         </simplelist>
1145
1146                         <para>
1147                         These attributes are only stored with the sambaAccount entry if
1148                         the values are non-default values.  For example, assume TASHTEGO has now been
1149                         configured as a PDC and that <parameter>logon home = \\%L\%u</parameter> was defined in
1150                         its &smb.conf; file. When a user named "becky" logons to the domain,
1151                         the <parameter>logon home</parameter> string is expanded to \\TASHTEGO\becky.
1152                         If the smbHome attribute exists in the entry "uid=becky,ou=people,dc=samba,dc=org",
1153                         this value is used.  However, if this attribute does not exist, then the value
1154                         of the <parameter>logon home</parameter> parameter is used in its place.  Samba
1155                         will only write the attribute value to the directory entry if the value is
1156                         something other than the default (e.g. <filename>\\MOBY\becky</filename>).
1157                         </para>
1158
1159                 </sect3>
1160
1161                 <sect3>
1162                 <title>Example LDIF Entries for a sambaAccount</title>
1163
1164                         <para>
1165                         The following is a working LDIF with the inclusion of the posixAccount objectclass:
1166                         </para>
1167
1168         <para>
1169         <programlisting>
1170         dn: uid=guest2, ou=people,dc=plainjoe,dc=org
1171         ntPassword: 878D8014606CDA29677A44EFA1353FC7
1172         pwdMustChange: 2147483647
1173         primaryGroupID: 1201
1174         lmPassword: 552902031BEDE9EFAAD3B435B51404EE
1175         pwdLastSet: 1010179124
1176         logonTime: 0
1177         objectClass: sambaAccount
1178         uid: guest2
1179         kickoffTime: 2147483647
1180         acctFlags: [UX         ]
1181         logoffTime: 2147483647
1182         rid: 19006
1183         pwdCanChange: 0
1184         </programlisting>
1185         </para>
1186
1187                         <para>
1188                         The following is an LDIF entry for using both the sambaAccount and
1189                         posixAccount objectclasses:
1190                         </para>
1191
1192         <para>
1193         <programlisting>
1194         dn: uid=gcarter, ou=people,dc=plainjoe,dc=org
1195         logonTime: 0
1196         displayName: Gerald Carter
1197         lmPassword: 552902031BEDE9EFAAD3B435B51404EE
1198         primaryGroupID: 1201
1199         objectClass: posixAccount
1200         objectClass: sambaAccount
1201         acctFlags: [UX         ]
1202         userPassword: {crypt}BpM2ej8Rkzogo
1203         uid: gcarter
1204         uidNumber: 9000
1205         cn: Gerald Carter
1206         loginShell: /bin/bash
1207         logoffTime: 2147483647
1208         gidNumber: 100
1209         kickoffTime: 2147483647
1210         pwdLastSet: 1010179230
1211         rid: 19000
1212         homeDirectory: /home/tashtego/gcarter
1213         pwdCanChange: 0
1214         pwdMustChange: 2147483647
1215         ntPassword: 878D8014606CDA29677A44EFA1353FC7
1216 </programlisting>
1217         </para>
1218
1219                 </sect3>
1220
1221                 <sect3>
1222                 <title>Password synchronisation</title>
1223
1224                 <para>
1225                 Since version 3.0 samba can update the non-samba (LDAP) password stored with an account. When
1226                 using pam_ldap, this allows changing both unix and windows passwords at once.
1227                 </para>
1228
1229                 <para>The <parameter>ldap passwd sync</parameter> options can have the following values:</para>
1230
1231                 <variablelist>
1232                        <varlistentry>
1233                                <term>yes</term>
1234                                <listitem><para>When the user changes his password, update
1235                                                <constant>ntPassword</constant>, <constant>lmPassword</constant>
1236                                                and the <constant>password</constant> fields.</para></listitem>
1237                        </varlistentry>
1238
1239                        <varlistentry>
1240                                <term>no</term>
1241                                <listitem><para>Only update <constant>ntPassword</constant> and <constant>lmPassword</constant>.</para></listitem>
1242                        </varlistentry>
1243
1244                        <varlistentry>
1245                                <term>only</term>
1246                                <listitem><para>Only update the LDAP password and let the LDAP server worry
1247                                                about the other fields. This option is only available when
1248                                                the LDAP library supports LDAP_EXOP_X_MODIFY_PASSWD. </para></listitem>
1249                        </varlistentry>
1250                 </variablelist>
1251
1252                 <para>More information can be found in the <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPPASSWDSYNC">smb.conf</ulink> manpage.
1253                 </para>
1254
1255                 </sect3>
1256
1257                 <sect3>
1258                 <title>ldap trust ids</title>
1259
1260                 <para>
1261                 LDAP Performance can be improved by using the <command>ldap trust ids</command> parameter.
1262                 See the <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#LDAPTRUSTIDS">smb.conf</ulink> manpage for details.
1263                 </para>
1264
1265                 </sect3>
1266
1267         </sect2>
1268
1269         <sect2>
1270         <title>MySQL</title>
1271
1272         <para>
1273         Every so often someone will come along with a great new idea. Storing of user accounts in an
1274         SQL backend is one of them. Those who want to do this are in the best position to know what the
1275         specific benefits are to them. This may sound like a cop-out, but in truth we can not attempt
1276         to document every nitty little detail why certain things of marginal utility to the bulk of
1277         Samba users might make sense to the rest. In any case, the following instructions should help
1278         the determined SQL user to implement a working system.
1279         </para>
1280
1281                 <sect3>
1282                 <title>Creating the database</title>
1283
1284                         <para>
1285                         You either can set up your own table and specify the field names to pdb_mysql (see below
1286                         for the column names) or use the default table. The file <filename>examples/pdb/mysql/mysql.dump</filename> 
1287                         contains the correct queries to create the required tables. Use the command :
1288
1289                         <screen>
1290                         <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>mysql -u<replaceable>username</replaceable> -h<replaceable>hostname</replaceable> -p<replaceable>password</replaceable> <replaceable>databasename</replaceable> &gt; <filename>/path/to/samba/examples/pdb/mysql/mysql.dump</filename></userinput>
1291                         </screen>
1292                         </para>
1293                 </sect3>
1294
1295                 <sect3>
1296                 <title>Configuring</title>
1297
1298                         <para>This plugin lacks some good documentation, but here is some short info:</para>
1299
1300                         <para>Add a the following to the <parameter>passdb backend</parameter> variable in your &smb.conf;:
1301                         <programlisting>
1302                         passdb backend = [other-plugins] mysql:identifier [other-plugins]
1303                         </programlisting>
1304                         </para>
1305
1306                         <para>The identifier can be any string you like, as long as it doesn't collide with 
1307                         the identifiers of other plugins or other instances of pdb_mysql. If you 
1308                         specify multiple pdb_mysql.so entries in <parameter>passdb backend</parameter>, you also need to 
1309                         use different identifiers!
1310                         </para>
1311
1312                         <para>
1313                                 Additional options can be given thru the &smb.conf; file in the <parameter>[global]</parameter> section.
1314                         </para>
1315
1316                 <para>
1317                 <programlisting>
1318                 identifier:mysql host                     - host name, defaults to 'localhost'
1319                 identifier:mysql password
1320                 identifier:mysql user                     - defaults to 'samba'
1321                 identifier:mysql database                 - defaults to 'samba'
1322                 identifier:mysql port                     - defaults to 3306
1323                 identifier:table                          - Name of the table containing users
1324         :       </programlisting>
1325                 </para>
1326
1327                         <warning>
1328                         <para>
1329                         Since the password for the mysql user is stored in the 
1330                         &smb.conf; file, you should make the the &smb.conf; file 
1331                         readable only to the user that runs samba. This is considered a security 
1332                         bug and will be fixed soon.
1333                         </para>
1334                         </warning>
1335
1336                         <para>Names of the columns in this table(I've added column types those columns should have first):</para>
1337
1338                 <para>
1339                 <programlisting>
1340                 identifier:logon time column             - int(9)
1341                 identifier:logoff time column            - int(9)
1342                 identifier:kickoff time column           - int(9)
1343                 identifier:pass last set time column     - int(9)
1344                 identifier:pass can change time column   - int(9)
1345                 identifier:pass must change time column  - int(9)
1346                 identifier:username column               - varchar(255) - unix username
1347                 identifier:domain column                 - varchar(255) - NT domain user is part of
1348                 identifier:nt username column            - varchar(255) - NT username
1349                 identifier:fullname column               - varchar(255) - Full name of user
1350                 identifier:home dir column               - varchar(255) - Unix homedir path
1351                 identifier:dir drive column              - varchar(2)   - Directory drive path (eg: 'H:')
1352                 identifier:logon script column           - varchar(255)
1353                                                          - Batch file to run on client side when logging on
1354                 identifier:profile path column           - varchar(255) - Path of profile
1355                 identifier:acct desc column              - varchar(255) - Some ASCII NT user data
1356                 identifier:workstations column           - varchar(255)
1357                                                          - Workstations user can logon to (or NULL for all)
1358                 identifier:unknown string column         - varchar(255) - unknown string
1359                 identifier:munged dial column            - varchar(255) - ?
1360                 identifier:user sid column               - varchar(255) - NT user SID
1361                 identifier:group sid column              - varchar(255) - NT group ID
1362                 identifier:lanman pass column            - varchar(255) - encrypted lanman password
1363                 identifier:nt pass column                - varchar(255) - encrypted nt passwd
1364                 identifier:plain pass column             - varchar(255) - plaintext password
1365                 identifier:acct control column           - int(9) - nt user data
1366                 identifier:unknown 3 column              - int(9) - unknown
1367                 identifier:logon divs column             - int(9) - ?
1368                 identifier:hours len column              - int(9) - ?
1369                 identifier:unknown 5 column              - int(9) - unknown
1370                 identifier:unknown 6 column              - int(9) - unknown
1371                 </programlisting>
1372                 </para>
1373
1374                         <para>
1375                         Eventually, you can put a colon (:) after the name of each column, which 
1376                         should specify the column to update when updating the table. You can also
1377                         specify nothing behind the colon - then the data from the field will not be 
1378                         updated. 
1379                         </para>
1380
1381                 </sect3>
1382
1383                 <sect3>
1384                 <title>Using plaintext passwords or encrypted password</title>
1385
1386                         <para>
1387                         I strongly discourage the use of plaintext passwords, however, you can use them:
1388                         </para>
1389
1390                         <para>
1391                         If you would like to use plaintext passwords, set
1392                         'identifier:lanman pass column' and 'identifier:nt pass column' to
1393                         'NULL' (without the quotes) and 'identifier:plain pass column' to the
1394                         name of the column containing the plaintext passwords. 
1395                         </para>
1396
1397                         <para>
1398                         If you use encrypted passwords, set the 'identifier:plain pass
1399                         column' to 'NULL' (without the quotes). This is the default.
1400                         </para>
1401
1402                 </sect3>
1403
1404                 <sect3>
1405                 <title>Getting non-column data from the table</title>
1406
1407                         <para>
1408                         It is possible to have not all data in the database and making some 'constant'.
1409                         </para>
1410
1411                         <para>
1412                         For example, you can set 'identifier:fullname column' to : 
1413                         <command>CONCAT(First_name,' ',Sur_name)</command>
1414                         </para>
1415
1416                         <para>
1417                         Or, set 'identifier:workstations column' to :
1418                         <command>NULL</command></para>
1419
1420                         <para>See the MySQL documentation for more language constructs.</para>
1421
1422                 </sect3>
1423         </sect2>
1424
1425         <sect2 id="XMLpassdb">
1426         <title>XML</title>
1427
1428                 <para>This module requires libxml2 to be installed.</para>
1429
1430                 <para>The usage of pdb_xml is pretty straightforward. To export data, use:
1431                 </para>
1432
1433                 <para>
1434                         <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>pdbedit -e xml:filename</userinput>
1435                 </para>
1436
1437                 <para>
1438                 (where filename is the name of the file to put the data in)
1439                 </para>
1440
1441                 <para>
1442                 To import data, use:
1443                 <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>pdbedit -i xml:filename</userinput>
1444                 </para>
1445         </sect2>
1446 </sect1>
1447
1448 <sect1>
1449 <title>Common Errors</title>
1450
1451         <sect2>
1452         <title>Users can not logon - Users not in Samba SAM</title>
1453
1454         <para>
1455         People forget to put their users in their backend and then complain samba won't authorize them.
1456         </para>
1457
1458         </sect2>
1459
1460         <sect2>
1461         <title>Users are being added to the wrong backend database</title>
1462
1463         <para>
1464         A few complaints have been recieved from users that just moved to samba-3. The following
1465         &smb.conf; file entries were causing problems, new accounts were being added to the old
1466         smbpasswd file, not to the tdbsam passdb.tdb file:
1467         </para>
1468
1469         <para>
1470         <programlisting>
1471         [globals]
1472                 ...
1473                 passdb backend = smbpasswd, tdbsam, guest
1474                 ...
1475         </programlisting>
1476         </para>
1477
1478         <para>
1479         Samba will add new accounts to the first entry in the <emphasis>passdb backend</emphasis>
1480         parameter entry. If you want to update to the tdbsam, then change the entry to:
1481         </para>
1482
1483         <para>
1484         <programlisting>
1485         [globals]
1486                 ...
1487                 passdb backend = tdbsam, smbpasswd, guest
1488                 ...
1489         </programlisting>
1490         </para>
1491
1492         </sect2>
1493 </sect1>
1494 </chapter>