Very large number of markup fixes, layout updates, etc.
[samba.git] / docs / docbook / projdoc / DOMAIN_MEMBER.xml
1 <chapter id="domain-member">
2
3 <chapterinfo>
4         &author.jht;
5         &author.jeremy;
6         &author.jerry;
7
8 <!-- Authors of the ADS-HOWTO -->
9         &author.tridge;
10         &author.jelmer;
11 </chapterinfo>
12
13 <title>Domain Membership</title>
14
15 <para>
16 Domain Membership is a subject of vital concern, Samba must be able to
17 participate as a member server in a Microsoft Domain security context, and
18 Samba must be capable of providing Domain machine member trust accounts,
19 otherwise it would not be capable of offering a viable option for many users.
20 </para>
21
22 <para>
23 This chapter covers background information pertaining to domain membership,
24 Samba configuration for it, and MS Windows client procedures for joining a
25 domain.  Why is this necessary? Because both are areas in which there exists
26 within the current MS Windows networking world and particularly in the
27 Unix/Linux networking and administration world, a considerable level of
28 mis-information, incorrect understanding, and a lack of knowledge. Hopefully
29 this chapter will fill the voids.
30 </para>
31
32 <sect1>
33 <title>Features and Benefits</title>
34
35 <para>
36 MS Windows workstations and servers that want to participate in domain
37 security need to
38 be made Domain members. Participating in Domain security is often called 
39 <emphasis>Single Sign On</emphasis> or <acronym>SSO</acronym> for short. This
40 chapter describes the process that must be followed to make a workstation
41 (or another server - be it an <application>MS Windows NT4 / 200x</application>
42 server) or a Samba server a member of an MS Windows Domain security context.
43 </para>
44
45 <para>
46 Samba-3 can join an MS Windows NT4 style domain as a native member server, an 
47 MS Windows Active Directory Domain as a native member server, or a Samba Domain
48 Control network.
49 </para>
50
51 <para>
52 Domain membership has many advantages:
53 </para>
54
55 <itemizedlist>
56         <listitem><para>
57         MS Windows workstation users get the benefit of SSO
58         </para></listitem>
59
60         <listitem><para>
61         Domain user access rights and file ownership / access controls can be set
62         from the single Domain SAM (Security Accounts Management) database 
63         (works with Domain member servers as well as with MS Windows workstations
64         that are domain members)
65         </para></listitem>
66
67         <listitem><para>
68         Only <application>MS Windows NT4 / 200x / XP Professional</application>
69         workstations that are Domain members
70         can use network logon facilities
71         </para></listitem>
72
73         <listitem><para>
74         Domain Member workstations can be better controlled through the use of
75         Policy files (<filename>NTConfig.POL</filename>) and Desktop Profiles.
76         </para></listitem>
77
78         <listitem><para>
79         Through the use of logon scripts users can be given transparent access to network
80         applications that run off application servers
81         </para></listitem>
82
83         <listitem><para>
84         Network administrators gain better application and user access management
85         abilities because there is no need to maintain user accounts on any network
86         client or server, other than the central Domain database 
87         (either NT4/Samba SAM style Domain, NT4 Domain that is back ended with an
88         LDAP directory, or via an Active Directory infrastructure)
89         </para></listitem>
90 </itemizedlist>
91
92 </sect1>
93
94 <sect1>
95 <title>MS Windows Workstation/Server Machine Trust Accounts</title>
96
97 <para>
98 A machine trust account is an account that is used to authenticate a client
99 machine
100 (rather than a user) to the Domain Controller server.  In Windows terminology,
101 this is known as a "Computer Account."
102 </para>
103
104 <para>
105 The password of a machine trust account acts as the shared secret for
106 secure communication with the Domain Controller.  This is a security
107 feature to prevent an unauthorized machine with the same NetBIOS name
108 from joining the domain and gaining access to domain user/group
109 accounts.  Windows NT, 200x, XP Professional clients use machine trust
110 accounts, but Windows 9x / Me / XP Home clients do not.  Hence, a
111 Windows 9x / Me / XP Home  client is never a true member of a domain
112 because it does not possess a machine trust account, and thus has no
113 shared secret with the domain controller.
114 </para>
115
116 <para>
117 A Windows NT4 PDC stores each machine trust account in the Windows Registry.
118 The introduction of MS Windows 2000 saw the introduction of Active Directory,
119 the new repository for machine trust accounts.
120 </para>
121
122 <para>
123 A Samba PDC, however, stores each machine trust account in two parts,
124 as follows:
125
126 <itemizedlist>
127         <listitem><para>
128         A Domain Security Account (stored in the 
129         <parameter>passdb backend</parameter> that has been configured in the
130         &smb.conf; file. The precise nature of the account information that is
131         stored depends on the type of backend database that has been chosen.
132         </para>
133
134         <para>
135         The older format of this data is the <filename>smbpasswd</filename> database
136         which contains the unix login ID, the Unix user identifier (UID), and the
137         LanMan and NT encrypted passwords. There is also some other information in
138         this file that we do not need to concern ourselves with here.
139         </para>
140
141         <para>
142         The two newer database types are called <emphasis>ldapsam</emphasis>,
143         <emphasis>tdbsam</emphasis>.  Both store considerably more data than the
144         older <filename>smbpasswd</filename> file did. The extra information
145         enables new user account controls to be used.
146         </para></listitem>
147
148         <listitem><para>
149         A corresponding Unix account, typically stored in
150         <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>.  Work is in progress to allow a
151         simplified mode of operation that does not require Unix user accounts, but
152         this may not be a feature of the early releases of Samba-3.
153         </para></listitem>
154 </itemizedlist>
155 </para>
156
157 <para>
158 There are three ways to create machine trust accounts:
159 </para>
160
161 <itemizedlist>
162         <listitem><para>
163         Manual creation from the Unix/Linux command line. Here, both the Samba and
164         corresponding Unix account are created by hand.
165         </para></listitem>
166
167         <listitem><para>
168         Using the MS Windows NT4 Server Manager (either from an NT4 Domain member
169         server, or using the Nexus toolkit available from the Microsoft web site.
170         This tool can be run from any MS Windows machine so long as the user is
171         logged on as the administrator account.
172         </para></listitem>
173         
174         <listitem><para>
175         "On-the-fly" creation. The Samba machine trust account is automatically
176         created by Samba at the time the client is joined to the domain.
177         (For security, this is the recommended method.) The corresponding Unix
178         account may be created automatically or manually. 
179         </para></listitem>
180 </itemizedlist>
181
182 <sect2>
183 <title>Manual Creation of Machine Trust Accounts</title>
184
185 <para>
186 The first step in manually creating a machine trust account is to manually
187 create the corresponding Unix account in <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>. 
188 This can be done using <command>vipw</command> or another 'add user' command
189 that is normally used to create new Unix accounts.  The following is an example for a Linux based Samba server:
190 </para>
191
192 <para>
193 &rootprompt;<userinput>/usr/sbin/useradd -g 100 -d /dev/null -c <replaceable>"machine nickname"</replaceable> -s /bin/false <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$ </userinput>
194 </para>
195
196 <para>
197 &rootprompt;<userinput>passwd -l <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$</userinput>
198 </para>
199
200 <para>
201 On *BSD systems, this can be done using the <command>chpass</command> utility:
202 </para>
203
204 <para>
205 &rootprompt;<userinput>chpass -a "<replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>$:*:101:100::0:0:Workstation <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable>:/dev/null:/sbin/nologin"</userinput>
206 </para>
207
208 <para>
209 The <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> entry will list the machine name 
210 with a "$" appended, won't have a password, will have a null shell and no 
211 home directory. For example a machine named 'doppy' would have an 
212 <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> entry like this:
213 </para>
214
215 <programlisting>
216 doppy$:x:505:501:<replaceable>machine_nickname</replaceable>:/dev/null:/bin/false
217 </programlisting>
218
219 <para>
220 Above, <replaceable>machine_nickname</replaceable> can be any
221 descriptive name for the client, i.e., BasementComputer.
222 <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable> absolutely must be the NetBIOS
223 name of the client to be joined to the domain.  The "$" must be
224 appended to the NetBIOS name of the client or Samba will not recognize
225 this as a machine trust account.
226 </para>
227
228 <para>
229 Now that the corresponding Unix account has been created, the next step is to create 
230 the Samba account for the client containing the well-known initial 
231 machine trust account password.  This can be done using the <ulink 
232 url="smbpasswd.8.html"><command>smbpasswd(8)</command></ulink> command 
233 as shown here:
234 </para>
235
236 <para>
237 <screen>
238 &rootprompt;<userinput>smbpasswd -a -m <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable></userinput>
239 </screen>>
240 </para>
241
242 <para>
243 where <replaceable>machine_name</replaceable> is the machine's NetBIOS
244 name.  The RID of the new machine account is generated from the UID of 
245 the corresponding Unix account.
246 </para>
247
248 <warning>
249         <title>Join the client to the domain immediately</title>
250
251         <para>
252         Manually creating a machine trust account using this method is the 
253         equivalent of creating a machine trust account on a Windows NT PDC using 
254         the <application>Server Manager</application>.  From the time at which the 
255         account is created to the time which the client joins the domain and 
256         changes the password, your domain is vulnerable to an intruder joining 
257         your domain using a machine with the same NetBIOS name.  A PDC inherently 
258         trusts members of the domain and will serve out a large degree of user 
259         information to such clients.  You have been warned!
260         </para>
261 </warning>
262 </sect2>
263
264 <sect2>
265 <title>Using NT4 Server Manager to Add Machine Accounts to the Domain</title>
266
267 <para>
268 If the machine from which you are trying to manage the domain is an 
269 <application>MS Windows NT4 workstation</application>
270 then the tool of choice is the package called <command>SRVTOOLS.EXE</command>. 
271 When executed in the target directory this will unpack 
272 <command>SrvMge.exe</command> and <command>UsrMgr.exe</command> (both are 
273 Domain Management tools for MS Windows NT4 workstation.
274 </para>
275
276 <para>
277 If your workstation is any other MS Windows product you should download the
278 <command>Nexus.exe</command> package from the Microsoft web site. When executed 
279 from the target directory this will unpack the same tools but for use on 
280 <application>MS Windows 9x/Me/200x/XP</application>.
281 </para>
282
283 <para>
284 Launch the <command>srvmgr.exe</command> (Server Manager for Domains) and follow these steps:
285 </para>
286
287 <procedure>
288 <title>Server Manager Account Machine Account Management</title>
289         <step><para>
290         From the menu select <guimenu>Computer</guimenu>
291         </para></step>
292
293         <step><para>
294         Click on <guimenuitem>Select Domain</guimenuitem>
295         </para></step>
296
297         <step><para>
298         Click on the name of the domain you wish to administer in the
299         <guilabel>Select Domain</guilabel> panel and then click 
300         <guibutton>OK</guibutton>.
301         </para></step>
302
303         <step><para>
304         Again from the menu select <guimenu>Computer</guimenu>
305         </para></step>
306
307         <step><para>
308         Select <guimenuitem>Add to Domain</guimenuitem>
309         </para></step>
310
311         <step><para>
312         In the dialog box, click on the radio button to 
313         <guilabel>Add NT Workstation of Server</guilabel>, then
314         enter the machine name in the field provided, then click the 
315         <guibutton>Add</guibutton> button.
316         </para></step>
317 </procedure>
318
319 </sect2>
320
321 <sect2>
322 <title>"On-the-Fly" Creation of Machine Trust Accounts</title>
323
324 <para>
325 The second (and recommended) way of creating machine trust accounts is
326 simply to allow the Samba server to create them as needed when the client
327 is joined to the domain.
328 </para>
329
330 <para>Since each Samba machine trust account requires a corresponding Unix account, a method
331 for automatically creating the Unix account is usually supplied; this requires configuration of the
332 <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#ADDMACHINESCRIPT">add machine script</ulink> option in
333 <filename>smb.conf</filename>. This method is not required, however; corresponding Unix
334 accounts may also be created manually.
335 </para>
336
337
338 <para>
339 Below is an example for a RedHat Linux system.
340 </para>
341
342 <para><programlisting>
343 [global]
344    # &lt;...remainder of parameters...&gt;
345    add machine script = /usr/sbin/useradd -d /dev/null -g 100 -s /bin/false -M %u 
346 </programlisting></para>
347
348
349 </sect2>
350
351
352 <sect2><title>Making an MS Windows Workstation or Server a Domain Member</title>
353
354 <para>
355 The procedure for making an MS Windows workstation of server a member of the domain varies
356 with the version of Windows:
357 </para>
358
359 <sect3>
360         <title>Windows 200x XP Professional</title>
361
362         <para>
363         When the user elects to make the client a domain member, Windows 200x prompts for
364         an account and password that has privileges to create  machine accounts in the domain.
365         A Samba administrative account (i.e., a Samba account that has root privileges on the
366         Samba server) must be entered here; the operation will fail if an ordinary user
367         account is given. 
368         </para>
369
370         <para>
371         Note: For security reasons the password for this administrative account should be set
372         to a password that is other than that used for the root user in the
373         <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>.
374         </para>
375
376         <para>
377         The name of the account that is used to create domain member machine accounts can be
378         anything the network administrator may choose. If it is other than <emphasis>root</emphasis>
379         then this is easily mapped to root using the file pointed to be the &smb.conf; parameter
380         <parameter>username map = /etc/samba/smbusers</parameter>.
381         </para>
382
383         <para>
384         The session key of the Samba administrative account acts as an
385         encryption key for setting the password of the machine trust
386         account. The machine trust account will be created on-the-fly, or
387         updated if it already exists.
388         </para>
389 </sect3>
390
391 <sect3>
392         <title>Windows NT4</title>
393
394         <para>
395         If the machine trust account was created manually, on the
396         Identification Changes menu enter the domain name, but do not
397         check the box <guilabel>Create a Computer Account in the Domain</guilabel>.
398         In this case, the existing machine trust account is used to join the machine 
399         to the domain.
400         </para>
401
402         <para>
403         If the machine trust account is to be created
404         on-the-fly, on the Identification Changes menu enter the domain
405         name, and check the box <guilabel>Create a Computer Account in the 
406         Domain</guilabel>.  In this case, joining the domain proceeds as above
407         for Windows 2000 (i.e., you must supply a Samba administrative account when
408         prompted).
409         </para>
410 </sect3>
411
412 <sect3>
413         <title>Samba</title>
414
415         <para>Joining a samba client to a domain is documented in 
416         the <link linkend="domain-member">Domain Member</link> chapter.
417         </para>
418 </sect3>
419
420 </sect2>
421 </sect1>
422
423 <sect1>
424 <title>Domain Member Server</title>
425
426 <para>
427 This mode of server operation involves the samba machine being made a member
428 of a domain security context. This means by definition that all user
429 authentication will be done from a centrally defined authentication regime. 
430 The authentication regime may come from an NT3/4 style (old domain technology)
431 server, or it may be provided from an Active Directory server (ADS) running on
432 MS Windows 2000 or later.
433 </para>
434
435 <para>
436 <emphasis>
437 Of course it should be clear that the authentication back end itself could be
438 from any distributed directory architecture server that is supported by Samba.
439 This can be LDAP (from OpenLDAP), or Sun's iPlanet, of NetWare Directory
440 Server, etc.
441 </emphasis>
442 </para>
443
444 <para>
445 Please refer to the <link linkend="samba-pdc">Samba as a Primary Domain
446 Controller chapter</link> for more information regarding how to create a domain
447 machine account for a domain member server as well as for information
448 regarding how to enable the samba domain member machine to join the domain and
449 to be fully trusted by it.
450 </para>
451
452 <sect2>
453 <title>Joining an NT4 type Domain with Samba-3</title>
454
455 <para>
456 <table><title>Assumptions</title>
457 <tgroup align="left" cols="2">
458         <tbody>
459         <row><entry>NetBIOS name:</entry><entry>SERV1</entry></row>
460         <row><entry>Win2K/NT domain name:</entry><entry>DOM</entry></row>
461         <row><entry>Domain's PDC NetBIOS name:</entry><entry>DOMPDC</entry></row>
462         <row><entry>Domain's BDC NetBIOS names:</entry><entry>DOMBDC1 and DOMBDC2</entry></row>
463 </tbody>
464 </tgroup>
465 </table>
466 </para>
467
468 <para>
469 First, you must edit your &smb.conf; file to tell Samba it should
470 now use domain security.
471 </para>
472
473 <para>
474 Change (or add) your <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#SECURITY">
475 <parameter>security</parameter></ulink> line in the [global] section 
476 of your &smb.conf; to read:
477 </para>
478
479 <para>
480 <programlisting>
481 security = domain
482 </programlisting>
483 </para>
484
485 <para>
486 Next change the <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#WORKGROUP"><parameter>
487 workgroup</parameter></ulink> line in the <parameter>[global]</parameter>
488 section to read: 
489 </para>
490
491 <para>
492 <programlisting>
493 workgroup = DOM
494 </programlisting>
495 </para>
496
497 <para>
498 as this is the name of the domain we are joining.
499 </para>
500
501 <para>
502 You must also have the parameter <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#ENCRYPTPASSWORDS">
503 <parameter>encrypt passwords</parameter></ulink> set to <constant>yes
504 </constant> in order for your users to authenticate to the NT PDC.
505 </para>
506
507 <para>
508 Finally, add (or modify) a <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#PASSWORDSERVER">
509 <parameter>password server</parameter></ulink> line in the [global]
510 section to read: 
511 </para>
512
513 <para>
514 <programlisting>
515 password server = DOMPDC DOMBDC1 DOMBDC2
516 </programlisting>
517 </para>
518
519 <para>
520 These are the primary and backup domain controllers Samba 
521 will attempt to contact in order to authenticate users. Samba will 
522 try to contact each of these servers in order, so you may want to 
523 rearrange this list in order to spread out the authentication load 
524 among domain controllers.
525 </para>
526
527 <para>
528 Alternatively, if you want smbd to automatically determine 
529 the list of Domain controllers to use for authentication, you may 
530 set this line to be:
531 </para>
532
533 <para>
534 <programlisting>
535 password server = *
536 </programlisting>
537 </para>
538
539 <para>
540 This method, allows Samba to use exactly the same mechanism that NT does. This 
541 method either broadcasts or uses a WINS database in order to
542 find domain controllers to authenticate against.
543 </para>
544
545 <para>
546 In order to actually join the domain, you must run this command:
547 </para>
548
549 <para>
550 <screen>
551 <prompt>root# </prompt><userinput>net join -S DOMPDC -U<replaceable>Administrator%password</replaceable></userinput>
552 </screen>
553 </para>
554
555 <para>
556 If the <option>-S DOMPDC</option> argument is not given then
557 the domain name will be obtained from &smb.conf;.
558 </para>
559
560 <para>
561 As we are joining the domain DOM and the PDC for that domain 
562 (the only machine that has write access to the domain SAM database) 
563 is DOMPDC. The <replaceable>Administrator%password</replaceable> is 
564 the login name and password for an account which has the necessary 
565 privilege to add machines to the domain.  If this is successful 
566 you will see the message:
567 </para>
568
569 <para>
570 <computeroutput>Joined domain DOM.</computeroutput>
571 or <computeroutput>Joined 'SERV1' to realm 'MYREALM'</computeroutput>
572 </para>
573
574 <para>
575 in your terminal window. See the <ulink url="net.8.html">
576 net(8)</ulink> man page for more details.
577 </para>
578
579 <para>
580 This process joins the server to the domain without having to create the machine
581 trust account on the PDC beforehand.
582 </para>
583
584 <para>
585 This command goes through the machine account password 
586 change protocol, then writes the new (random) machine account 
587 password for this Samba server into a file in the same directory 
588 in which an smbpasswd file would be stored - normally :
589 </para>
590
591 <para>
592 <filename>/usr/local/samba/private/secrets.tdb</filename>
593 </para>
594
595 <para>
596 This file is created and owned by root and is not 
597 readable by any other user. It is the key to the domain-level 
598 security for your system, and should be treated as carefully 
599 as a shadow password file.
600 </para>
601
602 <para>
603 Finally, restart your Samba daemons and get ready for 
604 clients to begin using domain security!
605 </para>
606
607 </sect2>
608
609 <sect2>
610 <title>Why is this better than security = server?</title>
611
612 <para>
613 Currently, domain security in Samba doesn't free you from 
614 having to create local Unix users to represent the users attaching 
615 to your server. This means that if domain user <constant>DOM\fred
616 </constant> attaches to your domain security Samba server, there needs 
617 to be a local Unix user fred to represent that user in the Unix 
618 filesystem. This is very similar to the older Samba security mode 
619 <ulink url="smb.conf.5.html#SECURITYEQUALSSERVER">security = server</ulink>, 
620 where Samba would pass through the authentication request to a Windows 
621 NT server in the same way as a Windows 95 or Windows 98 server would.
622 </para>
623
624 <para>
625 Please refer to the <ulink url="winbind.html">Winbind 
626 paper</ulink> for information on a system to automatically
627 assign UNIX uids and gids to Windows NT Domain users and groups.
628 </para>
629
630 <para>
631 The advantage to domain-level security is that the 
632 authentication in domain-level security is passed down the authenticated 
633 RPC channel in exactly the same way that an NT server would do it. This 
634 means Samba servers now participate in domain trust relationships in 
635 exactly the same way NT servers do (i.e., you can add Samba servers into 
636 a resource domain and have the authentication passed on from a resource
637 domain PDC to an account domain PDC).
638 </para>
639
640 <para>
641 In addition, with <parameter>security = server</parameter> every Samba 
642 daemon on a server has to keep a connection open to the 
643 authenticating server for as long as that daemon lasts. This can drain 
644 the connection resources on a Microsoft NT server and cause it to run 
645 out of available connections. With <parameter>security = domain</parameter>, 
646 however, the Samba daemons connect to the PDC/BDC only for as long 
647 as is necessary to authenticate the user, and then drop the connection, 
648 thus conserving PDC connection resources.
649 </para>
650
651 <para>
652 And finally, acting in the same manner as an NT server 
653 authenticating to a PDC means that as part of the authentication 
654 reply, the Samba server gets the user identification information such 
655 as the user SID, the list of NT groups the user belongs to, etc. 
656 </para>
657
658 <note>
659 <para>
660 Much of the text of this document 
661 was first published in the Web magazine 
662 <ulink url="http://www.linuxworld.com">LinuxWorld</ulink> as the article <ulink
663 url="http://www.linuxworld.com/linuxworld/lw-1998-10/lw-10-samba.html">Doing 
664 the NIS/NT Samba</ulink>.
665 </para>
666 </note>
667
668 </sect2>
669 </sect1>
670
671 <sect1>
672 <title>Samba ADS Domain Membership</title>
673
674 <para>
675 This is a rough guide to setting up Samba 3.0 with kerberos authentication against a
676 Windows2000 KDC. 
677 </para> 
678
679 <sect2>
680 <title>Setup your <filename>smb.conf</filename></title>
681
682 <para>
683 You must use at least the following 3 options in &smb.conf;:
684 </para>
685
686 <para><programlisting>
687         realm = your.kerberos.REALM
688         security = ADS
689         encrypt passwords = yes
690 </programlisting></para>
691
692 <para>
693 In case samba can't figure out your ads server using your realm name, use the 
694 <parameter>ads server</parameter> option in <filename>smb.conf</filename>:
695 <programlisting>
696         ads server = your.kerberos.server
697 </programlisting>
698 </para>
699
700 <note><para>
701 You do <strong>not</strong> need a smbpasswd file, and older clients will be authenticated as 
702 if <parameter>security = domain</parameter>, although it won't do any harm and 
703 allows you to have local users not in the domain. It is expected that the above 
704 required options will change soon when active directory integration will get 
705 better.
706 </para></note>
707
708 </sect2>
709   
710 <sect2>
711 <title>Setup your <filename>/etc/krb5.conf</filename></title>
712
713 <para>
714 The minimal configuration for <filename>krb5.conf</filename> is:
715 </para>
716
717 <para><programlisting>
718         [realms]
719             YOUR.KERBEROS.REALM = {
720                 kdc = your.kerberos.server
721             }
722 </programlisting></para>
723
724 <para>
725 Test your config by doing a <userinput>kinit
726 <replaceable>USERNAME</replaceable>@<replaceable>REALM</replaceable></userinput> and
727 making sure that your password is accepted by the Win2000 KDC.
728 </para>
729
730 <note><para>
731 The realm must be uppercase or you will get <errorname>Cannot find KDC for
732 requested realm while getting initial credentials</errorname> error
733 </para></note>
734
735 <note><para>
736 Time between the two servers must be synchronized.  You will get a
737 <errorname>kinit(v5): Clock skew too great while getting initial credentials</errorname>
738 if the time difference is more than five minutes. 
739 </para></note>
740
741 <para>
742 You also must ensure that you can do a reverse DNS lookup on the IP
743 address of your KDC. Also, the name that this reverse lookup maps to
744 must either be the netbios name of the KDC (ie. the hostname with no
745 domain attached) or it can alternatively be the netbios name
746 followed by the realm. 
747 </para>
748
749 <para>
750 The easiest way to ensure you get this right is to add a 
751 <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> entry mapping the IP address of your KDC to 
752 its netbios name. If you don't get this right then you will get a 
753 <errorname>local error</errorname> when you try to join the realm.
754 </para>
755
756 <para>
757 If all you want is kerberos support in &smbclient; then you can skip
758 straight to <link linkend="ads-test-smbclient">Test with &smbclient;</link> now. 
759 <link linkend="ads-create-machine-account">Creating a computer account</link> 
760 and <link linkend="ads-test-server">testing your servers</link>
761 is only needed if you want kerberos support for &smbd; and &winbindd;.
762 </para>
763
764 </sect2>
765
766 <sect2 id="ads-create-machine-account">
767 <title>Create the computer account</title>
768
769 <para>
770 As a user that has write permission on the Samba private directory
771 (usually root) run:
772 <programlisting>
773         <userinput>net join -U Administrator%password</userinput>
774 </programlisting>
775 </para>
776
777 <sect3>
778 <title>Possible errors</title>
779
780 <para>
781 <variablelist>
782         <varlistentry><term><errorname>ADS support not compiled in</errorname></term>
783         <listitem><para>Samba must be reconfigured (remove config.cache) and recompiled
784         (make clean all install) after the kerberos libs and headers are installed.
785         </para></listitem></varlistentry>
786
787         <varlistentry><term><errorname>net join prompts for user name</errorname></term>
788         <listitem><para>You need to login to the domain using <userinput>kinit
789         <replaceable>USERNAME</replaceable>@<replaceable>REALM</replaceable></userinput>.
790         <replaceable>USERNAME</replaceable> must be a user who has rights to add a machine
791         to the domain.  </para></listitem></varlistentry>
792 </variablelist>
793 </para>
794
795 </sect3>
796
797 </sect2>
798
799 <sect2 id="ads-test-server">
800 <title>Test your server setup</title>
801
802 <para>
803 If the join was successful, you will see a new computer account with the
804 NetBIOS name of your Samba server in Active Directory (in the "Computers"
805 folder under Users and Computers.
806 </para>
807
808 <para>
809 On a Windows 2000 client try <userinput>net use * \\server\share</userinput>. You should
810 be logged in with kerberos without needing to know a password. If
811 this fails then run <userinput>klist tickets</userinput>. Did you get a ticket for the
812 server? Does it have an encoding type of DES-CBC-MD5 ? 
813 </para>
814
815 </sect2>
816
817 <sect2 id="ads-test-smbclient">
818 <title>Testing with &smbclient;</title>
819
820 <para>
821 On your Samba server try to login to a Win2000 server or your Samba
822 server using &smbclient; and kerberos. Use &smbclient; as usual, but
823 specify the <parameter>-k</parameter> option to choose kerberos authentication.
824 </para>
825
826 </sect2>
827
828 <sect2>
829 <title>Notes</title>
830
831 <para>
832 You must change administrator password at least once after DC 
833 install, to create the right encoding types
834 </para>
835
836 <para>
837 W2k doesn't seem to create the _kerberos._udp and _ldap._tcp in
838 their defaults DNS setup. Maybe fixed in service packs?
839 </para>
840
841 </sect2>
842 </sect1>
843
844 <sect1>
845 <title>Common Errors</title>
846
847 <para>
848 In the process of adding / deleting / re-adding domain member machine accounts there are
849 many traps for the unwary player and there are many "little" things that can go wrong.
850 It is particularly interesting how often subscribers on the samba mailing list have concluded
851 after repeated failed attempts to add a machine account that it is necessary to "re-install"
852 MS Windows on t he machine. In truth, it is seldom necessary to reinstall because of this type
853 of problem. The real solution is often very simple, and with understanding of how MS Windows
854 networking functions. easily overcome.
855 </para>
856
857 <sect2>
858 <title>Can Not Add Machine Back to Domain</title>
859
860 <para>
861 <emphasis>Problem:</emphasis> A Windows workstation was reinstalled. The original domain machine
862 account was deleted and added immediately. The workstation will not join the domain if I use 
863 the same machine name. Attempts to add the machine fail with a message that the machine already
864 exists on the network - I know it doen't. Why is this failing?
865 </para>
866
867 <para>
868 The original name is still in the NetBIOS name cache and must expire after machine account
869 deletion BEFORE adding that same name as a domain member again. The best advice is to delete
870 the old account and then to add the machine with a new name.
871 </para>
872
873 </sect2>
874
875 <sect2>
876 <title>Adding Machine to Domain Fails</title>
877
878 <para>
879 Adding a Windows 200x or XP Professional machine to the Samba PDC Domain fails with a
880 message that, <errorname>The machine could not be added at this time, there is a network problem.
881 Please try again later.</errorname> Why?
882 </para>
883
884 <para>
885 You should check that there is an <parameter>add machine script</parameter> in your &smb.conf;
886 file. If there is not, please add one that is appropriate for your OS platform. If a script
887 has been defined you will need to debug it's operation. Increase the <parameter>log level</parameter>
888 in the &smb.conf; file to level 10, then try to rejoin the domain. Check the logs to see which
889 operation is failing.
890 </para>
891
892 <para>
893 Possible causes include:
894 </para>
895
896 <itemizedlist>
897         <listitem><para>
898         The script does not actually exist, or could not be located in the path specified.
899         </para>
900
901         <para>
902         <emphasis>Corrective Action:</emphasis> Fix it. Make sure that when run manually
903         that the script will add both the Unix system account _and_ the Samba SAM account.
904         </para></listitem>
905
906         <listitem><para>
907         The machine could not be added to the Unix system accounts file <filename>/etc/passwd</filename>
908         </para>
909
910         <para>
911         <emphasis>Corrective Action:</emphasis> Check that the machine name is a legal Unix
912         system account name. ie: If the Unix utility <command>useradd</command> is called
913         then make sure that the machine name you are trying to add can be added using this
914         tool. <command>Useradd</command> on some systems will not allow any upper case characters
915         nor will it allow spaces in the name.
916         </para></listitem>
917 </itemizedlist>
918
919 </sect2>
920
921 </sect1>
922 </chapter>