doc: fill metainfo "manual" and "source" in the ctdb manual page
[metze/ctdb/wip.git] / doc / ctdb.1.xml
1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE refentry PUBLIC "-//Samba-Team//DTD DocBook V4.2-Based Variant V1.0//EN" "http://www.samba.org/samba/DTD/samba-doc">
3 <refentry id="ctdb.1">
4
5 <refmeta>
6         <refentrytitle>ctdb</refentrytitle>
7         <manvolnum>1</manvolnum>
8         <refmiscinfo class="source">ctdb</refmiscinfo>
9         <refmiscinfo class="manual">CTDB - clustered TDB database</refmiscinfo>
10 </refmeta>
11
12
13 <refnamediv>
14         <refname>ctdb</refname>
15         <refpurpose>clustered tdb database management utility</refpurpose>
16 </refnamediv>
17
18 <refsynopsisdiv>
19         <cmdsynopsis>
20                 <command>ctdb [ OPTIONS ] COMMAND ...</command>
21         </cmdsynopsis>
22         
23         <cmdsynopsis>
24                 <command>ctdb</command>
25                 <arg choice="opt">-n &lt;node&gt;</arg>
26                 <arg choice="opt">-Y</arg>
27                 <arg choice="opt">-t &lt;timeout&gt;</arg>
28                 <arg choice="opt">-T &lt;timelimit&gt;</arg>
29                 <arg choice="opt">-? --help</arg>
30                 <arg choice="opt">--usage</arg>
31                 <arg choice="opt">-d --debug=&lt;INTEGER&gt;</arg>
32                 <arg choice="opt">--socket=&lt;filename&gt;</arg>
33         </cmdsynopsis>
34         
35 </refsynopsisdiv>
36
37   <refsect1><title>DESCRIPTION</title>
38     <para>
39       ctdb is a utility to view and manage a ctdb cluster.
40     </para>
41   </refsect1>
42
43
44   <refsect1>
45     <title>OPTIONS</title>
46
47     <variablelist>
48       <varlistentry><term>-n &lt;pnn&gt;</term>
49         <listitem>
50           <para>
51             This specifies the physical node number on which to execute the 
52             command. Default is to run the command on the daemon running on 
53             the local host.
54           </para>
55           <para>
56             The physical node number is an integer that describes the node in the
57             cluster. The first node has physical node number 0.
58           </para>
59         </listitem>
60       </varlistentry>
61
62       <varlistentry><term>-Y</term>
63         <listitem>
64           <para>
65             Produce output in machine readable form for easier parsing by scripts. Not all commands support this option.
66           </para>
67         </listitem>
68       </varlistentry>
69
70       <varlistentry><term>-t &lt;timeout&gt;</term>
71         <listitem>
72           <para>
73             How long should ctdb wait for the local ctdb daemon to respond to a command before timing out. Default is 3 seconds.
74           </para>
75         </listitem>
76       </varlistentry>
77
78       <varlistentry><term>-T &lt;timelimit&gt;</term>
79         <listitem>
80           <para>
81             A limit on how long the ctdb command will run for before it will
82             be aborted. When this timelimit has been exceeded the ctdb command will
83             terminate.
84           </para>
85         </listitem>
86       </varlistentry>
87
88       <varlistentry><term>-? --help</term>
89         <listitem>
90           <para>
91             Print some help text to the screen.
92           </para>
93         </listitem>
94       </varlistentry>
95
96       <varlistentry><term>--usage</term>
97         <listitem>
98           <para>
99             Print useage information to the screen.
100           </para>
101         </listitem>
102       </varlistentry>
103
104       <varlistentry><term>-d --debug=&lt;debuglevel&gt;</term>
105         <listitem>
106           <para>
107             Change the debug level for the command. Default is 0.
108           </para>
109         </listitem>
110       </varlistentry>
111
112       <varlistentry><term>--socket=&lt;filename&gt;</term>
113         <listitem>
114           <para>
115             Specify the socketname to use when connecting to the local ctdb 
116             daemon. The default is /tmp/ctdb.socket .
117           </para>
118           <para>
119             You only need to specify this parameter if you run multiple ctdb 
120             daemons on the same physical host and thus can not use the default
121             name for the domain socket.
122           </para>
123         </listitem>
124       </varlistentry>
125
126     </variablelist>
127   </refsect1>
128
129
130   <refsect1><title>Administrative Commands</title>
131     <para>
132       These are commands used to monitor and administrate a CTDB cluster.
133     </para>
134
135     <refsect2><title>pnn</title>
136       <para>
137         This command displays the pnn of the current node.
138       </para>
139     </refsect2>
140
141     <refsect2><title>status</title>
142       <para>
143         This command shows the current status of the ctdb node.
144       </para>
145
146       <refsect3><title>node status</title>
147         <para>
148           Node status reflects the current status of the node. There are five possible states:
149         </para>
150         <para>
151           OK - This node is fully functional.
152         </para>
153         <para>
154           DISCONNECTED - This node could not be connected through the network and is currently not participating in the cluster. If there is a public IP address associated with this node it should have been taken over by a different node. No services are running on this node.
155         </para>
156         <para>
157           DISABLED - This node has been administratively disabled. This node is still functional and participates in the CTDB cluster but its IP addresses have been taken over by a different node and no services are currently being hosted.
158         </para>
159         <para>
160           UNHEALTHY - A service provided by this node is malfunctioning and should be investigated. The CTDB daemon itself is operational and participates in the cluster. Its public IP address has been taken over by a different node and no services are currnetly being hosted. All unhealthy nodes should be investigated and require an administrative action to rectify.
161         </para>
162         <para>
163           BANNED - This node failed too many recovery attempts and has been banned from participating in the cluster for a period of RecoveryBanPeriod seconds. Any public IP address has been taken over by other nodes. This node does not provide any services. All banned nodes should be investigated and require an administrative action to rectify. This node does not perticipate in the CTDB cluster but can still be communicated with. I.e. ctdb commands can be sent to it.
164         </para>
165         <para>
166       STOPPED - A node that is stopped does not host any public ip addresses,
167       nor is it part of the VNNMAP. A stopped node can not become LVSMASTER,
168       RECMASTER or NATGW.
169       This node does not perticipate in the CTDB cluster but can still be
170       communicated with. I.e. ctdb commands can be sent to it.
171         </para>
172         <para>
173         PARTIALLYONLINE - A node that is partially online participates
174         in a cluster like a node that is ok. Some interfaces to serve
175         public ip addresses are down, but at least one interface is up.
176         See also "ctdb ifaces".
177         </para>
178       </refsect3>
179
180       <refsect3><title>generation</title>
181         <para>
182           The generation id is a number that indicates the current generation 
183           of a cluster instance. Each time a cluster goes through a 
184           reconfiguration or a recovery its generation id will be changed.
185           </para>
186           <para>
187           This number does not have any particular meaning other than to keep
188           track of when a cluster has gone through a recovery. It is a random
189           number that represents the current instance of a ctdb cluster
190           and its databases.
191           CTDBD uses this number internally to be able to tell when commands 
192           to operate on the cluster and the databases was issued in a different
193           generation of the cluster, to ensure that commands that operate
194           on the databases will not survive across a cluster database recovery.
195           After a recovery, all old outstanding commands will automatically
196           become invalid. 
197         </para>
198         <para>
199           Sometimes this number will be shown as "INVALID". This only means that
200           the ctdbd daemon has started but it has not yet merged with the cluster through a recovery.
201           All nodes start with generation "INVALID" and are not assigned a real
202           generation id until they have successfully been merged with a cluster
203           through a recovery.
204         </para>
205       </refsect3>
206
207       <refsect3><title>VNNMAP</title>
208         <para>
209           The list of Virtual Node Numbers. This is a list of all nodes that actively participates in the cluster and that share the workload of hosting the Clustered TDB database records.
210           Only nodes that are participating in the vnnmap can become lmaster or dmaster for a database record.
211         </para>
212       </refsect3>
213
214       <refsect3><title>Recovery mode</title>
215         <para>
216           This is the current recovery mode of the cluster. There are two possible modes:
217         </para>
218         <para>
219           NORMAL - The cluster is fully operational.
220         </para>
221         <para>
222           RECOVERY - The cluster databases have all been frozen, pausing all services while the cluster awaits a recovery process to complete. A recovery process should finish within seconds. If a cluster is stuck in the RECOVERY state this would indicate a cluster malfunction which needs to be investigated.
223         </para>
224         <para>
225         Once the recovery master detects an inconsistency, for example a node 
226         becomes disconnected/connected, the recovery daemon will trigger a 
227         cluster recovery process, where all databases are remerged across the
228         cluster. When this process starts, the recovery master will first
229         "freeze" all databases to prevent applications such as samba from 
230         accessing the databases and it will also mark the recovery mode as
231         RECOVERY.
232         </para>
233         <para>
234         When CTDBD starts up, it will start in RECOVERY mode.
235         Once the node has been merged into a cluster and all databases
236         have been recovered, the node mode will change into NORMAL mode
237         and the databases will be "thawed", allowing samba to access the
238         databases again.
239         </para>
240       </refsect3>
241
242       <refsect3><title>Recovery master</title>
243         <para>
244           This is the cluster node that is currently designated as the recovery master. This node is responsible of monitoring the consistency of the cluster and to perform the actual recovery process when reqired.
245         </para>
246         <para>
247         Only one node at a time can be the designated recovery master. Which
248         node is designated the recovery master is decided by an election
249         process in the recovery daemons running on each node.
250         </para>
251       </refsect3>
252
253       <para>
254         Example: ctdb status
255       </para>
256       <para>Example output:</para>
257       <screen format="linespecific">
258 Number of nodes:4
259 pnn:0 11.1.2.200       OK (THIS NODE)
260 pnn:1 11.1.2.201       OK
261 pnn:2 11.1.2.202       OK
262 pnn:3 11.1.2.203       OK
263 Generation:1362079228
264 Size:4
265 hash:0 lmaster:0
266 hash:1 lmaster:1
267 hash:2 lmaster:2
268 hash:3 lmaster:3
269 Recovery mode:NORMAL (0)
270 Recovery master:0
271       </screen>
272     </refsect2>
273
274     <refsect2><title>recmaster</title>
275       <para>
276         This command shows the pnn of the node which is currently the recmaster.
277       </para>
278     </refsect2>
279
280     <refsect2><title>uptime</title>
281       <para>
282         This command shows the uptime for the ctdb daemon. When the last recovery or ip-failover completed and how long it took. If the "duration" is shown as a negative number, this indicates that there is a recovery/failover in progress and it started that many seconds ago.
283       </para>
284
285       <para>
286         Example: ctdb uptime
287       </para>
288       <para>Example output:</para>
289       <screen format="linespecific">
290 Current time of node          :                Thu Oct 29 10:38:54 2009
291 Ctdbd start time              : (000 16:54:28) Wed Oct 28 17:44:26 2009
292 Time of last recovery/failover: (000 16:53:31) Wed Oct 28 17:45:23 2009
293 Duration of last recovery/failover: 2.248552 seconds
294       </screen>
295     </refsect2>
296
297     <refsect2><title>listnodes</title>
298       <para>
299         This command shows lists the ip addresses of all the nodes in the cluster.
300       </para>
301
302       <para>
303         Example: ctdb listnodes
304       </para>
305       <para>Example output:</para>
306       <screen format="linespecific">
307 10.0.0.71
308 10.0.0.72
309 10.0.0.73
310 10.0.0.74
311       </screen>
312     </refsect2>
313
314     <refsect2><title>ping</title>
315       <para>
316         This command will "ping" all CTDB daemons in the cluster to verify that they are processing commands correctly.
317       </para>
318       <para>
319         Example: ctdb ping
320       </para>
321       <para>
322         Example output:
323       </para>
324       <screen format="linespecific">
325 response from 0 time=0.000054 sec  (3 clients)
326 response from 1 time=0.000144 sec  (2 clients)
327 response from 2 time=0.000105 sec  (2 clients)
328 response from 3 time=0.000114 sec  (2 clients)
329       </screen>
330     </refsect2>
331
332     <refsect2><title>ifaces</title>
333       <para>
334         This command will display the list of network interfaces, which could
335         host public addresses, along with their status.
336       </para>
337       <para>
338         Example: ctdb ifaces
339       </para>
340       <para>
341         Example output:
342       </para>
343       <screen format="linespecific">
344 Interfaces on node 0
345 name:eth5 link:up references:2
346 name:eth4 link:down references:0
347 name:eth3 link:up references:1
348 name:eth2 link:up references:1
349       </screen>
350       <para>
351         Example: ctdb ifaces -Y
352       </para>
353       <para>
354         Example output:
355       </para>
356       <screen format="linespecific">
357 :Name:LinkStatus:References:
358 :eth5:1:2
359 :eth4:0:0
360 :eth3:1:1
361 :eth2:1:1
362       </screen>
363     </refsect2>
364
365     <refsect2><title>setifacelink &lt;iface&gt; &lt;status&gt;</title>
366       <para>
367         This command will set the status of a network interface.
368         The status needs to be "up" or "down". This is typically
369         used in the 10.interfaces script in the "monitor" event.
370       </para>
371       <para>
372         Example: ctdb setifacelink eth0 up
373       </para>
374     </refsect2>
375
376     <refsect2><title>ip</title>
377       <para>
378         This command will display the list of public addresses that are provided by the cluster and which physical node is currently serving this ip. By default this command will ONLY show those public addresses that are known to the node itself. To see the full list of all public ips across the cluster you must use "ctdb ip -n all".
379       </para>
380       <para>
381         Example: ctdb ip
382       </para>
383       <para>
384         Example output:
385       </para>
386       <screen format="linespecific">
387 Public IPs on node 0
388 172.31.91.82 node[1] active[] available[eth2,eth3] configured[eth2,eth3]
389 172.31.91.83 node[0] active[eth3] available[eth2,eth3] configured[eth2,eth3]
390 172.31.91.84 node[1] active[] available[eth2,eth3] configured[eth2,eth3]
391 172.31.91.85 node[0] active[eth2] available[eth2,eth3] configured[eth2,eth3]
392 172.31.92.82 node[1] active[] available[eth5] configured[eth4,eth5]
393 172.31.92.83 node[0] active[eth5] available[eth5] configured[eth4,eth5]
394 172.31.92.84 node[1] active[] available[eth5] configured[eth4,eth5]
395 172.31.92.85 node[0] active[eth5] available[eth5] configured[eth4,eth5]
396       </screen>
397       <para>
398         Example: ctdb ip -Y
399       </para>
400       <para>
401         Example output:
402       </para>
403       <screen format="linespecific">
404 :Public IP:Node:ActiveInterface:AvailableInterfaces:ConfiguredInterfaces:
405 :172.31.91.82:1::eth2,eth3:eth2,eth3:
406 :172.31.91.83:0:eth3:eth2,eth3:eth2,eth3:
407 :172.31.91.84:1::eth2,eth3:eth2,eth3:
408 :172.31.91.85:0:eth2:eth2,eth3:eth2,eth3:
409 :172.31.92.82:1::eth5:eth4,eth5:
410 :172.31.92.83:0:eth5:eth5:eth4,eth5:
411 :172.31.92.84:1::eth5:eth4,eth5:
412 :172.31.92.85:0:eth5:eth5:eth4,eth5:
413       </screen>
414     </refsect2>
415
416     <refsect2><title>ipinfo &lt;ip&gt;</title>
417       <para>
418         This command will display details about the specified public addresses.
419       </para>
420       <para>
421         Example: ctdb ipinfo 172.31.92.85
422       </para>
423       <para>
424         Example output:
425       </para>
426       <screen format="linespecific">
427 Public IP[172.31.92.85] info on node 0
428 IP:172.31.92.85
429 CurrentNode:0
430 NumInterfaces:2
431 Interface[1]: Name:eth4 Link:down References:0
432 Interface[2]: Name:eth5 Link:up References:2 (active)
433       </screen>
434     </refsect2>
435
436     <refsect2><title>scriptstatus</title>
437       <para>
438         This command displays which scripts where run in the previous monitoring cycle and the result of each script. If a script failed with an error, causing the node to become unhealthy, the output from that script is also shown.
439       </para>
440       <para>
441         Example: ctdb scriptstatus
442       </para>
443       <para>
444         Example output:
445       </para>
446       <screen format="linespecific">
447 7 scripts were executed last monitoring cycle
448 00.ctdb              Status:OK    Duration:0.056 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
449 10.interface         Status:OK    Duration:0.077 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
450 11.natgw             Status:OK    Duration:0.039 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
451 20.multipathd        Status:OK    Duration:0.038 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
452 31.clamd             Status:DISABLED
453 40.vsftpd            Status:OK    Duration:0.045 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
454 41.httpd             Status:OK    Duration:0.039 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
455 50.samba             Status:ERROR    Duration:0.082 Tue Mar 24 18:56:57 2009
456    OUTPUT:ERROR: Samba tcp port 445 is not responding
457       </screen>
458     </refsect2>
459
460     <refsect2><title>disablescript &lt;script&gt;</title>
461       <para>
462         This command is used to disable an eventscript.
463       </para>
464       <para>
465         This will take effect the next time the eventscripts are being executed so it can take a short while until this is reflected in 'scriptstatus'.
466       </para>
467     </refsect2>
468
469     <refsect2><title>enablescript &lt;script&gt;</title>
470       <para>
471         This command is used to enable an eventscript.
472       </para>
473       <para>
474         This will take effect the next time the eventscripts are being executed so it can take a short while until this is reflected in 'scriptstatus'.
475       </para>
476     </refsect2>
477
478     <refsect2><title>getvar &lt;name&gt;</title>
479       <para>
480         Get the runtime value of a tuneable variable.
481       </para>
482       <para>
483         Example: ctdb getvar MaxRedirectCount
484       </para>
485       <para>
486         Example output:
487       </para>
488       <screen format="linespecific">
489 MaxRedirectCount    = 3
490       </screen>
491     </refsect2>
492
493     <refsect2><title>setvar &lt;name&gt; &lt;value&gt;</title>
494       <para>
495         Set the runtime value of a tuneable variable.
496       </para>
497       <para>
498         Example: ctdb setvar MaxRedirectCount 5
499       </para>
500     </refsect2>
501
502     <refsect2><title>listvars</title>
503       <para>
504         List all tuneable variables.
505       </para>
506       <para>
507         Example: ctdb listvars
508       </para>
509       <para>
510         Example output:
511       </para>
512       <screen format="linespecific">
513 MaxRedirectCount    = 3
514 SeqnumInterval      = 1000
515 ControlTimeout      = 60
516 TraverseTimeout     = 20
517 KeepaliveInterval   = 5
518 KeepaliveLimit      = 5
519 MaxLACount          = 7
520 RecoverTimeout      = 20
521 RecoverInterval     = 1
522 ElectionTimeout     = 3
523 TakeoverTimeout     = 5
524 MonitorInterval     = 15
525 TickleUpdateInterval = 20
526 EventScriptTimeout  = 30
527 EventScriptBanCount = 10
528 EventScriptUnhealthyOnTimeout = 0
529 RecoveryGracePeriod = 120
530 RecoveryBanPeriod   = 300
531 DatabaseHashSize    = 10000
532 DatabaseMaxDead     = 5
533 RerecoveryTimeout   = 10
534 EnableBans          = 1
535 DeterministicIPs    = 1
536 DisableWhenUnhealthy = 0
537 ReclockPingPeriod   = 60
538 NoIPFailback        = 0
539 VerboseMemoryNames  = 0
540 RecdPingTimeout     = 60
541 RecdFailCount       = 10
542 LogLatencyMs        = 0
543 RecLockLatencyMs    = 1000
544 RecoveryDropAllIPs  = 60
545 VerifyRecoveryLock  = 1
546 VacuumDefaultInterval = 300
547 VacuumMaxRunTime    = 30
548 RepackLimit         = 10000
549 VacuumLimit         = 5000
550 VacuumMinInterval   = 60
551 VacuumMaxInterval   = 600
552 MaxQueueDropMsg     = 1000
553 UseStatusEvents     = 0
554 AllowUnhealthyDBRead = 0
555       </screen>
556     </refsect2>
557
558     <refsect2><title>lvsmaster</title>
559       <para>
560       This command shows which node is currently the LVSMASTER. The
561       LVSMASTER is the node in the cluster which drives the LVS system and
562       which receives all incoming traffic from clients.
563       </para>
564       <para>
565       LVS is the mode where the entire CTDB/Samba cluster uses a single
566       ip address for the entire cluster. In this mode all clients connect to
567       one specific node which will then multiplex/loadbalance the clients
568       evenly onto the other nodes in the cluster. This is an alternative to using
569       public ip addresses. See the manpage for ctdbd for more information
570       about LVS.
571       </para>
572     </refsect2>
573
574     <refsect2><title>lvs</title>
575       <para>
576       This command shows which nodes in the cluster are currently active in the
577       LVS configuration. I.e. which nodes we are currently loadbalancing
578       the single ip address across.
579       </para>
580
581       <para>
582       LVS will by default only loadbalance across those nodes that are both
583       LVS capable and also HEALTHY. Except if all nodes are UNHEALTHY in which
584       case LVS will loadbalance across all UNHEALTHY nodes as well.
585       LVS will never use nodes that are DISCONNECTED, STOPPED, BANNED or
586       DISABLED.
587       </para>
588
589       <para>
590         Example output:
591       </para>
592       <screen format="linespecific">
593 2:10.0.0.13
594 3:10.0.0.14
595       </screen>
596
597     </refsect2>
598
599
600     <refsect2><title>getcapabilities</title>
601       <para>
602       This command shows the capabilities of the current node.
603       Please see manpage for ctdbd for a full list of all capabilities and
604       more detailed description.
605       </para>
606
607       <para>
608       RECMASTER and LMASTER capabilities are primarily used when CTDBD
609       is used to create a cluster spanning across WAN links. In which case
610       ctdbd acts as a WAN accelerator.
611       </para>
612
613       <para>
614       LVS capabile means that the node is participating in LVS, a mode
615       where the entire CTDB cluster uses one single ip address for the
616       entire cluster instead of using public ip address failover.
617       This is an alternative to using a loadbalancing layer-4 switch.
618       </para>
619
620       <para>
621         Example output:
622       </para>
623       <screen format="linespecific">
624 RECMASTER: YES
625 LMASTER: YES
626 LVS: NO
627       </screen>
628
629     </refsect2>
630
631     <refsect2><title>statistics</title>
632       <para>
633         Collect statistics from the CTDB daemon about how many calls it has served.
634       </para>
635       <para>
636         Example: ctdb statistics
637       </para>
638       <para>
639         Example output:
640       </para>
641       <screen format="linespecific">
642 CTDB version 1
643  num_clients                        3
644  frozen                             0
645  recovering                         0
646  client_packets_sent           360489
647  client_packets_recv           360466
648  node_packets_sent             480931
649  node_packets_recv             240120
650  keepalive_packets_sent             4
651  keepalive_packets_recv             3
652  node
653      req_call                       2
654      reply_call                     2
655      req_dmaster                    0
656      reply_dmaster                  0
657      reply_error                    0
658      req_message                   42
659      req_control               120408
660      reply_control             360439
661  client
662      req_call                       2
663      req_message                   24
664      req_control               360440
665  timeouts
666      call                           0
667      control                        0
668      traverse                       0
669  total_calls                        2
670  pending_calls                      0
671  lockwait_calls                     0
672  pending_lockwait_calls             0
673  memory_used                     5040
674  max_hop_count                      0
675  max_call_latency                   4.948321 sec
676  max_lockwait_latency               0.000000 sec
677       </screen>
678     </refsect2>
679
680     <refsect2><title>statisticsreset</title>
681       <para>
682         This command is used to clear all statistics counters in a node.
683       </para>
684       <para>
685         Example: ctdb statisticsreset
686       </para>
687     </refsect2>
688
689     <refsect2><title>getreclock</title>
690       <para>
691         This command is used to show the filename of the reclock file that is used.
692       </para>
693
694       <para>
695         Example output:
696       </para>
697       <screen format="linespecific">
698 Reclock file:/gpfs/.ctdb/shared
699       </screen>
700
701     </refsect2>
702
703     <refsect2><title>setreclock [filename]</title>
704       <para>
705         This command is used to modify, or clear, the file that is used as the reclock file at runtime. When this command is used, the reclock file checks are disabled. To re-enable the checks the administrator needs to activate the "VerifyRecoveryLock" tunable using "ctdb setvar".
706       </para>
707
708       <para>
709         If run with no parameter this will remove the reclock file completely. If run with a parameter the parameter specifies the new filename to use for the recovery lock.
710       </para>
711
712       <para>
713         This command only affects the runtime settings of a ctdb node and will be lost when ctdb is restarted. For persistent changes to the reclock file setting you must edit /etc/sysconfig/ctdb.
714       </para>
715     </refsect2>
716
717
718
719     <refsect2><title>getdebug</title>
720       <para>
721         Get the current debug level for the node. the debug level controls what information is written to the log file.
722       </para>
723       <para>
724         The debug levels are mapped to the corresponding syslog levels.
725         When a debug level is set, only those messages at that level and higher
726         levels will be printed.
727       </para>
728       <para>
729         The list of debug levels from highest to lowest are :
730       </para>
731       <para>
732         EMERG ALERT CRIT ERR WARNING NOTICE INFO DEBUG
733       </para>
734     </refsect2>
735
736     <refsect2><title>setdebug &lt;debuglevel&gt;</title>
737       <para>
738         Set the debug level of a node. This controls what information will be logged.
739       </para>
740       <para>
741         The debuglevel is one of EMERG ALERT CRIT ERR WARNING NOTICE INFO DEBUG
742       </para>
743     </refsect2>
744
745     <refsect2><title>getpid</title>
746       <para>
747         This command will return the process id of the ctdb daemon.
748       </para>
749     </refsect2>
750
751     <refsect2><title>disable</title>
752       <para>
753         This command is used to administratively disable a node in the cluster.
754         A disabled node will still participate in the cluster and host
755         clustered TDB records but its public ip address has been taken over by
756         a different node and it no longer hosts any services.
757       </para>
758     </refsect2>
759
760     <refsect2><title>enable</title>
761       <para>
762         Re-enable a node that has been administratively disabled.
763       </para>
764     </refsect2>
765
766     <refsect2><title>stop</title>
767       <para>
768         This command is used to administratively STOP a node in the cluster.
769         A STOPPED node is connected to the cluster but will not host any
770         public ip addresse, nor does it participate in the VNNMAP.
771         The difference between a DISABLED node and a STOPPED node is that
772         a STOPPED node does not host any parts of the database which means
773         that a recovery is required to stop/continue nodes.
774       </para>
775     </refsect2>
776
777     <refsect2><title>continue</title>
778       <para>
779         Re-start a node that has been administratively stopped.
780       </para>
781     </refsect2>
782
783     <refsect2><title>addip &lt;public_ip/mask&gt; &lt;iface&gt;</title>
784       <para>
785         This command is used to add a new public ip to a node during runtime.
786         This allows public addresses to be added to a cluster without having
787         to restart the ctdb daemons.
788       </para>
789       <para>
790         Note that this only updates the runtime instance of ctdb. Any changes will be lost next time ctdb is restarted and the public addresses file is re-read.
791  If you want this change to be permanent you must also update the public addresses file manually.
792       </para>
793     </refsect2>
794
795     <refsect2><title>delip &lt;public_ip&gt;</title>
796       <para>
797         This command is used to remove a public ip from a node during runtime.
798         If this public ip is currently hosted by the node it being removed from, the ip will first be failed over to another node, if possible, before it is removed.
799       </para>
800       <para>
801         Note that this only updates the runtime instance of ctdb. Any changes will be lost next time ctdb is restarted and the public addresses file is re-read.
802  If you want this change to be permanent you must also update the public addresses file manually.
803       </para>
804     </refsect2>
805
806     <refsect2><title>moveip &lt;public_ip&gt; &lt;node&gt;</title>
807       <para>
808       This command can be used to manually fail a public ip address to a
809       specific node.
810       </para>
811       <para>
812       In order to manually override the "automatic" distribution of public 
813       ip addresses that ctdb normally provides, this command only works
814       when you have changed the tunables for the daemon to:
815       </para>
816       <para>
817       DeterministicIPs = 0
818       </para>
819       <para>
820       NoIPFailback = 1
821       </para>
822     </refsect2>
823
824     <refsect2><title>shutdown</title>
825       <para>
826         This command will shutdown a specific CTDB daemon.
827       </para>
828     </refsect2>
829
830     <refsect2><title>recover</title>
831       <para>
832         This command will trigger the recovery daemon to do a cluster
833         recovery.
834       </para>
835     </refsect2>
836
837     <refsect2><title>ipreallocate</title>
838       <para>
839         This command will force the recovery master to perform a full ip reallocation process and redistribute all ip addresses. This is useful to "reset" the allocations back to its default state if they have been changed using the "moveip" command. While a "recover" will also perform this reallocation, a recovery is much more hevyweight since it will also rebuild all the databases.
840       </para>
841     </refsect2>
842
843     <refsect2><title>setlmasterrole &lt;on|off&gt;</title>
844       <para>
845         This command is used ot enable/disable the LMASTER capability for a node at runtime. This capability determines whether or not a node can be used as an LMASTER for records in the database. A node that does not have the LMASTER capability will not show up in the vnnmap.
846       </para>
847
848       <para>
849         Nodes will by default have this capability, but it can be stripped off nodes by the setting in the sysconfig file or by using this command.
850       </para>
851       <para>
852         Once this setting has been enabled/disabled, you need to perform a recovery for it to take effect.
853       </para>
854       <para>
855         See also "ctdb getcapabilities"
856       </para>
857     </refsect2>
858
859     <refsect2><title>setrecmasterrole &lt;on|off&gt;</title>
860       <para>
861         This command is used ot enable/disable the RECMASTER capability for a node at runtime. This capability determines whether or not a node can be used as an RECMASTER for the cluster. A node that does not have the RECMASTER capability can not win a recmaster election. A node that already is the recmaster for the cluster when the capability is stripped off the node will remain the recmaster until the next cluster election.
862       </para>
863
864       <para>
865         Nodes will by default have this capability, but it can be stripped off nodes by the setting in the sysconfig file or by using this command.
866       </para>
867       <para>
868         See also "ctdb getcapabilities"
869       </para>
870     </refsect2>
871
872     <refsect2><title>killtcp &lt;srcip:port&gt; &lt;dstip:port&gt;</title>
873       <para>
874         This command will kill the specified TCP connection by issuing a
875         TCP RST to the srcip:port endpoint. This is a command used by the 
876         ctdb eventscripts.
877       </para>
878     </refsect2>
879
880     <refsect2><title>gratiousarp &lt;ip&gt; &lt;interface&gt;</title>
881       <para>
882         This command will send out a gratious arp for the specified interface
883         through the specified interface. This command is mainly used by the
884         ctdb eventscripts.
885       </para>
886     </refsect2>
887
888     <refsect2><title>reloadnodes</title>
889       <para>
890       This command is used when adding new nodes, or removing existing nodes from an existing cluster.
891       </para>
892       <para>
893       Procedure to add a node:
894       </para>
895       <para>
896       1, To expand an existing cluster, first ensure with 'ctdb status' that
897       all nodes are up and running and that they are all healthy.
898       Do not try to expand a cluster unless it is completely healthy!
899       </para>
900       <para>
901       2, On all nodes, edit /etc/ctdb/nodes and add the new node as the last
902       entry to the file. The new node MUST be added to the end of this file!
903       </para>
904       <para>
905       3, Verify that all the nodes have identical /etc/ctdb/nodes files after you edited them and added the new node!
906       </para>
907       <para>
908       4, Run 'ctdb reloadnodes' to force all nodes to reload the nodesfile.
909       </para>
910       <para>
911       5, Use 'ctdb status' on all nodes and verify that they now show the additional node.
912       </para>
913       <para>
914       6, Install and configure the new node and bring it online.
915       </para>
916       <para>
917       Procedure to remove a node:
918       </para>
919       <para>
920       1, To remove a node from an existing cluster, first ensure with 'ctdb status' that
921       all nodes, except the node to be deleted, are up and running and that they are all healthy.
922       Do not try to remove a node from a cluster unless the cluster is completely healthy!
923       </para>
924       <para>
925       2, Shutdown and poerwoff the node to be removed.
926       </para>
927       <para>
928       3, On all other nodes, edit the /etc/ctdb/nodes file and comment out the node to be removed. Do not delete the line for that node, just comment it out by adding a '#' at the beginning of the line.
929       </para>
930       <para>
931       4, Run 'ctdb reloadnodes' to force all nodes to reload the nodesfile.
932       </para>
933       <para>
934       5, Use 'ctdb status' on all nodes and verify that the deleted node no longer shows up in the list..
935       </para>
936       <para>
937       </para>
938       
939     </refsect2>
940
941     <refsect2><title>tickle &lt;srcip:port&gt; &lt;dstip:port&gt;</title>
942       <para>
943         This command will will send a TCP tickle to the source host for the
944         specified TCP connection.
945         A TCP tickle is a TCP ACK packet with an invalid sequence and 
946         acknowledge number and will when received by the source host result
947         in it sending an immediate correct ACK back to the other end.
948       </para>
949       <para>
950         TCP tickles are useful to "tickle" clients after a IP failover has 
951         occured since this will make the client immediately recognize the 
952         TCP connection has been disrupted and that the client will need
953         to reestablish. This greatly speeds up the time it takes for a client
954         to detect and reestablish after an IP failover in the ctdb cluster.
955       </para>
956     </refsect2>
957
958     <refsect2><title>gettickles &lt;ip&gt;</title>
959       <para>
960         This command is used to show which TCP connections are registered with
961         CTDB to be "tickled" if there is a failover.
962       </para>
963     </refsect2>
964     <refsect2><title>repack [max_freelist]</title>
965       <para>
966         Over time, when records are created and deleted in a TDB, the TDB list of free space will become fragmented. This can lead to a slowdown in accessing TDB records.
967         This command is used to defragment a TDB database and pruning the freelist.
968       </para>
969  
970         <para>
971         If [max_freelist] is specified, then a database will only be repacked if it has more than this number of entries in the freelist.
972         </para>
973       <para>
974         During repacking of the database, the entire TDB database will be locked to prevent writes. If samba tries to write to a record in the database during a repack operation, samba will block until the repacking has completed.
975       </para>
976  
977       <para>
978         This command can be disruptive and can cause samba to block for the duration of the repack operation. In general, a repack operation will take less than one second to complete.
979       </para>
980  
981       <para>
982         A repack operation will only defragment the local TDB copy of the CTDB database. You need to run this command on all of the nodes to repack a CTDB database completely.
983         </para>
984
985       <para>
986         Example: ctdb repack 1000
987       </para>
988
989       <para>
990          By default, this operation is issued from the 00.ctdb event script every 5 minutes.
991       </para>
992  
993     </refsect2>
994
995     <refsect2><title>vacuum [max_records]</title>
996       <para>
997         Over time CTDB databases will fill up with empty deleted records which will lead to a progressive slow down of CTDB database access.
998         This command is used to prune all databases and delete all empty records from the cluster.
999       </para>
1000  
1001       <para>
1002          By default, vacuum will delete all empty records from all databases.
1003          If [max_records] is specified, the command will only delete the first
1004          [max_records] empty records for each database.
1005       </para>
1006  
1007       <para>
1008          Vacuum only deletes records where the local node is the lmaster.
1009          To delete all records from the entire cluster you need to run a vacuum from each node.
1010
1011          This command is not disruptive. Samba is unaffected and will still be able to read/write records normally while the database is being vacuumed.
1012       </para>
1013
1014       <para>
1015         Example: ctdb vacuum
1016       </para>
1017  
1018       <para>
1019          By default, this operation is issued from the 00.ctdb event script every 5 minutes.
1020       </para>
1021     </refsect2>
1022
1023     <refsect2><title>backupdb &lt;dbname&gt; &lt;file&gt;</title>
1024       <para>
1025         This command can be used to copy the entire content of a database out to a file. This file can later be read back into ctdb using the restoredb command.
1026 This is mainly useful for backing up persistent databases such as secrets.tdb and similar.
1027       </para>
1028     </refsect2>
1029
1030     <refsect2><title>restoredb &lt;file&gt;</title>
1031       <para>
1032         This command restores a persistent database that was previously backed up using backupdb.
1033       </para>
1034     </refsect2>
1035
1036     <refsect2><title>wipedb &lt;dbname&gt;</title>
1037       <para>
1038         This command can be used to remove all content of a database.
1039       </para>
1040     </refsect2>
1041   </refsect1>
1042
1043
1044     <refsect2><title>getlog &lt;level&gt;</title>
1045       <para>
1046         In addition to the normal loggign to a log file,
1047         CTDBD also keeps a in-memory ringbuffer containing the most recent
1048         log entries for all log levels (except DEBUG).
1049       </para><para>
1050         This is useful since it allows for keeping continous logs to a file
1051         at a reasonable non-verbose level, but shortly after an incident has
1052         occured, a much more detailed log can be pulled from memory. This
1053         can allow you to avoid having to reproduce an issue due to the
1054         on-disk logs being of insufficient detail.
1055       </para><para>
1056         This command extracts all messages of level or lower log level from
1057         memory and prints it to the screen.
1058       </para>
1059     </refsect2>
1060
1061     <refsect2><title>clearlog</title>
1062       <para>
1063         This command clears the in-memory logging ringbuffer.
1064       </para>
1065     </refsect2>
1066
1067
1068   <refsect1><title>Debugging Commands</title>
1069     <para>
1070       These commands are primarily used for CTDB development and testing and
1071       should not be used for normal administration.
1072     </para>
1073     <refsect2><title>process-exists &lt;pid&gt;</title>
1074       <para>
1075         This command checks if a specific process exists on the CTDB host. This is mainly used by Samba to check if remote instances of samba are still running or not.
1076       </para>
1077     </refsect2>
1078
1079     <refsect2><title>getdbmap</title>
1080       <para>
1081         This command lists all clustered TDB databases that the CTDB daemon has attached to. Some databases are flagged as PERSISTENT, this means that the database stores data persistently and the data will remain across reboots. One example of such a database is secrets.tdb where information about how the cluster was joined to the domain is stored.
1082       </para>
1083       <para>
1084         If a PERSISTENT database is not in a healthy state the database is
1085         flagged as UNHEALTHY. If there's at least one completely healthy node running in
1086         the cluster, it's possible that the content is restored by a recovery
1087         run automaticly. Otherwise an administrator needs to analyze the
1088         problem.
1089       </para>
1090       <para>
1091         See also "ctdb getdbstatus", "ctdb backupdb", "ctdb restoredb",
1092         "ctdb dumpbackup", "ctdb wipedb", "ctdb setvar AllowUnhealthyDBRead 1"
1093         and (if samba or tdb-utils are installed) "tdbtool check".
1094         </para>
1095         <para>
1096         Most databases are not persistent and only store the state information that the currently running samba daemons need. These databases are always wiped when ctdb/samba starts and when a node is rebooted.
1097       </para>
1098       <para>
1099         Example: ctdb getdbmap
1100       </para>
1101       <para>
1102         Example output:
1103       </para>
1104       <screen format="linespecific">
1105 Number of databases:10
1106 dbid:0x435d3410 name:notify.tdb path:/var/ctdb/notify.tdb.0 
1107 dbid:0x42fe72c5 name:locking.tdb path:/var/ctdb/locking.tdb.0 dbid:0x1421fb78 name:brlock.tdb path:/var/ctdb/brlock.tdb.0 
1108 dbid:0x17055d90 name:connections.tdb path:/var/ctdb/connections.tdb.0 
1109 dbid:0xc0bdde6a name:sessionid.tdb path:/var/ctdb/sessionid.tdb.0 
1110 dbid:0x122224da name:test.tdb path:/var/ctdb/test.tdb.0 
1111 dbid:0x2672a57f name:idmap2.tdb path:/var/ctdb/persistent/idmap2.tdb.0 PERSISTENT
1112 dbid:0xb775fff6 name:secrets.tdb path:/var/ctdb/persistent/secrets.tdb.0 PERSISTENT
1113 dbid:0xe98e08b6 name:group_mapping.tdb path:/var/ctdb/persistent/group_mapping.tdb.0 PERSISTENT
1114 dbid:0x7bbbd26c name:passdb.tdb path:/var/ctdb/persistent/passdb.tdb.0 PERSISTENT
1115       </screen>
1116       <para>
1117         Example output for an unhealthy database:
1118       </para>
1119       <screen format="linespecific">
1120 Number of databases:1
1121 dbid:0xb775fff6 name:secrets.tdb path:/var/ctdb/persistent/secrets.tdb.0 PERSISTENT UNHEALTHY
1122       </screen>
1123
1124       <para>
1125         Example output for a healthy database as machinereadable output -Y:
1126       </para>
1127       <screen format="linespecific">
1128 :ID:Name:Path:Persistent:Unhealthy:
1129 :0x7bbbd26c:passdb.tdb:/var/ctdb/persistent/passdb.tdb.0:1:0:
1130       </screen>
1131     </refsect2>
1132
1133     <refsect2><title>getdbstatus &lt;dbname&gt;</title>
1134       <para>
1135         This command displays more details about a database.
1136       </para>
1137       <para>
1138         Example: ctdb getdbstatus test.tdb.0
1139       </para>
1140       <para>
1141         Example output:
1142       </para>
1143       <screen format="linespecific">
1144 dbid: 0x122224da
1145 name: test.tdb
1146 path: /var/ctdb/test.tdb.0
1147 PERSISTENT: no
1148 HEALTH: OK
1149       </screen>
1150       <para>
1151         Example: ctdb getdbstatus registry.tdb (with a corrupted TDB)
1152       </para>
1153       <para>
1154         Example output:
1155       </para>
1156       <screen format="linespecific">
1157 dbid: 0xf2a58948
1158 name: registry.tdb
1159 path: /var/ctdb/persistent/registry.tdb.0
1160 PERSISTENT: yes
1161 HEALTH: NO-HEALTHY-NODES - ERROR - Backup of corrupted TDB in '/var/ctdb/persistent/registry.tdb.0.corrupted.20091208091949.0Z'
1162       </screen>
1163     </refsect2>
1164
1165     <refsect2><title>catdb &lt;dbname&gt;</title>
1166       <para>
1167         This command will dump a clustered TDB database to the screen. This is a debugging command.
1168       </para>
1169     </refsect2>
1170
1171     <refsect2><title>dumpdbbackup &lt;backup-file&gt;</title>
1172       <para>
1173         This command will dump the content of database backup to the screen
1174         (similar to ctdb catdb). This is a debugging command.
1175       </para>
1176     </refsect2>
1177
1178     <refsect2><title>getmonmode</title>
1179       <para>
1180         This command returns the monutoring mode of a node. The monitoring mode is either ACTIVE or DISABLED. Normally a node will continously monitor that all other nodes that are expected are in fact connected and that they respond to commands.
1181       </para>
1182       <para>
1183         ACTIVE - This is the normal mode. The node is actively monitoring all other nodes, both that the transport is connected and also that the node responds to commands. If a node becomes unavailable, it will be marked as DISCONNECTED and a recovery is initiated to restore the cluster.
1184       </para>
1185       <para>
1186         DISABLED - This node is not monitoring that other nodes are available. In this mode a node failure will not be detected and no recovery will be performed. This mode is useful when for debugging purposes one wants to attach GDB to a ctdb process but wants to prevent the rest of the cluster from marking this node as DISCONNECTED and do a recovery.
1187       </para>
1188     </refsect2>
1189
1190
1191     <refsect2><title>setmonmode &lt;0|1&gt;</title>
1192       <para>
1193         This command can be used to explicitly disable/enable monitoring mode on a node. The main purpose is if one wants to attach GDB to a running ctdb daemon but wants to prevent the other nodes from marking it as DISCONNECTED and issuing a recovery. To do this, set monitoring mode to 0 on all nodes before attaching with GDB. Remember to set monitoring mode back to 1 afterwards.
1194       </para>
1195     </refsect2>
1196
1197     <refsect2><title>attach &lt;dbname&gt;</title>
1198       <para>
1199         This is a debugging command. This command will make the CTDB daemon create a new CTDB database and attach to it.
1200       </para>
1201     </refsect2>
1202
1203     <refsect2><title>dumpmemory</title>
1204       <para>
1205         This is a debugging command. This command will make the ctdb
1206         daemon to write a fill memory allocation map to standard output.
1207       </para>
1208     </refsect2>
1209
1210     <refsect2><title>rddumpmemory</title>
1211       <para>
1212         This is a debugging command. This command will dump the talloc memory
1213         allocation tree for the recovery daemon to standard output.
1214       </para>
1215     </refsect2>
1216
1217     <refsect2><title>freeze</title>
1218       <para>
1219         This command will lock all the local TDB databases causing clients 
1220         that are accessing these TDBs such as samba3 to block until the
1221         databases are thawed.
1222       </para>
1223       <para>
1224         This is primarily used by the recovery daemon to stop all samba
1225         daemons from accessing any databases while the database is recovered
1226         and rebuilt.
1227       </para>
1228     </refsect2>
1229
1230     <refsect2><title>thaw</title>
1231       <para>
1232         Thaw a previously frozen node.
1233       </para>
1234     </refsect2>
1235
1236
1237     <refsect2><title>eventscript &lt;arguments&gt;</title>
1238       <para>
1239         This is a debugging command. This command can be used to manually
1240         invoke and run the eventscritps with arbitrary arguments.
1241       </para>
1242     </refsect2>
1243
1244     <refsect2><title>ban &lt;bantime|0&gt;</title>
1245       <para>
1246         Administratively ban a node for bantime seconds. A bantime of 0 means that the node should be permanently banned. 
1247       </para>
1248       <para>
1249         A banned node does not participate in the cluster and does not host any records for the clustered TDB. Its ip address has been taken over by another node and no services are hosted.
1250       </para>
1251       <para>
1252         Nodes are automatically banned if they are the cause of too many
1253         cluster recoveries.
1254       </para>
1255     </refsect2>
1256
1257     <refsect2><title>unban</title>
1258       <para>
1259         This command is used to unban a node that has either been 
1260         administratively banned using the ban command or has been automatically
1261         banned by the recovery daemon.
1262       </para>
1263     </refsect2>
1264
1265
1266   </refsect1>
1267
1268   <refsect1><title>SEE ALSO</title>
1269     <para>
1270       ctdbd(1), onnode(1)
1271       <ulink url="http://ctdb.samba.org/"/>
1272     </para>
1273   </refsect1>
1274   <refsect1><title>COPYRIGHT/LICENSE</title>
1275 <literallayout>
1276 Copyright (C) Andrew Tridgell 2007
1277 Copyright (C) Ronnie sahlberg 2007
1278
1279 This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
1280 it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
1281 the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or (at
1282 your option) any later version.
1283
1284 This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
1285 WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
1286 MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
1287 General Public License for more details.
1288
1289 You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
1290 along with this program; if not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.
1291 </literallayout>
1292   </refsect1>
1293 </refentry>